36 Burst results for "Clyde"

Fresh update on "clyde" discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:39 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "clyde" discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Juan Nino told variety last month that he wanted to treat the topic of cannibalism very matter of factly. He took a more animalistic approach to the feeding scenes, which though jarring to watch, but are rooted in reality. Several pathologists provided us with answers on how you perform a bite on the body of someone who just died, for example. He said when talking about the film's accuracy, it takes a lot of effort to bite through the skin, someone was wondering if we would need more defined jaw muscles. But Americans are like that anyway, it's from chewing gum. How scary is bones and all? With all this talk of flesh eating, it's probably no surprise to hear that bones and all is as gory a movie as they come. Theater goers may want to reschedule their dinner plans or maybe just skip dinner entirely. Despite the film's commitment to realism, Taylor Russell told slash film that she was really feasting on maraschino cherries, dark chocolate, and fruit roll ups in the film, not flesh. That being said, the film, which has been compared to Bonnie and Clyde, bad lines, and natural born killers could have been far more unsettling. But ino often cuts away from the gratuity of the feedings. But kajan is revealed during the inaugural refocus film festival in October that an earlier cut of the movie was far more disturbing. While he didn't go into detail, he told the festival crowd that there was a limit and you have to cross the line to know where the line is, finding that line was upsetting because we had to step over it and then realize that we didn't need to push the audience around. We just needed to not protect the characters from their needs and their behaviors and their desires. Juan and Nino agreed that bones and all is more than the sum of its gruesome parts telling deadline in August that he wasn't interested at all in the shock value, which I hate. I was interested in these people. I understood there moral struggle very deeply. His goal was to make Marin and Lee feel less alien to the audience. I'm not there to judge anybody. He said, you can make a movie about cannibals if you were there in the struggle with them. And you're not codifying cannibalism as a topic or a tool for horror. How did Timothée Chalamet casting influence the film? What a Nino's first choice for the role of Lee was always his call me by your name star, he went so far as to tell variety that Charlemagne was the reason the movie got made. When Charlemagne, who is also a producer on the film, signed on to the movie, he offered the director and kajan helpful feedback that they both say changed the character and the film for the better.

Juan Nino Taylor Russell Kajan Clyde Bonnie Nino Timothée Chalamet Juan LEE Marin Charlemagne
What We Can Learn From FBI Whistleblower Steve Friend

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:50 min | Last week

What We Can Learn From FBI Whistleblower Steve Friend

"I want to talk about an FBI whistleblower named Steve friend. This is a really good guy. This is a guy who actually never wanted to be a whistleblower. He's sort of one of those guys who kind of like me. A big fan of the old reputation of the FBI, these are the guys who went after the body and clydes, going back to the earlier part of the 20th century. These are the guys who then busted the mafia who have taken down a lot of crime syndicates. This is the FBI you may say of the untouchables. And Steve friend followed this as a career. He wanted to be the guy who got the bad guys. And then he was put on these child pornography cases, which by the way is a clear case of good versus evil. And but right when he was in the middle of those, they pulled him off and told him, hey, we're going to move you to January 6th. So this was odd for two reasons. Number one, he realized that the FBI is now dropping and minimizing and turning away from a lot of serious crimes like child pornography. And sex trafficking and putting its energy into going after insurrectionists. So that was the first thing. The second thing, which I think is very telling, is that this guy Steve friend was in a local or regional office away from Washington, D.C.. So he actually had nothing to do with January 6th. When they told him he was going to be a kind of case officer in January 6th, he was kind of shocked because it's not his jurisdiction. He has nothing to do with it. And then he realized that the FBI is playing a dirty game, which is they're taking a lot of cases that are all from Washington, D.C., and they're assigning case officers in remote parts of the country. Why? Because they want to make it look like domestic terrorism coming from the right is a national problem.

FBI Steve Washington, D.C. Steve Friend
Marsha Blackburn: An Electric Weekend for Tennessee Victory

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:16 min | Last month

Marsha Blackburn: An Electric Weekend for Tennessee Victory

"Senator I know you were there Saturday night. Oh my goodness, it was the entire weekend was a electric Todd. I mean people were so excited. And I had been talking with I was good friend Clyde Travis before the games started and one of the things we were talking about was the amount of fan energy that was there. People that were so excited they just felt like this is the year. And even though they didn't have tickets to the game, they came to not fill, they were on campus, they read a tailgate or they were in one of the areas, what they had done was to set a big screen TV. All over campus. So it was like the smaller version of a jumbotron. And people were gathered around watching the game on those, just thousands of people, all across the campus. And they were all hearing and they were there. They just knew this was the year. And

Clyde Travis Todd
Dr. Bhavik Kumar: Men Can Have Pregnancies

Mark Levin

00:56 sec | 2 months ago

Dr. Bhavik Kumar: Men Can Have Pregnancies

"Here we have this guy doctor Baháʼí Kumar At a hearing yesterday he's asked by representative Andrew Clyde cut 14 go Doctor kamar can biological men become pregnant and give birth So men can have pregnancies especially trans men Okay now we know trans men can because their biologically women So they have all the tools that God gave them to have Babies And to get pregnant But can men have pregnancies He says yes men can have pregnancies especially trans men So especially trans men but what about those who are not trans men Well by that statement he's saying yes they can have pregnancies Now you have to be a moron to say something like this And yet you're compelled to say it

Baháʼí Kumar Andrew Clyde Doctor Kamar
Brave Republicans Confront DOJ About Whitmer 'Entrapment'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:19 min | 7 months ago

Brave Republicans Confront DOJ About Whitmer 'Entrapment'

"A handful of Intrepid Republicans, and it's, it shouldn't be a handful. It should be the Republicans in a unified political phalanx. But no, it takes the brave ones to go out front. And here I'm talking about, I'm gonna name them. It's led by Marjorie Taylor Greene, but you've got Scott Perry, Dan bishop, Andrew Clyde, Andy Biggs, bob good, Mary Miller, Paul gosar, Andy Harris, Louie gohmert, Thomas massie Matt Gaetz, well, what are they doing? In the aftermath of the exoneration of two key defendants in the Whitmer kidnapping trial, the pressing attorney general Garland for some specific answers. Now, trying to get answers out of Garland is not an easy business. This is like going to the consigliere of Don Corleone and saying, hey, listen, we're we want to find out more about the mafia. You're actually talking to the mafia. But nevertheless, this needs to be done. And so this is a stinging letter and a demand. Of Merrick Garland copied a Christopher wray, and the questions themselves are telling, let me just read a couple of them. Who within the DoJ and the FBI knew about or was involved in the plot to kidnap governor Whitmer, tell us. Remember, this is a letter being sent by the legislators to the executive branch, which is accountable to the legislative branch. Number two, to what extent would the DoJ and the FBI motivated by the 2020 presidential election to paint political opponents as domestic terrorists specifically Vis-à-vis the plot to kidnap governor Whitmer and the events of the U.S. capitol on January 6th, 2021. In other words, this is not just at the FBI staging orchestrating infiltrating and moving along a plot. This is the FBI timing those events to coincide with an election. So the issue here being raised is the election interference, very important issue because these revelations came to light in early October of 2020.

Marjorie Taylor Greene Scott Perry Dan Bishop Andrew Clyde Andy Biggs Bob Good Paul Gosar Louie Gohmert Thomas Massie Matt Gaetz Garland Governor Whitmer Mary Miller Andy Harris Merrick Garland Christopher Wray Whitmer Don Corleone FBI DOJ
"clyde" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

11:11 min | 10 months ago

"clyde" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Part series. The series will dive deep into past book panics, explore why public schools so often become ideological battlegrounds and dissect the interplay between book bands and political bullying. Join us as we try to make sense of the role that bans have played in our national culture and explain why we're seeing so many bands today. Listen for free on Apple, cafe dot com or wherever you get your podcasts. Support for the show today comes from Shopify if you're someone who sells things online, you need a commerce platform that makes it easy to sell the things and Shopify is one of them. In fact, it is the go to choice for millions of different businesses according to Shopify. They've got this all in one commerce platform that includes everything you need to start run and even grow your business, whether you're selling organic dog treats, formal clothing for collectible dolls. Go to Shopify dot com slash explain all lower case for a free 14 day trial and get full access to Shopify's entire suite of features, grow your business with Shopify today, go to Shopify dot com slash explained now that it's Shopify dot com slash explained all over case. What's it like? What's your main prison? No. Armed robbery. Ain't like anything. She finally knew you never robbed a place you faker. Devlin, it sounds like this crime was ultimately historic and huge, but kind of dumb, like someone did something here that was literally traceable. They left a trail, a very literal trail online. Is that fair? Dumb may be a little harsh only because I think everyone's learning how Bitcoin really works, how cryptocurrency really works. It's a learning curve for everyone. And it's learning curve for criminals. It's a learning curve for law enforcement. And that's true of any new technology that comes around. But I think what you see in this case in particular is it shows you that this is a learning curve that involves potentially billions and billions of dollars. But the government wasn't really ultimately caught flat footed here. How did they trace this crime? They don't say exactly how they got onto this couple, but there's a really interesting hint dropped in the court papers. When the government seized a dark web marketplace in 2017 that was called alpha bay. This is the largest dark market web place takedown in world history. Most of this activity was in illegal drugs, pouring fuel on the fire of the national drug epidemic, alpha bay was basically a place where according to the government, people use cryptocurrency to buy drugs, guns, and fake IDs essentially. And it was a place that sort of build itself as you can spend crypto here and it won't be traceable like the rest of crypto is. Taking down alpha bay, they were able to see some of the transactions that this couple were making as they tried to move and launder and hide and use the money stolen from bitfinex. And just to be clear, they don't outright say, you know, the takedown of alpha bay led to these arrests. But if you put the dots together, they seem to all point to that. So they're willing to sort of show their hand a little bit? Yeah, and that's part of the cat and mouse game of cops and robbers to be honest. Every case requires the government usually to say a little bit about how they cracked it. This is a really interesting moment, I think, in the law enforcement and criminal contest around cryptocurrency and Bitcoin because a lot of criminals, I think are going to look at this case. And think, oh, this could be bad for us down the road because the government has clearly figured out how to do something here because for a long time, law enforcement fear that it couldn't follow these kind of transactions. And I think this case proves that they can. How is it different as far as we know than the way the DoJ or FBI typically investigates financial crimes? Pre crypto and frankly pre Internet. A lot of financial crime investigations started because someone picked up the phone and called the FBI. Someone a human being said something to an investigator that you should really look at this or that. And sometimes it was the victim of a crime, like if it's a fraud, sometimes it was someone who worked alongside someone who was committing fraud. Here there's a really interesting dynamic that I think points to how future crimes involving crypto are going to be solved, which is the investigators and prosecutors ran a kind of software called clustering software, pulls out similar transactions and says, these transactions seem to be related to each other, you might look at these as possibly involving money laundering or some other crime. And so early in this investigation, what happened was the government went to a judge seeking approval for searches of this couple's accounts and they basically said, look, the clustering software we used suggests that the users of these accounts are the people who are moving the money that was stolen back in 2016. And the judge spent a lot of time chewing on that and basically said that this computer program is a confidential source in another form. And that's really something new and different. The government has used different types of software to help them solve different types of crimes before. But I think this is really a big moment in terms of how software is used as a tip essentially to point to possible financial crimes. And in this case, the tip leads to this tech investor rapper spammer in New York City. What happens when it leads to some dingy warehouse in Moscow? That's a big problem with cybercrime in general, what FBI agents and others say all the time is how frustrating it is that a lot of their evidence trails lead to places where they can't make arrests, where local authorities won't help them. It's a particular problem in a different way regarding crypto because a lot of crypto is used by people who do ransomware. And part of the reason the Justice Department is spending so much more time and energy learning how to trace cryptocurrency transactions. Is that ransomware is out of control in some parts of the economy. And if they can harness this technology, it might go a long way to reducing the problem of ransomware that the challenge is, frankly, that a lot of the folks who are doing that live in places that do not cooperate with U.S. law enforcement. Right. In which case, they'll sort of be powerless. Powerless up to a point, you know, what U.S. officials always like to say is we have a long memory and arms, meaning you know, ransomware criminal may think you have gotten away with it. And you may think we don't know who you are. But we do know who you are, and if you ever take a vacation to Thailand, just use a random example, but it actually happens fairly often. We're going to have you arrested. And then we're going to have you extradited. And then you're going to be in a U.S. prison. So that's the hope that law enforcement brings to these types of investigations. But you know, not everyone vacations in Thailand. And smart criminals know you shouldn't probably travel to places that have extradition treaties with the United States. You know, I heard once that after 9 11, the government dedicated so much of its law enforcement and intelligence agencies to terrorism that it became a really good time to commit a financial crime. Is there some kind of shift going on within the law enforcement apparatus in the United States right now with crypto, where so much attention's moving to crypto that it's becoming a really good time to commit a different kind of crime? I would say two things. One, it is true that there is a significant concern among current and former federal law enforcement officials. That the post 9 11 era had a debilitating effect on the FBI and the DoJ and their ability to investigate and prosecute white collar crime. What's interesting about the sort of the crypto era, we may be in sort of the first generation of cryptocurrency crime. And I think in that era, the FBI and Justice Department have two challenges. One, they're not necessarily as good as they used to be at pursuing financial crimes. And two, they have to pursue it in this digital landscape that they are still learning. It's a big score. Any criminal would look at that and be like, well, that's the biggest score that you could ever get. And not be able to spend. A $500 Walmart gift card may await you. And that's evidence against them, right? You could argue that even that Walmart $500 gift card was a bad idea. Brutal, just a brutal brutal payoff. It's tough out there. Tough outside. It's like the worst heist movie ever because once I get the money, they go to Walmart, but I'm curious as a reporter. I'm sort of waiting to figure out, did they get that Walmart card because they actually needed or wanted to spend something or were they sort of testing the system? If it's a test, it failed, right? But either way, it was $500. All of your tradecraft and all of your cleverness and all of the tricks you use to get away with something. All look brilliant until the moment the handcuffs come on you, and then it all looks really dumb. Because it didn't work. And because they saw you. So if you're a spy, who's leaving something under a rock, if the FBI is already sitting there behind a bush with a camera, you look pretty dumb. But if they're not sitting there behind a bush with a camera, you're a genius. But don't know where I'm headed. Motherfucking crocodile Wall Street. Silver on my fingers and boots on my feet. Always be a goat not a goddamn heat. Email me, fuck your message at the beat. You can read Devlin Barrett's reporting on the Bonnie and Clyde of Bitcoin over at The Washington Post. I'm Sean romance firm our episode was produced by Victoria Chamberlain, edited by Matthew collette's engineered by Paul mounsey and fact checked by Laura bullard, we used music by razzle Khan..

