35 Burst results for "Co Director"

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 3 weeks ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
Zack Snyder's 'Justice League' will debut March 18 on HBO Max

Colleen and Bradley

00:25 sec | Last month

Zack Snyder's 'Justice League' will debut March 18 on HBO Max

"The long awaited Snyder cut of the movie Justice League. It will arrive on HBO, Max. March 18th. Now the Snyder cut is from the film's original co director, Zack Snyder. It will be one full length film, not four separate hourlong episodes like was originally planned, so Justice League was co written and co directed by Snyder and Josh, Sweden. We didn't came in after executives didn't like Snyder's initial cut of the film. So now he gets to say,

Snyder Justice League Zack Snyder HBO MAX Josh Sweden
Biden ups vaccine goal to 1.5 million shots a day, says vaccine to be widely available by spring

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:58 min | Last month

Biden ups vaccine goal to 1.5 million shots a day, says vaccine to be widely available by spring

"Big announcements about vaccine distributions from the biden administration. Dr peter hotels who specializes in molecular virology microbiology at baylor. College of medicine says that the newly increased goal of one and a half million vaccine shots per day. The old goal was a million shots a day. Now president biden's has a million and a half shots per days. The goal dr houghton says even that might be enough. He's now arguing in the pages on the op-ed pages of the washington. Post that to get closer to what we need. We need to three million doses a day. How possible is that. And why is that the right number to aim at star peter. Hotels is co director of the center for vaccine development at texas children's hospital. He's dina the national school. Tropical medicine at baylor dr hotels. It's a real honor to have you back with us tonight. Thank you for making time. Thanks rachel great to be here so these are big numbers. And it's hard to sometimes conceptualize what they mean. I know that we just got to the point as a country where we can do a million point one. Maybe one point two million shots day. Why do you say that that number the number we need to be aiming at is actually triple that we need to be up to three million a day. I first of all. I think it's really important not to diminish the the accomplishments of the biden administration. We've now got a national plan in place. We have a national vaccination strategy. We didn't have that before so In a matter of a week we've already got a national vaccine plan in place that's so absolutely important. So i give a lot of credit to the biden administration. I'm a little concerned. However that we're not picking up the pace fast enough. The reason i say that is our estimates. Indicate that in order to stop virus transmission remember. There's two things these vaccines do they keep you out of the hospital. In the icu. But if enough americans get vaccinated we could actually hold virus transmission potentially and we think that number is around three quarters of the us population of two hundred and forty million people. Most of the vaccines are two doses. So that's about half a billion immunizations that we have to take care of. And i want to do that by the beginning of the summer. Not the end of the suburb. Erase ahead of the virus variants. So the simple back of the envelope. Numbers are five hundred million over five months. That's a hundred million a month three million a day so we're only a striving for half of that and it's not good enough because we have the according to the centers for disease control now the uk variant may be the dominant variant in the united states by march or april the transmissions. Go way back even up way back up even though we're down by about twenty thirty percent now from where we are. That's only temporary. I think we're in the eye of the hurricane in those numbers are going to go back up. So i feel like even as ambitious as the plan is the biden plan is still not ambitious enough and we can have to vaccinate of half a billion people by the summer in order to prevent that terrible number of six hundred thousand. That's that's the bottom line. I want to save

Biden Administration Dr Peter Hotels College Of Medicine President Biden Dr Houghton Center For Vaccine Development Texas Children's Hospital Baylor Dr Hotels Baylor Dina Rachel Washington ICU United States Centers For Disease Control UK Biden
A protected right? Free speech and social media

WGN Programming

06:35 min | Last month

A protected right? Free speech and social media

"President Trump was banned from Facebook and permanently banned from Twitter. For certain inciting language. We also watched his Amazon suspended the right wing social media platform parlor from its sight lawsuit ensued. It's pending. People are crying. First amendment has been violated. What are your rights are their First Amendment rights when it comes to Social Media and consortium media banned people for reasons that it feels are appropriate. Joining us to talk about this is very interesting is she was Eric Goldman. Who is a professor of LOT Santa Clara University School of Law in the Silicon Valley, his co director of the high tech Law Institute, and he is gonna explain it all to us. Hi, Professor Goldman. Thank you for joining me. My pleasure. Thanks for having me. I'm gonna start by asking you Is there a first Amendment right that a person has to use Twitter. The short answer is no. The First Amendment only applies to state actors entities of the government. Since Twitter is a private actor, private publisher. It's not covered by obligations that the government is So in and I just I wanna explain it this way. If I am saying things that are harmful or offensive, and I say to Twitter what you have to publish them, it doesn't create a First Amendment problem for Twitter. Meaning Twitter can't be forced to publish things that it doesn't believe are appropriate. Is that a fair way to look at? Yeah, that's 100% correct. In fact, if you look at the First Amendment guarantees the right to freedom of speech and freedom of the press, And so when Twitter is choosing to publish their party content, it's acting is a function of the press. So the First Amendment applies under that freedom of the press obligation Now, people there's something about it that Is driving everyone crazy because in this country, we believe we can say anything at any time. And who is it? Who are our Amazon? And who is Facebook? And who is Twitter to tell us what we should be hearing and not hearing. Explain to our listeners. Is this fair and I guess there's two questions. Is it fair? And what are the legalities of that? And what are the What are the ramifications of that? Yeah, it's the same question that we have with your own radio station that everyone's listen to. Right now. That's radio stations are obligated to provide air time to any listener who wants to call in. He just him screaming in terms of who calls in and then if someone's out of control, saying things that are inappropriate, you're going to cut the mic off and none of that. Whatever assume is a violation, their First Amendment rights, they would say. That we expect this radio station Tonto cater to its audience. So the entire premise of um WGN making sure that the broadcast continents fit for its listeners. It's identical to the thought process that we applied to places like Twitter or Amazon that they're going to publish what they think it's fit for their audience. I'm going to give out our phone numbers. I'm better. Some people have some questions for our professor here. 3129817 200 Let me play doubles advocate here and you look at the statistics on where people get news and this is so different than it used to be. When I was a kid. We was all the newspapers and and news on television, And now much of it is done on social media Getting news from The Internet and and things that are published online. How fair is it to have certain people be in charge of deciding what's harmful, inoffensive and what's not, and a lot of people are saying, you know, I hear all this horrible racist stuff that we, you know, on Twitter, but yet we are president can't be on Twitter. And what did he say? And what How is it that that was worse than what somebody else said? How is this fair? And how should we deal with this from a legal perspective going forward? Well, I think that people have very different views about what's fair. So I find that when we start shifting the evaluation metric there, um I think that we're probably not going to end up agreeing that a zoo community But just you went back to talking about how things were when you were kids. I don't know how far apart we are in aged, But when I was a kid in the mid 19 seventies, there was one local newspaper, and there were three television stations that could reach a community, right? WGN was one of them on and in those days, um even in when there was such Linda channels to reach a community there was a Supreme Court case called Miami Herald versus Tonio with the Supreme Court said You can't force that newspaper the only one that's catering to that local market to publish content that they don't want to publish that violates our freedom of the press. And so, it's said. That's true, even though that paper might have a local monopoly, even though there's only that one. We still don't think that that's permissible under the First Amendment. We're making incursion on their free speech rights. So you see why the conversation about fairness is so difficult because I want the right deal. Say whatever I want whenever I want. You said that earlier, um but but the reality is that we have to look at all the different competing interests when we think about Uh, who gets the right to say What toe Which audiences? Okay, so again, I'm just gonna go over this, because is there any obligation on the part of Twitter? Let's say to be fair, meaning if I said the same thing you said, and they cut me off and they didn't cut you off. Do I have a right to sue? Do I have a right to somehow have a legal argument that I'm not being treated fairly and I deserve to be treated fairly. It's a really great question, and I think it really gets at the heart of the challenges or bedeviling services like Facebook or Twitter. They really aspire to treat like cases equally. That if the Jackson birds, we say, said, by people in the same circumstance that they would apply the same rules to those that's an overwhelming challenge. It's actually not possible with the volume and scale that services like that engage in. It's simply not possible them toe always treat like cases equally, despite their best efforts, despite their intent. Um, but the reality is that because they're deciding what's safe for their audience, even if they make an arbitrary decision, one of which a content that was okay on day one from person A first would be a day two is cut off. That's their prerogative, and that's actually quite legally protected and their several layers legal protection. Provide Twitter Facebook, the ability to make those classifications sessions decisions, even though they're not going to get him all

Twitter President Trump Lot Santa Clara University Sch High Tech Law Institute Professor Goldman Amazon Eric Goldman Facebook Silicon Valley Miami Herald Supreme Court WGN Tonio Linda Jackson
General info about BI SIG with MaryBeth Osborne

Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy Podcast

04:57 min | 2 months ago

General info about BI SIG with MaryBeth Osborne

"Everybody to the brain injury sig podcast. This is our first podcasts. And we are so excited to have mary beth born as our person that we are interviewing for this podcast so as our inaugural version here. We figured we'd do is talk about the sig in some influent in some Can up-to-date versions of what's going on with the sig. So mary beth is a physical therapist who initially got her degree from the university of north carolina at chapel hill in nineteen eighty nine and then went back a few years later to get her. Dpt in two thousand nine as she has clinical specialization in neurologic. Physical therapy which She was board certified in two thousand fourteen. She has professional experience in a lot of different settings. I'm a large portion of her time in brain injury community based re entry and then supported living program. She was adjunct faculty at unc chapel hill for five years and then has been at university health for five years in their outpatient narrow clinic in serves as the co director of the neuro residency program. She has expertise in the hippo. Therapy and aquatic therapy so. Welcome mary beth. Good to have you thank you. I'm delighted to be the first gassed on your podcast. And help promote the sake right so i guess i should mention the reason why you're here as our guest for the big is that you have quite a lot of experience helping out with the brain injury sig in general in the a n. P. t. on so could you maybe just tell us a little bit about your role in the brain injury sake. Sure i'm the immediate past chair of the brain injury special interest group and served two terms And it was an extra year is well because it was We transitioned from chair. Lacked position which i served that year so i believe it was seven years as the brain injury. Sick share I started as the chair so A lot of people know came back or karen mccullough she nominated nominated me from the floor at a csm meeting and That's when i started being involved with the big. Wow awesome and we thank you for all your work that you've done for the many changes in the accomplishments that you had over the years with it so for people who don't really know the structure of organization of maybe kind of umbrellas. Ap ta in a n. p. t. could you just kinda give a brief Overview of kind of how the brain injury falls into place where really falls amongst the structure of the aneka ti. Of course that abt a has a number of academies sections and so the academy with under which the brain injury special interest group falls is the academy of neurologic physical therapy or a. n. p. t. and so under a. n. p. t. There are eight special interest groups or six and so the brain injury special interest group is one of those eight special interest groups and the intent is just to break down the content area or Interest area of clinicians and their pets Into common interest areas so that the special interest groups kind of interface directly with the membership on a smaller level. Right right thanks. That's really helpful. I think to kind of know where everyone falls in alignment and kind of how they all work together. So the brain injury sig than is part of the a. N. p. t. Does the brain injury saying have its own particular goals or kind of missions or things that it's doing to can help on conditions who are had interested in helping individuals with brain injury. Yeah so the jury's special interest group mission aligns with the economy of neurologic. Pt's mission and is basically. And i'm paraphrasing. But it's basically just a forum to promote health wellness Optimal function and quality of life for individuals with acquired brain injury That's kind of the overall arching thing is to gather people who are interested in providing care and assisting individuals with acquired brain injury From the physical therapy perspective.

Mary Beth Born Mary Beth Unc Chapel Hill Neuro Residency Program Karen Mccullough University Of North Carolina Chapel Hill Academy Of Neurologic Physical CSM
Cant Deport a Movement

In The Thick

05:03 min | 2 months ago

Cant Deport a Movement

"What's up. Welcome to the podcast about politics. Race and culture from a poc perspective money. Sam and i'm lorella joining us as a special guest. All the way from brooklyn is a daas. She's an immigrant rights lawyer professor at new york university school of law and co director of the. Oh so important. Nyu immigrant rights clinic alina. Welcome to in the thick. Thank you so much for having me. You are the author of the recent book. No justice in the shadows. Which is what we've been saying. You know people in the shadows is not a good thing for democracy and your book you write that. Roughly three hundred thousand people are formerly deported from the us every year with a million more turn back. Just you know. Within the border area you talk about how the immigration criminalization and deportation systems are intertwined desire to maintain the racial status quo in other words the white supremacy and white majority of this country. You talk about how the use of the terms like criminal alien one of our favorites. Yeah falsely separates immigrant communities into categories of good versus bad right. And we've also had this presidential election where one candidate didn't denounce white supremacists and in this mist of a nationwide protest for black lives and a pandemic that has disproportionately affected black and communities following the election right. it was declared that joe biden had one right. Donald trump who previously had said. He wouldn't commit to a peaceful. Transfer refuse to concede and his allies started referring to vote as what a surprise quote legal or illegal and they especially tried to discredit the vote counting in cities with large black populations detroit philadelphia atlanta. This idea of like even votes now becoming good and bad legal and illegal criminal or non-criminal. It just permeates throughout our entire electoral politics so alina. Can you talk about how the immigration system has been set up to protect a particular type of immigrant absolutely and this is one of the things i focus on in. The book is really a historical perspective. Because we're told that our country is a welcoming country in that people who face deportation must be facing this. Because they've broken the law. They violated the laws where the laws are actually written and the foundation of the laws are designed to treat immigrants a- suspects to exclude them and to exploit them and we know this from the very origins of this country right there first naturalisation law that congress row because the constitution required them to come up with a universal naturalization law was limited to free white persons that's the foundation of our rules about membership in belonging and we police migration in this country initially focused on black people an indigenous people right so for the first century when voluntary immigration was mostly why congress was focused on fugitive slave laws that allowed black people to be removed from free state's to slaveholding states and the indian removal act that allowed indigenous people to be removed from their ancestral lands to make room for property white man and those are the tools that congress picked up on when it decided to focus on immigrants because they had chinese immigrants arriving in large numbers but eventually that led to the national origins quotas where we explicitly used racism to decide who could get a visa a spot in this country and mexicans in particular were actually exempted in order for southern businesses to use them for cheap labor so instead of excluding them that's why in the nineteen twenties southern segregation has proposed criminalizing unlawful border crossings. So that when people's labor was no longer needed they could be easily police imprison than deported. And that's the legacy of our immigration laws and while we may have gotten rid of the national origins quotas in nineteen sixty five. We replaced it with a system that essentially perhaps immigration including mexican immigration for the first time to twenty thousand nieces when hundreds of thousands of people have been going back and forth and the laws created this kind of undocumented population at created this false sense of illegality and as a backlash to legal immigration suddenly coming from asia africa. The caribbean you saw this rise of law and order policies nineteen seventies eighties war on crime. The war on drugs suddenly treating immigrants as criminals. And that's really what's laid the foundations for the modern immigration system today where police have been taken over as essentially immigration agents to create a pipeline for deportation and that replicates all of the racism that we see in policing generally and combined so that immigrant communities kind of double ranked in their communities.

Lorella New York University School Of Alina NYU Congress Brooklyn Joe Biden Donald Trump SAM Detroit Philadelphia Atlanta United States Caribbean Asia Africa
Why some Black Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:56 min | 3 months ago

Why some Black Americans are skeptical of a COVID-19 vaccine

"How do you feel about the comeback team as my excellent even have my children american community. We must trust me because we do feel like the first they wanna test on and we're being experimental. We used to be mistreated. We use the ban experimental role and we used to be last any category when it comes to healthcare to words to start off here remember tuskegee public. Health officials are focused on countering distrust toward this vaccine particularly in black communities in our country. Michelle norris from the washington post puts the conundrum this way quote vaccine. Hesitancy from black americans is different from an anti vaxxers stance. It's not that black. Americans don't believe in vaccines. They don't trust a public health system that has in too many cases engaged in grievous harm by experimenting on black bodies without consent or ignoring the specific needs of black people here to talk about we. Welcome to our broadcast tonight. Dr peter hotels he's a vaccine scientists working with a team to develop a low cost cove at nineteen version for global distribution. He happens to serve as co director of the center for vaccine development at texas children's and he is the dean of the national school of tropical medicine at baylor college of medicine also with us tonight. The reverend walker. We are proud to say she started as did a number of us in local news notably as the first african-american weeknight news anchor in boston. And is now senior pastor at roxbury presbyterian. She's been at the center of an effort. Enlisting dr rao cheese help and others to build trust in the vaccine among members of her congregation and the larger city at large Dr houghton. Says i'd like to begin with you and your reaction to this. Fda authorization tonight well it certainly important news Critical first step towards backseat our way out of this epidemic. you know. We're hoping not to have to completely rely on biotechnology solutions but in the absence of a national cove nineteen strategy by. This white house backed us into a corner and now we pretty much have no other major tools now to halt the screaming epidemic. Where we're looking at two hundred thousand new cases a day in three thousand deaths per day. So we're in a dire situation in. Having this vaccine is going to be an absolutely critical tool. And i hope it's going to be the first of four or five ac scenes that will have in the coming months because i don't think we're going to be able to vaccinate the us population with these two marnie vaccines alone. So a major first step but a pretty long road ahead here here on time is of the essence of reverend walker. It's great to have you. I'm looking at pew. Research polling says sixty one percent of white americans are prepared to have the vaccine forty-two percent of black americans. I'm gonna make a sweeping assumption about all of our viewers. The folks smart enough to watch this hour every night. Know their history so we have established the fear and distrust. Tell us what you're hearing in your congregation. However some people are saying they wanna wait it out and see what's going to happen which gives me a little hope. This is a very tragic situation. If we don't take vaccine a lot of people as you have already pointed out simply do not trust systems a not just because of history but because of their daily experiences people who feel that they have been abused and they have been disrespected. They have been ignored by. Hospitals are in general. So you know getting that to change is not going to be an

Reverend Walker Michelle Norris Dr Peter Hotels Center For Vaccine Development National School Of Tropical Me Roxbury Presbyterian Dr Rao Cheese Dr Houghton The Washington Post Baylor College Of Medicine Texas Boston FDA White House PEW United States
Reid Hoffman and Fei-Fei Li on Human-Centered AI

WSJ Tech News Briefing

03:03 min | 4 months ago

Reid Hoffman and Fei-Fei Li on Human-Centered AI

"I'm Llewellyn for the Wall Street Journal and I have a guest co host today are artificial intelligence report jared council hey jared. Thanks for having me. Okay. So last week, Lincoln founder Reid Hoffman and the computer scientists faith Lee or part of a session at our Tech Live Conference, and we sat down with them for a conversation as a special episode of Tech News Briefing we'll get to their conversation but I want to tell you a little more about what you're about to hear dared verse things first who are Reid Hoffman and fairly so reid. Hoffman was one of the CO founders of Lincoln which he sold to Microsoft in two thousand sixteen. And he's now a partner at the venture capital firm gray lock. He's been involved with a number of Tech Company boards, including Microsoft, and AIRBNB. Our other guests doctor Faye Faye Lee is a professor of computer science at Stanford University. She's widely considered one of the leading experts in a I. Computer. Vision. She used to be the chief scientist of machine learning in. Google and the to work together at Stanford's Institute for Human Centered Artificial Intelligence. Dr Lee is one of the CO directors air and Mr, Hoffman is a member of its advisory council. Okay. Got It. So Hofmann and Lee were at tech live to talk about human centered ai you guys will get into what that means in the interview but I wonder if you could just give a little background information as our artificial intelligence reporter, why is it such a hot topic of conversation right now? Yeah. Hey, I is a is a hot topic because it's becoming ingrained in a just so many aspects of our lives from predicting next next word or phrase in an email to recommending products on Amazon or songs on spotify. Those kind of innocuous aspects but also more high stakes decisions like what kinds of sentences. A person may serve or what kinds of jobs opportunities they may have access to so. Has Benefit Society but there's also a lot of a lot of risk know one of the biggest ones has to do with bias. There's been studies out there that that show that facial recognition systems for instance are better at detecting white male faces than they are at detecting women and people of Color, and so you know when you have a technology that is really infiltrating our world, there's going to be a lot of attention paid to it. Especially, some of the the issues that come with it and for read and Faye. Faye, with they're trying to do is really elevate somebody ethical issues and concerns and try to get as many stakeholders as possible whether it's businesses or governments to think hard about an of course developers to think hard about what they're creating in in how they're designing.

