35 Burst results for "Clinton"

Tupac: The Black Leader We Need

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:03 min | 2 d ago

Tupac: The Black Leader We Need

"Tupac, the last three albums he recorded, two of them have so much to do with him talking about his mortality. And there were a ton of examples. The video for the song Iron Man at gets to me because it depicts him getting shot and going to heaven. And that was recorded just weeks before his death. And you've heard me say that beyond his work in the studio or on a Hollywood set, I'm absolutely no doubt that he would be the single most important figure in black society today. I mean, he would be the one who put together a Black Lives Matter movement that made a difference, but his wouldn't have been corrupt and Marxist. Tupac would have absolutely been the black guy with the business sense and the street Cred, not to mention the charm and the generosity and the empathy to walk into the oval offices of every president from Clinton to Bush to Obama to Trump even Biden and get shit done.

Tupac Hollywood Clinton Bush Barack Obama Biden
Rachel Bovard on What Makes Trump Different

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:58 min | 2 d ago

Rachel Bovard on What Makes Trump Different

"Joining us now is Rachel bovard, who wrote a very interesting piece of The New York Times. What makes Trump different from desantis and other Republicans, Rachel is with us right now, Rachel, welcome to the program. Thanks for having me. So Rachel, why don't you summarize the piece for our audience and we'll dive into it from there? So the piece really looks into what I think is the appeal of Donald Trump. And I think people in Washington, particularly establishment Republicans, and even sort of what I call a conservative intelligentsia, missed this. And this is exactly the dynamic I saw play out in 2016 and it's going to play out again in 2024 because people in leadership of the Republican Party have no idea still have no idea why it is that Trump won. And it is this visceral connection that he has with his base voters who trust him implicitly. And interestingly, Dave Chappelle honed in on this, I think, really well when he was hosting Saturday Night Live recently. I don't watch Saturday Night Live personally, but I caught this clip and I thought he articulated it extremely well. He said, look, I live in Ohio. You people have no idea why Trump is so popular there. And he said, Trump is what I call an honest liar. And what he meant by that was, you know, he pointed back to this debate that Trump had with Hillary Clinton in 2016, where Trump basically said, look, I know the system is rigged because I use it. And that was just, I think, distilled to its essence, the why people trust Trump the way that they do. Because he set out loud as a beneficiary of someone at the top of the system who benefited from how it's going to rigged and corrupt toward the top. He set out loud what everybody at the bottom has long suspected, which is that the system itself is rigged and because he benefited from it. He had tremendous credibility in pointing that out. And so people, I think, who vote for Trump really see him as someone who can not bend the system because he's been part of it.

Dave Chappelle Rachel Ohio Donald Trump 2016 Rachel Bovard Washington Hillary Clinton 2024 Republican Party Saturday Night Live New York Times Republicans
Supreme Court Greenlights the Release of Trump Tax Records

The Trish Regan Show

02:09 min | 3 d ago

Supreme Court Greenlights the Release of Trump Tax Records

"Going on here. I mean, you look at what's happening here with the Supreme Court, just this week now saying that they're not going to block a House committee from getting their hands on those tax returns, which is apparently kind of a final defeat, right? Because the president and former president have been trying over and over and over again to prevent this from happening, his argument has been all along that this is a political witch hunt. They're trying to use this for political purposes and they're not going to stop. I mean, it's amazing how much he has angered the other side. I think it's political enemies are hoping that they can somehow prove this conflict of interest between what he had going on within his business and what he was doing as president of the United States. And if they can prove that, they can sort of point the lines to a money trail that may somehow indict him in some way. I mean, we're standing the fact that so many of these presidents have really kind of maximized the whole money trial thing. After the fact, of course, I guess in their defense, it was after the fact, right? So whether it be Bill Clinton getting all kinds of deals and setting up the whole Clinton global initiative after the fact it was after the fact, I would still argue that it's pretty murky. It's pretty suspicious. Some of the relationships and the money that has changed hands within that whole CGI environment, but they're trying to suggest that the president was using his office for financial gain. If they could prove that, then that would be a pretty big win for the Democrats. And should theoretically completely exclude him from being able to run again in 2024, which is the plan right now because you heard him the other night, he announced his candidacy. I would say, and if you look at some of the polls right now, he's way ahead. I've told people this before I do think that if he is successful with being able to go through with this run, I mean, if the Democrats don't take him down on these fraud charges, then you're probably looking at the Republican Party, nominee, being Donald Trump, because the base loves him, and it would be very hard for, say, Ron DeSantis or any of the others to kind of come out of the woodwork and take the mantle, so to speak from Donald

House Committee Supreme Court Bill Clinton United States Clinton Ron Desantis Republican Party Donald Trump
John Mellencamp Sits for National Anthem Before Colts-Eagles Game

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:49 min | 4 d ago

John Mellencamp Sits for National Anthem Before Colts-Eagles Game

"John mellencamp. He's still a thing apparently. He's 71 years old. And Mellon camp's music has been used by a lot of politicians over the years. He's one of these, what he's from Indiana, one of the heartland guys, sings about blue collar workers, but the guys are raging leftist, as a matter of fact, he once said that the problem with Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton is they were not liberal enough. So anyway, mellencamp portrays himself as like, you know, I'm down with the people kind of a guy. Well, over the weekend, he was at the Indianapolis game. Was it Indianapolis and Philadelphia? Big football game, and he was spotted inside a luxury suite because we all know that regular Joe's just hang out in the luxury suites. And he was stuffing his face with popcorn and his butt was in the seat. During The Star-Spangled Banner. So we got a picture of it up on the website, someone snapped a photo. Sport says mellencamp is one of America's greatest frauds. And the reality is this guy is a radical, radical leftist. But really, I mean, this guy can't muster the courage to stand up for 90 seconds. And show a little bit of respect to the men and women who fight for our freedom, he can't do that. I mean, come on. No, I don't know. I don't know if it was orville redenbacher. I don't know what kind of popcorn it was, Kyle, I'm sorry. But probably some of that, I don't know. Organic unsalted popcorn. The stuff without the butter.

Mellon Camp Mellencamp John Mellencamp Indianapolis Hillary Clinton Indiana Barack Obama Philadelphia Football JOE America Orville Redenbacher Kyle
Do Democrats Really Want to Run Biden AGAIN?

The Trish Regan Show

01:57 min | 5 d ago

Do Democrats Really Want to Run Biden AGAIN?

"Matters, right? Who you hire? So it matters who our president is. It really does. And we're setting the stage now for what could be a very interesting 2024. There is some talk of Hillary Clinton coming back. I don't see it happening. I can't imagine that would happen, but when you have this sort of power vacuum, as you do, right now in the Democrat party, you're going to see some interesting things. That's saying it nicely, right? Interesting things. Hillary Clinton still still has a lot of power and pulls a lot of weight, but she's not likeable. And therefore, not electable. That's kind of what happened in 2016. In fact, there were a lot of people that went out to vote for Trump, but there were a lot of people that also went to vote against Hillary Clinton. That would be exactly the play if Kamala Harris runs. There will be so many people that will just go out to vote against Kamala Harris. So Biden may have to run, right? At all 82 years old. He's going to be celebrating 83, 84. I mean, what's he thinking? At some point to the American people say enough, you know, I want to share with you a poll. This is an AP vote cast survey, actually, it's not a poll. It's a survey of the electorate and it came out just this month in a full 58% of voters say that Joe Biden does not have the mental capacity to serve effectively as president. Again, I'll never think he had the mental capacity to ever serve as president. I say that with a lot of conviction. And I would suggest if you don't believe that, go back and look at his law school grades. And then the fact that he would try and spin it as though he was in the top part of his class, give me a break. So he's never had the intellectual chops. The ability, I think, to really understand and process foreign policy, economic policy. The things that you need and would expect in a president, he's been political, of course, and he's survived because he's so darn damn political, but that doesn't mean he's actually qualified, really. And

Hillary Clinton Kamala Harris Democrat Party Donald Trump Biden Joe Biden AP
Which Side Cares Most About Your Vote?