alpha bay Shopify FBI DoJ government Devlin U.S. Apple Walmart Thailand Moscow New York City bush Devlin Barrett Sean romance Victoria Chamberlain Clyde Bonnie
"clyde" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:16 min | 10 months ago

"clyde" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Warning. Today's show is about the Bonnie and Clyde of Bitcoin. Bonnie has a bit of a potty mouth. Listener discretion is advised. My name is Devlin Barrett. I cover the FBI and Justice Department for The Washington Post. So on February 8th, a pretty amazing arrest happened of a couple in New York in their 30s, arrested on charges of trying to launder $4.5 billion worth of Bitcoin. Today, the Department of Justice has dealt a major blow to cybercriminals looking to exploit cryptocurrency. We've just department says that's the largest seizure they've ever done. The Department of Justice has seized over $3.6 billion worth of that stolen cryptocurrency. Largest ever like bigger than an Al Capone comparatively relatively bigger than a Bernie Madoff, anything like that. Made up wasn't chump change. But this is just an astronomical amount of money in the form of Bitcoin. It's funny, though, 'cause Al Capone, Bernie Madoff became household names, I don't know if you could find an American who conveyed the two people who got arrested for this $4.5 billion scheme here. Who are they? A 34 year old man named Ilya Lichtenstein, he is essentially a tech entrepreneur. He's had a fairly observable career in the world of tech and startups. We helped a little scrappy startups compete with the big incumbents. And his wife named Heather Morgan, Heather Morgan is 31, started some of her own businesses in that space. I am a serial software entrepreneur and investor, a copywriter for more than a decade. A former economist. But I think what it was sort of more eye popping about his wife's background is that she also is some sort of aspiring rapper. Do you ever have people in your life who just suck? And the song's about them. Be it you suck like a vacuum cleaner. It's an amazing couple of characters to be at the center of the biggest seizure in U.S. Justice Department history. But what's her nom de plume, you know? What's her rapper pseudonym? I believe she goes by razzle Khan. Razzle gun. Refers to herself as the crocodile of Wall Street. Wall Street. Silver on my fingers and boots on my feet. What does that mean? I boy, you know, I guess I guess the wolf was already taken. I've been a rich man and I have been a poor man, and I choose rich every fucking time. His public profile seems to be a little more straightforward. He has both U.S. and Russian citizenship. He describes himself as basically an angel investor. Her sort of more official work is a little different. She started a company that she calls sales folk, which describes itself as a cold email marketing company? So if you want to be successful in today's world, whether you're in sales or not, you need to know how to build relationships online as well as offline. Through the power of email outreach. She postures the company as advising clients on how to make more successful cold emails to people. I think most of us would call that spamming. One of the things that's interesting about them is they have a very extensive online life. It's a little strange to see that according to the feds. These folks were involved in trying to launder just a massive amount of Bitcoin and being allegedly some of the biggest criminals that just department has ever caught. How did this angel investor tech entrepreneur and his rapper wife spam email marketer end up seizing $4.5 billion of Bitcoin? How does that happen exactly? So far, the government has not accused them of the actual theft. But it's a very interesting criminal complaint that was filed against them because it seems to suggest that from the moment this Bitcoin was stolen from a cryptocurrency exchange called bitfinex in 2016. This money was essentially under the control of Liechtenstein and Morgan. Pretty much from the moment it was taken. So they don't know if they took it, but they certainly received it. The government is very confident they can prove that these two tried to launder the money. Okay. I think what they're not saying is if they think they can prove that these two actually stole it. It's the kind of theft that really could only happen in the modern world, which means they basically went into bitfinex and they were able to hack their way into creating. 2000 separate, unauthorized transactions. Meaning they basically took a lot of bites out of other people's accounts. They were able to manipulate other people's accounts and send Bitcoin, wherever they wanted it to go, and through those 2000 different transactions, the hackers, whoever the hackers may be, the hackers were able to take off close to a 120,000 Bitcoin. One of the amazing parts of this whole story, right? Is that at the time in 2016 when this is done, a 120,000 Bitcoin was worth roughly $71 million. But because Bitcoin and cryptocurrency in general has been exploding in value in the years since that 71 million of Bitcoin is now worth about 4.5 billion. And the government just grabbed 3.6 billion of that. The prosecutors and investigators from the Justice Department, IRS criminal investigation, Homeland Security investigations and the FBI followed the stolen money on its complex journey. Through a labyrinth of virtual currency exchanges and wallets based here and abroad. And that's a huge sum of money in itself. There will be some really interesting decisions that you have to make in terms of the government has said they will give that out to the people from whom it was taken, but that's a process that has to go through the court system. So people are going to have to come forward and say, well, this was taken from me and I want my Bitcoin back. So do we know how Ilya and his wife razzle Khan get their hands on the money? Some of this stuff has to be aired out in court. What the government alleges is that they have controlled the accounts that hold this money for years. They may have had some role in the actual theft and hacking of it. But the government isn't accusing them of that. I think from the government's point of view from prosecutors point of view from the IRS's point of view and the FBI's point of view, they just look at it as well, we have enough evidence to prove that they tried to launder this money. They controlled it, and they tried to launder it, and we can prove that. There will likely be an indictment formal indictment that comes out of this investigation. And I'll be interesting to see if the DoJ adds additional charges in that indictment. I mean, what do you do with that kind of money when you're holding it and laundering it? Potentially allegedly. The government charges that part of what this couple were doing was they were trying to cover up the actual original source of the money being stolen by just moving it hopping it from account to account to account. And the government has an alleged that they actually spent much of it at all. The charging document that's filed now basically says they bought a $500 Walmart gift card. They spent some money on PlayStation, they spent some money on hotels dot com and Uber. So sorry with $4.5 billion they lived like a maybe like an upper middle class American. Exactly. That's the whole point of Bitcoin, right? Is that there's this ledger that's tracking everything and it's constantly changing and it's one of the real.

DoJ Heather Morgan Al Capone Bernie Madoff Devlin Barrett razzle Khan Bitcoin Bonnie Ilya Lichtenstein FBI Clyde The Washington Post New York Liechtenstein IRS government U.S.
"clyde" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:38 min | 11 months ago

"clyde" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Well, there's so many. There's so many programs. There's so many landmark achievements. It's just like mind boggling. So we just got about another minute or so before we have to wrap up. But I do want to give you the last word on our show today. And ask you did Clyde talk it all about how he wanted to be remembered. You know, Clyde, although he was always thought after for press and media everywhere we went. His legacy is more in his work and. He wanted to ensure that we continue to. Push forward the spiritual and cultural aspect of aim in that protecting those rights and practice and protocols and traditions and always making sure you know that our children have access. To that. And that was a really big thing for him that he was children the children are everything of the future. So. Folks, I'm sorry, but that is all the time we have for today's show. I want to thank my guests. Lisa Bellinger. Levi rickard. And we're not able to duke for sharing their memories of clad bell court. And celebrating his legacy of leadership and advocacy for Native American people. We're back tomorrow when we'll be discussing the latest iteration of the indigenous futures project. The survey is the most comprehensive, Native American data gathering effort ever. We'll learn about what the information accomplishes and how you can get.

Clyde Lisa Bellinger Levi rickard
"clyde" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:38 min | 11 months ago

"clyde" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Show. Your tuned in to native America calling, I'm Sean spruce. We're remembering the life and legacy of Clyde bell court who died last week at the age of 85. We're hearing from some of the people who knew him and worked alongside him. And if you'd like to share your memory of Clyde bell court, we welcome your call. One 809 9 6 two 8 four 8. Before we went to break, we were talking with winona leduc and winona. I know that you have a busy schedule and you can't join us for too much longer. So I do want to thank you for taking the time to call in today to say hello to Lisa and offer your expressions of gratitude as well. But I would like to ask you just one more question before you have to run out. Winona Clyde looms is this iconic figure in contemporary Native American history. Among as many accomplishments and endeavors, he's known as one of the original founders of aim, what can you tell us about his involvement in those early days? Right. Donald. Older than me. Like, I just remember being a kid and watching them guys take over stuff and saying, man, that's a good thing to be Indian people, you know? And then but I didn't really start hanging with Clyde till I was 17 now. Lisa, Baird. I know Lisa since before she is born probably, I don't know. She's probably decade younger than me, maybe not quite, but you know she was raised pretty much in that. And I just want to say that they transformed our communities. And movements transform communities and the American Indian movement. I am forever grateful to how they transform my life and set me on this path that I'm on today. And I'm a 100% behind lease ballinger as a new executive director and you don't get like a tiara in the movement. You just keep working, praying to do the best and serve your people. You know, and I just want to shout out to brother Clyde or uncle Clyde and shout out to Lisa. And he thanks you guys. Have a good day. I'm listening a little bit in, but I do kind of roll at least at best key sisters see you down the path. Thank you so much winona. At least, sorry, you don't get a tiara, but you do get major props and recognition from winona leduc. How does that make you feel? It's been well, you know what? I haven't had time to stop and feel. The day after that, the day after Clyde went public, we had our press conference in George Floyd was murdered here in Minneapolis and so you know it was moccasins on the ground and away we go, I didn't get a tier, but I did get a bulletproof vest in a matching ribbon skirt, so I'm happy. A flak jacket in a ribbon. That's in the country for you, right? Well, winona did a really good job of painting like when she talked about the battling and just the intensity of that time period. It really, I could just visualize it, like what that might have been like and she mentioned being young and I know you were a young child as well. And I know that in the early days of aim quite often brought his young children to meetings and events and he was very much interested in and inspired about getting kids involved early. So just, could you share from your own experience saying what were some of those epic confrontations and battles like from a child's perspective? 'cause you must have been there and seen a lot of that too. All right, yep, like I was saying earlier, you know, and I really have to say it's shout out and neglect to sister when no one on because you know everything she said was so spot on and she has such a great way to say things. And I'm not that much younger than her, so but you know, and we both grew up that was we were young when as we became impacted by the movement and I remember writing in cars and walking from St. Paul from the aim office for the capital to either work either walking to or from the capitol. I know we did the prison. We. Did still water prison. I remember going there as a little girl. And you know it was so protests and caravans are norm to me. I didn't know that wasn't like what you did as a kid. That was just what we did. And we did bring, you know, I have sisters that have been in the movement along with me because our parents work side by side through the different aim work, whether it was education, legal housing, courts and children. Family protection and such like the day family, you know, their mom and my mom, you know, we're excited by side in St. Paul aimed as well as the other cofounder Eddie Benton. His children were participating as well. So we always had a youth contingency incline with Susie and Tanya and Kroll wolf was around yet, but you know I grew up. I grew up going to high school with Susie. I chose to go to Minneapolis the heart of the earth. Even though I lived a class from red school house, those are the first two survival schools. I went to Minneapolis to heart of the earth because that's where Susan went to school Susie bell part his daughter and we traveled a lot uncle would come and get me. He was stopped by in the morning and say, yeah, we're going to go for a ride. You want to go along like, okay, you know, we'll grab some stuff. I've got my stuff. And the story I like to tell is how I jumped in the car it had been early in the morning and as kids were away in the back, you know, getting comfortable and stuff and fell asleep on the road and I woke up on where near Canada. You know, just no plan of going there and saying, you know, like grabbing overnight bag, you know, it might be the day we just went with where we, you know, if the call came, we went, you know, and that was a big thing, but he did, I was include family and children and children were a big part of our movement. And I'll ask. I think my first big protest that I can remember is highlighted, I think, in the dick Bancroft book. And Heyward the LCL winter dam occupation and I remember the police dogs. And I remember that my mom telling me later, I don't remember this at the time, but to me, they were dogs. So I went over there to go pet the dogs and they were trying to call me back and my mom was saying she didn't even know it was police dogs, you know, and they were like, get away get away. You know, so the child affect your perspective, I see the dogs, you know, our people were and we had a feast that I think I had my first bear meat there. And so..

