17 Burst results for "Clint Smith"

"clint smith" Discussed on Daddy Issues with Joe Buck and Oliver Hudson

Daddy Issues with Joe Buck and Oliver Hudson

03:51 min | Last month

"clint smith" Discussed on Daddy Issues with Joe Buck and Oliver Hudson

"Word you state sanctioned second class citizen if you're considered a citizen at all. If you would kick somebody for three hundred and fifty years, and then extensively stop kicking them for seven of the amount of time that you spent kicking them. It'd be both morally, and intellectually disingenuous didn't look at people and be like what's wrong with you want Jeb. The same academic outcomes aren't saying economic outcomes. Is it so much violence and poverty community? What we know the answers to these questions, right? Right now get doesn't need have to stop s late workshop deal, and how the new deal with the same rate as catalysts have been a generational wealth over the course of the twentieth century, and was designed specifically to prevent black people from having access specifically black people in the south from having access to its greatest benefits, so glad people have access social security minimum wage, protection housing mortgages health care. union membership until you give the single greatest catalysts of intergenerational wealth of course, but century to one group of people, and then you very. Purposely don't give it to another group of people and generations later people want look surprised when they're dispersed outcomes, lines that those resources were allotted, and like I, think these are the stories that have to be told in the history to be reminded of because if if you're not actively. Told this history. If you're not actively reminded of this history, you can walk around. You look at one part of L., A. and another part of La one part of Minneapolis and another part of Minneapolis, one part of DC, in another part of DC, you, in this group of.

Minneapolis Jeb La
"clint smith" Discussed on Daddy Issues with Joe Buck and Oliver Hudson

Daddy Issues with Joe Buck and Oliver Hudson

05:08 min | Last month

"clint smith" Discussed on Daddy Issues with Joe Buck and Oliver Hudson

"Of. humanity and personal that I want to live up to you know and so this poem. was written sort of as a way to say like the this. These are the implications. This is what happens if you fail to say anything when. People beyond your your group or your family, your community or those who aligned with different facets of your identity. When you when you only care about or speak up for things that have to do with those. He will doing a disservice to the sort of larger human project I think, and and you know so for me. I had to think actively about like what is it means? Thinking about how I Clint Smith exist at you know in. Amid a combination of factors in my or a combination of identity, so you know I'm a black straight. Gender male and so like in one context I'm a black man, and I'm part of a group are Blam a black person, and I'm part of a group. We've been historically marginalized depressed, and on another hand I'm a straight man who is a part of a group that has. Done a lot of the right, so thinking about the ways that I both benefit from sexism and Atri arche and homophobia while at the same time. Recognizing the way they like the history of oppression against black people is shaped my family, my community, my lineage, and recognizing that both of those things are a part of me right and recognizing that we all have this sort of amalgamation of factors that shape we are, and how we navigate through the world, and so all as to say you know. When I think about the dangerous silence I think about like what does it mean if I Clint Smith not like actively speaking up for Trans People. What does it mean if our Clint Smith and not acting speaking up for women? What is it mean if Mike Lynch Smith, not actively speaking for people who exist beyond the borders of the United. States a lot about what morning looks like I've written about this bit just. Why is it that we mourn? Some lives in certain ways when the only difference seems to be sort of arbitrary border that we have created between like what one country is in another is so so you know? The dangerous islands was born out of impulse to push back against and sort of unlearn so much of what? I had been consciously unconsciously sort of explicitly and implicitly talk about What I care about an hour. I should move through world Where do where I I know you? You look up to your father and you call your father. Your first teacher I'm wondering where you get this desire to be so introspective. It's so I mean I could listen to you. Talk Forever, and it makes me think about my own failings. Looking at at life, and where I sit the way you are, but where where do you think that comes from?.

Trans People Clint Smith Mike Lynch Smith
"clint smith" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:40 min | 2 months ago

