2 Burst results for "Clove Magazine"

"clove magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"clove magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Services magazine offers so perhaps there's a new a new clarity. Certainly in the mind of the folks at clove magazine, you talk a little bit in the briefing notes about clove being a welcome look away from the US and a welcome back away from Europe, we can focus on journeys again, though for you next magazine pick, which is cool to migrant micro Odysseys, and I have to admit this is an extremely extremely intriguing choice. Not one I've come across before slightly smaller than a four format with a lot of use of kind of Flora's text heavy in some places, but then amazing expressive photography full bleed images. An illustration who are enough is this magazine about holy. Well, I'm quite late to the party on this as well. So it's a six part magazine, which is interesting that it sets lifespan. It's kind of what it says. So it's devoted to looking at my Gration. I think what it's trying to do is open up the ways we think of migration so it looking at migrations of peoples all of infrastructure data flows. Flora and fauna. So each issue has lightly different theme. The most recent one which is number five is looking at the world of micro and flow of very small things. It's still very new to me as well. But I just find it very intriguing magazine, it's taking a very serious topic. And I think it topic that could do with a little bit more nuance and could do with some more depth to other time when debates about migration at become very polarized. And I think quite shallow and superficial and aggressive. So I quit my what they're doing looking through. It's kind of serious. Highly researched writing it's academic. But I think has that nice trick of wearing it's not mere quite lightly as he says for beautiful they're already pops of this sort of flora coral running through, and then this kind of metallic goal to has this very well defined color. Palette? That's quite poppy and fun and brings you in. So I think it's clever design job of taking something that could be very of putting in heavy and just giving it that level of injury to make you want to dive in and make you want to engage with that topic. We do have enough time to delve into another title, which is the London review of books. Now. Can I give you a compassion herald? I've never read the London review of books, the New York review books older sibling on which this is based while they're both great cities. Yeah. Both great public relations. But won't draws you to the the unabashed text, heavy newspaper esque stylings under review of books. I think London review of books everyone at Tucson you on their to'real stuff is subscribed to it. It's just the most fantastic research results. So it's extremely long form journalism book reviews. So it takes a topic, and then just delve into essays about that book and engaging with its content, and it kind of shows what you can do if you support long form journalism, and if writers at the time to research, a topic and really get to grips with it. So you get these huge often, very stylishly written all the time. So some quite drawing, but that's kind of what I admire about it. But it's unafraid to take on topics which on the surface could be very dry. They're often quite nation often quite historical. But through the strength of the writing in just the kind of classical journalism that has gone into it really draws you in becomes very gripping. And you you get into topics sort of like about seventeenth century diarist working in. I don't know Dr just writing endlessly about wool prices. But because. The way it's being dealt with it becomes fascinating and my sincere. Thanks to all these travel only. We'll be back to join us in April for the next issue is then you suddenly hype side. Thank you very much. And sadly, that's always have time for today. Next week. We sit down with Spencer Bailey. The charismatic new editor in chief a book publisher fighting and don't forget if you need a little more design minded inspiration. You can subscribe to this show or our sister podcast Monaco on design Xtra which is available. Each thursday. You could also pick up leaf through a copy of Monaco magazine at your leisure or peruse on library books or travel goods for bit of inspiration monocle on design was produced by definitely Condie's an edited by the ever patient Christie Evans on Josh Harnett, underplay us out its craft work with computer.

clove magazine London review of books services magazine Flora Monaco magazine US Europe Gration Spencer Bailey New York review editor in chief Josh Harnett Condie Tucson Christie Evans publisher
"clove magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