The Officer Tatum Show

02:20 min | Last week

Which Side Cares Most About Your Vote?

"I love what the guy Antonio said that called in, you know, I just wanted sometimes what I mean Antoine. I said Antonio Laura helped me Jesus. Antoine, one of my good friends name is Antoine. But I like what he had to say because I like for people to give perspective to me about certain things, you know, sometimes I'm like, you know, I like for people to talk to me like I talk. And if a person would sit me down and telling me, hey, man, you know, let's keep it real. You know, you're allowing yourself to just only pick one side and you're going to pigeonhole yourself. And the reason why I say these things because I want black people to understand this is that you're going to get yourself to the point that if you only vote for one side, the other side is going to find a way to not need you. And they're never going to do anything that you want them to do and they'll try to find a way to survive. Let me just give you an example. Donald Trump won the election pretty significantly in 2016, and I think he got like 8% of the black vote. I mean, that's, I mean, y'all, that's almost no black people voted for Trump. Compared to out of the voters, 92% voted for Democrats and Trump won by a lot against Hillary Clinton. And also out in Georgia, you have the Georgian governor, winning by, I don't know how many hundreds of thousands of votes he beat. Stacey Abrams by and black women voted like 90 something percent for the Democrat party in black men voted a little less 80 some percent. And when you do that, you have to, you have to look at this. You have to say, am I being pursued equally by both parties? This is about money. It's about numbers and strategy. It's not about emotion or even race. If you spend $20 million on advertisement and you know that black folks ain't really going to vote for you anyway. For whatever reason, they don't even want to hear what you have to say. You're going to spend less of that money and you're going to speak less to that community than other places because you're not going to get their vote. That's what I think ends up happening.

Antoine Antonio Laura Donald Trump Antonio Stacey Abrams Hillary Clinton Democrat Party Georgia
Amber Athey: Young Voters Swayed by Brainwashing in Institutions

The Dan Bongino Show

02:00 min | Last week

Amber Athey: Young Voters Swayed by Brainwashing in Institutions

"Having grown up in New York in the Giuliani era Things have to get really bad to wake people from this slumber I'm not us conservatives see it coming and see the train getting ready to wreck but liberals are so attached to the brand sold to them by their college professors in the media for like two decades of their life or something like that That they're just not ready to shake it yet And the thing is that I said on my Fox show is things just haven't gotten bad enough yet but they will And your general thoughts on that Yeah I think that's probably fair Especially when you look at the fact that young people were such a huge factor in these midterms typically we don't see a high level of turnout from young people and the fact that they did show up in such high numbers I think just shows the level in depth of some of the brainwashing that's been going on in American institutions and they're not grown up enough yet and don't have enough life experience to really understand what's happening So I think that does bode well for 2024 in the sense that the Biden administration regardless of not having the help anymore is going to continue to solve the struct and things will get so bad that regardless of who the Republican nominee ends up being whether that's Trump or somebody else you're going to have a lot to run against But these midterms also showed us it's not enough to just run against something you have to have a viable alternative And I think one of the biggest mistakes that the party made collectively both between Kevin McCarthy and the House side Mitch McConnell on the Senate side and then ronna mcdaniel over at the RNC is that there was not a consistent vision for the country and just running against Hal bad Biden was didn't work just like how we saw Hillary Clinton running against how bad she thought Trump was in 2016 didn't work

Giuliani Biden Administration FOX New York Ronna Mcdaniel Kevin Mccarthy Mitch Mcconnell Hal Bad Biden RNC Senate House Hillary Clinton Donald Trump
Trish Analyses What's Changed Since 2016

The Trish Regan Show

02:07 min | Last week

Trish Analyses What's Changed Since 2016

"Go back to 2015 and 2016. So what was unique about Donald Trump in 2015, 2016. He was the anti politician, right? And there's something very, very appealing about the guy who's just going to say anything, especially when you're up against the woman who was so controlled and so contrived. I'm talking about Hillary Clinton and so frankly despised by so many Americans. She was not well liked. She didn't have that sense of humor that he seemed to display, and so he won. Now, one strategist once told me, and I thought this was very interesting. In some ways, 2016 was more about a vote against Hillary than it was for Trump. I think there's an element to that, of course, but simultaneously, I do think that people, they felt like he could do something different and they were desperate for different. We've been going down the same path and we've had the bushes and we've had that clintons and people wanted something new. And here was this businessman who had done some pretty exciting things in the business space and heck was a household name on the apprentice show, a very popular show and they thought, hey, why not roll the dice on something different? But a lot has happened since then, I still stand by what I said all along. It was a mistake to shut the economy down. That was the first red flag, if you would, in what was about to go wrong because at that point, the Trump administration effectively was just giving in if you would, too, those that really wanted to take control of things. And we became a complete failure as an economy. I think we did a lot of extra damage along the way, including to our children who spent many, many months over year right without getting in some cases proper schooling. So there was a lot of damage inflicted by that one decision. Look, I'm neutral on this. You know that. I'd like to see conservatives win, but I'm neutral on who would be the person, but I'm doubtful that we can get back to where we were in that 2015, 2016 kind of scenario where you saw this groundswell and you saw this momentum for so many people even crossing party lines,

Donald Trump Hillary Clinton Trump Administration Clintons Hillary
Pres. Trump Going After Ron DeSantis Is 'Not Helpful' Right Now

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Pres. Trump Going After Ron DeSantis Is 'Not Helpful' Right Now

"He sees Ron DeSantis as a political rival. He doesn't like all the credit, Ron DeSantis has been getting for his huge victory. We can go down the line about excuses or explanations. I'm a Trump supporter and if he runs, I'm going to crawl over broken glass to get him elected, just like I did in 2016 and in 2020. I'm not going to pretend that there aren't a whole lot of angry Trump supporters right now. Over his attacks on desantis. I don't think I've ever really said in 6 years a critical thing of Donald Trump. And I'm not going to really start today because frankly, this country owes him an enormous debt of gratitude. We got anywhere that we got because of him. I'm thankful for the maga movement, I'm grateful that America is, you know, put first in terms of the ideology of millions of us, and all of that, Donald Trump saved us from Hillary Clinton. Donald Trump fought for this country and he has been without a doubt the most persecuted individual in my lifetime. Okay? I will acknowledge this is probably his milder criticism as you're going to get from me going after desantis is not helpful. Not now. Not now.

Ron Desantis Donald Trump Desantis Hillary Clinton America
Dan Bongino: Maybe Not a Red Wave but Still a Red Success

The Dan Bongino Show

01:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Dan Bongino: Maybe Not a Red Wave but Still a Red Success

"Folks we had not we did not win the house for 40 years up until the gingrich revolution of the Bill Clinton years We just flipped it Okay it's not by 40 seats It wasn't a tsunami I wouldn't even call it a red wave But I would call it a red success And I would strongly suggest you that calling it otherwise is just media spin and you're buying into the leftist narrative We now Republicans won the house and we will more than likely win the Senate too But he's walking around depressed like they got kicked in the Johnson or something What the hell We learned some lessons from this I did an entire show yesterday Thank you for the feedback by the way It's on podcast We want to check it out On how I hate to say it but it's just not bad enough yet Conditions in the country people Democrats and swing districts haven't been forced to pay a price high enough that they put the product back on the shelf They just happen folks

Gingrich Bill Clinton Senate Johnson
Does Donald Trump Understand the Fight Ahead? Dick Morris Explains

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Does Donald Trump Understand the Fight Ahead? Dick Morris Explains

"Suppose Trump understands now what is at stake and what he has to do to drain the swamp and whom he has to fire and what kind of a fight he has to bring to the marxists that have taken over the Democratic Party. Yes, and yes and yes, I'm just scoring enormously. I expected Trump several times a week, including last night. And Trump is very much aware of all of that and very enthusiastic about it. There'll be no more cotton into the establishment by him. You'll see it in his appointments. You'll see it in his style and in his substance. And Eric, I have to go in a minute, but let me just outline the future. Trump is going to be the candidate. Trump is going to win the election because the economy will go to hell, even worse than it is now. And any Republican will win. Then because we went through this, we're going through this recession. Historically, after you get through recession like that, inflation and then recession, you've cleared out all the bad businesses you've cleared out all the bad debt. You cleared out the unproductive enterprises. And the economy soars like it did under Reagan like it did under Clinton after they got out of the doldrums. And I think it will do that under Trump.