"clint smith" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is Clint Smith he writes about race and justice in the US my name is Clint Smith and I'm a writer poet and teacher Clinton on the show before and we are so grateful that he has come back to spend this entire hour with us so we can listen to how he's processing this moment I think I've I've watched like so many people over the past several years I've watched endless loops of videos of black people being assaulted being beaten being killed at the hands of police at the hands of agility and I had not ever I I know many people have come to moments long before this in which they felt like they didn't want to consume black death in that way and and that is one hundred percent an acceptable decision because I talk often about there's a tension where the very thing that creates a certain level of awareness of phenomenon for people who are not proximate to the black community already is the very thing that can sort of re traumatize black people as were forced to inundate this content that that is you seem to feel unique to to our community you know if we think about the how often we see videos of of white people being killed or beaten at the hands of police it's it's it's far less than I think we have to interrogate why the country accepts that we can watch videos of black people being killed or beaten at the hands of police in ways that are not reflected when we think about other demographics so so I do remember that this was the first one that I felt like I couldn't watch and I think that that's because a confluence of factors I think it's in you know I've been quarantined in my in my home with my family and I think the fatigue of this moment it made it incredibly difficult to add anything else to the plate and and I think I just I didn't need to see something I still need to see another one of us dying yeah and and you know it's interesting that word confluence that used there's so much going on in the world right now and I guess I wonder if there was something different about the death of George Floyd in light of the corona virus which has laid so bare the inequality between white and black Americans in terms of who gets the virus and who doesn't and whether this was kind of the final straw so to speak oh absolutely it has been revealed through the data that black people are being disproportionately killed by corona virus in the United States and what out what often takes place in these moments in which black people are disproportionately impacted by something on file in this country is that we have to go about convincing people that it is not our fault because what can happen is that you can have the Surgeon General who himself is a black man come out and say that black people have to make better decisions that need to be responsible about what they're eating or drinking or consuming without saying anything about the sort of larger systemic and structural realities that underlie their disparities in health outcomes in our community right what does it mean to to talk about the disparities in in health without also talking about the history of segregation that makes it so that black people are living in confined community saturated by poverty and violence as is the case for any community that experience hyper segregation anywhere in the world what does it mean that black people are have a lack of access to health care and all of these things that are or are we are disproportionately represented in the essential jobs that force people to leave their homes and get on public transportation and so any conversation around corona virus that is not taking into account the larger systemic and structural realities that make it so that black people are more exposed and more vulnerable to this virus make it sound as if black people are somehow doing something themselves that are contributing to the disparities and I think that that is a battle that black Americans have had to fight for a long time and you know convincing the country that the conditions that we live in are not simply because of our own doing but are instead because of much larger historical forces and so I think when I think you add when you add what is happened to George Floyd brown Taylor and and so many others recently something is added on top of what is already a a sense of profound exhaustion of having to convince this country that this is not our fault even though this country consistently tells us either implicitly or explicitly that it is it's hard and it's exhausting and I think I I and and so many others I feel a different level of fatigue that that I I don't think I've experienced in my lifetime you have been part of the black lives matter protests before but how would you describe your role in the movement for black lives right now this spring yeah you know I've never really thought of myself as an activist all right think of myself largely as as I'm a writer and I'm a teacher I just received my PhD thinking about the history of of any quality and and I've been teaching in prisons the past six years and so you know my work is as an educator is as a writer and and writing and thinking and teaching about the sort of historical context that shapes the current landscape of inequality and and hopefully attempting to give people a sort of historical political and social context that that better shapes the way they're able to understand what's happening in this particular moment and the reason you know one part of Minneapolis looks another what one way and another part of Minneapolis looks another way is is not the result of the people in those communities but is instead a result of things that have been done to those communities generation after generation after generation and you know many I say Minneapolis obviously because of George Floyd but you can look at any city in the country and see how the history of housing segregation history of mass incarceration history of immigration policy the history of food insecurity the history of of redlining and all of these different phenomenon have shaped what these communities look like and so part of what I see my role as he's writing into those spaces and and educating in those spaces to to help provide some semblance of a political education that makes people better understand how how we arrived and part of doing that is giving Ted talks you've actually been on the show before you write poetry you write beautiful pieces in the Atlantic but are you also on the streets are you are you out there as well or do you feel like that's not what we're your places right now where you can have the most impact yeah that's interesting and that's that's something I've been wrestling with a lock and so part of what I wrote about in this piece recently for the Atlantic is how different this moment feels both you know sort of macro historical sense then two thousand fourteen and fifteen when the movement for black lives was in its early stages and and how different this moment feels now for me personally because now I have a three year old and a one year old and so I have two small children where as in two thousand fourteen or fifteen I didn't have any children and so as I write in the piece I was kind of governed by by nothing but my own anger I was governed by this rates that I felt this that was this as it was for many people it was an incredibly politicizing moment because I felt like I gained a lot of clarity around how this country saw me and I gained a lot of clarity around the way that certain institutions are built and sort of way that we always talk about them is broken being kind of a misnomer because they're not actually broken they're operating in ways that are are fundamentally tied to their origins and their operating in ways that they were largely designed to and so I think it was a moment in which I you know I would be out of these protests and at the time I was living in Boston and and didn't think about anything that might happen to me you know I wasn't really considering certainly I have my my parents and my siblings and but now I have a wife.