winona leduc Clyde Lisa Sean spruce Clyde bell Clyde bell court Winona Clyde winona George Floyd American Indian movement Minneapolis ballinger Baird Donald St. Paul Eddie Benton Kroll wolf America
Mahomes, Chiefs cruise, clinch AFC West crown

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 11 months ago

Mahomes, Chiefs cruise, clinch AFC West crown

"The the chiefs chiefs of of wrapped wrapped up up their their sixth sixth consecutive consecutive AFC AFC west west crown crown and and improved improved to to eleven eleven and and four four with with the the thirty thirty six six ten ten route route of of the the Steelers Steelers Patrick Patrick Mahomes Mahomes threw threw for for two two hundred hundred fifty fifty eight eight yards yards and and three three touchdowns touchdowns with with Byron Byron Pringle Pringle accounting accounting for for two two of of those those scores scores Clyde Clyde Edwards Edwards Allaire Allaire had had a a touchdown touchdown run run for for Kansas Kansas city city before before leaving leaving early early in in the the second second half half with with a a collarbone collarbone injury injury Pittsburgh Pittsburgh fell fell to to seven seven seven seven and and one one and and further further behind behind the the bangles bangles in in the the AFC AFC north north Ben Ben Roethlisberger Roethlisberger threw threw for for one one hundred hundred fifty fifty nine nine yards yards with with a a meaningless meaningless fourth fourth quarter quarter touchdown touchdown for for Pittsburgh Pittsburgh he he also also threw threw an an interception interception and and lost lost a a fumble fumble on on the the ferry ferry the the chiefs chiefs of of wrapped wrapped up up their their sixth sixth consecutive consecutive AFC AFC west west crown crown and and improved improved to to eleven eleven and and four four with with the the thirty thirty six six ten ten route route of of the the Steelers Steelers Patrick Patrick Mahomes Mahomes threw threw for for two two hundred hundred fifty fifty eight eight yards yards and and three three touchdowns touchdowns with with Byron Byron Pringle Pringle accounting accounting for for two two of of those those scores scores Clyde Clyde Edwards Edwards Allaire Allaire had had a a touchdown touchdown run run for for Kansas Kansas city city before before leaving leaving early early in in the the second second half half with with a a collarbone collarbone injury injury Pittsburgh Pittsburgh

Patrick Patrick Mahomes Mahome Byron Byron Pringle Pringle Steelers Steelers Clyde Clyde Edwards Edwards Pittsburgh Allaire Allaire Kansas City City Ben Ben Roethlisberger Roethli Chiefs Chiefs Chiefs Kansas AFC Steelers
"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"This episode of based on a true story was produced by me down the fab. I'd like to thank John Neal Phillips once again for taking the time to help us separate fact from fiction in 1960 7s Bonnie and Clyde. If you want to learn even more about the real Bonnie and Clyde, go check out John's excellent books, running with Bonnie and Clyde, the fast ten years of Ralph folks and my life with Bonnie and Clyde. As always, you can find links to those books in the show notes for this episode, as well as on the show's home on the web based on a true story podcast dot com. And while you're there, if you haven't listened to John talking about the laws side of things in the highwaymen, make sure to do that. He was so much fun to talk to and I certainly learned a ton for him. I hope that you did too. Speaking of being fun to talk to at the beginning of this episode, I introduced him as the emperor of the western world. To give you a little peek behind the podcast, before I hit record with the guest, I always like to verify their title and how they would like me to introduce them on the episode. Both times I've talked to John, he has joked around saying he's trying to get the title emperor of the western world off the ground. So I told him I would actually include it in the episode. I don't think he was serious about having me actually included in the episode, but I thought it was too funny not to. Bless it helps show what a great personality John has. Okay, now it's time for the answer to our two truths and a lie game from the beginning of the episode. And as a refresher, here are the two truths and one line. One. Clyde always drove carefully so he wouldn't draw the attention of the police. Two. Around the time of the ambush, Clyde's cover in Louisiana was as a lumberjack. Three. Bonnie and Clyde's favorite weapon of choice was the browning automatic rifle. Did you find out which one is a lie? Let's start with number one. Clyde always drove carefully so he wouldn't draw the attention of the police. That's the lie. When John talked to Sophie stone about the time that she was kidnapped by Bonnie and Clyde, she told him the thing that scared her the most wasn't the large amount of weapons that she saw in the car. It was Clyde's driving. He would go off the road and drive across the fields and drive 90, 95, a hundred miles an hour on where did dirt roads that just made the whole car vibrate? Well, that's just one example John also told us about how the car Bonnie and Clyde were ambushed in, had just a hundred miles on it when they stole it. And then two weeks later, it had 7500 miles or so on it. Then there's the story John told us about how Clyde didn't notice the sign that a bridge had moved and wrecked the car so bad that it flipped caught fire and nearly killed Bonnie. So Clyde drove a lot, but I think it's safe to say he was not the most careful driver. That means number two is true. Around the time of the ambush, Clyde's cover in Louisiana was as a lumberjack. As we learned from John, the ambush worked in part because the truck that ivy methvin used to pretend he needed help with on the side of the road was one that Clyde had purchased for ivy as part of the cover of being a lumberjack. Of course, we also learned that no one in bienville parish believed that Clyde was actually a lumberjack, but still, that was the story. And number three is also true, Bonnie Clyde's favorite weapon of choice was the browning automatic rifle. Even though we see the barrel gang using the Thompson machine gun a lot in the movie, John pointed out that at that time, prior to World War II, the Thompson machine gun wasn't very reliable. So in reality, Bond preferred the browning automatic rifle, also known as the BAR. That just about wraps up our time together today. Before we go, the last thing I like to do on each episode is to share how much time and effort went into creating this episode. My hope in sharing this information is to go beyond my podcast and hopefully you'll start to appreciate all the podcasts that you listened to for free just a little bit more. Of course I only had the stats for my show, so with that said, today's episode took a total of 43 hours to create. And as I always do, I want to make it clear. That's only my time for this one episode. In other words, that 43 hours does not include any of my guest time researching the subject matter that we talked about. It also doesn't include the time it takes for me to do podcasts related to things that are not part of creating this one episode. For example, at the time it takes to maintain the base on a true story website email, newsletter, social media, and all those other little things outside creating a single podcast episode that are still required to make a podcast. All those things take time to set up and maintain and cost money that goes beyond things associated with this one episode. But they're all things that are required because if I didn't do those things, then there wouldn't be any episodes of based on a true story at all. In a nutshell, this podcast may be free to listen to, but it is not free to create. And that's why I'm so thankful for the sponsors whose ads you've heard on this episode. You can find more information about them over at base on a true story podcast dot com slash advertisers. But they're not the only ones helping to keep the show alive. There are wonderful people just like you who are helping to keep this show financially going. So if you found value in today's episode and if you're using a podcast two app, I would really appreciate it if you boost now. Otherwise, I hope you enjoyed today's episode enough to share it with a friend. And maybe even consider helping to support the next episode over at bass on a true story podcast dot com slash support. Once again, that's based on a true story podcast dot com slash support. Until next time, thanks so much for listening and.

Clyde Bonnie John John Neal Phillips Sophie stone ivy methvin Louisiana bienville Bonnie Clyde Ralph Thompson Bond
"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"They're still shooting at him in the cars rolling off down the road. But then it just kind of eased up against an embankment and stopped and they knew they finally had them there. McLeod never got out of the car, but the movie does portray the old truck in the wheel off of the truck is the decoy and the blind that the officers had built there to conceal themselves, of course the weapons are all wrong. But you know that's neither here nor there. But the way is portraying the movie. It's a beautiful moment because there's this moment between Clyde and Bonnie, which never happened. They didn't have time for that. Apparently, but two different accounts. Apparently, Bonnie may have seen the deputy standing up because she screamed. She must have seen something just before those first two shots. And then everybody opened up. I spoke with two farmers who were working nearby and fields and one of the farmers was familiar with dynamite because he used it to blow tree stunts. And he said, he distinctly remembers hearing two shots and then what he thought was dynamite going off. That was how powerful the sound was. Just when they all opened up. Yeah, when they all opened up, then he walked over and see what was going on in the road was just full of smoke. You know, that was back before smokeless tobacco. I mean, that was back before smokeless gunpowder. And even Ted Hinton described it took several minutes for the air to clear before they could actually see anything. Because the smoke was so thick, they had unleashed so much gunpowder. I wanted to ask you, I know you've talked to members of the barrow gang, like you mentioned earlier blanche barrow getting to see herself portrayed in the movie, but you've also talked to Ralph wolz. Did they ever talk more about the movie and how it was? Ralph said he went to see the movie because he when it first came out. And he said from the moment it started, he couldn't figure out what was going on. He said, he didn't he didn't recognize anybody in that movie. And then when one of the parts we've talked about already, when money and clad cohorts, the kid at the filling station to join them, Ralph said, you don't walk up to a stranger and say, we rob banks. We wouldn't have lasted two weeks if we were broadcast and things like that around to perfect strangers. He was absolutely flabbergasted by the movie. But, you know, I often think about this. Imagine a producer in a director, making a movie of your life. How much of it do you suppose you'd actually recognize? No, that's fair. That's fair. It's your life through someone else's eyes. And it's always the way it is. But nevertheless, there's so much evidence. I don't know why writers and directors feel like they have to take an absolutely exciting, very true story and alter it at all. I don't know. Why? I don't know why. Nevertheless, I really like that 67 movie a lot. I like the performances and I like the writing, even though it's not historically accurate. And man, the cinematography is fantastic. That cinematography, you know, he did all the king's men and here to eternity. It is a big deal. And he just made that movie look so rich. That's a great movie. I like it. It's just not historical. Well, thank you so much for coming on a chat about Bonnie and Clyde. I know I mentioned Ralph Fulton and blanche barrow as well. You've got a book called running with finding Clyde D ten fast years of Ralph fults. And you also edited blanche's memoir called my life with Bon Kline. So let's say that this is the first time that someone has heard the real story of Bonnie and Clyde, which of your books would you recommend that they start with to learn more? Well, it depends on the viewpoint if you want a real intense look at the most intense three months of bunning class, go with blanche book, because she puts you in the car with them. And she's very descriptive. She didn't pull many punches. She pulls the punches she pulls us with buck mostly. And you can usually see through those. But she don't pull any punches with herself or with bunny and Clyde, really. And then if you want the larger picture that includes those three months that starts before body met Clyde and continues well after they're killed, that's running with Bonnie Clyde, ten past years of Ralph false, which includes the only successful escape from the Texas death house that ever occurred. And that's when Raymond Hamilton broke out of that place..