Donald Trump Democratic Party Eric Reagan Clinton
Americans Are About to Vote and There's Only ONE Issue on Their Minds

The Trish Regan Show

01:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Americans Are About to Vote and There's Only ONE Issue on Their Minds

"Economy hasn't turned out so great. Even though Hillary Clinton wants you to think so, Hillary Clinton tweeting out on Monday morning that the president's created all these jobs and things are just great. They keep telling us that, but you know what Americans aren't feeling that Americans don't feel like the economy is doing great because, well, hey, it's not. In fact, if you look at the real numbers, what you saw was two consecutive quarters of negative growth that traditionally has been the definition of a recession, and yet no one wanted to admit it. That was somehow, you know, sinful to actually say, hey, is 6 months of negative growth is a recession. So this is when the chickens come home to roost and I think as a result of all of this, we're going to have a pretty pretty darn eventful day and well, actually night. I mean, I think it's going to be pretty epic. I think that there is a real chance here when you look at some of these polls that people make a big decision and you're going to have a lot of people that aren't voting in traditional party ways, but they're voting based on their feelings on the economy. Now,

Hillary Clinton
Fetterman's Team Sues Over Undated Absentee Ballots in Pennsylvania

Mark Levin

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Fetterman's Team Sues Over Undated Absentee Ballots in Pennsylvania

"John fetterman's campaign And the Democrat senatorial campaign committee and the Democrat congressional campaign committee have now filed a lawsuit Seeking to overturn the Pennsylvania Supreme Court's ruling I'll keep in mind I court has 6 members one died Four of whom are Democrats To over there in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court's ruling that we talked about last week That undated mail in ballots should not be counted arguing it violates the federal Civil Rights Act Now let me tell you something This has been the Pennsylvania state law They're bringing up the federal Civil Rights Act violation because they're getting it into federal court And how much you want to bet the federal Department of Justice joins them The civil rights division of the Justice Department headed by a racist bigot By the name of Clark how much you want to bet this was already planned Write Politico right New York slimes white Russia compost and why do you think the Democrats keep talking about just look how the media have screwed this up Just stick with me a second Let's walk through this Use your common sense That's all I've got It's all we've got And that's why mostly right And the meteor always wrong because they're ideologues It has not made any sense That Obama Clinton Biden in their surrogates Will be campaigning the last two weeks or so But especially intensely the last week On democracy as at stake Unless they believe they're going to get slaughtered tomorrow

Pennsylvania Supreme Court John Fetterman Democrat Senatorial Campaign C Democrat Congressional Campaig Federal Department Of Justice Civil Rights Division Of The J Pennsylvania Clark Obama Clinton Biden Russia New York
Elon's Twitter Takeover Is the Louisiana Purchase of Our Time

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Elon's Twitter Takeover Is the Louisiana Purchase of Our Time

"Elon purchasing Twitter is the single most consequential private transaction in American history. Nothing comes even close. You guys can if you guys have another piece in history that is close to a $44 billion purchase of the largest public square to liberate the ability to be able to incubate elite thought. I think it's the Louisiana Purchase of our time. I really do. Now, you might say, Charlie Elon is, you know, he's not one of us. He's already firing the executives. He's already restoring accounts. And he responds to Hillary Clinton with an article that says that this very well might have been a prostitute with Paul Pelosi. We don't know, but it's a question that's Elon, by the way. I'm just quoting Eli. And so we don't know. That's the world's richest man. Just asking a question of which the media should probably be doing right now. So

Elon Charlie Elon Twitter Paul Pelosi Louisiana Hillary Clinton ELI
Ronna McDaniel: We Want Republicans Who Will Work With Biden

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Ronna McDaniel: We Want Republicans Who Will Work With Biden

"I will say this, two words of caution, and it happened yesterday. When you had ronna mcdaniel, coming out and saying if Republicans win the Senate and the House, that the message that we're sending is that we want the Republicans to work with Biden. Is that the message? Let's take a listen here. Cut ten. We need a president that's going to work across the aisle. None of this happens unless both parties are working together. So if we went back the house in the Senate, it's the American people saying to Joe Biden, we want you to work on behalf of us and we want you to work across the aisle and solve the problems that we are dealing with. Bill Clinton did that, right? After 94, when he lost those midterms, he came across and said, let's work together. It would be interesting to see if President Biden does. That's ronna mcdaniel, the chair of the RNC. And I want to be very respectful here. But may I just ask your question, what the heck is she smoking? We want to send Republicans to control Congress so we can work with Joe Biden. No, we want to stop Joe Biden. We want to stop the agenda. You see folks, this is the kind of thinking that gets Republicans in trouble. And the fact that she would say something like this just days before the election, two days before the election, she's got to be smoking something.

Ronna Mcdaniel Senate Joe Biden President Biden Biden Bill Clinton House RNC Congress
Why Is Hillary Clinton Giving Interviews Every Day Now?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:58 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Is Hillary Clinton Giving Interviews Every Day Now?

"You were in a good mood. I was in a good mood. I'm going to ruin it now. She's back, cut 8. Hillary. When an 82 year old man is attacked by an intruder in his own home, they don't seem to be too bothered by that because that person is married to the Speaker of the House who's of a different political party. I just want your viewers and really, I would like every American just to stop and think about that. This is the kind of violent rhetoric that leads to violent action that props up authoritarians and that unfortunately what we see the Republican Party today supporting. Okay. It's all a complete light. There's no member of the Republican Party that supported or did anything to commend the events that occurred in San Francisco, she is Elias in a veteran like she can't open a mouth without lying. But I have to ask you, why do you think she's giving interviews almost every day now? I think she's running, Jen. Oh yeah, we talked about this last week, I think, on this very program, she is absolutely running. She is absolutely in the race, she knows that Joe Biden is failing, and so she's putting herself in front of every camera that she can find, but what she says is so infuriating because they only look at certain, they only look at certain things, right? They never address the double standards that are happening on their side of the aisle every single day. So you had a tweet and I don't know when it was. Yesterday, the day before, but I saw you say, where is the bail for this David de pap? Right now, look, I think this guy did something atrocious. I don't know about the circumstances surrounding it. The only reason that there are these weird conspiracy theories floating around is because the mainstream news media offered a set of reports that we were supposed to, we were led to believe we should understand is the truth. And now they've started to back them off. But where is the bail for this guy? That was your tweet.

Republican Party Hillary Elias Joe Biden David De Pap JEN San Francisco House
Lee Zeldin: Times Square Naked Cowboy Endorses Lee Zeldin

Mark Levin

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Lee Zeldin: Times Square Naked Cowboy Endorses Lee Zeldin

"I guess you were very frightened today In Clinton and Harris that must have sent shivers down your spine You think that'll have any effect Well we neutralized it because we got the endorsement of the naked cowboy in Times Square who decorated his guitar with his Zelda for governor gear and came up with an original song You know I'll tell you while he was while she was having her rally with Hillary Clinton and Kamala Harris in tish James we had a rally up in the capital region with at least stefanik and a bunch of other candidates And we had ten times up at our rally We once again had another rally into the thousands There's no doubt that we have the energy and momentum over this weekend that's coming up Kathy hochul is bringing in Bill Clinton for one rally bringing in Joe Biden for another rally and I'm just sure that if she adds up the sum total of all attendees at all these rallies she still wouldn't be able to put it inside of for example that desantis rally we had last Saturday So we have the energy we have the issues We just have to make sure that everyone shows up and votes No one can stay home

Tish James Kamala Harris Times Square Harris Kathy Hochul Clinton Hillary Clinton Joe Biden Bill Clinton Desantis
Hillary Clinton Claims Crime Numbers Are Higher in Red States