Clint Smith US writer Clinton
"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:01 min | 2 months ago

"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I've grown accustomed to a lifetime of aphorisms. Meant to assuage my fierce. pithy sayings meant to convey that everything ends up fine in the end. But there is no solace in rearranging language to make different word. Tell the same lie. Sometimes the moral arc of the universe is not bend in a direction that will comfort us. Sometimes, it bends in ways we don't expect. And there are people who fall off in the process. Please? Dear reader. Do not say that I am hopeless. I believe there is a better future to fight for. Simply, accept the possibility. That I may not live to see. I've grown weary of telling myself is that I might one day begin to believe? We're not all left standing after the war has ended. Some of US have become ghosts. By the time the dust has settled. Clint Smith. Thank you so so much. Thank you I was lovely. Thank you. I'm so grateful as I, said it. It's reminding me of the phrase. We're all in this together, which has just become so flat and flabby and hollow. indeed. Indeed thanks again I. Hope we get to meet some day I. Appreciate It,.

Clint Smith US
"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:17 min | 2 months ago

"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Hey everyone just a quick thanks to our sponsor capital, one capital one knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. That's why they created. The capital, one assistant that looks out for surprise credit card charges like. Duplicate charges or potential fraud then sends an alert to your phone and helps if you need to fix them another way. They're watching out for your money when you're not capital one. What's in your wallet? Seed capital one dot com for details. Cell, phone footage shows police killing unarmed black people. Protesters take to the streets, rinse and repeat for a decade. Why. Removes on. A blunt reminder that we've been here before. On code switch from NPR. It's Ted Radio Hour from NPR I'm a Newsom Roti, and let's get back to poet and author Clint Smith reading US His letter for my future Black Sun which he wrote in two thousand fifteen. My hopes dreams fears for my future Black Sun. Published in two thousand fifteen. Son. I want to tell you how difficult it is to tell someone. They're both beautiful and endangered. So worthy of life, yes, so despised for living. I do not intend to scare you. My father. Your grandfather. taught me. How follow a certain set of rules before I even knew their purpose. He told me that these rules would not apply to everyone. That they would not even apply to all my own friends. But they were ruled to abide by this. Too. Many black boys are killed for doing what others give no second thought. Playing music too loud. Wearing a sweatshirt with the hood. Playing with a toy in the park. My father knew these things. He knew that there was no room for error. He knew it was not fair. But he loved me too much. Not Teach me. Not to protect me. I've told you this story before. But it is worth revisiting. Many Saturday morning. Friends and I would ride bikes through the neighborhood together. The Wind chiseled our faces into work. The. Sent a breakfast being prepared, seek out from the windows. The shotgun homes that mind our street. All that we deemed worthy of our attention with the endless possibilities that lay atop are handlebars. Which is to say? We were children. We were a motley crue. In interracial assemblage of young boys who would have made the Disney. Channel Proud Between building tree houses with secret passwords. Fighting dragons effortlessly sidestepping the perilous fiery breath. Of hitting the game winning shot at stadiums of thousands of people chanting our names. Are Ambitions were as far reaching as the galaxy we had been born into. We were small planets. Simply attempting to find our orbit. On one afternoon. We went to the field where we often played football. Tackle of course. As we were set on replicating the Braun. Bravado that. We watched each Sunday on our television. This time, however, the field was closed. Offense bolted by locked. That could not be snapped. One friend, WHO's long blond hair dangle gently over his ears. Toss the football to me. And immediately began to climb the fence. I watched him. The ease with which he lifted one foot over the other. The indifference of his disposition to the fact that this was an area. We were quite clearly not supposed to enter. I remember hearing the soft distant echo of a police siren. Perhaps a few blocks away. Perhaps headed in a different direction. I couldn't be sure. But I knew better than to ignore it. He reached the other side and look back. Beckoning the rest of us to join him. I held the football in my hand. Looking at him through the chain link fence between us. It was at this moment I realized. How different he and I were. Before I had the words to explain them to either him or myself? How he could break a rule without a second thought. Whereas for me any mistake. Might have the most dire consequences. I hope to teach you so much of what my father taught me. But I pray that you live in a radically different world than the one. He and I have inherited. Do not envious task. When that might become my own. I tell you these things because I know how strong and resilient you'll be. How you will take the fear and make a fourth of the skin. And turn it into a bastion of love against unwarranted in humanity. I want you to realize that sometimes. It will not be the things the world tells you. But the things that does not tell you. It will be the emissions. Rather than the director, fronts, That often. Do the most damage. Your textbooks will likely not tell you how Thomas Jefferson. Thought Blacks were quote inferior to the whites in endowments of both body and mind. Our Franklin Delano Roosevelt's new deal left a whole, just wide enough for black families to fall through by lifting the rest of the country into the middle class. It will not tell you how the federal actively prevented black families from purchasing homes in cities across the country. It will not tell you how police departments across this nation are incentivized to see you as problem something to be taken care of. They will not tell you these things. And because of that they will expect you to believe that the contemporary reality of our community is of our own doing. that. We simply did not work hard enough that things would be different if we simply changed our attitudes or the way we speak. The. Way, we dress With that said, do not for a moment. Thank. You cannot change what exists. This world is a social construction. It can be reconstructed. This world was built. It can be rebuilt. US everything that you accrue. To Re imagine the world. You're not a mistake. You're not a deficit. You're not something to be a radical or rendered obsolete. You exist beyond pathology. You come from lineage of those who built this country. You come from my grandfather's. One, who toiled tobacco fields amid the ever expanding pastures and Mississippi throughout his adolescence, the other who fought a war for country that was spit at his feet as soon as he put down his gun. You come from grandmothers who dedicated their lives to teaching in communities with a of one's education is subject to the whims of the state. You come from parents. Who both protected me from violence and made me feel whole. You are the manifestation of their unyielding commitment to overcome. I. Hope the world you inherit. Is One in which you may love whomever you choose. I hope you read and write and laugh and sing and dance and build and cry, and to all of the things a child should do. I pray that you never have to stand on the other side of offense. And know that it is a world you cannot enter. Simply because of your skin..