Bonnie blanche barrow Clyde Ted Hinton Ralph wolz McLeod Ralph rob banks Ralph Fulton Clyde D Ralph fults Bon Kline blanche bunning Bonnie Clyde Raymond Hamilton Texas
"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"Nothing is ever mentioned about Henry methane except by accident by accident, for instance, the Dallas morning news after the double murder of these Texas highway patrolman. Dallas morning news makes a big deal about this fingerprint found on a whisky bottle at the scene that it was clad barrow's thumbprint actually on there. And that's on the headlines, the Dallas morning news and the daily times Herald. But over in Fort Worth, where the actual fingerprint expert was because that's in county where they were killed the paper prints that the thumbprint is Henry methods. And that's the only time you see the name Henry myth. It gets suppressed after that. You can imagine what governor Ferguson's thinking. Oh, man, I've made this deal with this guy, and now he's shooting at the state home. So she's after a hammer to hurry up and get this job done. So anyway, so by this time, bob alcorn from Dallas county and Ted Hinton are out there looking for Bonnie and Clyde two and they keep coming across hamer so they join forces. And then hamer decides to get a partner too. And he gets this colleague to come along with him and then Henderson Jordan and his deputy. And that makes the 6 people there. They encounter Bonnie and Clyde frequently over there in Louisiana. One time Ted Hinton says the driver on the road in Barack passed him, and of course hamer's behind the wheel and he doesn't know because he doesn't know what they look like. And hint in an alphonse, there they go. Right there. And by the time they turned around, he was gone. He was out of there. And then this family, methane's mother and father, they were so destitute. They were actually living in a tent at the time in this town called castor in a public park in the middle of castor. And this is where the 6 officers had this plan to try and take money and climb there in the middle of castor. But it was in a different parish and that particular sheriff was on the take and couldn't be trusted and it's possible that Clyde was paying him off to be able to stay there. So they got the methods to move into Henderson Jordan's parish into this abandoned farmhouse. And set up business there. And somehow it all escaped the scrutiny of Clyde. Clyde's usually really suspicious of things like that. And clad certainly wouldn't have known this sheriff in benville parish, the cinders in Jordan. I'm kind of surprised Clyde went along with it. I don't know what the details were about how they convinced this was a good idea, but they moved into a different parish there. So that they have a better shot at them and not in some public place. Where somebody else could get hurt, but more importantly, there would be witnesses to do. So then much of the rest of the movies pretty spot on, old man meth and has this truck. Ironically, it's a truck that Clyde bought for him as a cover, clad was supposed to be a lumberjack. And everybody I spoke to have been Bill Paris that remembered them said, everybody knew this guy wasn't a lumberjack. Nobody no lumberjack there and drove ran a brand new Ford V8s with silk shirts and diamonds tie pins and stuff. They knew this guy was some kind of outlaw. They didn't know punning clad, but they knew this guy was somebody else. But anyway, that was the cover. The old man had this truck and of course that was the perfect decor because how on earth are you going to get somebody like Clyde barrel to stop long enough to get yourself shot in the idea was we'll make it look like broke down way out on this back road. So that's what they did. And they were very clever about it. The officers set up this blind on one side of the road, just like they show in the movie. And it's on the east side of the road. And the truck is parked facing north on the west side of the road. Meaning that as cloud approached from the north, he'd have to pull into the oncoming lane to get up next to that truck or to pass that truck, we should put him real close to the ambush team and also because clad would know that truck he'd probably be looking at that truck and not officers that were on the other side. And then Henry's father, ivy was supposed to be out of the truck, like the truck had broken down. He took a wheel off the truck and had to land there on the ground. And that, of course, did the trick. Clyde stopped. And asked, you know, started talking to him. In accordance to court transcripts, there was a signal because only Ted Hinton and bob alcorn knew it bunning Clyde looked like, but of course Henry ivy met him, but really knew what they looked like. So alcorn and Hinton, they would get idea if they could, but if there were some issue then only on methane, the signal was methane to act like maybe he was starting to get sick to his stomach and hold his stomach and run off into the trees like he was going to throw up. And that was the signal. Yeah, this is them. So he did that, apparently. Ran off into the trees, bunting cloud or looking toward him and toward the truck away from the officers. And they portrayed this in the movie a little bit differently. They have Clyde get out of the car in the movie, but he never did get out of the car, which would be natural for him. Even if he knew somebody, you wouldn't get out of the car unless he felt real comfortable about it. And it appears he had the car shifted into first. It was a standard transmission. So he had to clutch depressed and he was shifted into first so he could get out of there real quick if he had to. And he's just waiting there. Well, apparently one of the 6 officers, the deputy, was so nervous. He jumped up before the signal was given. And he fired off two shots and Ted Hinton said he saw Clyde's head snapped back. So cloud was probably killed right there. But the jig was up, then. And so everybody else got up and just opened up on that car because they wanted to make sure they got this guy because he was really scary in this guy. And so what happened was when he was hit there, apparently he had this thing shifted into first with a clutch depressed. And when he was hit, he let the clutch go and the car goes rolling off down the road. And Ted Hinton said his first thought was, my gosh, he's getting away. Well, how does the car is full of bull holes? And.

Clyde Ted Hinton Henderson Jordan hamer bob alcorn Dallas daily times Herald governor Ferguson Henry Bonnie benville Bill Paris Dallas county barrow Fort Worth Louisiana Barack Texas bunning Clyde Henry ivy
"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"People are. And so clad in WD Jones and buck are shooting out all of the windows. And those browning automatic rifles can go right through brick walls. They're just powerful this can be one of the slugs penetrated the red crown, the main building there and went into the kitchen through a stove and struck somebody hiding behind that stove there. That's how powerful those things are. And in this vehicle, this police vehicle is often described as an armored car, had been pulled up in front of the garage to try and block the garage and clad started shooting at that thing. And he just tore it apart and he hit the driver and the knees and the driver instantly thought, yeah, I think I'll back out of here. And so he threw it in reverse and he backed up and clad still shooting. And clad hits the horn in his shorts out the horn and the horn just starts going and a lot of the officers took that as a signal to stop shooting and so the officers stopped shooting and that's when buck and blanche decided to come out and officers then opened fire on them. They were holding mattresses up like the show in the movie, but the garage door was closed. Clyde and W Jones were trying to load Bonnie into the car in the garage. And they heard the gun fire. And then this time, blanche does scream. She's screaming above the sound of gunfire for clad to open up the garage door. And the witness across the street that I spoke with said, he remembers a woman screaming. And that was blast. She said she was screaming above the sound of the gunfight, get clad to open up the garage or clad out, not the garage door, and by then bucket had been shot through the hit. It was a through and through shot, right through the head. Blanche was unheard at that point. But fell into blanche's arms. When he was struck, the man across the street saw this, when he was struck, he had started to fire his browning automatic rifle and he went back and in the barrel went up in the air fire straight up into the air and then fell back into blanche's arms and then Clyde came out and clad reached for buck and reached for buck's gun and grabbed it by the barrel and burned the hell out of his hand and dropped the gun right there. He just, it was just an accident that loaded him in the car. At this point, Clyde knows buck's hit, but he doesn't know how serious it is. Hello them in the car, and they back the car out. And by this time, all the officers had stopped shooting. Although blanche told me, she said, it didn't seem like they stopped shooting to me, but everybody else I talked to on the other side said they had stopped shooting because they just kind of wanted them to leave. It was that kind of thing that they were way over matched with weapons here. The one thing in the movie that they portray, they're using those Thompson machine guns, which they used in the highwaymen also. And I even told the director, I said, nobody was using those things because they jammed really bad Thompson didn't fix that till World War II came out. The director said, yeah, I know, but they look so good. Yeah. It looks so good, you know? I will say, they are super recognizable. No, no, kidding. Yeah. And it only really matters to somebody like me and other people like it. But nevertheless, they're in the car and they're back out in the evidence that they were still shooting is that one of the tires was hit. One or two of the tires was hit. As they drove off, but they kept driving. They kept drowning. And they had to stop more than once to fix the tires. In fact, until the morning they never did get out of the area. They were within a few miles of the place, the whole night. Trying to fix the tires. Yeah, other evidence that they were still shooting when the car backed out was a line of fire raked into the car. And glass hit blanch in the eye. Hit her in both eyes. One of her odds was permanently damaged and a bullet fragment struck her in the forehead. Just above the hairline. And that was that remain there. The rest of her life. But she was blind in one eye and couldn't see real well out of the other eye, either because of that glass. But she concealed that until later because she didn't want buck to be upset because he was conscious that this through shot and he was absolutely conscious she said the floorboard in the back seat was just about a inch of blood down there. It wasn't until they were trying to change one of the tires just a few miles from the shootout. That clad came to realize blanche was injured too. He didn't realize it till then. So it took them all night to get out of the area there. But that's the way that story went. The only reason why they got out of there was because they had superior firepower. Well, we do see them get out in the movie, but then afterwards, they're in a field out there when the law catches up to them. And again, another shootout, this time I think cloud is hitting the arm as they're trying to escape. There's a ton of gunfire. They're driving around almost looks like Clyde is trying to go one direction and then there's gunfire there, so it goes into the direction. They're basically completely surrounded. This is when we see buck die. We see buck and blanche. Blank is captured. Buck dies seems to die there right there. We don't really see him die, but the camera is kind of zooms in on his hand and it's twitching and then it stops so you get the impression that he didn't make it. But then we do see that Bonnie Clyde and in this case in the movie CW moss get away from there as everybody was kind of converging on buck and blanche. How well did the movie do showing that? The chaos of it is pretty spot on in the fact that Jones and Bonnie got away. That's right. Buck and blanche were captured, buck blasted 6 days and died 6 days later. And he was apparently in and out of consciousness pretty coherent all the way to the end. And he had been shot there too. In addition to the through and through shot in platte city, he was shot in the back in this Iowa gunfight.