The Officer Tatum Show

01:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Hillary Clinton Claims Crime Numbers Are Higher in Red States

"You got Democrats doing stuff like this. Y'all remember blase Ford? Deadline mother. You know what? Blase Ford, if she was telling the truth, a Democrat leaked her information. Leaked the accusations. Democrats are the ones ruined his country. Who don't want a border? Democrats don't want a border. You got tears coming into our country as we speak. They already hear. Probably plodding. And that dude's going to get on television. And try to act as if Republicans are the ones. Did you feel safer under Trump? Yes, you did. You may not have liked him, but you feel safer. Was the crime up as crazy as it is today? Under Trump. Because of his rhetoric, no it wasn't. It wasn't. They let BLM run wild. Burning up city all summer. And Washington they had, I forgive this call of safe space, safe zone, I forget what it's called. They call it the weekend of love. They are here killing people. You must be living on The Rock if you think these Democrats tell them truth. Then you got your boy, Joe Biden. But let me go to Clinton because we got a clip from Clinton. I want you to go to Clinton and for us to hear how silly she is. Clip 5. Concern. I mean, I don't care where it happens or what it is. I want people to be safe. That's not the Republican's argument because of course, if you look at real crime statistics, which they're not interested in examining, the states with the highest crime levels are states run by Republicans. That's just a fact. That's just a fact. Yeah, you know, you know what's funny about her, that's just a fact. I want you to look at the states and you tell me what cities or have the most crime.

Blase Ford Clinton Ford BLM Joe Biden Washington
"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

02:37 min | 8 months ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"<Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> You can find Kelly <Speech_Female> Rowland on social <Speech_Female> media at Kelly <Speech_Female> Rowland. <Speech_Female> Her new children's book <Speech_Female> always with you <Speech_Female> always with me <Speech_Music_Female> will be out on April <Speech_Music_Female> 26th. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> In fact is <Speech_Female> brought to you by iHeartRadio. <Speech_Female> We are <Speech_Female> produced by a <Speech_Female> mighty group of women <Speech_Female> and one <Speech_Female> amazing man. <Speech_Female> Erica Goodman, <Speech_Female> Margaret, <Speech_Music_Female> Sarah Horowitz, <Speech_Music_Female> Jasmine Molly, <Speech_Music_Female> and Justin <Speech_Music_Female> Wright. With <Speech_Music_Female> help from Lindsay Hoffman, <Speech_Music_Female> Barry lurie, <Speech_Music_Female> Joyce Cuban, <Speech_Music_Female> Julie, <Speech_Music_Female> Mike Taylor, <Speech_Music_Female> and Emily young. <Speech_Music_Female> Original <Speech_Music_Female> music is by Justin <Speech_Music_Female> Wright. <Speech_Music_Female> If you liked this episode <Speech_Music_Female> of in fact, <Speech_Music_Female> please make sure to subscribe <Speech_Music_Female> so you never miss an <Speech_Music_Female> episode and tell your family <Speech_Music_Female> and friends to do the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> same. If you <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> really want to help

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

08:02 min | 8 months ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"April, when you walked into that White House briefing room, how many other black women were there? I remember Sonya Ross, when they Associated Press and scales from the Boston Globe. So you weren't the only one, but no, you also were still probably not. It was not representative of what it should have been right. But I was the only one there focused in on the urban agenda focused in on news for people who were underserved. And there was a large content of black reporters that number said dwindled. So we've lost ground. We've lost ground a lot of ground. Yes. So April, could you? Just reflect on that a little bit. The White House briefing room that your colleagues have gotten less diverse over the last 25 years? Yeah, it's so sad. What happens is if you see a president come into The White House. And he has a leaning towards issues on race. He has a leaning on issues of diversity. They ten more to put reporters in that reflect the president's mindset are leaning. And are they the media organizations or are they The White House press office? Oh, no, no, the media organization. The White House press office has nothing to do with it. They can suggest or we would like to see a room that looks like America, but it's up to the news organization. So when George W. Bush came in, the numbers dwindled because the thought and even George W. Bush said this to make the thought is that he is not considered someone who is forward thinking what matters to rights. He said one because of his father. He's a Republican. He was governor of Texas and the fact that Texas had one of the worst death penalty rankings in the nation, not the worst. We talked so much about race on so many different levels and just said, you know, people don't believe. And I was like, really? And I said, the way we are talking, if you could talk like that, like you're talking to me, people would be more amenable and the George W. Bush that I saw at that time was so different than what we saw on television. I mean, Chelsea, we even had a conversation during the campaign between then presidential candidate John McCain and then presidential candidate Barack Obama. George W. Bush told me, he said, he saw the subtle and overt racism. In the campaign. And it was a moment I'll never forget. I mean, when you are around that rarefied air to find out what a sitting president is thinking on matters of race and issue that you cover, you listen. Because the division was happening. Political correctness was leaving the room. The racial divide was coming to the forefront. And the way I see it is that your father, former president Bill Clinton. Saw a need to deal with matters of race. He was willing to put race on the table when others did not do it. And when I first came into The White House, the first couple of months, people thought I was militant because I was asking questions about race. I'm like, what? And how much of that do you think was because you were a black woman that you were perceived as militant versus if I were asking those questions? 100%, they would think, oh, that's great for a moment. And then they'll ask you, why is she keep asking on Madison rice? Race is always on the table. Grace and money are two factors that are always on the table, but it's never spoken about. And I've learned this to Chelsea that The White House Capitol Hill, it's not about politics or party. It's about people. And it's about humanity. And that is what's missing. I think we forget as we have this crazy discourse. I think we forget it's about people, truth that humanity. And I'm throwing the word truth in there too. I certainly think one of the greatest existential challenges we confront in our democracy is the erosion of a shared understanding of what facts are and what truth is. Yeah, my history books didn't prepare me for this. Laws are made to be broken now. You never thought that a president could break the rule of law. He never imagined January 6th. Which now the Republicans say it was a legitimate form of political expression. Every threat against every person during those four years was made real on January 6th. And if that is embraced public discourse, we are really going down the wrong road. I've watched the Republican Party call for decorum in sacred political spaces. And that was a full on riot to overthrow the government. End of story, the executive branch at that time waged war on the legislative branch. And we all watched it happen on live television. The threats that so many of us received during those four years were made real that day. And I tell people do not take this lightly. I mean, this is a sacred political space that has been marred and forever changed. The body politic is moving in a direction that is totally juxtaposed to what the founding fathers put in place. Yes, the founding fathers did not expect in April Ryan. War Barack Obama or Bill Clinton or George W. Bush. Or Donald Trump. Well, arguably, they were worried about a Donald Trump. That's what they were trying with all of these pillars that they put in place to prevent, but now we're embracing what the Patriots contend they never wanted, you know? April you, during the Trump years, at times went from covering the story to being a story. And I didn't like it. 'cause that's not the job you were there to do. You weren't there to be a character in his narrative. You were there to help. Americans understand why we should be concerned about the narrative that he was creating and all of it weaponized hate. What was it like to be singled out by former president Trump? Every day, my stomach churned, walking in. I didn't want to make it about me and I tried not to make it about me I tried to put the issue on the table. And they continued with personal attacks. And it became very hot to the point where you had people like Caesar sayoc. Put me in his bullseye. I had to move my home with my children. And as a mother, I had to make my children feel safe as I was unnerved. As my oldest daughter was in school Chelsea, reading on a live feed in current events class, what was happening at The White House. She text messaged me. And said, mama, you're a cast of baby. I'm great. How do you tell your daughter who is 50 miles away in Baltimore, and you're at The White House, and there are attacking her mother. And she's like, are you okay? I'm like, I'm great..