football NPR Clint Smith fraud Franklin Delano Roosevelt Braun Disney Mississippi director Thomas Jefferson
"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:01 min | 2 months ago

"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Dr Martin Luther, King Junior. In one thousand, nine, hundred sixty eight speech where he reflects upon the civil rights movement states. In the end. We will remember not the words of our enemies. But the silence of our friends. It's worked that he's been doing for years as a poet and an educator. Here's Clint on the Ted Stage. Teacher I've internalized this message. Every day all around us. We see the consequences of silence manifest themselves in the form of discrimination. Violence Genocide and war. In the classroom! Challenged my students to explore the silences in their own lives poetry. We work together to fill those face. To recognize. To Neymar. To understand that they don't have to be sources of shame. In an effort to create a culture within my classroom where students feel safe, sharing the intimacies of their own silences. I have four core principles posted on the board that sits in the front of my class. which every student signs the beginning of the year? We critically. Right consciously. Speak clearly. Tell you. I find myself thinking a lot about that last point. Tell you. And I realize that if I was going to ask, my students speak up. I was going to have to tell my true. And be honest with them about the times failed to do so. So I. Tell them that growing up. As a kid, a Catholic family in New Orleans. During lent. I was always taught that. The most meaningful thing one could do was to give something. Sacrifice, something you typically indulgent prove to God. You understand his sanctity. I've given up soda. McDonald's French fries. French kisses and everything in between. But one year. I gave up speaking. Figure the most valuable thing I could stack. Was My own voice, but it was like a hen realize. That I had given that up a long time ago. I spent so much a my life, telling people the things they wanted to hear instead of the things they needed to told myself I wasn't meant to be anyone's conscience, because I still had to figure out being my own so sometimes. I just wouldn't say anything. Appeasing ignorance with my silence unaware that validation doesn't need words to endorse its existence when Christian was beat up for being gay, I put my hands in my pocket and walk with my head down. If I didn't even notice, couldn't use my locker for weeks, because the bolt on the lock reminded me of the one I put on my lips when the homeless man on the corner looked at me with. With eyes up really searching for an affirmation that he was worth seeing, I was more concerned with touching the screen and my apple than actually feeding him one when the woman at the fundraising gala said I'm so proud of you. It must be so hard teaching. Those poor unintelligent kids are bit my lip. Because apparently, we needed her money with my students needed their dignity. We spend so much time. Listening to the things people are saying. That we rarely pay attention to the things they don't. Silence is the residue fear. is, feeling your flaws. Gut, Rich Guillotine your tongue. It is the air retreating from your chest because it doesn't feel safe in your lungs, silence is Rwandan genocide. Silence is Katrina. It is what you hear when there aren't enough. bodybags left the southbound after the news is already tied charring, it has changed. It is privileged. It is pain. There was no time to pick your battles. When your battles have already picked you I will not let silence wrap itself around my indecision so this year. Instead of giving something up. I will live every day as if we're the microphone tucked under my tongue. Stage on the underside of my inhibition. because. Who has that was so box? No you've ever needed. Voice! You. Mention how much is being left unsaid and a lot of your research and writing is about how the US has failed to address. And talk about and reckon with its past whether it's slayer D-. Jim Crow systemic discrimination as you just described, there has been no national conversation here like in Germany about Nazism in World War Two. I used to live there or how South Africa addressed history of apartheid with its Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Why. Why has there been no conversations? Yeah it's it's something that is. That feels specifically unique to this country in this way, and so the book actually have coming out next year entitled how the Word is past is thinking about this question is thinking about. How different places across the country different historical sites museums, monuments memorials different cities how they reckon with Warfield to reckon with their relationship to the history of slavery, so for example you brought up Germany, and if we were to go to Germany. And there was a prison. On top of a former concentration camp. In which the majority of the people in prison there were disproportionately Jewish. It would very clearly be in a front to our moral sensibilities. It be unacceptable. People would be protesting outside of that place every day. And yet in the United States the largest maximum security prison in the country Angola prison in southern Louisiana. is on top of former plantation. In which eighty some odd percent of the people, there are black, our black men, and and what is say about the way part of what I'm interested in exploring is the ways white supremacy both violence. Against Black people, but also numbs this country to two sorts of violence that should otherwise be outrageously. There should be no reason that a prison is on top of foreign plantation, especially a prison in which the vast majority of the people there. Are Black and so part of what I'm doing in. The book is exploring like well. What is it that allows for this to happen? What is it that allows for the so many confederate statues to exist across this country? What is it that allows for? Plantations to be sites of weddings for them to for there to be sites of parties and celebrations when they are the site of so much historical trauma in pain, so many others in how can what does it mean for a site to be a place of celebration for someone and to be a site of violence for another can those two people experienced the same place in such such different ways in part of why I'm asking when I go to all of these places whether it be Angola whether it be windy plantation. Plantation in Louisiana are Monticello Virginia or the Blandford cemetery where the one of the largest confederate cemeteries in the country is asking to what extent of our people who are responsible for these places, twit extent, are they reckoning with what is happening on this land, and to what extent they not I think that the question of how places reckon with slavery is is reflective, is in many ways, a microcosm of how willing America is to reckon with myriad of of manifestations of systemic racism and and I think that.