Faye Faye Lee Reid Hoffman Institute For Human Centered A Microsoft Wall Street Journal Llewellyn Jared Professor Of Computer Science Benefit Society Stanford University Lincoln Google Stanford Advisory Council Founder Airbnb
The Brainwashing of my Dad (with documentary filmmaker Jen Senko)

The Thinking Atheist

06:08 min | 5 months ago

The Brainwashing of my Dad (with documentary filmmaker Jen Senko)

"My mother thinks that rush limbaugh. Yoda you know what? Saying? She's always saying well, rush limbaugh says. Our rush had a great monologue. It was just on point. Oh it's he so tuned into the Culture Rush Limbaugh g listen to rush limbaugh the other day and of course I know I don't listen to rush limbaugh. I did fifteen years ago. You know I was a Ditto head actually read for you a chapter about right wing radio on the broadcast I read it out of my book couple of weeks ago. But I wanted to come back to this because I feel like it's Really been on my mind and it's hugely relevant in today's culture. We've got a whole group this graphic of these pulpit pounding Bible Banging, rush, limbaugh right, Wing Radio Listening Evangelical 's right the Christian Nationalists and they're screaming the name of God is they use their religion just to be Shitty to other people. May I've noticed that about a lot of these guys limbaugh Michael Savage, etc. they're just nasty people. They are always being cruel to other people there pushing buttons because they can. They're stoking the fires of outrage and they sit back and bask in the ratings and the advertising dollars and. All the way to the bank. There's this I think it's a myth that rush limbaugh is himself a Christian. I. Know He likes to speak the language of Christianity. I'm not convinced the Guy Cares at all about the Bible or religion of any kind and back I'd love to sit them down and give him like a sixty second Bible quiz just to see how much he really in fact I'd like to sit most the evangelical 's in power. Donald. Trump I'd like to give him a Bible quiz. Let's just sit down and let me quiz you for a couple minutes. Betsy Devos loved to talk to her Ben Carson Rick, Perry all these people in government are banging their. Bibles I would love to sit them down and asked him basic questions about their faith. But that's a whole other conversation. Today's conversation is with the director and producer of a film called the brainwashing of my dad, an ambassador father who SORTA got sucked in to this rush limbaugh right-wing Radio Christian, nation, kind of narrative focusing at the very least and narrative that sort of others, non-christians, sort of sets them off in their own little box while the moral righteous people are sitting over here. Now, the film itself is not new. It's been out for a few years but I referenced it in my book and I just it's been on my mind because. There is so much of this going on and right-wing radio. I don't think it's ever been more popular. There's video of this conversation. I am going to play some clips from the documentary during the broadcast. These clips add a few extra layers. So you can kind of hear the angle that she's taking Gen Sankoh Director of the documentary film, The brainwashing of my dad. So glad you're here. Hi Seth, it's nice to be here. Give me like a resume real fast the types of work that you've done before the brainwashing my dad. Sure. Will I started out as an artist and a painter? But then I felt like I wanted to reach a wider audience and I just started making films but they were always sociopolitical. The Sue. The first one was roadmap warrior women about really independent women that I met out west and then the second was was. co-director with fury derosa the vanishing city. About the lecture vacation of New York City. But also how it's happening throughout the world and cities coming less affordable and right now I'm writing a book. Also called the brainwashing of my dad. Got Picked up by source books so I can always tell you more. Fun, I mean. Let's go back to your dad. You didn't grow walk in this sort of right wing I mean I know limbaugh started back in the eighties but I mean, you didn't come from that sort of hardcore conservatism. nope. Not at all my parents were what I guess. I would describe as very liberal, very open minded. They were Kennedy Democrats and they were also like FDR Democrats they came from the depression. So FDR them was a hero who pull them out of the depression they most remembered hoover and felt like he didn't do anything but they were really enthusiastic about. And I think they were quite devastated. When he was assassinated. But yeah, they were they were I would actually list describe them as hippies before hippies same. We're very open minded My Dad especially loved talking all different kinds of people very non judgmental. As you probably saw the film, you know one time in this is in the sixties. We came out and port. Authority. We're visiting New York. For the day and there was a a black homeless man and she US Monday for some money my dad called him Sir had a conversation with them. And gave them like a couple of coins or two, but you know so they kind of thing made an impression on me that. You know accept all people and jobs. You know he wasn't for they were judgmental national change later.

Limbaugh New York City Betsy Devos FDR Michael Savage Seth Donald Trump Perry Director Hoover Co-Director Ben Carson Rick Derosa Producer
Trump’s call for poll-watching volunteers sparks fear of chaos and violence on Election Day

Fresh Air

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Trump’s call for poll-watching volunteers sparks fear of chaos and violence on Election Day

"Voting rights advocates are concerned about President Trump's call during Tuesday night's debate for his supporters to watch the polls for fraud. NPR's Pam Fessler explains the group's heir concerns some people might be discouraged from turning out to vote as a result of the president's call. President Trump is appealing to his supporters to watch the polls very carefully. He also refused to disavow white supremacist groups, raising fears of possible violence at the polls. Voting rights advocates condemned the remarks. But they're also trying to assure voters they'll be safe. If they do go vote. Tram Wind is co director of the New Virginia majority, which works with voters of color. That's the whole point of folks. We're trying to suppress the vote rightist in still chaos and still fear And make it so that folks are going to choose the vote, and we only combat that by actually turning out the vote. Advocates note. There are laws against voter intimidation and that lawyers will be on hand to help voters who run into

President Trump Pam Fessler Tram Wind NPR Fraud New Virginia Director
"co director" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:15 min | 5 months ago

"co director" Discussed on KPCC

"Patients on November 3rd mail in ballots will take longer to come in and longer to count. But once that's done, there have been a lot of indicators from President Trump that he won't accept the results that they aren't in his favor. If Biden is the winner, and the president says no. Then we will talk about what might happen in the street soon. But today we're focusing on the courts and on Congress. What system is in place for contested election and can it support? Whatever. 2020 hasn't store tweet us at one end Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. Voting rights advocates are concerned about President Trump's call during Tuesday night's debate for his supporters to watch the polls for fraud. NPR's Pam Fessler explains the group's heir concerned some people might be discouraged from turning out to vote as a result of the president's call. President Trump is appealing to his supporters to watch the polls very carefully. He also refused to disavow white supremacist groups, raising fears of possible violence at the polls. Voting rights advocates condemned the remarks. But they're also trying to assure voters they'll be safe. If they do go vote Tram Win is co director of the New Virginia majority, which works with voters of color. That's the whole point of folks. We're trying to suppress the vote rightist and still chaos and still fear and make it so that folks are going to choose the vote, and we only combat that by actually turning out the vote. Advocates note. There are laws against voter intimidation and that lawyers will be on hand to help voters who run into problems. Pam Fessler. NPR News, one of President Donald Trump's closest aides has tested positive for the Corona virus. President Trump confirming various media reports in an interview with Fox News tonight that hope Hicks has tested positive for the virus today after experiencing symptoms. It's most recently traveled with President Trump Tuesday's debate in Cleveland and yesterday aboard the Presidential helicopter Marine one to a rally in Minnesota. Trump says both he and the first lady had been tested are waiting results. Experimental covert 19 treatment room deserve ear is no longer in short supply. Therefore, the government says it won't be in charge of allocating it anymore more from NPR's Sidney Lumpkin. Ramdas severe is one of only a few treatment options Doctors have.

President Trump president NPR NPR News Pam Fessler Biden Congress Jack Spear Sidney Lumpkin fraud Fox News Cleveland Presidential helicopter Marine director New Virginia Hicks Minnesota
Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:05 min | 5 months ago