White House George W. Bush Sonya Ross Boston Globe Madison rice White House Capitol Hill Texas Associated Press Bill Clinton Barack Obama John McCain Chelsea Donald Trump America Grace Republican Party Patriots
"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

01:38 min | 8 months ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"Engaged with many different administrations. 25 years. 25 years. And I never imagined that. Former president Bill Clinton was my first president. And I'll never forget, I got the bug to come to Washington. Reporting in Baltimore when your family came to D.C. to begin to 8 years and that big celebration at the Lincoln Memorial, Aretha Franklin, Michael Jackson, Stevie, wonder so many people were there. And I was like, wow, this is amazing. And never knowing that four years later, I've been covering The White House. What was that first day like? When you got into The White House briefing room on your first day, what was it like? I was intimidated. I was scared. When I started walking up to the building. You see this stark bright white building with these black broad iron gates surrounding. I said, wow, look at the history. It wasn't about the occupants inside. But it was about how it was built. It was built by the people who were in their negotiating for my right to be there. I always look at the history of things before I just immerse myself in things. And I was that was so intimidating. And I started tearing up. And like I said, a kid from Baltimore. I never expected this. Yeah, I'm supposed to be there because our founding fathers said it, but I'm humble enough to understand that not many people get there..

Lincoln Memorial Bill Clinton Aretha Franklin Baltimore Stevie Michael Jackson D.C. Washington White House
"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

05:40 min | 9 months ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"That means that more than.

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

03:52 min | 9 months ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"Or enraging. I'm on the board of Emily's list. Emily's list is we believe in helping women run for office who are pro choice democratic women. And trying to recruit women in the before times, Chelsea, I like to say, was really hard. There was always a litany list of why they couldn't run. And so in 2016 to give you an example, 600 women collectively sent an email saying that they were interested in running for office at Emily's list. And Emily's list is a huge organization. After the election of the former president, the twice impeached, over 42,000 women contacted Emily's list within 17 months saying that they wanted to run for office. And we see a bench now of incredibly talented women. It wasn't by chance that for the first time in Congress in 2018, a 126 women filled the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives. It's because we were able to field candidates. Lina hidalgo at 27 years old. She is one of someone to watch in Texas. We see Jessica Cincinnati also in Texas. We saw presenta Durant who had run. We see a whole group of young women from the different type of fortitude of saying the only way we change our country is I become involved. And that shyness has dissipated and that is what gives me hope. Claiming space and then using their platforms to help actually advance opportunity and equity. Well, you certainly inspire many people as well. And I count myself among them, and I am incredibly thankful for your time today. This was fun. Thanks so much, Chelsea. You can learn more.

Emily Lina hidalgo Chelsea Jessica Cincinnati presenta Durant U.S. House of Representatives Texas Congress
"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

01:42 min | 9 months ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"Spring is around the corner and we're thinking about our health and wellness. What do fiber magnesium and niacin have in common? They're found in peanuts. When it comes to eating peanuts, peanut butter and peanut products. The research is clear. Peanuts improve your health. Celebrate march, national peanut month by making healthy choices and choose peanuts as your next snack. Visit about peanuts dot com to learn more and to order your next peanut snack today. That's right, visit about peanuts dot com. Hey, it's Emily, and you live by Vania health is so unique. It's a healthcare practice that provides complete women's health and wellness all in one place. From primary care to mental health and gynecology to obstetrics, live, understands these are all connected. And with Liv, you'll have a care team that works together with you around your distinct needs and goals. Live is a membership based practice and the heart of D.C., and on top of top notch patient care, members also get access to care coordination, same day prescription delivery, exclusive events, and so much more. Plus, they accept all major insurance. Learn more by searching for live by advantage. Charles didn't have just any coronary artery disease. He had Charles coronary artery disease. Michelle didn't have just any heart attack. She had Michelle's heart attack. At VCU health poly heart center, we know every heart is unique. And as Virginia's only nationally ranked heart program, we'll keep them beating healthy and strong. VCU health Polly heart center. Learn more at VCU health dot org slash heart..

Vania Emily Liv artery disease Charles D.C. heart attack VCU health poly heart center Michelle coronary artery disease VCU health Polly heart center Virginia VCU
"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

02:14 min | 9 months ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"<Speech_Female> <Music> <Speech_Female> In fact, <Speech_Female> is brought to you by iHeartRadio. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We are produced by <Speech_Female> a mighty group of women <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> one amazing man. <Speech_Female> Erica goodmanson, <Speech_Female> Martha, <Speech_Female> Sarah Horowitz, <Speech_Music_Female> Justin <Speech_Music_Female> Molly, and Justin <Speech_Music_Female> Wright. <Speech_Music_Female> With help from Lindsay Hoffman, <Speech_Music_Female> Barry lurie, <Speech_Music_Female> Joyce <Speech_Music_Female> Cuban, Julie, <Speech_Music_Female> Mike <Speech_Female> Taylor, and Emily <Speech_Female> young. Original <Speech_Music_Female> music is by <Speech_Female> Justin Wright. <Speech_Female> If you liked this <Speech_Female> episode of in fact, <Speech_Female> please make sure to subscribe <Speech_Female> so you never miss an <Speech_Female> episode and tell <Speech_Female> your family and friends to do <Speech_Female> the same. If <Speech_Female> you really want to

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

02:15 min | 9 months ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"For our very democracy. So we have to redouble our efforts. We have to. We're taking a quick break, stay with us..

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

01:32 min | 9 months ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"It's Emily and you live by Vania health is so unique. It's a healthcare practice that provides complete women's health and wellness all in one place. From primary care to mental health and gynecology to obstetrics, live, understands these are all connected. And with Liv, you'll have a care team that works together with you around your distinct needs and goals. Live is a membership based practice and the heart of D.C. and on top of top notch patient care members also get access to care coordination, same day prescription delivery, exclusive events, and so much more. Plus, they accept all major insurance. Learn more by searching for live by advantage. Spring is around the corner, and we're thinking about our health and wellness. What do fiber magnesium and niacin have in common? They're found in peanuts. When it comes to eating peanuts, peanut butter and peanut products. The research is clear. Peanuts improve your health. Celebrate march, national peanut month by making healthy choices and choose peanuts as your next snack. Visit about peanuts dot com to learn more and to order your next peanut snack today. That's right, visit about peanuts dot com. Ready to take your career further with marketing expertise, gain a deeper understanding of both strategy and creativity with a masters and integrated marketing communications from Georgetown. Led by a faculty of industry experts, our program delivers the foundational knowledge, analytical thinking, and creative skills needed to succeed in this dynamic field. Explore the program at SCS dot Georgetown.

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

01:54 min | 9 months ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"Hi, I'm Chelsea Clinton, and I'm so excited to be back with a new season of my podcast. In fact. Last season, we investigated what vaccines, stigma, climate change, and sex have in common. And why public health matters, even when we're not in a pandemic. We heard from experts and activists across industries and around the world who have incredible stories of courage and leadership. Now, as we celebrate women's history month, I'm talking with 12 trailblazing women about their personal journeys, the progress we've made or loss, and how far we still have to go. From soccer star and equal pay advocate Megan Rapinoe, to veteran White House correspondent April Ryan, to world renowned fashion designer Stella McCartney, and more. These are women who have risen to the top of their fields and are fighting, fighting for equal rights, equal opportunities, and so much more. We'll hear how they got started and who inspired them. The Baltimore city where they say the word failure is built into our very existence. She instilled in me. I can be and do anything I want to be. And I believed her. What it's like to be a woman with power in their industry. So I found myself being the only girl in most of my classes in engineering school and looking back a lot of those four years is what shaped who I ended up becoming as an adult and a leader. The strides we've made toward equality after the election of the former president, the twice impeached. Over 42,000 women contacted Emily's list within 17 months saying that they wanted to run for office. And what does it look like when women are finally given an equal shock and a seat at the table? I'm so excited that my journey is and was what it was because I feel like it could really help to inform the next generation on how they can be better in this industry and how we can build a better culture in this.