United States Germany Angola Dr Martin Luther Clint Louisiana. New Orleans King Junior Blandford cemetery Neymar McDonald South Africa apple Katrina Jim Crow Warfield America Reconciliation Commission
"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:24 min | 2 months ago

"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I'm thinking a lot about this lady. This idea of humanity. And specifically who, in this world is afforded the privilege of being perceived as fully human. The world has watched unarmed. Black men and women have had their lives taken at the hands of police invigilate. These events. Transpired after them. Have brought me back to my own child. And the decisions that my parents made raising a black boy in America. That growing up I didn't always understand the way that I do now. These are the sorts of messages I've been inundated with my entire life. Always keep your hands where they can see them. Don't move too quickly. Take off your hood when the sun goes down, my parents raised me and my siblings in an armor of advice in ocean of alarm, bells, or someone wouldn't steal the breath in our lungs that they wouldn't make a memory of skin that we could be kids, not casket or concrete, and it's not because they thought it would make us better than anyone else is simply because they wanted to keep us alive. When we say that black lives matter, it's not because others don't is simply because we must affirm that we are worthy of existing without fear. When so many things tell us we are not i. want to live in a world where my son will not be presumed guilty. The moment he is born where toy in his hand isn't mistaken for anything other than a toy and I refuse to accept that we can build this world into something new some place where a child's name doesn't have to be written on a t shirt tombstone where the value of someone's life isn't determined by anything other than the fact that they had lungs. Please? We're every single one of us. Can Breathe. We'll hear more from writer and scholar Clint Smith after the break. It's the Ted Radio hour from NPR. I'm a new summer ODI stay with us. Everyone just a quick thanks to two of our sponsors who help make this podcast possible I to e trade trading isn't for everyone, but e trade is whether it saving for a rainy day or for your retirement each rate has you covered? They can help you. Check financial goals off your list, and with a team of professionals giving you support when you need it. You can be confident that your money is working hard. Hard for you get more than just trading with E. Trade to get started visit e-trade dot com slash podcast for more information e-trade securities. LLC member Finra SIPC, thanks also to duck duck go. Do you want the same Internet but more privacy duct go can help. They helped millions of people like you get privacy online without any tradeoffs with one download you can search and browse privately. Avoiding trackers duck duck go privacy simplified. With civil unrest, the pandemic and the economic crisis. You want to know what's happening right when you wake up and that's why there is up. I The news. You need in about ten minutes from NPR news. Listen every day. It's the Ted Radio Hour from NPR I'm a new summer ODI. And we were just hearing how writer and researcher Clint. Smith is thinking through this moment when black voices are asking.