07:17 min | 3 years ago

"clove magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Make. When you start looking at how for instance, the built environment utilize technology that utilizes technology very badly at the moment in a houses and cities and sell them. But once we start using the technologies that starting point we may start seeing uses for our houses to be built off site to be built faster offsite to have longer lifetimes to be built for maintenance to be built for social benefits to plug into Heli deliver things to houses how we buy and sell houses. The technology really hasn't been utilized by the built environment in any meaningful sense yet. Pages Scott at technical director at the let manufacturing design exchange at University College London. Thank you very much. Peter. And I'm delighted decide on joined in-studio now by the editor in chief, no less of designer magazine. And Ali, you are lending, your your voice new wisdom to a format that I've stolen from our sister show, the stack the print industry review, we have in front of us panoply of printed pages and some of your favorites like to through is that right? Yeah. So I picked a few different titles. Some sort of more core, I suppose traditional design magazines, and then a few outliers which is something that a little bit is what the center aims to do. We want to write about design, but we also want to rise about the areas that shape the design industry. So I've tried to reflect that in the choices. So on my way here I decided to try and break the format and springs magazines on you like this. I like this already. Nothing if not rebellious dishonor, so I tried to buy some couple of extra von's, and it's only cosmic quite how expensive magazines I think I'd try to buy two magazines, and it was forty three pound, which is kind of ridiculous. It's not the magazines fault. That's clearly the pricing they have to put themselves out to be sustainable, but that immediately puts him out of the hands of lot of people that I work in magazines. I would spend that much to get them. You know, it is lighter shade is fabulous that much. But I think some questions is that how the industry should be asked. I agree, and I do too that the of kind of distribution points. I think there are countries that do news kiosks much better than the UK their countries that are there magazines upside down next to the suites always been w at Smith, and there are different ways of telling magazine story in the distribution world. I want to go straight to your first magazine. You talk about longevity Gunter is. Amazing bookish, collectible magazine that's been around in some form since the eighties, but was kind of relaunched in the seventies. And it's not a political magazine. It's a magazine rallied usually around kind of singular theme. Yes. So they pick a different fame each issue. Current issue is ghosts. I think recent ones I remember Canada, quite strongly. So this knows the rhyme or reason really, and then it's collection of new writing fiction and poetry around. That theme the reason I picked grant her and why I think it so splendid is at least within design writing. I think it can often be very limited. So if you read through most design magazines what you get is studio. Visit the studio visit and a writer speaking about the white bear walls of designer studio and how much light flooded in. And isn't that collection of source pan sauce from around the world fabulous and that kind of has its place. That's fine. I think it's a real lack of. Variety in design writing, it doesn't draw repond quite lots of those journalistic traditions, you might take for granted in other areas. So travel writings a court reporting things like that. About grantee is just picking a single theme. And then showing the sort of myriad of ways. You can write about that and access that topic. We're going to dive under the covers even I of a beautiful issue. One of the new magazine believe clove magazine, which is dedicated to South East Asian culture, ever striking image who's this gentleman on the front kind of colonial policeman is wearing aviators under the title shifting the lens. Yeah. Well, I don't know the details of hammett's from this really fabulous story inside the magazine, which is a digital initiative documenting Nepali people in the way in which photography has traced them over time, and the image is really remarkable. I don't know what decade that's from top ahead. Make seventies or something. Like that thing. Isn't it? Incredible. Yeah. It looks like it could have come to a contemporary fashion shoot or something. It's really fabulous. This sky quite thick moustache. He's ends sort of. Yeah. Police uniform, and then sort of wide brimmed. Hatton holding this kind of old school radio it's immediately arresting and it's a black and white image. And then you have this very heavy sort of yoki, sunshine. Yellow font spread across I think, it's really quite beautiful and quite unusual image really to get on the magazine often gets very young beautiful, people magazine and not this is not beautiful, but there's a touch of the data about him quite nice. I completely agree. But maybe it's kind of invoking this kind of that life magazine or older issues of time where you get a piece of repertory that takes you to a place that you haven't been to before there's a little bit of kind of a scape. His into it ever the only on business. I located a page in this magazine, which talks about the editorial consultancy service, which clove do called clove press, which was reveals that the team is London based. So there is this focused on southeast Asia. But again, we're seeing this business model where magazines offer some white label services. Maybe they offer some intelligence reporting. Maybe they can kind of weight in and help people with their advertising with a particular project is not the way forward for magazines in the age where -tising is falling. Whether it's the way forward, I know at the moment is suddenly seems an inevitability. So everyone does this any magazine out. They really will have a white label division that kind of props it up a little bit alongside print advertising. I think it's it's an important thing to do unto extend it maybe could be seen as freeing aditorial up from some of the demands of advertising, I think it's a strange thing. More than anything. It's a very weird situation in which it now feels as not true in commonplace that a magazine in magazines to'real stuff should be doing branded work for companies as it does for them to run a website or run a magazine, we do is send you as well into really important parts of what we do on. It's fulfilling in its own way. But I think that probably is worth reflecting. On a little bit. How those two worlds sits alongside each other. What happens when a magazine gets into that world which runs a bit close advertising? Maybe oh consultantcy and how does that shape the two fields? I agree. I think it's a very interesting thing. And you wouldn't always have an advert in a magazine for those branded services

this magazine designer magazine clove magazine collectible magazine life magazine people magazine editor in chief Ali Peter University College London Scott southeast Asia technical director UK Gunter clove press Canada writer