Solving Health Challenges Through Research and Collaboration

"Let's start with. Sharon who has not been here before we usually like to struck these podcasts by talking to our guests about specifically what they do and how did they get their sort of talking to the public about how does one become professor of medicine or a division director of nephrology or interested in the research that you do. So I started in research when I was in a froggy fellow at the University of Chicago. I was motivated to be honest by a patient on dialysis who kept having bleeding into their shoulder joint that I had to actually remove the blood for her to be able to use her arm on a weekly basis, and this was due to a rare disease that patients on dialysis get that deposits in the bone called amyloidosis. So that made me start doing research on bone learning about bone I worked in someone's. Lab and then when I came to. INDIANA. University in thousand hundred two I came really because of the strength of the Bone Research Group at Indiana University? Not Necessarily in the nephrology division from there I have held a lot of different administrative positions. I am kind of an organizer and get things done type person. So it comes pretty naturally to be able to put all that together. I could say I've been truly doing. Translational, research since my fellowship, as I hadn't during my fellowship, a clinical research paper and a basic science lab paper published in one year. So sometimes I feel like the word translational isn't really new and novel, but I'm happy that people are finally understanding that when you do something in the lab, you ought to be thinking about who the patient is. That would benefit from this at least some point in their life. So can I get you talk a little bit more about that like what do you? What do you think translational research is because I'd agree with you it it does seem like one of those things that people are treating soften is it's a new thing but it is it. So how what does it mean to you? So it should mean that there ought to be a potential and the back of your head. As to where this was going to go at some point in the future I truly believe there is an important area for research just to do research to understand, for example, and identify new and novel gene, and what does that gene do on the other hand translational means that you actually go from a patient and you work backwards to try to figure out what makes that patient tick? What makes them have this? Disease, what makes them prone to this disease? Both of those kind of approaches from science perspective are absolutely needed. But the whole emphasis of the he sl is really to actually take discoveries into humans and overtake humans back to bench discovery so that we improve their health to see this as something that doesn't do that. There needs to be a focus or we just sort of doing more no I think the difference between. That and very focused research is that in order to really cover that spectrum, you have to have collaboration you have to actually have other people who can work on different pieces of that Longitudinal plan again from patient back to bencher bench to patient, and so it is hard for someone to do all of those facets and so you have to have this ability or desire to get there and you need to collaborate. And that's really what the chess is all about. It creates an infrastructure that people can go to so that they can understand how to take that part that they're doing in that trajectory and make it happen. Can you give me some hard examples of some of the work for structure talking about? Yeah, I mean this is I. It is absolutely fabulous and I give talks and visit places all around the country and. We are truly one of the best and most advanced CPS I in my book from start to finish, you have an idea you think might actually be a drug down the road. We are working to try to figure out how we can actually benefit people who are not sure if it's going to be good. So connecting them with the right people to understand drug discovery, we then want to know if you're doing. An animal work is that gene that you're studying that protein actually present in humans because there's a lot of discrepancy in animal models of human disease, and so we have a giant bio bank samples that people can gain access to to actually measure the DNA and try to understand the Hamas between an animal and human, and then if you do have something and you have an idea and you want to implement a Clinical Research Study, do you need to know how many patients you have? So we have a connection where the Reagan streep data set to help to feasibilities. Do these people that you think exist really exist? Is there something unique about them that you need to know who the people are that you want to study, and then we have a pool of trained research coordinators and infrastructure setup to actually conduct clinical research and? Then from there, we have an ability to help people learn how to communicate how to publish how to write a grant. Harman's all these other things through our professional education opportunities the whole beauty and the fun of research is that it's never a dull moment. So every day you think you're going to be studying this and something send you to a tangent and you go wait a minute maybe I should be doing that. And that's how you end up needing collaborators and resources and methods and infrastructure to learn how to do it. Otherwise, you lose those tangents and discoveries are errors initially and someone takes a different look at it from a different viewpoint and they turn it into something really positive. So the CY is an effort that involves just more than Indiana University School of Medicine Right? Absolutely. So it's really Notre Dame purdue IU Bloomington. And many other hospital systems as well as the medical student campuses. So it it really integrates everything and it's very fun to actually learn what people are doing at different institutions and to actually get people excited and have a pathway forward to maybe something that isn't at their institution. Bring it back to what the research is that they're doing. So Sarah I'm not gonNA ask for full introduction. I think you may be the. Frequent. Guests on our podcast dates. So if the audience is familiar with anyone, it would be you but I would love to hear a little bit about how you became involved in community and translational research as well as what you see is the distinction between say clinical and translational sciences and community in Translational Sciences my research has always focused on vulnerable populations and health equity related issues and started with geospatial concentrations of poor health outcomes among adolescence and I was doing a project that was enrolling team girls on the West Side of Indianapolis and tracking them, and when we recruited from the clinic for the study just to give you an idea, we were using blackberry pearls. So that dates long ago this was. One hundred percent of the girls we had approached agreed to participate so much so that the I R. B thought perhaps the protocol was coercive because we were offering free cell phone service while we attract their locations and they were wondering if even after our main criticism with this grant to the NIH, which was like this grant isn't possible no never is going to let you track them Things have changed since I started asking those questions in any case my point is, is that when we brought it into the community because we didn't want a clinical sample because it can be quite biased for an adolescent population, those who are seeking healthcare, we were not meeting our enrollment targets and so what I learned after a lot of errors that engagement with the community in this case our target population of teen girls on the West Side we realized they weren't seeing sort of the Ir be approved flyers. replastering everywhere. That, there were all kinds of things that we needed to reconsider and it had nothing to do with the protocol itself. So the science was valid. There wasn't anything that was sort of keeping them necessarily from participating in terms of the incentives or what we're asking them to do. It was that we were not effectively engaging with them and as part of that as well as some I think innovative at least at the time collaboration with a faculty member from Herron. School of. Art and design in Santa Matsu we sort of employed this human center design research approaches sort of our how community engagement in any case because of that sort of experience for me personally as a researcher I learned the value of engagement and really beyond just meeting recruitment targets to getting to something much more meaningful from the participant's perspective, and it's just grown from there. So it has taken a lot of different trajectories for me and my own research relating to data, sharing partnerships to what's. Now Research Sham the patient engagement core to various community engagement in between but I guess where my role now as associate Dean as well as CO director of the CSI, plays in Israeli extending that translational spectrum in with the community and back rights as a bidirectional relationship, and so it's extending those collaborations to stakeholders in the community. My definition of team science and sort of that collaborative space is not restricted to individuals within the academy and really absolutely needs to include community folks at all. Levels of the translational spectrum. So this is not just from like clinical to community in my book it's you know community engagement even within the basic science from.

Indiana University Translational Sciences Bone Research Group Disease Clinical Research Study Indiana University Of Chicago Amyloidosis Sharon Professor Of Medicine Hamas Bloomington Division Director Santa Matsu Reagan Streep Associate Dean Harman Faculty Member Herron
1 in 3 parents don't intend to have their child get the flu vaccine this year

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

1 in 3 parents don't intend to have their child get the flu vaccine this year

"A traveling finding of the new national poll on Children's health. As many as a third of parents are thinking about avoiding flu shots this year for their kids. The Bower family gets flu shots every year to make sure that we really made every effort to protect ourselves. Doctors say It's critical to get vaccine it this year because the flu and the Corona virus have similar symptoms. And a surgeon. Flu cases could overwhelm the health system. But a new poll finds one in three parents say their child is unlikely to get the vaccine. They're afraid to bring the kid into a providers office. Sarah Clark is the co director of the C S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health where the individual does, In fact, influenza fascinated people are much less likely to have serious applications and hospitalizations. That CBS News correspondent Nancy

FLU C S. Mott Children Sarah Clark Cbs News Bower Director
Antebellum's DirectorsWe Made A Slave Movie

Toure Show

04:25 min | 5 months ago

Antebellum's DirectorsWe Made A Slave Movie

"I watched the film twice because. It was compelling and I kind of had to like see it a second time after I've seen the twist and all that Sorta good stuff So a lot to talk about why this film now. Well, you know. We'd like to say that it was it was strategic but it but it wasn't about. SIX MONTHS DR moved to La for Miami I had this horrific nightmare that I think. was probably precipitated by the death of my father. Bit, less than a year prior that I was having some problems processing. And in this nightmare. This woman who was eating. was so desperate for help that it felt as though she was screaming across dimensions to reach anybody. And when I when I awoke from the nightmare. It didn't feel like anything that I had experienced before. It was within the the Brandon category of what would you call dream or nightmare, but it definitely felt like something other worldly like an ancestral visitation. And the next day Christian from I talked about it and ended up writing the short story because that's our process. And the natural writing the short story. We wrote the script that is now a antebellum. So you know for us as part of the work that we've done up to this moment, we've always felt like. All of the work that we were presenting or that we're trying to percent. Of that, there was an urgency of now and that that. The world in America has been. Careening. Toward disaster. And so yeah I mean we we never imagined in a million years that anything that we would create would be just for entertainment sake but that it is it is art. To, activate into catalyze a national dialogue around a host of issues. Not least of which is race in America. But without finger-wagging. you guys are co directors right and that's unusual to my experience and the last pair of CO directors. I remember the Hughes Brothers where there was a clear delineation of like I do this sort of stuff. I, this sort of stuff is there a division of labor or you guys kind of like one? Group. We pretty much. You know act as one onset were always together in the same space, which is super important because otherwise you know production designer or Qassams Zainur will come up to one of US nasty question we have to kind of be central in the same place but. What what helps us as a directing duo is that were also writing duo so that we kind of are able to have all of those knock down drag out. Battles on the creative in our own home. As writing the by the time we get onset we really have one vision at were were super. I mean within the duo is there a division? Is there I'm a little bit more this. I'm a little bit more that. I think. We've been together for twelve years and so we speak a telepathic shorthand. I don't know that we could be objective in saying that one is a little bit more this or that I think. I think. An outside observer would have to get you that answer as far as we're concerned we are we are. It's Qismat and we're we're we're certainly would have connected on on levels that feel we normal most writer director. duos were also a couple. So it's like everything is really on. Utilized.

America LA Hughes Brothers Qassams Zainur United States Miami Writer Director.
Afghan mothers' names to be included on children's ID cards

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:57 sec | 6 months ago

Afghan mothers' names to be included on children's ID cards

"Afghanistan has issued a decree allowing women to be listed on the identity cards of their Children. NPR's DEA had eight reports. Until now, the documents on Ly contained the names of Father's. The new law is expected to make things easier for single Afghan mothers in particular, who struggle to do things like sign their kids up for school or get them emergency medical care. This is how the bar co director of the women's rights division at Human Rights Watch, So this law is actually a really important development, which is gonna have a lot of really world consequences. Boss says The new decree may also shift the common notion in Afghanistan that Children are their father's property, and it comes at an important time. The government and the Taliban are negotiating pace and feminist fear women's rights will be compromised to appease the insurgents. There's a sense that laws mandating women's equality have to be pushed through quickly. D a deed. NPR NEWS ISLAMABAD, Europe's largest

Afghanistan NPR LY Director DEA Islamabad Taliban Europe Government
Afghan mothers' names to be included on children's ID cards

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 6 months ago

Afghan mothers' names to be included on children's ID cards

"Has issued a decree saying women will now be listed on the identity cards of their Children. That's according to his spokesman. Until now, Afghan Children on Lee had their father's listed as NPR's DEA Hadeed reports. The new law is expected to make things easier for single Afghan mothers in particular who struggle to do things like sign their kids up for school or get them emergency medical care. This is how the bar co director of the women's rights division at Human Rights Watch, So this law is actually a really important development, which is gonna have a lot of really world consequences. Boss says The new decree may also shift the common notion in Afghanistan that Children are their father's property. And it comes at an important time. The government and the Taliban are negotiating pace and feminist fear women's rights. We compromised to appease the insurgents, There's a sense that laws mandating women's equality have to be pushed through quickly. D a