Clint Smith NPR writer America E. Trade LLC researcher
"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:52 min | 2 months ago

"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Ted Conferences to bring about the future. We want to see around the world to understand who we are from those talks. We bring you speakers and ideas that will surprise you. You just don't know what you're GONNA. Find Challenge you have. The acts are self like. Why's it no worthy and even change you, I. Literally feel like I'm indifferent I. Do you feel that way ideas worth spreading. From Ted. NPR. New Summary. In Minneapolis Louisville Atlanta Los Angeles in hundreds of cities across the country. People are taking to the streets, and protesting, expressing their pain, anger and frustration I want my son and daughter to live in peace in America, they are Americans. We demand change in the system. It's not the real issue is institutional racism. Injustice that's been going on in America against black people. A minority people forever. Ever, stop fighting. We can't stop fighting. A fire we need protection. Meet piece. You won't stand for this then, don't Stanford the role of organizers like myself is to continue to beat the drums when we think no one's listening because there's always planting seeds for hope for another world, and for people to become a part of it. Before the chanting and marching and demands for change before police used tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse even the most peaceful crowds Ahmad armory was killed by two white men while jogging in Brunswick Georgia. Brianna Taylor was killed by police in her own home in Louisville. Kentucky and in Minneapolis Minnesota on May Twenty Fifth George Floyd was killed by an officer who put a need to his neck for eight minutes and forty six seconds. I! Don't remember exactly where I was but I do remember it. It was the first video. In, the years that I I decided I couldn't watch. This is Clint Smith. He writes about race and injustice. In the US, my name is clint. Smith and I'm a writer, poet and teacher Clinton on the show before, and we are so grateful that he has come back to spend this entire hour with us, so we can listen to how he's processing this moment I think I've I've watched like so many people. The past several years I've watched endless loops of videos of black people, being assaulted, being beaten being killed at the hands of police at the hands of Delancey and I had not ever I I know many people had come to moments long before this in which they felt like they didn't want to consume black death in that way, and and that is one hundred percent an acceptable decision, because as I talk often about there's attention where the very thing that creates a certain level of awareness of phenomena for people who are not proximate to the black community, already is the very thing that can sort of retraumatize black people as we're forced to inundate this content that. That seems to feel unique to to our community You know if we think about the how often we see videos of white people, being killed or being at the hands of police it's it's far less than I think we have to interrogate why the country accepts that we can watch videos of black people being killed or beaten at hands of police in ways that are not reflected when we think about other demographics so. So so I do remember that this was the first one that I felt like I couldn't watch and I think that that's because the confluence of factors. I think it's you know I've been quarantined demain in my home with my family and I think the fatigue of this moment made it incredibly difficult to add anything else to the plate, and and I think I. Just I didn't need to see something Just, didn't need to see another one of US dying. Yeah, and and you know it's interesting that word confidence that you used There's so much going on in the world right now and I guess I wonder if there was something different about the death of George Floyd in light of the corona virus, which has laid, so bear the inequality between white and black Americans in terms of who gets the virus, and who doesn't and whether this was kind of. The final Straw so to speak. Oh absolutely, it has been revealed through the data that black people are being disproportionately killed by corona virus in the United States, and what would often takes place in these moments in which black people are disproportionately impacted by something in this country is that we have to go about convincing people that it is not our fault. Because what can happen is that you can have the surgeon general who? Who himself is a black man. Come out and say that black people have to make better decisions by early to be responsible about what they're eating or drinking, consuming without saying anything about the sort of larger systemic and structural realities that underlie the disparities in health outcomes in our community. What does it mean to to talk about the disparities in health without also talking about the history of segregation? Segregation that makes us so that black people are living in confined communities saturated by poverty and violence, as is the case for any community that experience hyperstimulation anywhere in the world. What does it mean that black people have a lot of access to healthcare and all of these things that are or are disproportionately represented in the essential jobs that force people to leave their homes and get on public. Public Transportation and so any conversation around Corona virus that is not taking into account, the largest systemic and structural realities that make it so that black people are more exposed and more vulnerable to this virus. Make it sound as if black people are somehow doing something themselves that are contributing to the disparities and I think that is a battle that Americans have had to fight for a long time. convincing. This country that the conditions that we live in are not simply because of our own doing, but are instead because of much larger historical forces, and so when you add. When you add what has happened to George Floyd Brown. Taylor and so many others recently, something is added on top of what is already a sense of profound exhaustion of having to convince this country that this is not our fault. even though who country consistently. tells us either implicitly or explicitly that it is. It's hard, and it's exhausting. I think I and so many others. Feel a different level of fatigue that that I I don't think I've experienced in my lifetime You have been part of the black lives matter protests before. But how would you describe your role in the Movement for black lives right now the spring. Yeah, you know I've never really thought of myself. As an activists I think of myself largely as a writer and I'm a teacher I just received my PhD, thinking about the history of of inequality, and I've been teaching in prisons the past six years, and so you know my work as an educator is as a writer and writing and thinking and teaching about the sort of historical context that shapes the current landscape of inequality and. Attempting to give people a sort of historical political in social context, that better shapes the way they're able to understand what's happening in this particular moment and the reason you know one part of Minneapolis looks another one way in another part of Minneapolis looks another way is not the result of the people in those communities, but instead a result of things.