blanche buck Clyde WD Jones W Jones Thompson Bonnie Blanche Bonnie Clyde Buck Jones platte city Iowa
"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"He took off like a bat out of hell. He was just flying through towns and he would take off across fields. He would leave the road and just go blasting across a field and pick up another road someplace else and then went all the way into Arkansas. And then just stopped and dropped Darby and stone off and gave him $5 for bus ride home and then took off. But Sophie stone said she was scared out of her mind. Oh, at one point, they stopped. I remember this. One point they stopped because it was too crowded in the backseat and Sophie stone was brought up to the front seat. And so she's sitting between bunny and Clyde. And that's when she really got the full effect of how fast Clyde was driving these rutted dirt roads he'd be doing 90, 95, a hundred on these rutted in the cars just vibrate and slide all over the place. And on those rutted roads, the car was vibrating so much. The glove compartment door would open up frequently. And these magazines for browning automatic rifles filled with ammunition would fall out under the floor. While he's still driving Clyde would reach across and pick them up off the floor and shove them back into the glove box and slam the door. And then it opened up again. And that just scared the heck out of her because he's taking his eye off the road and just flying down this road. Finally, this kept happening and finally he just picked them all up and dumped him in Sophie stone's lap and said, here, holy, she did not have a fun time at all. There was no hamburger eating. There were no jokes being told. However, the subject of Darby being an undertaker did come up. Bonnie started getting chatty. Plaid was still human. He never stopped being mad, that whole trip. But Bonnie, she started getting chatty and wanting to know who these people were, and so she asked Sophie stone, what do you do? And she said she taught home economics in school and Bonnie said, you mean like cooking things? Yeah. Oh, did you cook something today? If you did describe it to me, because I'm so hungry. She said, then she asked Darby what he did. And he said he was an undertaker. There's a lot of conflict about who said what and what they said. Some sources say Clyde actually asked, wouldn't you like to embalm me, but three sources, including Clyde's mother's manuscript, said it was Bonnie that asked that question. Would you like to embalm plaid and me? They did identify themselves, which was unusual. They usually didn't do that. They did it. Would you like to embalm plaid in me? And Darby said, no, no, I hope you all live a long time. You know, he was just trying to and apparently Bonnie thought it was funny and started laughing and said, oh, yeah, you'd love to embalm us, but clad was not thinking it was funny at all. And it was not long after that he stopped and dunked him out. And then drove off Sophie stone said they got dropped off, and then the car took off. And they were thinking, oh, good. Because they really thought they were going to be killed. Within the car stopped. And it backed up a few feet and they thought, oh no, here it comes. Come on, here come. And a $5 bill sailed out the window. We landed on the side of the road. And then the car took off. That was money for the bus ride home there. There was no love loss. And that's usually the way those abductions were. The unusual one was that city Marshall, Percy Boyd, if we go back to the movie, there is another big shootout that we see. Again, the gang is hold up somewhere this time. It's at some cabins in plat city, Iowa. Blanche and CW moss in the movie. Grab some chicken dinners for the gang. Someone at the restaurant happens to see a gun and then so he calls sheriff smoot after the two leave and this leads the law to the cabins where the barrow gang are spending the night. And this time it's the law that shoots first in the movie. And the shootout seems to be a lot bigger than the one in Missouri, the law even comes with as an armored vehicle. And this is where we kind of mentioned earlier that gang mentioned that they had Robin armory. We see them pulling out grenades and big machine guns. But the gang does manage to get away, not before both block I'm sorry, buck and blanche are injured. Although bucks injury seems to be a lot worse than blanches in the movie. How well did the movie do portraying this shootout in Iowa? Again, the essence of it is spot on. A lot of the details are kind of rearranged or didn't happen. But the essence of it is they're just like most of the rest of the movie, the essence is there. This particular shootout, the platte city, Missouri, which today were the Kansas City international airport is one of the runways is right up against where these cabins used to be. They don't exist anymore, but you'll go to visit the site. And there's a roadway that's been cut all through there so it's kind of hard to get a fix on where the place actually was, but in planes are always flying real low over you. Are you coming in? But in plat city, Missouri, this appears to be the first time a law enforcement actually thought this was the bearer brothers. And that's why all the armaments came out. That's why there were so many officers involved. The way it's portrayed in the movie, like you said, CW.

Sophie stone Clyde Darby Bonnie plat city Arkansas Percy Boyd Plaid CW moss sheriff smoot Robin armory Iowa Blanche Missouri Marshall blanche platte city buck Kansas City international airp
"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"The movie opens by showing how Bonnie and Clyde meet. It seems to be sort of a chance meeting when she catches Clyde stealing Bonnie's mother's car in 1931. The two end up walking in a town together and almost immediately, we can tell that she's smitten by him right away, we see the two committing a crime. It happens Bonnie asks Clyde, what armed robbery is like and Clyde chose Bonnie is gone, and she doesn't believe that he's actually going to use it. So to prove her wrong, he walks across the street to a place called rich groceries is what is called in the movie. And a couple minutes later, he emerges with a small stack of cash. They run into a nearby car, Clyde jump starts it and they drive away. How well does the movie do showing how Bonnie and Clyde first met? Not very well at all historically speaking, but that's a great scene. It really is. The way it's shot, the way it's acted, the way it's written in a love the way Warren Beatty has that little bit with the toothpick in his mouth when he's shown or the gun. I really like this movie. It's fun to watch. It's not at all historically accurate. So the way Bon applied met and stick with me because this gets a little convoluted, but there was a kid named clarence clay who was a friend of clad barros, a real close friend to Clyde barrows and clarence had a sister named Edith. And Edith married Hubert Parker, who was Bonnie's brother. And Hubert and Edith lived at one O 5 Herbert street down in west Dallas with Edith's parents and clarence clay, her brother lived there as well. So apparently Edith had been in some kind of accident broken her arm and needed some help around the house there and Bonnie came over to help one time and to visit with her brother and sister in law. And it so happened that clarence clay and Clyde Barrow showed up at the house. And by all accounts, bunny and plaid were immediately attracted to each other. But there was no attempt to steal Bonnie's mother's car for one thing. Bonnie's mother did not have a car. She didn't have enough money to own a car and as I remember in the movie that house is a two story house, there are very few two story buildings that all the date from that time in west Dallas, the homes, many of them are the old style shotgun houses, very quickly built because they were meant to be temporary, but people stayed down there for a long time, but yeah, the way buying that scene in the movie is very fanciful, but it's just not how they met at all. It sounds like the two parts they pulled from was that it was more of a chance encounter and she fell for him right away, but then the rest of it kind of filled in. True, yeah, much of the movie is like that. They do pull the essence of most of the incidents and then rearrange some things. They also conflate a few things for time reasons. But yeah, you're right about that. According to the movie, after a farmer named Otis Harris, says that his place was repossessed by the bank. And Bonnie and Clyde are there, and they shoot up the house. And Clyde tells Otis that they rob banks. And the way that they're shown in the movie, it really sounded to me like Clyde is just making this up as a way of making Otis feel better that the bank has screwed over Otis family. And so Clyde is going to give him some payback. But then a little bit later we see Bonnie and Clyde robbing their first bank nearby farmer state bank, was that how and why they started robbing banks? No, not at all, but that scene again really captures the public mood at the time, much of the public held responsible for the economic situation at the time. Banks, politicians, and the law for some reason. A lot of people had the feeling that the law was on the tape and that they were being paid off by wealthy bankers and wealthy politicians. And there probably was some of that, but there was a general feeling that all lawmen were on the so it was bankers politicians and lawmak and anybody that could ruin their day was okay. So that scene really captures that, but actually Clyde did not like robbing banks. He did it very reluctantly and only because somebody else needed something in the way of a lot of money real quick. One of the members of the original incarnation of the barrow gang, he and Raymond Hamilton and Clyde barrel robbed a bank in Lawrence, Kansas. Because they wanted to get a lot of money to recruit some other outlaws to go raid east and prison farm. And that was the first bank robbery, any of them had pulled, they learned how to do it in prison from bank robbers that they knew in prison and the bankrupts told them that tricks of the trade. And what weapons to use, how to act, what time of day to go in the bank robbers that taught them how to do this. Their technique was to case the bank for two or three days and see who arrives first in the morning. And then whoever it is that arise first get the drop on them and take them in before anybody else shows up in the bank, make them open up the vault and then clear out before the bank even opens. That was the technique. And that's what they did in Lawrence, Kansas. After that, Clyde did not like robbing banks because it made headlines. And he did not like headlines because it made him hot. Of course, he's still got hot anyway, because of all the chances he took, but he did not like robbing banks. After buck joined accidentally there in Missouri. Buck was interested in bank robbing. So the two of them pulled a few bank jobs about half of them actually were, but it was only because of buck. After buck and blanche were out of the picture, there are no bank robberies. Attributed to well, there's one in Missouri. Clad in two other guys pulled off one bank robbery that we know of. And then after that, it was just all gas stations and grocery stores. He didn't like Robin banks. That's the exact opposite impression I got walking away from that first part that first scene. Even though good scene, but when they robbed that bank, they find out that, oh, we went out of business a few weeks earlier. So they get almost nothing out of it, which tells me that there really wasn't any planning. It just seemed to be spur of the moment and they didn't really care about how much money they got out of it, because they didn't really seem to plan that one in that scene. Yeah. That kind of thing did happen Ralph told me that on his own in a spur of the moment usually Ralph chased everything he did. You know, really checked it out for a long time, but he was desperate and needed something on the spur of the moment. He went in and tried to rob a bank that was an insurance company. Now, it still said bank on the outside, but he walked in and everybody just kind of looked at him with a blank, you know, this isn't a bank anymore. This is an insurance company. And Raymond Hamilton told his brother Floyd that the same thing happened to him. Clyde's mother who.

Clyde Bonnie clarence clay Edith Clyde barrows Hubert Parker Otis Clyde Barrow Otis Harris Warren Beatty Dallas barros Hubert Raymond Hamilton clarence Clyde barrel rob banks Lawrence Kansas buck
"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

Based On a True Story

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on Based On a True Story

"That compares your favorite Hollywood movies with history. Today we're going to be learning about the 1967 movie, Bonnie, and Clyde. And joining us to help separate fact from fiction is author, historian, and emperor of the western world, John Neal Phillips. I'll explain that last one at the end of this episode. During his career, John has interviewed a lot of people close to the events that took place from witnesses all the way to members of the barrow gang itself. His book, running with Bonnie and Clyde, they tend fast years of Ralph faults, details the story from the perspective of Ralph folks who was a part of the gang. He also interviewed blanche barrow and edited her memoir called my life with Bonnie and Clyde. Blanche was Clyde's sister in law and ran with Bonnie and Clyde for an incredibly tense three month part of their crime spree. Before we connect with John though, it's time to set up our game. Two truths and a lie. If you're new to the show, here's how it works. I'm about to say three things. Two of them are true, and that means one of them is a lie. Are you ready? Okay, here they are. Number one Clyde always drove carefully so he wouldn't draw the attention of the police. Number two, around the time of the ambush, Clyde's cover in Louisiana was as a lumberjack. Number three Bonnie and Clyde's favorite weapon of choice was the browning automatic rifle. Got them? Okay, now as you're listening to our story today, your challenge is to find the two facts scattered somewhere throughout the episode. And by a simple process of elimination, you'll be able to find out which one is a lie. And of course, we'll do a recap at the end of the episode to see how well you did. Oh, and if you haven't had the chance, I would highly recommend checking out my last chat with John about the movie the highwayman because he was the consultant for that movie. And that movie covers the laws side of things, trying to catch Bonnie and Clyde. For now, it's time to learn more about what it was like for the barrow gang as we.

Clyde Bonnie John Neal Phillips blanche barrow Ralph John Hollywood Blanche Louisiana
Chiefs lean on D to stuff Prescott, Cowboys in 19-9 win

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Chiefs lean on D to stuff Prescott, Cowboys in 19-9 win

"After starting the year three and for the Kansas city chiefs of one four in a row after nineteen two nine one of the Dallas Cowboys the chiefs defense led by Chris Jones who had three and a half sacks limited the cowboys to three field goals I think this is the first time within four weeks where we had all our guys healthy and able to mention play together that's a huge part for us as a defense both cheese touchdowns were scored on the ground running back Clyde Edwards a layer was activated from injured reserve and scored the second touchdown to give the chiefs a sixteen to three halftime lead Greg Echlin Kansas city