Dea Hadeed Director Afghanistan Taliban NPR LEE Government
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:24 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"We look at the ways <Speech_Male> that this <Speech_Male> business model <Speech_Male> came out <Speech_Male> of nothing. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> we <Speech_Male> think long and hard <Speech_Male> about how <Speech_Male> that came to be <Speech_Male> and start <Silence> to think about how. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> To redistribute <Speech_Male> the wealth <Speech_Male> that is concentrated <Speech_Male> in facebook <Speech_Male> back to the rest of <Speech_Male> society and <Speech_Male> to do that I think <Speech_Male> we need. <Speech_Male> Better. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> We need a new digital <Speech_Male> rights framework. <Speech_Male> We needed a new social <Speech_Male> contract new. <Speech_Male> Negotiation <Speech_Male> of this <Speech_Male> distribution of power <Speech_Male> between consumers <Speech_Male> in the corporate <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> to institute <Speech_Male> that I think <Speech_Male> I think ultimately, <Speech_Male> we will need <Speech_Male> a very strong privacy <Speech_Male> law. We will <Speech_Male> need to rethink <Speech_Male> competition <Speech_Male> as we discussed earlier. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> will need <Speech_Male> radical transparency <Speech_Male> over <Speech_Male> the ways that companies. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Push content <Speech_Male> at us whether it's <Speech_Male> organic <SpeakerChange> or <Speech_Male> targeted advertising. <Speech_Male> Yeah. If you didn't get a <Speech_Male> chance to touch <Speech_Male> on this, I just want to <Speech_Male> quickly ask <Speech_Male> you so. <Speech_Male> You know <Speech_Male> one could <Speech_Male> argue <Speech_Male> at <SpeakerChange> the highest <Silence> level. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> information <SpeakerChange> this <Speech_Male> year's. <Speech_Male> Note somebody <Speech_Male> answers. <Speech_Male> At, if somebody <Speech_Male> is taking your inflammation <Speech_Male> has <Speech_Male> to be monetization <Speech_Male> back <Silence> to you. <Speech_Male> <hes> what <Speech_Male> we don't have in <Speech_Male> the system today <Speech_Male> is really <hes> <Silence> what we have is test. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> All Valuable Information <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> and <SpeakerChange> so <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> maybe what we need is <Speech_Male> also on top of <Speech_Male> it was sort of a market <Silence> for information. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> person who <Speech_Male> actually owns <Speech_Male> that information <SpeakerChange> could <Silence> actually monetize. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> I I completely <Speech_Male> agree <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> I think theft <Speech_Male> is not an unfair characterization <Speech_Male> of what's happening <Speech_Male> because there is a tremendous <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> information asymmetries <Speech_Male> between <Speech_Male> the consumer <Speech_Male> and the consumer <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> experience of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> facebook <Speech_Male> or Google <SpeakerChange> where <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> think of the the. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know the the <Speech_Male> merchant, the fish <Speech_Male> Merton, the fish <Speech_Male> monger in <Speech_Male> sub <Speech_Male> Saharan Africa think <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> you know the people <Speech_Male> on the streets. <Speech_Male> In <Speech_Male> China. <Speech_Male> These are typical <Speech_Male> users <Speech_Music_Male> of <Speech_Music_Male> facebook play. <Speech_Male> <Silence> <hes> and <Speech_Male> there's <Speech_Male> there's I think. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Think of college students <Speech_Male> in in the United. <Speech_Male> States I think there's <Speech_Male> a a <Speech_Male> lack <Speech_Male> of awareness <Speech_Male> across the board <Speech_Male> in all of these constituencies <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> we need <Speech_Male> <hes> we need <Silence> A. I'm <Speech_Male> not willing <Speech_Male> to accept that. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> every person in <Speech_Male> the world in every <Speech_Male> circumstance <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> can come <Speech_Male> to understand how <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> how these platforms work <Speech_Male> in. I. Wouldn't WanNa <Speech_Telephony_Male> requirement of everyone. <Speech_Male> What I <Speech_Male> said is is <Speech_Male> for companies <Speech_Male> to do the right thing <Speech_Male> and if they don't then. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They deserve to be <Speech_Male> regulated. We deserve <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> diminish that <Speech_Male> information asymmetry <Speech_Music_Male> enable. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Our people. <Speech_Male> Enable consumers. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> To to <Speech_Male> make fully informed <Speech_Male> decisions <Speech_Male> her that <Speech_Male> that are the <Speech_Male> best for that <SpeakerChange> right? <Speech_Male> Right. Yeah <Speech_Male> excellent. Yeah. This <Speech_Male> has been great to buy an <Speech_Male> end. Yeah. <Speech_Male> Thanks so much for spending <Speech_Male> time with me <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> good luck. Good <Silence> luck in Washington. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Much. <Speech_Male> It's a pleasure. <Speech_Telephony_Male> To <Speech_Male> have such a cerebral <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> conversation <Speech_Male> with this year. Yeah. <Silence> Thank you. <Silence> Bye. All right.

facebook Merton theft Google Washington. Saharan Africa China.
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:49 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Strong a natural monopoly features. We can call it a natural monopoly. We needed regulated like a like a utility in that traditional sense I. think we in making all those assertions. We can essentially extract all. That are extra wealth that that facebook is extracting currently. Are redistributed across the site because that I think is is what's needed that we diminish facebook's. A profit margins. Whatever they are right now hundred percent hundred percent avenue percent I know. We diminish those profit margins. To something that's more reasonable, and in fact, its profit margins themselves that are often the subject of competition policy analysis that argue extracting too much wealth from the rest of society are acting too much wealth from labor market from other media organizations that that may be take certain steps to protect democracy protect consumers are you taking too much wealth from the rest of society if so then well, we need to redistribute wealth in some way and knock your profit margins back down from five hundred percent to one hundred percent, which is still pretty Yes Oh concussion. Assuming. That have a ministration j.j lot of people hoping for that. what would be what would be from your perspective sort of a the first step that would take a toward a better that destruction. While I you know I think I. Think we've Thank you I. Think I think we've come to a state where our media ecosystem has completely changed and we need to acknowledge that it has changed environmental from traditional place where we were in, let's say nine hundred ninety and we now are in an age of of. High high content, high targeting, and a high hydration. where? The companies that are dominating the Internet today have tremendous, economic, and media power. and. To really start to combat that we need to we need to think about how their business models are structured in how we got here. That doesn't mean we need to say facebook's bad and we need to break up facebook or we to regulate facebook's business model and focused on facebook but rather that..

facebook
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:25 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Doesn't mean all those. Considerations you know it doesn't in a sense that it doesn't collect any data doesn't. or rather it's encrypted. So facebook can't see the majority data over over WHATSAPP Utah Algorithms. What I would say is contributed to facebook's business overall business model. You can you can bet that your social graph has revealed over WHATSAPP is very useful data to facebook you can. You can also bet upset control over the text messaging space. Globally. Is is very important to facebook the corporation's future. In in their consumer Internet ecosystem. So I think I think that's the. Right layer of analysis. Of course, it's not necessarily easy. You know it's it's not a trivial thing to suggest that you know we want bring regulatory action against this. Corporation. How. It's It's it's politically technically a very difficult very difficult. Yup. You got to prove that you got to prove the corporation. Is a natural monopoly. And you know you you think about facebook platform, you think about search google search. These have beatty good characteristics of natural monopoly have done that electric utilities have done that to others. and. There's no recently inventing the face of platform. There is no lease inventing the Google search. It will be a great resource for society and and for everybody else. So. Rather than creating google to compete with Google. We may just own up to the fact that search is really a utility that everybody should should have. and. Natural monopoly. I don't exactly You know it might be overturn type regulation just let maybe other other ways you can think about it. and then you know. A lot about I think about what's happened instagram as as separate companies that operate on you'd utility platform. So, it's almost electrcity. Gets their power. Through, the through the free spoke at facebook platform but different company altogether. I. Think that's I. think that's exactly right. That's exactly right..

facebook Google beatty
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:14 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"It Bill de disaster was designed so. So. I'll put a bit way does Mark Zuckerberg care more about the principal algorithm that that makes him his historic profit margins or does he care more about that secondary algorithm that contains the negative externalities generated by that first one I I I think I think it goes without saying that that. He has to think about his shareholders I. Yes and so So this goes back into our earlier discussion you know So you know you think about one -opoly laws. And other structural features. It's almost like you all the threats including external forces on this broadly wilbur platforms that good that could create negative outcomes even for for that for democracy in this case. The the maybe let me make a statement and he can object to that divide. Each lot better to have fifteen companies. Rather than one or two because in a in a market light dad, these type of issues I would argue is going to be less because if it is happening on on platform fly. You know platform seven and nine are going to find that lot faster than platform seventy itself. That's that's absolutely true. Yes I think I think. Is kind of coordinated response to nefarious content can condense help There's a there's a counter argument that is often raised by companies like facebook which say that. If YOU'RE A smaller company you're not They say that you know if if you WANNA force this sort of content moderation on us through regulation go ahead yet. But what you're going to be doing is is imposing costs on all the smaller companies and It's only US companies like facebook and Google that can that can Comply with this regulation. Yeah. So I want to get your perspective on this in coming from facebook as well. Also con in moderation at least on the surface seems like a bad idea. I. Mean You don't know where to stop. BET NICOLE DOWN THAT PATH And as we know, regulators are probably not not experts. In in content moderation, and so vide- Bronco tools like that. Are probably not not a good thing. and so then you ask so you know How do we actually counteract the misinformation not supposed to be said there's somebody that is an entity that looks at all information. You're going to tag it. You zero when ten Penn meaning it is it's absolute ground truth CEELO mean means his absolute wrong thing. Not Wrong thing but it's it's Yeah it's a lie or if it's not.