Megan Rapinoe April Ryan Chelsea Clinton Baltimore city Stella McCartney White House soccer Emily
"clinton" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"clinton" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Tim Clinton the book is take it back. Little bit of same love. Well done like in this rain to a paper this will go wild hey the folks, we're talking about masculinity, fatherhood, biblical manhood, I'm talking to my friend doctor Tim Clinton, the book is take it back. You've got a lot of stories in here. What is in here about George Foreman? I just love George Foreman. Well, you know, foreman was the heavyweight champion of the world, and then lost the title in his late 40s Eric. He makes a decision. He's going to make a comeback. That is going to take it back. And you know the story. He takes it back. It's one of the most stunning stories in sports history. And you love foreman. You know that? It's just a beautiful, beautiful story. We open up with that because again, a word of hope and encouragement. Eric, we've got to get beyond the shaming, the silencing, the stigmatizing of people. It's happening to men in particular in our culture. We got to rise above this. We got to push back. We've got to fight back like never before. Because let me share a little scene that I think encapsulate our entire discussion. Little leg are standing in center field, waiting for the next ball to be hit his way. Sure enough, a mind drive comes out to this little leaguer standing in center field. Eric, it's like he was days. Didn't see the ball coming. Misses the ball, finally gets the ball throws it back in and then he runs in after the inning's over and the dog got coach comes up to him and says, hey, bud. What happened out there? Red faced this little guy looks up at the coach and says this coach. I was looking in the stands for my dad. He promised he'd be here. Promise me he'd be here. Young or old, male or female. We all look in the stands, for our dad, and consider his influence. His input in our life, one of the most important gifts that God can give to us. God help us as dads to be in the stands and to give that gift of love and grace and to model and emulate Christ and God help us to step up and fight like we've never before. For that to continue and perpetuate from generation, the generation that generation. Why? Because it matters. More now than ever. There is nothing more important than this. And I just want to say to all the guys out there, Jesus is your answer. We don't have a lot of time so I got to cut to the chase. A lot of people don't realize that, and they really have misunderstood, you know, the Bible and faith and whether they maybe got some messed up feminized version of it. But when you read about the heroes of the Bible, I know they're in the book, take it back. But I mean, these are manly men. And they're warriors, many of them. And I just think that kind of faith is a lot of people have missed that. And when you bump into that, you know, promise keepers is a good example. I mentioned some pastures that you suddenly realized, yeah, this is what I'm looking for. This is, you know, my heart. And when you say, what about people who've blown it? I mean, honestly, that's the whole point of the Bible. God says, yes, you will blow it. You have blown it. Okay, now, come to me. And I will work with you. And now you're going to see what you can do with me. And, you know, your father could be dead. You could be, I mean, God always gives you a second chance. Don't get into, yeah, but yeah, but there's no yeah, but God has a plan. I just want to speak hope because so many people have some reason. They're clinging to they can't work because of this. I'm just telling you, you have no idea what God all things are possible. That's not a cliche. That is true. We're talking about miraculous stuff. I've seen it in my life, otherwise I wouldn't be yapping about it. I know this is true. Tim, if people want to find you, obviously, you're the author of the book take it back, but if people just want to find you, where can they find you online? Tim Clinton dot com. Or they can learn more. Clinton books dot com. Either one of them and the American association of Christian counselors. Tim Clinton dot com that's pretty easy. Tim Clinton dot com co hosting doctor James Dobson's family talk. My friend, Tim Clinton, thank you. Congratulations on the book. Take it back. God bless you..

Tim Clinton George Foreman Eric foreman bud American association of Christ Tim Clinton James Dobson
"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"Now i could go on and on but it's not like doctors were prescribing. These drugs for kids because they were but they never been tested on kids. Then you know. We began slowly to try to get the government to require the pharmaceutical industry. To do this. And i at the announcement of this there was a white ceremony back in nineteen ninety seven. I talked about my friend. Elizabeth glaser and what she had gone through. She eventually died from aids. Did her daughter ariel they hadn't prescribed adt even though elizabeth was taking it for her hiv aids. The doctor told elizabeth they couldn't prescribe. Azt for her daughter. Because they didn't know what dosage to give children so this had like real world effects on specific kids. I'm curious given that you've spent so much of your career and even your life focused on trying to help protect and promote the rights of children are there other areas in public health. Broadly where you don't think we've paid enough attention tickets. Well i still. It's the case that poor children children of color children isolated geographic areas. You know they're just not having opportunity to access quality affordable.

Elizabeth glaser elizabeth ariel nineteen ninety seven
"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"I was talking to an insurance agent. I said look. I can afford to pay for a good policy and the guy looked at me and he said you don't understand. We don't ensure burning houses so even well off people people who could travel people who were able to. They thought afford care for children with pre existing conditions. Even they were shut out of our system so my understanding and awareness of the inequities particularly with regard to children grew over time. While we're talking pfizer and madonna are studying there covid nineteen vaccines in younger kids and you certainly as a parent of three kids. I'm very hopeful that they will be able to gather your the necessary evidence over the next few months around what doses are effective and safe dealt protect kids from covid nineteen and yet a majority of medicines are on the market and available today actually weren't weren't tested in kids. In fact like for most of american history there weren't even very real or meaningful. Fda regulations on prescribing kind of correct had dosages federations tickets. So since i know this is an issue that you worked hard to try to help remedy. When did you first become aware that there was more kind of gets worse than actual like rigorous science in the dosing of medicines to kids. And how did you try to change that. I think i. I really became aware of it through to my friend. Elizabeth glaser who was the advocate for pediatric hiv aids treatment. Because for those. Who don't know the story elizabeth. She contracted hiv through a blood transfusion and she passed it on through breast milk. I to her daughter than to her son and when she got diagnosed and then the kids were found to be hiv positive. She's the one who really discovered in a very dramatic way. That people were just guessing at what kind of dosage of what kind of drugs could be given to children who had contracted hiv and she started an organization to really raise that awareness and she. She brought her concerns to me in the ninety two campaign. You know although her immediate an urgent request was to figure out how best to test and then treat kids with hiv. She had uncovered this much bigger problem that we were testing. Hardly anything on children and so..

Elizabeth glaser elizabeth three kids american today nineteen vaccines nineteen first ninety two campaign madonna few months pfizer covid
"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"You might know my mom. Hillary clinton as a presidential candidate secretary of state. And you senator but one thing you might not know is that she worked hard to change laws and regulations so that we'd have better guidelines around the right dosage of medicine for kids. I was so excited to have the chance to talk with her about this. And her lifelong efforts to include children are public health and policy. Make hi mom. Thank you doing this. Oh i am happy to do this chelsea. I know. I'm your daughter. And i've watched you over a few decades now that you've always been focused on trying to ensure that kids are included are given an equal rights equal dignity and and not forgotten. And so i just want to start with. When did you realize that kids were being left out. Left out of insurance doubt of kind of new drug therapy trials. When did you realize that kids were largely just absent. Well i think. I had some idea about the inequity in healthcare. Going back to my time at the yale child study center and then working for the children's defense fund so i was aware that children were often unable to access or easily. Get or afford the kind of care that i thought they should have. But i didn't really focus on that or immerse myself in what it until i was working. I in arkansas. On behalf of your dad's governorship. We were looking at how to expand health. Care to more people in arkansas. And i realized the paucity appear attrition. And the paucity of obgyn practitioners the total lack of you know midwives in many parts of arkansas particularly eastern arkansas which was predominantly black and in most places quite poor so i moved from knowing that kids and their families had problems accessing and affording care to seeing how the medical system itself wasn't really providing the opportunity even if you had resources in many geographic areas to get health care and i took on the mission of building up and improving the arkansas children's hospital because it was tertiary care facility but it treated everybody and it was able to take care of kids even if they had to be driven or or helicoptered some distance so i was aware of all of that from my advocacy work and my work in arkansas. Then when i began working on healthcare reform in ninety three after bill became president i really saw how disparate the care was just end with one story because it was so indicative and chilling to me. I was in cleveland at the children's hospital. They're doing a listening listening session with parents of kids with preexisting conditions and i was talking to a group of parents and i'll never forget a father saying to me that he said look. I own my own company. I do very well financially. But i cannot ensure my two daughters who have cerebral palsy and can't find insurance at any cost is i'll tell you the last time.