Chris Jones Dallas Cowboys Kansas City Chiefs Cowboys Clyde Edwards Greg Echlin
"clyde" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"And that's the funny <Speech_Male> thing about the west climb. <Speech_Male> We'll get you out in the second <Speech_Male> here but like <Speech_Male> we. All kinda <Speech_Male> fall to the lakers based <Speech_Male> on the talent <Speech_Male> at the very top <Speech_Male> their big three. <Speech_Male> Although there's <Speech_Male> a lot of adjustments they're going to <Speech_Male> have to happen there and they've turned <Speech_Male> over the entire roster around <Speech_Male> lebron ad. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> if there's any <Speech_Male> slip. They're <Speech_Male> like that next group. <Speech_Male> Like if it's not the lakers <Speech_Male> the will then it's <Speech_Male> who does a <Speech_Male> really hard question to answer <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> denver utah <Speech_Male> phoenix. <Speech_Male> Maybe even the clippers <Speech_Male> who <Speech_Male> we don't know if when <Speech_Male> kawais coming back when <Speech_Male> moore is coming back <Speech_Male> there's so much <Speech_Male> parody in <Speech_Male> the next group of <Speech_Male> four or five <Speech_Male> and then there's another group below <Speech_Male> them that's competitive <Speech_Male> like it really <Speech_Male> is tough do <Speech_Male> you. I mean <Speech_Male> i <Speech_Male> should just ask you this to get <Speech_Male> you out of here. <Speech_Male> Is it lakers <Speech_Male> in the finals. Or you think it's <Speech_Male> actually <Speech_Male> a little <Speech_Male> little <Speech_Male> counter <SpeakerChange> to expectations <Speech_Male> here. <Speech_Male> A great <Speech_Male> question because <Speech_Music_Male> you never know help <Speech_Music_Male> is gonna play a major <Speech_Male> part of <Speech_Male> the lakers. I love the <Speech_Male> fact that they have so many <Speech_Male> veterans <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> actually laughable. <Speech_Music_Male> But but they're all <Speech_Male> still good and <Speech_Music_Male> still play but <Speech_Male> i love <Speech_Male> They're the geriatric <Speech_Male> team of nba. <Speech_Male> I love that. <Speech_Music_Male> But <Speech_Male> but i think they <Speech_Male> ought effectiveness as <Speech_Male> well so you gotta <Speech_Male> love what they put together. <Speech_Male> They're trying to win <Speech_Male> now. And <Speech_Male> that's what it's all about. <Speech_Male> But the nets <Speech_Male> they can keep everyone <Speech_Male> healthy and <Speech_Male> and remedy to cowry <Speech_Male> situation. <Speech_Male> I think big a <Speech_Male> lot of talent but trevor <Speech_Music_Male> is going to be a factor. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> think milwaukee <Speech_Male> the defending champions <Speech_Male> a gonna be <Speech_Male> at the forefront of the <Speech_Male> conversation. <Speech_Male> It's all these teams <Speech_Male> are all multitalented <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> driven debbie. <Speech_Male> They're playing <Speech_Male> very high level <Speech_Male> and and that's <Speech_Male> gonna make for great <Silence> nbac's <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> absolutely <Speech_Male> That season <Speech_Male> starting tuesday night. <Speech_Male> That's when we'll also get <Speech_Male> the i twenty five <Speech_Male> members of the seventieth <Speech_Male> anniversary team <Speech_Male> that will be rolled out on tnt <Speech_Male> espn <Speech_Male> for the second twenty <Speech_Male> five and then back to <Speech_Male> see for the last <Speech_Male> group of twenty five next <Speech_Male> thursday <Speech_Male> clyde <Speech_Male> drexler voter <Speech_Male> top fifty <Speech_Male> all time. I'm certain <Speech_Male> top seventy five <Speech_Male> all time. I will <Speech_Male> reveal you. <Speech_Male> Were on my ballots or <Speech_Male> so. <Speech_Male> There's one <Speech_Male> one piece of my ballot. <Speech_Male> I'll i'll reveal here <Speech_Male> today. <Speech_Male> Congrats on your <Speech_Male> ship and getting <Speech_Male> to park anywhere <SpeakerChange> on earth <Speech_Male> you. You'd like to <Speech_Male> thank you so <Speech_Male> much. I appreciate <Speech_Male> you. I wish you <Speech_Male> continued success. <Speech_Male> And i <Speech_Music_Male> can tell <Speech_Male> through your conversation. <Speech_Male> You had some <Speech_Male> some some some <Speech_Male> debates. Were there <Speech_Male> moray. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> He <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> where we're very. <Speech_Male> We're here <SpeakerChange> in houston. I <Speech_Male> love darrel. We <Speech_Male> we <Speech_Male> we've had some knock <Speech_Male> down drag out over <Speech_Male> the phone as as well <Speech_Male> love love debating <Speech_Male> with. It's always fun. <Speech_Male> Clyde this bit of pleasure <Speech_Male> man. I hope we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> can just <SpeakerChange> do it again <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> soon. Thank you so much. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> Thank you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> okay. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That's it for today's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> show. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> My thanks again to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> clyde drexler. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> clinton at the nba <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for helping connect us <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> thanks to our producer <Speech_Male> shelby royston <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and of course thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you all

lakers clippers utah denver phoenix nba trevor milwaukee espn houston clyde drexler clinton
"clyde" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"You and me chris. This relationships can subscribe for the best weekly nba content. These two are capable of. What does that mean could be the best. Duo see how you can beat up here. They are chris mannix and howard back now. Very pleased to be joined by the hall of famer clyde drexler. Clyde welcome join us us delighted to be with you appreciate you. So in addition to other things that we will discuss congrats on your embassador ship with the seventy fifth. I need to clarify this. What isn't an nba ambassador special privileges overseas. Do you tend to state dinners. If i lose my passport and amsterdam. Can you help me. What's the ambassador privileges. Well a great question as one of five ambassadors a of the nba seventy fifth anniversary. It's a tremendous honor and and all five ambassadors really represent different eras of nba right. It's a it's an honor to be selected one of them. I don't know if i have any immunity privileges working on it. All the movies right if the ambassador license plates like the law enforcement can't touch you you can park wherever you want. They can't give your parking. That would be great if that's what this comes with love to have one of those ways to get anywhere. Nobody's hey we're working on that that's a great idea. How thank you. this is what i'm here for. I'll see if i get the nba to work on that application. So the other embassador. Of course for the seventy fifth anniversary magic johnson bob pettit oscar robertson and dirk nowitzki each of you representing certain eras of the nba. You and i were both voters for this. But because we're recording this before this revealed of course we will not talk in detail about our ballots. But i had this discussion and deliberation with jack mccallum. A fellow voter a few weeks back and this was really tough clyde..

nba chris mannix clyde drexler Clyde howard chris amsterdam johnson bob pettit oscar robertson dirk nowitzki jack mccallum clyde
Lamar Jackson Finally Leads Ravens Over Chiefs 36-35

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Lamar Jackson Finally Leads Ravens Over Chiefs 36-35

"Lamar Jackson rushed for two short touchdown runs in the fourth quarter in the ravens defense recovered a Clyde Edwards Allaire fumble late as they hung on to beat the chiefs thirty six thirty five Jackson rushed for a hundred and seven yards on sixteen carries he threw a touchdown pass but was intercepted twice both times by Tyron Matthew who took one thirty four yards for a score look at crazy when I like I said to to pick first quarter one for basic is like already might lose again you know but we we had only known to stay focused on my team like I said it's the women's bathroom homes threw for three hundred forty three yards and three touchdowns and had a costly interception Travis Kelsey caught seven passes for a hundred nine yards and a touchdown on marquise brown hauled in six balls four hundred and thirteen yards and a score Craig heist Baltimore

Lamar Jackson Clyde Edwards Allaire Tyron Matthew Ravens Chiefs Jackson Travis Kelsey Marquise Brown Craig Heist Baltimore
Charles Barkley Calls out Rich Paul and Klutch Sports for Manipulating the NBA

The Bill Simmons Podcast

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Charles Barkley Calls out Rich Paul and Klutch Sports for Manipulating the NBA

"Clutches able to come up with a solution to this that gets darryl what he needs. That gets them to a place that he'd like to be in an doesn't adversely impact the sixers fortunes in the east. And you know helps other players along the way. I keep hearing like weird names. Cleveland might have an angle minnesota's by favorite getaway any of their assets the minnesota in sacramento ones. Have that kind of logic of of those Folks in those offices have history with daryl. So you know that there they can have conversations and there's absolutely no reason whatsoever for the sixers do a goddamn thing before training camp before the season starts is the best thing about this before the trade deadline. I mean i think that they're well positioned to just chill for a bit. Here's what barkley said on the mike mass analysis show. He's talked about clutch. Was you know how that group works. They try to trade their players to where they want to anthony davis. They had better deals from boston. Maybe even new york. They're like no he's gonna play with. Lebron is not gonna play. They just bullied. The league team. Got to stand up and say i paid your guy. He can't bully me a trade him and meet and have me take some trash back. I'm hoping somebody in the sixers organization got some stones barkley said we have not seen a team degan before and the quick thing you know. There's a persecution complex of them look for so amid this point the most powerful agent is always the least popular agent. David falk in the nineties was basically presented as the anti christ and blame for every bad thing that happened the league in the nineties. Scott boras same thing in baseball. Everybody had scott boras when you're the top agent near attached to the top guy and you're swinging elbows and get clydes what you want and do all that stuff. You're gonna take shit. I don't like some of the stuff they do at the same time. This is a referendum on them right. What how much power do they actually have. Because in this case philly has no trade.

Sixers Minnesota Barkley Darryl Daryl Degan Cleveland Anthony Davis Sacramento David Falk Scott Boras Lebron Boston New York Baseball
Interview With Tennis Legend, Billie Jean King

LGBTQ&A

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Tennis Legend, Billie Jean King

"So just as we often say how much has changed for queer people in the last fifty years your bookers reminder that that statement is also true for women and your case being a woman and a professional tennis player wasn't even a career path that existed. So when you were starting out how are you thinking about what was possible for a career in tennis. I played team sports as child. I in a lot of people may or may not know my younger brother. Randy moffett moderates are birth. Name became a major league baseball player. So sports is in our blood. I dad was a good athlete. My mother was good athlete. So susan williams in fifth grade asked me. If i wanted to play tennis and i said what's tennis i thought i would probably wouldn't play because she played the country. Calm and my dad's a firefighter. Aside well this is an my realm of thinking. I've also played on the softball team and she told the coach. She'd taking me out to play tennis and she said oh they give free instruction here on tuesdays applied walker. And it's free coaching. While i go out to have my first session with clyde and at the end of it i knew i wanted to be the number one tessler in the world but then was amateur and i didn't like that because i grew up around pro sports pro met. You're really good at what you did and amateur. Music was a hobby so one of the first things. I wanted to change sport. As far as being a professional sport it were none really no options as a child for girls and today there's still many more options for boys. What really happened though. What really changed my life. My epiphany was when i was twelve. I was just daydream. One day and realize that everybody who played tennis for white shoes and white clothes play with white balls and everybody who played was white. And i asked myself whereas everybody else. Where is everyone else. So that was my moment that i dedicate the rest of my life to fighting for equality for everyone everything i've done. We'll go back to that moment. That epiphany twelve years old.

Tennis Randy Moffett Susan Williams Tessler Baseball Softball Clyde Walker
"clyde" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Well who clyde was hit. Been lurking in the area for some time by then. They watched him warily. Is he collected the sandwiches and limped back out to the car. Heading one of them over to his driving companion. Bonnie elizabeth parker one of the most wanted women in america. You'll note that bonnie didn't share clydes last name. This wasn't a pro feminist statement of independence. It reflected the minor detail that the tune notorious fugitives weren't married or at least not to each other and bonnie was officially the wife of a violently abusive crook who was serving time for robbery. Bonnie hadn't taken his name either michigan merit him when she was only sixteen years old and soon thought the better of at and separated from him. A few years later still neither was divorced. So bonnie and clyde were officially living in sin but that was the least of their outlaw behavior by may of nineteen thirty four. The couple was wanted on multiple charges of theft and murder and that broken the law in just about every way possible that also become popular criminal pinups banks to a cache of glamorous photos discovered by the cops at one of their previous hideouts but there was little glamour in their lives that spring morning in nineteen thirty four. The reason bonnie stayed in the car while clyde went inside the diner was because bonnie could barely walk at all about nine months earlier clyde had crashed a different stolen car into a river and acid from the battery had splashed all over one of bonnie's legs. They managed to save her leg from complete ruin with the help of some baking soda. But not before the acid eight it down to the bone in some places things had deteriorated to the point that bonnie had to hop rather than walk to get around and as often as not clyde had to carry her and as we already mentioned clyde himself had a pronounced limp some years earlier while serving time in penitentiary pit cut off two of his own toes to avoid the prisons brutal forced labor regime..

bonnie clyde Bonnie elizabeth parker Bonnie america michigan
How to Do Remote Work Well With Kara Luton