facebook Mark Zuckerberg principal US NICOLE Google
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:36 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And beautifully. and I would say that around two thousand or so we crossed a threshold. Crossed the threshold banks to this open. Capitalistic System that we have whereby It suddenly became a possible and economically viable. Companies, to pursue precisely the sort of business model that you That you shared a rare. To one collect as much data as possible on people. Onto. The end of behavioral profiling. To develop algorithms to hold those people's attention and algorithms that are tremendously opaque, but essentially current content and ads and Profiled individuals and three. Engage in aggressive platform growth through corporate development and other means an effectively whole rivals at bay and take advantage of this natural monopoly increasingly. National Monopoly status. whereby it's this business model that is at the core of any company that you look at in the sector whether it's facebook or Google or Microsoft, or Amazon or even twitter or snapchat are are trying to do this. End and That when I mean by destructive bydesign, it's these companies are forced into this corner. You cannot be at the top of the industry unless you follow this business model which which. Necessarily exploits people's data, which means you're exploiting someone's personality, their individuality, their autonomy new privacy for headed. It's. Dangerous we saw in twenty sixteen is that these platforms actually now provides a way for. An external actor. do to get even democratic outcomes their desire. That's exactly right this. This whole design has created the capacity for. For instance, a Chanel or NBA or a disinformation operator or a militias political campaign. To. To activate this system activated it's A. Desire. To to push his information to push political is to push. Hate speech at anything. Over the network and it doesn't necessarily have to be advertising either. You know I think sophisticated on social media. Now know how to reach their constituencies through organic content to yeah. But I you know you'd know more about this than I. Do you know what facebook and Google might say now is that they have very sophisticated algorithms on the platform. that can t smell out you know any type of bad styles. And and take care of it you know in any industry then you have. A solution that says, I you know I have a problem but another program that day scandal that problem. That is never going to work. You know he's a bit like if I decide in aircraft and they find that a problem, but then I'm going to put on the program. You know that.

facebook Google NBA corporate development twitter Microsoft Amazon
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:49 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Very, often has a tremendous impact on policy making process There's nothing wrong with that. Again, we're talking about you know in in a capitalistic system unless you unless you regulate against it, companies will have lobbyists those lobbyists will try to do right by their company is nothing necessarily wrong with that. So long as we all know that it's happening and we. As a society agree that it should be fair which. I have my own thoughts about it but but but I think it's fair to say that lobbying is is. Generally acceptable in the united. States. And in in these other jurisdictions around the world. it perhaps make sense to give companies the capacity at least two to share their perspectives especially in a in a in a country where we're trying to prioritize the openness of the market. And prioritize the pace of innovation. But The, but is that. oftentimes, there are gaps. Very often there are. Areas of advocacy where these companies push a certain thing. At the expense of their own consumers at the expense of American. Americans it and. The American democracy. And I think they're just too many examples like that account. So that is so that is sort of the team of the book right terms of disservice of Silicon Valley's destructive by design talk a bit about So, what what you mean by it the structure of Silicon Valley or is it specific actions? The companies are taking? I think I think it's all being both. Stepping back and looking at this. Looking at this whole. Industry from a from a broad perspective, what we what we have is let let's let's look at nineteen ninety in nineteen ninety We had a new invention the you know the the Internet around that time the the protocols that that we now have. Thanks to Tim Burners Lee and. Meanwhile. Of course, Moore's law was was. Active as it is now, where whereby semiconductor sizes are are going down in each gender. End. What does that mean? That meant that we have this new capacity and connectivity coming together with increasingly or. Increase the increasing pace of. A capacities in data storage.

Silicon Valley Tim Burners Lee Moore
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:32 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"The problem we have though is that that that he's totally of data is cast a set of biases. That then gets Pichu it almost unknowingly tuna system, right? So this is why when you have social media monopoly power. that. Makes this problem worse. You know you can imagine a competitive environment but a hundred competing for mind share. These type of errors could be found out lot faster I think. Absolutely, absolutely You Know I. Think I think you're absolutely right. Let let's not be overly harsh on. Let's. Let's give them the benefit of the doubt I think you're right that that you know in a in a space when I'll put it this way in a in a novel industry where there are very limited rules of the road that are established by governments whether it's the US or Germany or wherever. It in an open capitalistic. System. You have to be up there innovating that means you have to cut as many corners as you can cut. According to what socially acceptable let's say and. and. And and and try to dominate the industry try to try to claim that extra bit of market share because if you don't someone else will. They're told not to do. So. What does that mean for a company like facebook in designing its news feed algorithm or accompaniment Google designing it's targeted advertising will that means that? Look. If if if Google does not give the opportunity for an advertiser to reach specific audiences that the advertiser wishes to reach even that potential dissemination could be discriminatory against a marginalized group of people. If Google doesn't allow that sort of behaviour. Someone. Else will, and that someone else will capture that revenue and this is the core reason why we need not a system of communism not a system of socialism not system of pure uninhibited capitalism but a system of regulated capitalism where we invite back kind of innovation. But then we specify where the rules of the road should be for for any That's exactly why you know sometimes people confuse there. So capitalism for of capitalism to function properly. laws have to be implemented consistently right. You know it it it is. It is a principle right? You you can. You have to have the same set of rules applied to a large investment? Bank. compared to. A manufacturer or small manufacturer be should be can have only one set of rules. And they have to be consistently applied across the entire economy. That is how capitalism words. Be Don't really half gap listen today we have actually set of rules somebody's playing soccer. And somebody's playing football. And you know the soccer playing people never see the football train people? And and that is not really capitalism. It's crony capitalism. That's that's exactly right You know, I, think I think to Cut Straight to that crony, Ukrainian. The part part of the problem with Silicon Valley today part of the problem with our use of the platforms of Silicon Valley today is. These platforms have a political infrastructure behind them. They have A. An army of a very intelligent people policy officials within these companies. trade associations, and. Advocacy organizations working on behalf of these companies in Washington DC who are all pushing certain messaging in Washington? Pushing certain messaging in in London, Brussels in new. Delhi which.

Google Silicon Valley Pichu Washington soccer football facebook US Delhi London Germany Brussels
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:31 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And they found that. Less care was needed for African Americans. And the reason was that they were using historic data. And they demanded less care previously and that would imply the Algorithm Dan continue to perpetuate history. And so so so you can now take this to the social media type and Wineman to say. You know what to them that you create using historical data is going to be a collection of voices in it right? There's there's no doubt that that. Yes. When you when you design a machine learning algorithm or more generally a artificial intelligence to. Disperse, disperse insurance or or. Determine whether or not someone should be. Subject to a housing advertisement or. Whatever it might be. Determine someone's credit score. Let's say. Determine whether or not someone should should be invited to to join a credit. Credit. Card. Or for that matter, determine what kinds of social content and individuals should see should see in the in the news feed or what kind of add he or she should see on the on the panel in Google Search. Engine, results? Pages. All of these kinds of algorithm decisions involve the use of historical data. The application of presumptive model. And, decisions that ended at the end of the day have an impact on our consumption of media or have an impact on our ability to do finance haven't have an impact on our ability to take part in an fully participate in. The economy. End. Our companies all across the board Perpetuating, instituting in perpetuating bias, including Google and facebook you bet they are and why are they? The real reason that is happening is that again revisiting our prior conversation about capitalism We have we have an open open market system. That means that any company can essentially do what it wants until unless it's it's it's told not to. Respecting, of course, the boundaries that have been set. For it The fact is that in the space of Algorithms decision making, there's very little that has been said as to what Google can or cannot do what facebook can or cannot do or what any sort of company can or cannot do. With respect to collecting data, analyzing data and making decisions over that personal information scabby part of this is you know it is also possible that these companies have really focused on it. In the sense that you know when you get enamored by algorithms and artificial intelligence. You. Save that. So much data here we can actually make the computers analyze that data and and and it's assumed that the computers are going to bring up..

Google facebook Wineman
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:57 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"That's exactly that's exactly in my in my be what's happening here. And these companies own note they know it well. Let's. Let's keep on hoodwinking the public. Let's keep on misleading politicians in in Washington over exactly how our company works. Exactly this sorts of commercial arrangements that we make and let's keep on pushing this misleading statement. Bet that we we don't have a monopoly over digital advertising. Yeah. Not that's not the place to look place is social media and you know I think to your point perhaps we will need new legislation. Perhaps, we will need to rethink the way that we regulate the industry or set of industries because. perhaps are antitrust of the existing antitrust authority doesn't effectively capture. Market. Market problems in in the consumer internet industry because it's we all know that the Internet is fundamentally different from electric utilities or railroads or other traditional industries. They're sort of short of similar though like you said, they are you know search could be considered a utility. And he this. So it is. It is really a natural monopoly because there's so much scale in it. and. So if if if that's the case, then we should consider surge to be utility that he'll if regulated that way could substantially increase consumer welfare. I couldn't agree with you more I. I think that it is very much a utility. and that Google search is a natural monopoly. There's no one that can never unseated and. Google searches not incentivized to really innovate as quickly as. It would in a more competitive. Set of circumstances. I want to jump into another paper divine. This is kind of related. The makes the monopoly pouty. When would. So this is the commercialization of decision making towards regulatory framework to address machine buyers or the Internet So you say the comes to mention it has excelled except. Created the decision problem was. The business model that sits behind the front end of the industry is one that focuses on the unchecked collection or personal information and continual creation refinement of behavior profiles on individual user and the developing algorithms that curate accounted. and. You know in in small scale, we have seen this encamped game. For example, I can go to the month there was a case. In New York against the insurance company that had an algorithm that basically predicted how much cash should be disposed to a patient based on the patient's.

Google Washington New York
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:31 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"That has brought. A case against facebook. Is that. Is it that the US monopoly laws in the end the claim? is not sufficient to deal with this type of companies. This is this is the subject of a major debate has you know Gil Right. Now where and we we just had this engineering in in the House Judiciary Committee. Few You know I think I think. It's very much an open debate. Do we need to trust and competition policy reform or do our existing? Authorities are they sufficient to combat the the economic concentration and resulting political power that these companies have? I think. I think. We've come to a stage now where yes, we we do need to think about. Very, strict reform. here's what I would suggest to let. Let's say that we have a change of administration come November and I only say that in the sense that new fresh blood often brings in new flaking. But Let, let's say that we have a new administration in November or new administration for that matter in in twenty twenty four. Twenty twenty five and and would it a lot of new thinking around one needs to happen around around market competition? What I would suggest is that The new this new, this hypothetical new administration think seriously about first enforcing our antitrust laws to the to the word. Because right now, there is some room for. For the FTC. To do more and it's simply not doing that It's to be fair. It's engaging inquiry. It's engaging in discussion with the public is..