Hillary clinton cleveland arkansas two daughters one story eastern arkansas ninety three child study center one thing palsy secretary of state
"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"Did love teaching. I loved research in unloved. Clinical care academic medicine allowed for that. And then i started to recognize probably if i became an associate professor. I got my eighteen year this as an associate professor at the university of kansas. I really started to understand how you could have impact on who was educated in trying and i started more than administrative focus of understanding. What influenced really means it to me is about how the decisions you make. Impact on the people lives so you were able to find a path to becoming a doctor. Even though no one ever presented that as a possibility to you what can and must we do to help other young people from groups go into medicine. We have to create a pathway. That students can first of all see themselves in the role and chelsea. I really believe that that starts in k. Through five so that you know the fact that morehouse school of medicine. We adopted a school. Tuskegee airman global adamy about three to five miles from the school. Ninety seven percent of the key is on free lunch programs. There's some economic challenges in the community but we adopted that spoon so that we could do nothing else but go there and where are white coats and have those students to see themselves in us. Now we've done a lot more. We partnered with the school we've increased reading proficiency increase map efficiency. We train our employees to be mentors. We have about one hundred twenty five hundred and fifty mentors who go there every week to that spoke in this all about the students seeing the possibility amen increase in their capacity to be competent in the sinuses which is required for any type of health career. So i believe that what we do in that case through five really doesn't matter. Do you have more people applying to the morehouse school of medicine significantly. So so this year. We got eighty three hundred close eighty four hundred applications. We saw the same thing with our. Pa program significant number more doubled the number of applications. I think the pandemic has led young people to think about how they can contribute with medicine but also in service wanted a great things. That has happened with this. Pandemic is that people see their ability to give more through their profession. And so yes we definitely have seen an increase in the number of applications. That's incredibly encouraging. So what do you say to people who like. Don't think it's that important to really focus on increasing the number of black doctors and healthcare workers or lot next doctors and healthcare workers. I'm a scientist. Make a lot of decisions by data. The data clearly shows chelsea that when you coach really competent providers and most of the time that cultural competence is aligned with either gender or race or some type of cultural identity. That means that that provider in that patient are lined in some way and therefore you see a higher rate of compliance and so i just gave my alma mater. Commencement speech and i was really proud to do that. I was also very proud to tell them. Stories of course happened to me early on at harvard medical school a person come in from the south and actually being challenged in some ways by the environment than i was in as a black woman one of only ten black students in the class and what that felt like and how that limited some of my engagement..

Ninety seven percent eighteen year five miles eighty three hundred eighty four hundred applicatio university of kansas one this year about one hundred twenty five Tuskegee ten five fifty mentors Pandemic about three pandemic chelsea medical black Pa
"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"Summer is finally here and it's time to get out and enjoy the water hike bike run and to be back with friends but life with the hassles of contacts and glasses slows. You down the eye center is giving you a summer of freedom. Thanks to eilly with designed to point from dr boutros lazic at the eye center is even more affordable with huge savings and zero percent financing. Join the thousands of people clear vision. Thanks to dr. boutros. Learn top surgeons in virginia with five locations schedule. Your free lasik consultation at the eye center dot com today. Hi i'm chelsea clinton and this is in fact a podcast about why public health matters even when we're not in a pandemic today we're talking about what it takes to build public health system that reflects an includes while the public for a.