Minneapolis Clint Smith US George Floyd Ted Conferences writer Brianna Taylor Louisville America George Floyd Brown NPR Corona Ahmad armory Kentucky Delancey Minnesota Brunswick Georgia Public Transportation Clinton
"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:01 min | 2 months ago

"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"I've grown accustomed to a lifetime of aphorisms. Meant to assuage my fierce. pithy sayings meant to convey that everything ends up fine in the end. But there is no solace in rearranging language to make different word. Tell the same lie. Sometimes the moral arc of the universe is not bend in a direction that will comfort us. Sometimes, it bends in ways we don't expect. And there are people who fall off in the process. please. Dear reader. Do not say that I am hopeless. I believe there is a better future to fight for. Simply accept the possibility that I may not live to see. I've grown weary of telling myself. Is that I? Might One day begin to believe? We're not all left standing after the war has ended. Some of US have become ghosts. By the time the dust has settled. Clint Smith. Thank you so so much, thank you. I was lovely, thank you. I'm so grateful as I said it. It's reminding me of the phrase. We're all in this together, which has just become so flat and flabby and hollow. indeed. Indeed thanks again I hope we get to meet some day. I appreciate it.

Clint Smith US
"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:17 min | 2 months ago

"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Hey everyone just a quick thanks to our sponsor capital, one capital one knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. That's why they created. The capital one assistant that looks out for surprise credit card charges like. Duplicate charges or potential fraud then sends an alert to your phone and helps if you need to fix them another way. They're watching out for your money when you're not capital one. What's in your wallet? Seed capital one dot com for details. Cell phone footage shows police killing unarmed black people protesters to the streets, rinse and repeat for a decade. Why? Removes on. A blunt reminder that we've been here before. On code switch from NPR. It's Ted Radio hour from NPR. I'm Newsom Roti and let's get back to poet and author. Clint Smith reading US his letter for my future Black Sun which he wrote in two thousand fifteen. My hopes dreams fears for my future Black Sun. Published in two thousand fifteen. Son. I want to tell you how difficult it is to tell someone. They're both beautiful and endangered. So worthy of life, yes, so despised for living. I, do not intend to scare you. My father. Your grandfather. taught me. How follow a certain set of rules before I? Even knew their purpose. He told me that these rules would not apply to everyone. That they would not even apply to all my own friends. But they were ruled to abide by nonetheless. Too. Many black boys are killed for doing what others give a second thought. Playing music too loud. Wearing a sweatshirt with the hood. Playing with a toy in the park. My father knew these things? He knew that there was no room for error. He knew it was not fair. But he loved me too much not to teach me. Not to protect me. I've told you this story before. But it is worth revisiting. Many Saturday morning. Friends and I would ride bikes through the neighborhood together. The Wind chiseled our faces into work. The sent a breakfast being prepared seek out from the windows. The shotgun homes that mind our street. All that we deemed worthy of our attention with the endless possibilities that lay atop are handlebars. Which is to say? We were children. We were a motley crue. In interracial assemblage of young boys who would have made the Disney channel proud. Between building tree houses with secret passwords. Fighting dragons effortlessly sidestepping the perilous fiery breath. Of, hitting the game, winning shot at stadiums of thousands of people chanting our names. Are Ambitions were as far reaching as the galaxy we had been born into. We were small planets. Simply, attempting to find our orbit. On one afternoon. We went to the field where we often played football. Tackle of course. As, we were set on replicating the Braun Bravado that we watched each Sunday on our television. This time. However, the field was closed. Offense bolted by locked. That could not be snapped. One friend, WHO's long blond hair, dangle gently over his ears. Toss the football to me. And immediately began to climb the fence. I watched him. The ease with which he lifted one foot over the other. The indifference of his disposition to the fact that this was an area, we were quite clearly not supposed to enter. I remember hearing the soft distant echo of a police siren. Perhaps a few blocks away. Perhaps headed in a different direction. I couldn't be sure. But I knew better than to ignore it. He reached the other side and look back. Beckoning the rest of us to join him. I held the football in my hand. Looking at him through the chain link fence between us. It was at this moment I realized. How different he and I were. Before I had the words to explain them to either him or myself. How he could break a rule without a second thought. Whereas for me any mistake. Might have the most dire consequences. I hope to teach you so much of what