Gil Right House Judiciary Committee facebook US FTC
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:41 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"To enter the market. So why are they competing services? What what I'm? asking. You Do I. Think I think you're absolutely you hit the nail on the head that. They they're. They're I'd say three things. First Mover advantage. In this broader consumer Internet industry. Second, there is a very powerful network effect because of the nature of the consumer, Internet, industry in third. These companies undertake efforts especially once they've gained some power, they undertake efforts to hold their potential. There would be rivals ZANDT. And we've seen some evidence of that which is. Why we've seen antitrust inquiries and anticompetitive inquiries from Europe in the US. And other jurisdictions. but I would say that, yes, it it's. It's probably a combination of things that really institute's a half organic half artificial barrier to entry for anyone else in the market. and. That's the that's the biggest concern and so you know instagram's a good example of that. So what facebook I think what they have said as I don't know what the price tag was, but many hundreds of millions of dollars you know they said, if you know be the product. Pretty good radio KB could have done it ourselves, but it's going to cost a small. Soviet. Just spent at bottom and you know anybody else could do. Something Better at a future time and compete as so you know this idea that I can you find facebook Google. I can just go out and buy something that I believe is sort of inferior but you know it's going to cost me more to get there and the liquidators are basically saying Oh. Yeah. That's I'm slate that's okay. Yeah. But here's the thing. I mean, maybe maybe it it could very well be the case that Yes instagram I I think it was purchased for a about a one billion. Instagram, when it was purchased, benefited thereafter benefited from being under facebook mean the platform benefited not the founders but the platform benefited from from being under facebook because it grew. And Its impact now in the American social media market is. Dominant, let's say..

facebook instagram ZANDT Europe US Google
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:24 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Perspective just thinking about convenience and and style that that that is you know economists argue sometimes in about consumer welfare wage. So guy this okay for these type of monopolies exist but look at the consumer welfare side of. You'll get great cards that Dr Essentially free. So the white bully. I would argue that that they're not free you know I Google has let's say, let's go back to the example of Google search. We can. We can also pick on facebook for a moment. So facebook has has monopolized in its case, other sectors, for instance, social media and web based text messaging, I. It's it's dominant company. Through its various Platforms Messenger WHATSAPP. Face the big blue APP and Instagram and other other other services. It has this dominating market share in the in the US over social media and web. Based? Tax. What's the currency that lifting from from consumers? The currency is not dollars we don't. We don't feel our wallets getting lighter. We don't see our bank accounts getting smaller. Instead it's it's it's an it's not simply data. A lot of people argue that data is the new oil and data's the new currency. I think that's a little bit too simplistic. I would argue that it's a it's a new form of currency. It's a lot of companies have a data bank of America data, Goldman, Sachs as data. Are Insurance companies ever. FACEBOOK has not only our data and it is it is especially sensitive data but. Have, especially, sensitive skin into but. It has data and it has. A monopolized control over our attention in in these sub. Of A broader industry that I call the consumer Internet. where? Within. The consumer in Internet social media and search and all these dialogical sorts of platforms fob. FACEBOOK is able to rake at monopolistic rate OUTTA. A currency from us in the form of our data in the form of our attention and this combination thereof. rake that in a monopolistic rate, and then charged fare rates for it from from marketers from those chanels on those NBA's China target us yet that does that is so interesting. So. You sort of look at the at uses at. Let's call it aggregate attention advocate minutes of attention. Which is sort of concentrating resource. Right? You got eight point, five, billion people you can you know you can chase you twenty four hours a day Gonna change that. So that navigate a potential attention is constant. And when you get a line share of that aggregate attention, the power that you deriving from that is not is not the typical monopoly power is what you're arguing, right? True. It's it's not it's not typical. In fact, it's a it's a it's a natural..

facebook Google US NBA Instagram Sachs Goldman America China
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:00 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"We Google. Have thirty to thirty five percent Amazon is coming along you know within three or four years it's gotten to eight to ten percent. And then there's there's a lot of other companies that that occupy the rest of that I'm forty fifty percent of the market snapchat Microsoft these kinds of companies come and then say I would imagine they would testable markets even though they have share, it could be competitive anytime right Precisely precisely that. They'll say that you know. Not only do we have all the we only together only have sixty, fifty, five, sixty percent of the share of this market, which means that neither of us has a technical monopoly. were. You know other companies breathing down our neck so there's Go away regulators. To that what I would say in what I argue in this newspaper is that. That's that's the wrong analysis because that's wrong market to look at. The market that facebook and Google. have monopolized. is not digital advertising yet. Recall the these these are two sided platforms. These companies are two side platforms where to take Google is an example. It is certain certainly working with advertisers on one side of the market where Chanel in the NBA and the NFL com to Google, and spend their marketing budgets to target individuals over Google's many platforms. On the other side of the platform Google is is also working directly with consumers, those of us who use google search or youtube or email or whatever it might be maps. And it's that side of the market that is company has monopolized. And what is that market? well, each of these if you think about the four that I mentioned for instance, online video for you to maps after Google maps. G, mail an email and search on Google search in internet search. Each of these is, is it dominant company in that specific space but? An. By dominant I mean you know perhaps more than fifty more than in some cases, ninety percent of youth consumer use of any product in that market goes to Google and so. Consumed. By from a consumer perspective. Anytime you think about any of the services I thought is to use those products right by definition that's sort of your fuss Choi's late. On the if you cannot find something there, which is very unlikely that you look for something else. Exactly, there's no doubt in my mind about that in in the sense that you know these these companies. Have, almost, a network effect where you hear about Google maps from someone and you know that well, Google maps has to be the best service or. or or or Youtube, and indeed you know. They've become so powerful that it's not really a a word of mouth sort of thing anymore it's it's. It's not really even necessarily that that you hear about these things from your friends or you see their content on these platforms, I. But now, of course when we when we search anything it's these services that are that are prioritized over all else and indeed I would argue also that Perhaps, fittingly, they are probably the best services available on the market Lapses, there's nothing better than Google maps. There's nothing better maybe than than g mail from a consumer.

Google. Youtube Microsoft Amazon Chanel facebook Choi NBA NFL
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:06 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Yesterday is stopped by and goes who is a CO director of the digital platforms democracy? Project. The Harvard Kennedy School and faculty at Harvard Law School. He's the author of terms, the service of Silicon Valley's destructive. keep previously led strategic conflicts on privacy at facebook. And so doesn't economic advisor in the White House to the administration. Thanks so much for having me go. So I start with a few of your articles, recent articles. The plus one is entitled. A new digital solutions contract to encourage Internet competition. In that? You say over the past year, the common conception that the lion's share of the digital advertising market. Would say remain the dominion of facebook and and Google. Out For the foreseeable future was turned on its head. With An. Entirely new player Amazon. The company surgeons in digital advertising has raised the idea that it might present a major challenge to the market power that facebook and Google have developed in the sector over the past many years. Teddy. The truth by I wasn't advair that Amazon has entered. Advertising. A. But in a short period of time, they built a huge share like eight to ten percent of the market does something like that. but you in the paper. CAV argued that it doesn't really matter from a market perspective. So do you want to? Talk. A bit about about. that. IAGO I. Thank you Thank you for having me I. Love Your podcast and. You have such excellent guests. I'm really honored to be here on. This paper which published in the antitrust chronicle. Is is really you know this part of it? I, I I. I love the fact that you highlighted because there's this. There's this sort of implication that is drawn by companies like facebook which I worked for and companies like Google. Well I shouldn't say companies like I. Really Mean. Companies like it. Yeah that's right. What's right? But a lot of people have have raised the idea that you know facebook and Google have a lot of market power to which facebook and Google tend to say that you know what we don't. We don't have market power because look at where we make our revenue, we make our revenue. In the realm of digital advertising. The vast the share of our revenue comes from digital advertising. And and there's plenty of competition in the in the space of Digital Advertising We facebook have twenty to twenty five percent.

facebook Google Harvard Kennedy School Amazon Harvard Law School director IAGO advisor White House CAV
"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:20 min | 6 months ago

"co director" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

How Climate Change Is Fueling Hurricanes And Wildfires

Environment: NPR

03:50 min | 6 months ago

How Climate Change Is Fueling Hurricanes And Wildfires

"Last week Hurricane Laura made landfall in Louisiana as one of the strongest storms to hit the region in decades to be clear scientists say climate change doesn't cause a weather event, but it is playing a role in increasing the severity of them to understand why we called climate scientists Catherine Heyhoe in a warmer world hurricanes are not getting more frequent, but they are getting stronger they're intensifying faster they're getting bigger and slower, and they have a lot more rainfall associated with them, and they would've fifty or one hundred years ago Heyhoe Co director of the Climate Center at Texas Tech University. She says a warmer world also affects the size of wildfires in. California and elsewhere since the nineteen eighties due to climate change wildfires have burned over twice the area than they would have normally because of course, you get wildfires out west that's just part of life those ecosystems but climate change the great threat multiplier. It's making them worse Professor Heo taking everything into account you just described we also can't ignore that these events are happening during a pandemic. That's already killed more than one hundred and eighty thousand people just in the United States and I wonder is that also what you're talking about when the Department of Defense views climate change describes climate change as a threat multiplier is that part of it as well? It is. So climate change takes issues that we already have that we already care about, and it exacerbates them are makes them worse issues like poverty even age for example, one of my colleagues her parents live in the Houston area they were very concerned about getting in the car and driving you know when when everybody's evacuating, it could take hours to get one hundred miles away because of corona virus. What if they ended up exposing themselves to Corona virus as they drove in for people who are sheltering in shelters typically quite crowded, we are all vulnerable and climate change is exacerbating the risk that we already face today corona virus included. And if you don't mind my raising this, you've written about being a person who considers herself an evangelical. Christian. And you're also a scientists sounding the alarm about climate change. Some Christians. Do seem to see those things in conflict and you just say that this is not true. You say that these two different commitments are actually in harmony. Could you just as briefly as you can just say why you're absolutely right in the United States and that qualifier is very important. The people who are least concerned about climate change are white conservative Protestants and white Catholics but the interesting thing is. That the most concern people in the United States by denomination are Hispanic Catholics, and of course, the Pope Roten encyclical five years ago explaining why climate change is such global issue. So that sort of shows us hey, what's going on here? It turns out when social scientists dig deeper rejecting climate the reality of climate change and the need for climate solutions is exclusively tied to people who have bought into. A right. Wing ideology that somehow this planet doesn't matter but it does it matters to everyone of us if for Christians at the very beginning of the Bible. It talks about how God gave us humans responsibility over every living thing on this planet as well as how we are to care for those less fortunate than us you know the Bible talks about the widows and the orphans and the poor. And today. Those are the very people being most affected by changing climate. So if we take the Bible seriously, we are out at the front of the line demanding climate action, not dragging our feet at the end. All right. That's Catherine Heyhoe. She's a climate scientist and co-director of the Climate Center at Texas Tech University professor. Hey. Thanks so much for talking to us once again thank you for having me.