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

22:57 min | 1 year ago

"clinton" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"I was honored to welcome to the podcast. Dr fauci it's become almost a cliche to say this is an unprecedented time. And i'm just curious given that you have lived through other pandemics worked in other pandemics. How much of. This feels unprecedented. And how much of. It feels eerily familiar. Well chelsea the only eerily familiar thing about it is the unpredictable nature of outbreaks. Where you just going along. And then all of a sudden something comes up it could be subtle the way. Hiv this month. In the next few days where commemorating the fortieth anniversary of the realization that we were dealing with a new syndrome. We didn't know what the microbe the pathogen was. We didn't even have a name for it back in june and july of nineteen eighty one having had. I guess i would call it the privilege in some respects but also the painfully experience of being involved in that from the very first day. That's sort of snuck up on you. It was low level below the radar screen. Then as we learn more about it we found out dealing with just the tip of the iceberg when we saw people who were very very sick not knowing until we had a test that we're dealing with something where they were literally millions of people infected so the fact that outbreaks are unpredictable. They come in strange ways. That's the common denominator. The difference with this that validates the statement. it's unprecedented. is that when you're dealing with something as explosive as this which has a couple of characteristics that. I have often referred to almost ironically years ago. What is your worst nightmare. Dr fauci people would ask me that five years ago. Ten years ago fifteen years ago. And longer i would always say it was. The emergence of a new virus generally jumping species from an animal host to a human that had two characteristics one that is extraordinarily efficient in spreading from human to human and two that it has the capability of a great degree of morbidity mortality. When you put those two things together. That's when you get my worst nightmare and that's exactly what we're experienced because we have not had anything like this in well over one hundred years since the historic influenza pandemic of nineteen eighteen so there is a very strong true element of this being unprecedented. At least in over one hundred years and dr fauci there's an adage in public health that are notable epidemics aren't now with the benefit of both hindsight and your decades of experience in pandemics. What do you think we could have done differently in january or february to help save american lives and save lives across the globe in some respects. It is not answerable because you could certainly have done things differently. If you new things differently so you can say to yourself in this country. What could we have done if we knew back in january what we know right now is the characteristics that i'm telling me would ability to efficiently spread from human to human the fact that fifty to sixty percent of the transmissions occur from someone who is infected but has no symptoms at all. We know anywhere from a third to forty percent of the people who get infected never develop any significant symptoms at all that would bring attention to any medical intervention so back then if we knew that we were dealing with in this country something as extraordinary as this in its ability to spread. We would have done something. That likely would have not been acceptable to the american public. Like when we had the first case in. i think it was january. Twenty first to say okay. It's here and then a few days later a week or two later it became clear that there was community. Spread it just air which means someone infected someone and you don't have the chain of transmission locked in. You don't know where the person got it from that. Being the case that means it's spreading in society beneath the radar screen if we had known its capability of spreading. We could have said. Let's shut the country down right now to prevent it. I think there would have been such extraordinary pushback to say. Well wait a minute what are you talking about. We have one or two cases you want to shut the country down. That's crazy so when you ask me a question what could we have done differently. Well now that we have five hundred ninety thousand deaths you go back and say well look what this has done. We may be could have prevented some of those really shutdown early and prevented the spread. But you know if you look. Throughout the world chelsea even countries that appear to have done well early on every country has gotten hit really badly even some of the asian countries now that we pointed to as models of their response are now starting to get into trouble including places like taiwan and singapore and yet nam and places like that who seemed to have done very well in the first waves. You made a comment that resonates with me is. How do you prevent an outbreak from becoming a pandemic. so. I don't think we're necessarily going to be able to prevent the emergence of new microbes. They've occurred historically for as long as before history even recorded it. History is full of them. But in answer to your question how do you prevent that from becoming a pandemic. and that's what we talk about lessons learned. What can we learn having gone through this. Where the united states was ranked by public health agencies as being the best prepared country in the world for pandemic and we got hit among the top three with brazil and india as the three worst in the sense of numbers of cases. And and dr batniji think that that is because we were prepared for previous pandemics in not future wanting. Where are we ready to fight the last war. Not the next war. I think it's partially that not completely. I think it was. There were things that went wrong early on in. That was the issue with the testing that we didn't have a testing system for a considerable period of time. And we were testing only symptomatic people. Because we're not fully aware that a symptomatic spread was really really very important so those are the things that i think could have been done differently. And then don't want to relitigate what went on last year but there are things that i think could have been done better. Although i live in new york now i grew up in arkansas and then moved when i was twelve to dc and it is heartbreaking to me. Dr fauci that arkansas louisiana tennessee mississippi so much of the south have vaccination rates. That are half of what we see in the northeast since you've had to communicate now over so many decades so many different public health challenges and also imperatives. How do you think we rebuild trust in science and especially trust in in vaccines vaccinations. That is something that is not going to happen easily chelsea. I think that we may have to find ways. And that's a complicated issue as you will know probably better than i do. It's a complicated issue of how you heal the differences and end the hostility. I mean i've been the object myself of a phenomenal amount of hostility. Merely because i'm promoting. What really fundamental simple public health principles that seems astounding that that would generate a considerable degree of hostility. But it is it is so. I don't think the answer is intensifying the hostility and pointing figures. I think the approaches to outreach to try and understand each other better and realized that we have differences but those differences should be the source of strength in some respects and not the source of chaos. So i don. I don't know the answer to your question is if it's a seemingly simple question with a complicated answer we've got to reach out to people and get them to understand that this is for their own safety their own health and also what i referred to as communal responsibility your responsibility to society because there is a thing called the chain of transmission of an outbreak and one of the very interesting and i must say quite unique aspects of sauce covy to in covid nineteen. Is that the same virus that has killed. Almost six hundred thousand americans makes many. Many people have no symptoms at all. Just doesn't bother them. I mean there's thirty forty percent of the people get no symptoms at all so that is in many respects on unprecedented to have that situation usually when you have something as potentially deadly as this it makes just about everybody a little bit sick. This is something where there are people who are saying why should i get vaccinated the chances of my getting into trouble of very very low. And they're correct if you look at the rate of hospitalizations of young people. It's zero it's small compared to the rate among elderly people and among people with underlying conditions. But there are a couple of things there that people don't fully understand you're not completely exempt because a lot of young people wind up getting into trouble statistically not nearly as many as the elderly and those with the line conditions but there's another aspect of it let's say you get infected and you don't get any symptoms at all and you say see. I got infected big deal. What's the difference the differences that it is conceivable and maybe likely that even though you got no symptoms that you would inadvertently an innocent. I'll use that word. pass it on to someone else. Who would then pass it on to someone else who would then get a serious consequence so there is a degree that have to consider of. What is my societal responsibility of. Not being part of the chain of transmission as opposed to being a dead end for the virus. So do you wanna be a dead end for the virus or do you want to be a situation where you're part of the transmission chain which would get other people in trouble but that's tough to get that concept across dr fauci. I never thought. I would say i wanted to be a dead end but yes here. I am like very happy to be fully vaccinated in a in a dead end. We'll be right back. Stay with us at children's national hospital. Everything we do is just for kids are top. Rank specialists are here for kids of all ages from babies who need help before they're even born to teens and young adults are pediatric work to diagnose problems quickly and thoroughly and use treatments designed exclusively for growing children with convenient locations. All across the dc metro area. Find a specialist. Today at children's national dot org slash stronger. Any college can make you on paper at penn college. We're more into looking good on steel and looking good on x-rays with looking good and code building and rebuilding vision and revisions and when it's all said and done you'll look good to everyone because the past might be written on paper but the future will be made by hand. Learn more at p. c. t. dot edu. I do want to ask about preparedness. Because i think probably a lot of people are now as we are vaccinating the country. I know a lot of people wanna put cove in the rear view mirror. Leave it in twenty twenty one not worry about it again but we know that the virus is not done with us until we have everyone vaccinated and we know. We need to learn lessons from this to help. Better prepare us going forward. So what lessons do you think we need to learn. And how do you think your work. The nih has to adapt. How do you think the biden administration has to adapt what concrete things have to happen to ensure we are better prepared for the inevitable next time. Okay so two components to my answer chelsea. The first is that when you're dealing with a global pandemic you have to have a global response. We're not gonna be safe on this planet until the pandemic is controlled globally. So right away. It is not necessarily a lesson but almost a mandate that we really need to help the rest of the world as as a rich country. Get this under control because if there's still viral dynamics somewhere even if we get this on the very good control here there's always the danger of the generation variants which then would make our protection somewhat tenuous even with the vaccines. That's the first thing when you look at the future. What lessons learned for the future. We need to also prepare in a global way. There was a thing called the global health security network of the global health security agenda. Will you have into connectivity. Among countries of the world good modern up-to-date communications sharing reagents sharing of of specimens continued good collaboration and communication building up in the local areas. The public health infrastructure. That would allow them to respond in quench when it breaks out in any given country because it's generally don't start spontaneously in twenty-five countries they generally start as a jumping of species usually not always from an animal reservoir to a human and then it spreads to the rest of the world. That doesn't mean that you gotta blame the country where it happens. It just so happens but you've got to have those countries prepared to be able to contain it. So that's the thing with preparedness. The other thing from a scientific standpoint is that we are very fortunate that we have made decades and decades of investment in basic and clinical biomedical research. Which has allowed us to do something. That's unprecedented to get a vaccine in. Which a virus was first identified in january of twenty twenty and then in december of that same year. Eleven months later to be putting vaccine into people's arms. That's ninety four to ninety five percent efficacious. If we were having this conversation ten years ago you would've told me. I was completely crazy thinking that that would happen. It usually takes us in years and the speed was not because we were reckless in doing things. In cutting corners the speed was related to the extraordinary amount of investment that was made of the previous decades in clinical and basic research so there another component of lessons learned we need to continue to make the investments in research that will allow us to have the scientific component of the response be optimal and fortunately for us. That's what happened with regard to the vaccines dr brought to you. You mentioned earlier. The global health security agenda which while it had antecedents for many years really got codified in the aftermath of a bola and of the united states saying what has happened in western africa is clearly a tragedy for people there but it is a danger to us here too and we do need to have more robust public health architecture and there and then that wasn't a priority for the trump administration but it wasn't really a priority for the world. I do admittedly have a little bit of a concern that once we are through covid nineteen. I worry we might lose. Focus on the need to build robust global architecture to help protect public health everywhere will chelsea. I definitely share your. And the reason i do is from my experience in that corporate memory for things that have been very very difficult in. The sense of responding in preparing is often short lived. And when you put this behind us we will be dealing with problems. That are real and present yet. It's difficult to get people to understand that the threat of an outbreak is perpetually a real and present danger so what we've gotta do as globe as as a planet as a community of nations is to just make sure we tell ourselves that when we get this under control that we've gotta say never again and mean it and never again means to really put the effort into the kind of preparation that will require considerable resources and even though it's tough to convince people to give resources to something that isn't happening now we've got a call back the memory of to nineteen twenty twenty and twenty twenty one because we started off in the beginning of this podcast. The fact is that this is really what happened to us. It just came out of nowhere and it just immobilized us for such an extraordinary period of time in a second year now. The economy has been wrecked by. This is sure not only here in the united states. Thank goodness where recovering now. But it's still a lot of people out of work. I think those kinds of memories should spur assan to make sure we are adequately prepared next time around one hopefully will spur us on returning to comment that you made earlier that i am vigorous agreement with it. We have responsibility to help. Vaccinate the world. And while i certainly appreciate president biden's commitment to donate seventy million doses by july fourth. We know we can't effectively donate our way out of this. So i am curious. Dr fauci think about the architecture that we really need to help protect public health globally while often. The focus is on surveillance and specimen collecting testing. What do you think it should be for vaccine research and development for example or the actual ability to manufacturer and to guarantee the quality of vaccines in the next generation. I'm with you one hundred percent on that. And that is referring to building up the capacity and the ability to do technology transfer. So that when you have an outbreak. It isn't only companies in switzerland. The united states in the uk but you have plants and companies and technology and the knowledge to do it in senegal and ethiopia and south africa and indonesia and brazil and chile. So that when you have an outbreak you do have the capability and that is building up. Not only the infrastructure of public health to do surveillance and monitoring but also the ability to respond at a global level to rely on. Donations is a quick immediate partial. Fix but the real durable sustainable fix now in the future is to allow other countries that generally don't have that capacity to be able to make vaccine in a timely fashion and not depend completely on donations from the rich country. The rich countries should donate if they have to but the real ultimate solution is to have a world where it's evenly distributed with his equity in opportunity to make your own countermeasures. 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