CodeNewbie

02:21 min | 1 year ago

How to Do Remote Work Well With Kara Luton

"Thanks for being here. Thank you so much so carry. You are a career transition or who was pursuing dancing. Tell us how you got into development. Yes so i had done ballet my entire life. When i was three and i kind of started taking it more seriously. When i was in high school. I started going to summer intensive by different ballet companies and those are kind of just like summer camps for kids during ballet and the summer before my senior year of high school i went to the joffrey ballet summer intensive in new york city and they offered to let me do a so actually ended up moving there my senior year of high school finishing high school online. And doing that and when it was coming time for me to think about college. That's kind of what i was like. Kay do wanna keep pursuing ballet. Do i to do something different. So i'm moving back home to nashville. And i studied public relations and after graduating i got a job in the music industry. Doing pr in. I done that for a few years as getting really burnt out. I was really stressful. A time anxiety was at a high. And i was like i need to figure something out so i actually stumbled upon code academy and started teaching myself to code and enrolled in a boot camp. And i've been in tech ever since. Wow that's exciting. So you went from ballet. Pr music to to coding. That's really add clyde a transition. Yeah so when you first started. Coding what did that look like. What were you doing. I went to the iron yard. Which was the boot camp. It was twelve weeks long. And i was studying front end engineering so it was a lot of it. We're learning h. Two miles css melodramas script and then my cohort studied view in number as our frameworks so it was a lot of in the morning class. Time learning about new topics and then in the afternoon applying those and working on various projects. And what was that boot camp experience like tons of people who are maybe considering it thinking about it. What was your experience like there. I mean it's like a fire hose of information conflict. You i feel like once. I kind of got the grasp of wine concept. We were like. Here's a new one. Gotta learn this and i mean it was twelve weeks long. It's hard to learn anything twelve weeks but it kind of preps you for the basics of what you need to know and then obviously most people coming into software engineering or currently in it know that we're always constantly learning so kind of just prompts you to how to teach

Joffrey Ballet KAY New York City Nashville Clyde
Tourists or Terrorists? Officer Rejects GOP Lawmaker’s Characterization of Capitol Rioters

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Tourists or Terrorists? Officer Rejects GOP Lawmaker’s Characterization of Capitol Rioters

"As a house panel investigates the capital insurrection a Washington police officer has poked fun at one way Republicans have characterized the rioters at a hearing two months ago George's injury Clyde said those in the capital that day were orderly you would actually think it was a normal tourist visit while Clyde called them tourists terrorists pushed through the line and gauged us in hand to hand combat what do you call the attackers terrorists and what do you think about our colleagues who think we should call them tourists officer Daniel Hodges since first response yesterday to congressman Jamie Raskin was a joke that's what American tourists are like I can see why foreign countries don't like American tourists but after the laughter US code title eighteen part one chapter one one three B. isn't brown Hodges read how the law defines acts of domestic terrorism in part to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction assassination or kidnapping Sager mag ani Washington

Clyde Daniel Hodges Congressman Jamie Raskin Washington George Brown Hodges United States Sager Mag Ani Washington
"clyde" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Hello i am dr annabel santos schwartzman. I am a credit allergists that russian oversee medical center but my official title is the medical director of the rush heart center comment as well as vice chief of academic affairs rush university medical center for the section of algae. I've been rushed for thirty one years. And i am also the current cia governor of illinois chapter of the american culture cardiology which is just began. My term and. I'm so excited to be a part of this incredible organization. We are very busy. Doing all kinds of scholarly activities and were often trying to improve diversity and inclusion an equity in the state of illinois as well as the mid west region as a matter of fact one of the best programs that we had was a midwest regional program. It started out as a midwest regional but because of the pandemic with became international because we invited young high school students to see what a female cardiologists does so we featured several midwest cardiologists from all over the midwest such as iowa illinois wisconsin ohio and. This was headed up by dr Medina who was matina. Who was in michigan at the time eventually moved to the cleveland clinic and so she decided to increase the number of women going into cardiology by trying to track them to see what how wonderful women cardiologists are so we featured a day in the life of hard female cardiologists and it was amazing. We had dr clare duvernois from the university of michigan. Really being bad. She had her group of female interventional cardiologists and they looked like the eighteen. Th they looked scary a wonderful video but that was one of the fun things that we did. We are doing other things in the next few years that will try to improve diversity equity inclusion not only in illinois but of course the national american college of cardiology. So i'm really looking forward to being the governor of illinois a c. And one of the best things about being the governor. Is that in chicago alone. We have amazing internationally. Renowned cardiologists including my chief. Dr kim williams who is another african american cardiologists. That the head of cardiology in chicago. And you'll be hearing from another african american chief of cardiology in chicago. Dr clyde yancy. But dr williams is a my boss and i have to give a few wonderful words about him because he is part of the national. Acc diversity equity and inclusion committee. Along with dr. Clark yancy by dr williams is not only my boss but he's my mentor. My colleague was an internet university of chicago. And we've been friends ever since and he started out in a poor neighborhood in chicago and he had asthma and he was no access to care and he really was very upset about that and he decided when he grows up that he was going to be a cardiologist or doctor so that he could try to improve access to care for poor people and african americans so he is a hero to me for doing all the things that he's been doing. We do a lot of things for the west side chicago and he is making some really amazing changes. But another world. Renowned cardiologists is down the road for me. Dr clyde yancy who i know is going to be interviewed here so i'd like to Introduce as one of the members of our illinois chapter of acc. so dr clyde ganzi. The major sat professor of medicine and he's also professor of medical social sciences. He's the chief of the division of cardiology at northwestern university at the feinberg school of medicine. He's also the associate director of the bluhm cardiovascular institute at the northwestern memorial hospital here in chicago. He is a world renowned cardiologist and he has received recognition for clinical and research expertise in the field of had failure anti additional interest in cardiomyopathy heart valve diseases hypertension and prevention. He is an active member of the american heart association past president of that organization and the american college of cardiology american college of physicians. In heart failure society of america he has written over two hundred and fifty pure reviewed manuscripts including numerous book chapters editorials review articles. And he's a consultant for the fda the nih the ahrq the quarry. He has received numerous best physician. Best teaching awards. In addition to that he is one of the most articulate speakers. I have ever heard he is a friend for all of the cardiologists in chicago and we are so fortunate to be among one of his colleagues and chicago because we can always go to him and say. Hey clyde can you speak for one of our conferences. And he always says yes. He is the nicest kindest most warmest cardiologists i've ever met. We are so fortunate to have him here locally in chicago and now with zoom and with webinars he is a frontal everybody in the world so i am so happy to be introducing him for this recording. Thank you so much..

illinois midwest dr williams dr annabel santos schwartzman rush heart center chicago academic affairs rush universi american culture cardiology Dr clyde yancy dr Medina dr clare duvernois national american college of c Dr kim williams Acc diversity equity and inclu Clark yancy cia university of michigan dr clyde ganzi division of cardiology cleveland
"clyde" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

Arrowhead Pride

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

"Like that's kind of what he was as a player and as he's kind of progressed he's almost and i know we've we've kind of brought up lebrons named jimmy time early in this podcast but it's okay it's all right. It is what it is. He's kind of become abroad in that he dictates the speed of the game in a way. That's really fascinating like kelsey can speed up in slowdown in a way at his age. That's really unique and it kind of brings me back to. I think it was before the twenty nineteen season. If i'm not mistaken. He had that ankle surgery and he had said the year prior that he was just never truly a hundred percent and i wonder if what we watched last year was for the first time in a few years travis kelsey at one hundred percent and man that was special to be able to watch and i hope we get to see more of that as he continues. Yeah it just. It's just crazy. There's no way. Kyle pitch to come in and get more guaranteed money than those guys. And they've got to take a look at that. Because like i said travis kelsey making thirteen fourteen per compared to michael. Thomas making twenty plus. It's crazy to me everything you just stated is what drew brees would look forward. Michael tom watson and kyla. Marie look for with the andre hopkins in the same thing that patrick mahomes does who would with with travis kelsey and it's i also think by the way kelsey deserves like if you're a chief's fan kelsey deserves a little credit as well. I think he's taken a little bit of an under market value. Deal pretty much every time he's come up and we don't talk about him that way. We normally talk about the quarterback says guys that are willing to take a hometown discount. I didn't try kelsey. Did it not just once but twice in his chiefs career. I don't think he's going to be a guy that ends up holding out. He's really never been anybody that spoken publicly about that stuff in the past. I think what you're seeing is. This is going to probably be the final contract. Or maybe he gets one more and he's happy with worries at so he's making fourteen million dollars per season. I don't think you're going to hear him complaining about it. Which is awesome. And i remember when kelsey sign this last extension. I remember joel. Corey like flat out stating his agents should be pissed. Like there's no way his agent agreed to this deal. Travis kelsey cut the chiefs a deal and that's apparent based on what he's getting paid now. No yeah it's it's it's insane. So yeah that's that's just. That's just ridiculous to me kyle. Pitch gabby kidney. He isn't even done a damn thing in the league It's just maybe male kuyper. Junior got him got him that money. Many many folk. No one's sleeping. On travis kelsey in terms of skill level and the player he is but i know b k there is a chief who you believe is being slept on right now and could be a huge huge key factor that we're not really given a lot lotta thought to. That could really really change this offense. Yes oh in fantasy football. I know started with certainly know about this. There's something called the post type sleeper. Where like two three years into a receivers career especially you'll have a guy that has that breakout season right. He kinda struggled early on wasn't getting the playing time. Didn't have the quarterback for whatever reason it wasn't working out for him and then he blows up and people are in on those guys early in the drafts or earlier than you would expect them to be because they believe that's going to happen. I think quieted words. Elaire has a really good chance to be that guy this year for the chiefs. Us going in some drafts. in the first round. Last year after damian williams decided to opt out of the season and i think that backfired on a lot of people who took him early so as a result of that. You've seen a lot of people be like. Yeah he's fine. I don't know that he's going to be great. Well the chiefs upgraded their offensive line in a huge way this offseason. They have spoken publicly about how they got. They want to get him more involved in the passing game and the number one reason why i think she's fans were excited. About clyde coming out of lsu was his ability to play in the passing game both from the backfield and even landed up in the slot. If this team is devoid at talent at the receiver position. Like i think they are after tyreek hill. He's gonna have to step up in a big way in the passing game so whether it be from fantasy perspective or just as a chief's fan watching the games. I think we're in for a monster clyde edwards allaire season. Like fifteen hundred plus yards from scrimmage. I think it's totally in play. For clyde this year i agree with pk. So much right now on. I know you could This has to be all fantasy. Oh yeah i do. Thousands thousands of mock draft simulations before the nfl season. I've gotten clyde and like every one of them because people are sleeping on clyde were-they going on like second third. He's going in the third round in most fantasy drafts and he's an every down running back he should be going a lot higher. And that's why. I keep lining up with them because i'm all about the value in client is an incredible value this year run. He had eleven hundred yards last year in thirteen games from the thought to me. Is andy gonna make him a priority like are they going to make him a priority to where they feel the need in in a bigger way than they did last year that we gotta get him involved like that. That's a guy we gotta have. We gotta get involved. We're going to make a point and multiple port portions of the game that he has to get touches. Not i don't think clyde was that way and it'll be interesting to see with travis with Tyreek with pat mahomes. If they look at saying he's going to be a priority. And that's that's just something. I i wanna see i before i start thinking fifteen hundred sixteen hundred yards with him. Because i don't know if they made him a priority going at every game saint clydes. Gotta get this amount touches. I don't know man. I think he can be If you're looking if you're looking at their priority list. I mean obviously kelsey entire eager going to be one to on that list. Who's going to be third over tyreek or over Clyde i think he's pretty clearly the third guy that they would be looking to get involved like last year. I think they probably came into the season with these. Are sammy place as kind of a gadget player. He's gonna get these touches. We're gonna make sure we manufacture these touches for him. I think you're going to see some of those. Go to clyde this year and said and i would argue. It's pat like it's just all right. Let's put the ball in homes his hand in the passing game and potential big play. Now clyde could be involved in that but when you when it comes to that. I don't know if it means like this is the number recalling for clyde in my mind. I'm wondering are they going to games san. We gotta get twelve to fifteen carries for clive and we wanna get with screens or whatever for more touches and we're trying to get up to make it a point that he's reaching in. Nearly twenty touches a ballgame. I don't know if that was their priority last year. And i wonder if that will be an if that's the priority where they really want to get him touches involve. I could see that happening. And i think that this year they are gonna try to do that. I think he's gonna be a lot more involved in the passing game in. It seemed apparent to me that he just wasn't involved in it last year. Because i think that they were throwing a lot at him out of the gate and he just didn't pick it up as quickly as they wanted him to so they just flat out didn't trust them to do it because we saw them use kareem hunt that way his rookie season. That's why people were willing in their fantasy drafts to go draft clyde in the top five to because i saw what kareem hunt did as a rookie. They saw kareem hunt was doing in twenty eighteen with this offense before they cut him and it was top three to five running yet best running backs in the nfl and maybe clydes not as talented as kareem hunt but clyde still really good nfl running back and he could still be a huge contributor this team..

travis kelsey kelsey clyde Michael tom watson andre hopkins patrick mahomes chiefs Travis kelsey Elaire damian williams drew brees kyla clyde edwards allaire kuyper jimmy Kyle
Who Needs Passion When You Can Just Piss the Bed?