Climate Center Catherine Heyhoe United States Texas Tech University Hurricane Laura California Professor Heo Houston Louisiana Director Department Of Defense Professor Co-Director
Dr. Philippe Friedlich On Pediatric Surgery And Neonatal Therapeutic Hypothermia

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

03:54 min | 7 months ago

Dr. Philippe Friedlich On Pediatric Surgery And Neonatal Therapeutic Hypothermia

"Welcome to medicine. We're still practicing I'm Bill Curtis of course I my friend and Co host Dr Steven Tailback He's the quadruple board certified doctor of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Critical Care and neuro critical care these days he continues to fight on the front lines of the COVID battle in California for which we are eternally grateful Steve How you doing I'm well thank you. It's good to be. I'm sure you've heard of children's Hospital of Los Angeles notice. Hla US News and World Report has consistently ranked the H. L. A. in the top five nationally and the number one pediatric hospital in California for thirty years. Running this remarkable nonprofit children's care hospital is nationally known for Neonatal Research and care that is funded entirely by generous philanthropists. Dr Felipe Friedli is chief of neonatologist at Children's Hospital. He is also co director of the fetal and neonatal? Institute. And he is professor of clinical pediatrics and surgery at the renowned kept school of Medicine at USC where he's published over one hundred, fifty abstracts, Peer Review Articles and book. Chapters Dr. Freedland is a rock star in one of the world's most complicated pressure filled and delicate specialties that include newborn respiratory failures newborn pulmonary hypertension even surgery on unborn babies. Can you imagine welcome Dr Felipe Free Lick? It is an honor to have you here tonight and having me. So doctor. Can you just bring our listeners up to speed on C. H. LA and your mission there? Sharon's HUSK local Sandra's mission is to care for sick children's no matter what their background cultural background or insurance they have we are. Laced to gear for family and children's in babies when there's no other place that could care for them. Are we talking about like one of the few medical specialties that truly couldn't wait for Covid to pause that's a great question fortunately or many children's covid has not been has impactful. They are some babies are insurance that are sick but by four unless we compared to adults we. Are Really lucky so far. So we're not going to spend the whole show on Kovin because frankly I think people wanted to know much more about your specialty, but maybe you could tell us a little about what kind of a regimen as C. H. L. A. Developed uniquely for this pandemic and what are some of the special things that you do at your hospital to manage this. A lot of it has to do with making sure that became screen families in staff when they arrive at the hospital in make sure that they're the environment for caring for the Germans you regardless of the reason why they're in the hospital is is optimal until the hospital has and significant resources to ensure that we screen families and visitors and parents when they arrive psychologically, how do you get your clientele to feel safe under these circumstances that has been Estonia As you can imagine a lot of families or speared to even go close to a hospital. So said, only our data's suggesting that we can provide a safest environment to bring Ren's and care for them, but it is a concern. Certainly, we can see that visit to the emergency room are significantly down obviously a lot of the outpatient clinic. I've had to restructure their environment, but I think that honest conversations with family in trying to make sure that. Children can get the care they need. So they don't have complications from their Biz orders diseases are we tried to do our best to get the message across

Dr Felipe Friedli Doctor Of Internal Medicine Pu Professor Children's Hospital Hospital Of Los Angeles Dr. Freedland California Covid Dr Felipe Dr Steven Neonatal Research Bill Curtis Kovin USC Steve Estonia School Of Medicine H. L. A. Peer Review REN
Should Washington Break Up Big Tech?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

05:35 min | 7 months ago

Should Washington Break Up Big Tech?

"Hi everybody I'm John Donvan, and this is intelligence squared us and we've we've just seen something historic happened digitally in the halls of Congress when the four CEO's of four, the biggest tech companies in the World Amazon and apple and facebook and Google were required to testify before Congress, and while there they were put in the position of having to defend their companies against claims that they've just become too big that they've become gigantic to the detriment of the general public that they are using their market power crush competition that they're driven by nothing but their own prophets that they're amassing huge amounts of data and that basically they're running afoul of antitrust laws. Some people are calling this big tex big tobacco moment, which is a callback to the nineteen ninety s when seven. CEOS of Big Tobacco companies all had to appear before Congress, and be accused of doing bad things to the public but is this fair in this case? Are these companies really doing bad things because of their size are they really too big and are you the consumer losing out because they've become big or are you actually benefiting because of the size of these firms? So we think in these questions, we have the makings of debate and that's what. We're going to do, but we're going to do it a little bit differently from our normal approach. Today, we're going to be hosting this conversation in a format that we call a to disagree, and that's where we streamline things a little bit. Go to the news we find the dividing lines, and then we bring you what we do best a debate in the form of a conversation between just two debaters not our usual to against to instead we're one on one and instead of having a resolution, we're really going with a question and the question this time is. Should Washington break up big tech should Washington break up big tech I'm here with two debaters who are GONNA be arguing yes or no to that question Zephyr teach out and Andrew McAfee. So I Zephyr you've debated with us before on stage and I just want to say welcome back to intelligence squared. So excited to be back on. Thank you for having me for such an important discussion. It's a pleasure and for folks who don't know you are a law professor, you're an activist. And as it happens, you came out with a book, this July, the title of which break them up recovering our freedom from big big tech and big money. So which side of the debater you're going to be on again today I definitely think we need to be breaking up these big tech behemoths and hence your book. Okay. Now arguing against your position arguing no on the. Question of whether Washington should break attack. I. WanNa Welcome Andrew McAfee Andrew we've we've been wanting to get you into one of our debates for a long time. We are delighted to have you joining us for this one and all it took was a global pandemic right. Thank you for having us. It's a pleasure and for folks who don't know you also are a bestselling author. You're a principal research scientist at MIT. You're also the CO founder and Co Director of the initiative on the digital economy. So once again, welcome to intelligence squared. So the way that this format will go we'll go in four rounds, the first round Each of the debaters will be making a brief opening remarks about their position on the the question before us and then We will have you know along and lengthy back and forth discussion. Towards. The end we're GONNA go to our third round, which will be where each gets to put a the toughest question they can to their opponent, and then a fourth round will be closing remarks and wrapping things up. So there's a lot to discuss a lot to argue here and we're GONNA start with our opening rounds. That's where each get two minutes to make the case in their position on the question would should Washington break-up big tech? So our first debater will teach out who will be arguing? Yes. On the question of whether Washington, should break up big tax Zephyr. The floor is yours. We are in a moment of a genuine crisis and our democracy, and so I want to start with some first principles. The principles of equality and freedom. Central Job of democracy and government. is to. INSERVICE of those goals, protecting citizens from any group or any person wielding too much power from abuses of excessive private power from private governor Mench basically arising out of the corporate form Anti monopoly antitrust is a deep and powerful American tradition was at the heart of the American revolution. Think about the tea party protests the great anti monopolist of our country include ebd boys who saw. How monopoly power was used to crush lack political power after the civil war and Franklin Delano Roosevelt who is arguably the greatest trust buster this country's ever seen and nineteen forty to nine eighty. We lead the world anti monopoly using antitrust campaign finance laws, public utility regulation, labor laws, and other tools to ensure that no private company had too much power but since nineteen eighty, when Reagan, tour down. Anti monopoly laws and their spirits. Democrats, and Republicans alike have failed and instead embraced a policy of radical concentration and the result is the world we live in now.

Washington Big Tobacco Congress Andrew Mcafee John Donvan Amazon CEO Google Franklin Delano Roosevelt Facebook Mench Reagan Zephyr Apple MIT Professor Principal Research Scientist
"co director" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"co director" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Senior policy advisor and budget analyst to the United States Senate budget committee whose latest book is Goliath the hundred year war between monopoly power and democracy joins us to discuss this article at the guardian the coronavirus relief bill could turn into a corporate coup if we are not careful will assess whether the extra leverage Democrats have in the Senate because some Republican senators are not selection due to the virus will result in some of the money going to where it is needed most for example hospitals at ground zero of the crisis make them money from elective surgeries and have to pay for the much needed supplies to combat the virus personal protection equipment surgical masks and ventilators which trump keeps promising but nesses and doctors have yet to see but with Boeing asking for sixty billion hotels wanting a hundred and fifty billion manufactures one point four trillion shopping centers up to one trillion the beer industry five billion and the candy industry five hundred million it seems that workers and small businesses are at the back of the queue meanwhile the Democrats trying to get money to people the small businesses who need it most Senate Republicans are warning them that they are playing with fire by slowing down the response to the crisis they will examine the plight of small business in America which is a large part of our economy but is in free fall as main street closes down and workers are laid off Stacy Mitchell co director of the.

analyst Democrats Senate Boeing America director Senior policy advisor Stacy Mitchell