Netflix is A Daily Joke

01:08 min | 1 year ago

Who Needs Passion When You Can Just Piss the Bed?

"I asked you to name me to famous lovers who'd you say clydes great. Thank you anymore. Julius course portion backside last night take one off. Was richard. Burton elizabeth taylor. They were married to each other three different times and burton legendary said this about her and i love it. I might run for a thousand years. She's still my baby child. Love is so furious that we each other. I am too much feeling that anyone. I read it and i began to wonder if any of my ex is feeding that suv passion about somebody to be the girl. I went out with the longest when someone for ten years in office state together. I tried to blame her.

Burton Elizabeth Taylor Julius Burton Richard
100 Years After Tulsa Race Massacre, the Damage Remains

Sidedoor

01:46 min | 1 year ago

100 Years After Tulsa Race Massacre, the Damage Remains

"They were hurting people. Down convinced withhold labor internal in the whole building. We didn't know where they will take them. And then they set a house a factor. You could see the blazes from where we live over. The he'll not like the whole world was on fire. Burned over thirty square. Blocks seemed like a dream. See mac thing knocked. That ever happened. Clyde eddie jimmy lily. Franklin and eunice. Jackson were witnesses to the nineteen twenty one oklahoma race riot which started ostensibly because of an encounter between a young black shoeshiner and a white elevator operator over memorial day weekend in nineteen twenty. One the recordings were collected by the smithsonian's newly opened national museum of african american history and culture. It's foreign exhibit about the power of place in the african american experience in late may nineteen twenty one. Young man named dick rowland. Who was a tolson. Had an encounter with a young white woman on an elevator new downtown tulsa building. What happened on that elevator. We don't really know whether he stepped on her foot whether the elevator stopped short but what we do know is that young woman exited the elevator with claims that she was raped which he later recanted but to understand what happens next. You need to know more about what was going on. in oklahoma. at the time african americans had been moving to the oklahoma territory's since the eighteen forties some had come on the trail of tears both enslaved with cherokees and free members of the cherokee nation and had established themselves in pockets in communities all throughout eastern oklahoma

Thirty Square Clyde Eddie Jimmy Lily National Museum Of African Ame Dick Rowland Eunice Oklahoma Franklin Tolson Jackson Tulsa
Hearing on Jan. 6 Violence Exposes Stark Partisan Divisions

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Hearing on Jan. 6 Violence Exposes Stark Partisan Divisions

"House speaker Nancy Pelosi is calling out a GOP lawmaker who described the January six capital rioters as peaceful there was no insurrection at a hearing yesterday Georgia freshman Andrew Clyde was among Republicans defending the rioters he says video shows people walking through the capitol in an orderly fashion and staying between the ropes you would actually think it was a normal tourists visit this morning really really hello see says a normal day at the capitol doesn't involve threats to hang the vice president and shoot the speaker it was beyond denial it fell into the range of sick pelo see says the house will soon take up funding for what she called urgently needed security upgrades Sager mag ani Washington

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Andrew Clyde GOP Georgia House Ani Washington
Republican Loyal to Trump Claims Capitol Riot Looked More Like 'Normal Tourist Visit'

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Republican Loyal to Trump Claims Capitol Riot Looked More Like 'Normal Tourist Visit'

"Is 8 16 our top stories. The Republican congressman from Georgia says there was no insurrection on January 6th at the Capitol. And that the riot was actually more like a normal tourist visit. During a hearing of the House Oversight Committee, representative Andrew Clyde said Trump supporters behaved in a quote orderly fashion. Democratic Congressman Stephen Lynch called the

House Oversight Committee Andrew Clyde Georgia Donald Trump Stephen Lynch
"clyde" Discussed on Strength to Strength

Strength to Strength

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"clyde" Discussed on Strength to Strength

"While. maybe The strength to strength coordinators can just include that here. But i can see zimmerman at all. I'm driving. I can't yeah. I'm sure one goal or gwen to give it to me. And i'll get it. You very good client post that and patrick out. I'll get that chief klein One last question here Question for me anyhow. I'm not sure when was gonna shut it down So i was in and out here this morning. I was getting stuff ready for the meeting ends. So this question might sound rhetorical. but it actually isn't What is our biggest issue or or hindrance as an anti baptist community in actually doing so enlight. What is our biggest mertz. Now you talk about. I i call it contaminated soil and that you need to dig into the soil and fix issues so please Ah when you talk about a root issue. Let's let's go there. I think it comes from generations of you know. America's changed around us. What worked in our grandparents day and our parents day doesn't necessarily work anymore heading you know. There was a survey done recently For unbelievers atheist That said When you're approached by christians about their faith what what offends you most. You know what the number one thing was receiving a attract. It's too simplistic. Life is too difficult. That's not the right tool to shove tracking their faith in their face. You know so. And i'm not against tracks. Don't misunderstand what i'm saying here but we need to be real with. What's in the soil. I think it's really viewing who we are as a body of christ are we are. We is a church for me and my family of course but it can't stop there and we need non anna baptist among us in the worst way we we need. We need those us to round out our thinking and debate and discuss scripture. And i never thought about it that way. I never thought about it that way. I'm not thinking for a moment. We need to assimilate simulator become like them to win them history. I'm very clear on that. So but what's our biggest probably just.

patrick zimmerman America One last question this morning christ one goal christians parents day one day baptist anna baptist
Boy abducted, sexually assaulted and shot in Miami-Dade

Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Boy abducted, sexually assaulted and shot in Miami-Dade

"Are looking for a suspect they say, abducted and sexually assaulted a child in northwest Miami Dade. The victim was walking near 43rd terrorists and 30th Avenue when he was forced into a car and sexually assaulted, shot and left on the side of the road. He's now being treated the hospital in critical condition. Anyone with information on the crime should call police

Dade Miami
More Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines arrive in Florida

Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

More Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines arrive in Florida

"Is is once once again again receiving receiving doses doses of of the the Johnson Johnson and and Johnson Johnson single single shot shot covert covert vaccine vaccine that that word word in in Pensacola Pensacola from from governor governor Rhonda Rhonda Santas. Santas. We We hope hope to to get get more more Johnson and Johnson over the next couple weeks. So my hope is is that you start to get really significant amounts of Johnson and Johnson to match what we're getting with flies and Madonna to send us announcing that 2000 doses a day of J and J will be available for the next three days at a local Pensacola church. The state reported 5300 new Corona virus infections on Tuesday,

Johnson Johnson Pensacola Rhonda Rhonda Johnson Madonna Pensacola Church
Guest Teacher Jon Mitchell  How to Maximize Productivity With Biohacking

The $100 MBA Show

06:49 min | 1 year ago

Guest Teacher Jon Mitchell How to Maximize Productivity With Biohacking

"I brought on john. Because i do feel that. A lot of us as entrepreneurs neglect will we put in our body. Our physical activity or nutrition. All that because of the business. I've been guilty of this several times in the last decade and were all bizarre brought on john to give some laser focus advice on how to bio hacker way to success and be more productive passage john now. But i'll be back to wrap up to episode fill in any gaps but for now taken away john. Everyone this john mitchell. I'm really excited to here. And what i want to do. Today is to teach guys how to go about optimizing your health energy mental performance. And how to do it the right way because there is a lot of noise and confusion online in the health space. And what i wanna do is help you sift through all of that for for those of you guys don't know i'm a functional medicine practitioner. I work virtually with driven professionals. Looking to improve things like energy focus and resolve any chronic health issues that are keeping them from being at their best. Both at work and at home and i've worked for over ten years. I started off on the conventional side of medicine working in the emergency room at urgent care and addiction medicine and then i transitioned over to functional medicine which is more a whole body systems base approach to optimizing your health and i've i've learned firsthand that conventional medicine is great at certain things. It's great i'd taken care of acute issues broken bones infections and surgeries but it's port helping people achieve robust health and maintaining it. Which is what. I'm passionate about and why i do the work i do because people are starting to realize the limitations of the current medical system right and if we're talking about your business or your job the question is why should you prioritize your health versus prioritizing your business well from a business perspective you need to be at the top of your game right. You need to wake up with energy. You need to have the mental clarity to get your work done. And you need to be level headed enough to deal with the constant stressors so as a business owner myself. I understand that Owning a business or even just working in a jock can be very stressful. And you need to have the the mental strength. You need to have the health to be able to handle those things properly and move ford if your health is non point you're not going to be operating anywhere near one hundred percent. You're going to be leaving things on the table. In fact what. I find with many of the professionals that i work with is that they don't even realize how bad they feel and how much they're leaving on the table until we get them feeling better. So what i wanna do is. I'm going to lay out three pillars to optimizing your health. And how to do it the right way. Okay so pillar number one. Let's jump right into it. Recognize you are a category of one so everybody has unique genetics upbringing lifestyle environment habits and nutrition that inform their current level of wellness. So what you need. In nutrition and supplements lifestyle is going to be very different than what somebody else needs. So this is why we can't blindly follow online influencers or healthcare ruse. Because they don't know anything about you right. They can't tell you. Oh you should be on akita genyk diverse vegan diet versus a carnivore diet because nobody knows your blood levels. They don't know your genetics. They don't know you history and all those things are going to influence what diet you should be on current time so i wanna give you guys a good example of this from two different clients. Mine who had similar complaints. So both were both were men in their forties or fifties and we'll say client number one complained of brain fog fatigue and he had type two diabetes and he was on a strict ketogenic. Diet was doing intermittent fasting or not. Johnny on a paleolithic diet into an intermittent fasting was exercising an our day and yet his blood sugars were still running in the two hundred zero higher when they should be under one hundred and the question was what was going on and when we did the right testing found that he was being exposed to some significant environmental. Toxins that were damaging his pancreas. The panthers is what produces insulin to help regulate blood sugar so regardless of what diet he tried regards if it was cute genyk carnivore vegan or anything in between he was not going to get better until we address this toxin issue right. And let's compare this to clyde number two who had similar complaints brain fog. He was overweight. Type two diabetes. He followed a ketogenic diet and fasting and he lost a lot of weight. Blood sugars regulated. And he did great on that so one person did not do well on a very restrictive diet. One person did because it depends on what they specifically need. Okay so always recognize you are category one in all recommendation should be based off of that so that brings us the pillar number to quantify what you need using the right labs right so i see too many people who just take things for things. So i'll see people take things like kuala or some mushroom blend for focus or they'll take zinc and dhea your tributaries for testosterone. But how do you know that you actually need these things. And how'd you know you aren't doing more harm in the long by taking these things. So let's take zinc for instance. Some people probably know that. It's hard to overdo zinc. You can take a lot of and you really won't get into trouble but what the problem is if you're taking zinc It will influence your absorption of copper. So the more zinke take the less you absorb copper so you can create mineral imbalances by taking the wrong supplements if you don't need them and if you're not tracking you can create issues over time. Okay so instead of guessing what diets and supplements are best for you. It's better to know what's best and you do this. By focusing on the right testing so we wanna do is focus on strategies over tactics as specific diet or certain supplement is a tactic akito genyk diet. Carnival diet intermittent fasting. They're all tactics. What we want to focus on strategies instead. Okay so our strategy is going to be influenced by your health history which should be somewhat should help you get a foreigner standing of your health history and put it together combined with some advanced testing so when it comes to determining what types of diets in supplements you should take what i like to use advanced nutritional profile and within that there should be a comprehensive assessment of your vitamins your minerals your amino acids fatty acids heavy metals. Your mitochondria metabolites transmitter. Metabolites and your detoxification

John John Mitchell Confusion Diabetes Ford Panthers Johnny Clyde Kuala