my father taught me. But I pray that you live in a radically different world than the one he and I have inherited. Do not envious task. When? That might become my own. I. Tell You these things because I know how strong and resilient you'll be. How you will take the fear and make a fourth of the skin. And turn it into a bastion of love against unwarranted in humanity. I want you to realize that sometimes. It will not be the things the world tells you. But the things that does not tell you. It will be the emissions. Rather than the director fronts. That often do the most damage. Your textbooks will likely not tell you how Thomas. Jefferson thought blacks were quote inferior to the whites in endowments of both body and mind. Our Franklin Delano Roosevelt's new deal left to hold just wide enough for black families to fall through by lifting the rest of the country into the middle class. It will not tell you how the federal actively prevented black families from purchasing homes in cities across the country. It will not tell you how police departments across this nation are incentivized to see you as problem something to be taken care of. They will not tell you these things. And because of that, they will expect you to believe that. The contemporary reality of our community is of our own doing. That we simply did not work hard enough that things would be different if we simply changed our attitudes or the way we speak. The way we dress. With that said do not for a moment. Thank. You cannot change what exists. This world is a social construction. It can be reconstructed. This world was built. It can be rebuilt. US everything that you accrue. To Re imagine the world. You're not a mistake. You're not a deficit. You're not something to be a radical or rendered obsolete. You exist beyond pathology. You come from lineage of those who built this country. You come from my grandfather's. One, who toiled tobacco fields amid the ever expanding pastures and Mississippi throughout his adolescence, the other who fought a war for country that was spit at his feet as soon as he put down his gun. You come from grandmothers who dedicated their lives to teaching in communities with a quality of one's education is subject to the whims of the state. You come from parents. Who both protected me from violence and made me feel whole. You are the manifestation of their unyielding commitment to overcome. I hope the world you inherit. Is One in which you may love whomever you choose. I hope you read and write and laugh and sing and dance and build and cry, and to all of the things a child should do. I pray that you never have to stand on the other side of offense. And know that it is a world you cannot enter. Simply because of your skin..

football NPR fraud Clint Smith Franklin Delano Roosevelt Disney Mississippi director Jefferson Thomas
"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:01 min | 2 months ago

"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Dr Martin Luther King Junior. In one thousand, nine, hundred sixty eight speech where he reflects upon the civil rights movement states. In the end. We will remember not the words of our enemies. But the silence of our friends. It's worked that he's been doing for years as a poet and an educator. Here's Clint on the Ted Stage Teacher I've internalized this message. Every day all around us. We see the consequences of silence manifest themselves in the form of discrimination. Violence? Genocide and war. In the classroom. Challenged my students to explore the silences in their own lives poetry. We work together to fill those face. To recognize. To Neymar. To understand that they don't have to be sources of shame. In an effort to create a culture within my classroom, where students feel safe, sharing the intimacies of their own silences. I have four core principles posted on the board that sits in the front of my class. which every student signs the beginning of the year? We critically. Right consciously. Speak clearly. Tell you. I find myself thinking a lot about that last point. Tell you. And I realize that if I was going to ask, my students speak up. I was going to have to tell my true. And be honest with them about the times failed to do so. So I tell them that growing up. As a kid a Catholic family in New Orleans. During lent. I was always taught that the most meaningful thing one could do was to give something. Sacrifice something you typically indulgent prove to God you understand his sanctity. I've given up Soda McDonald's French fries, French kisses and everything in between. But one year. I gave up speaking. Figure the most valuable thing I could sacrifice was my own voice, but it was like a hen realize. That I had given that up a long time ago. I spent so much a my life. Telling people the things they wanted to hear instead of the things they needed to told myself. I wasn't meant to be anyone's conscience. Because I still had to figure out being my own so sometimes. I just wouldn't say anything. Appeasing ignorance with my silence unaware that validation doesn't need to endorse its existence when Christian was beat up for being gay I, put my hands in my pocket and walk with my head down. If I didn't even notice, couldn't use my locker for weeks because the boat on the lock reminded me of the One I. Put on my lips when the homeless man on the corner looked at me with. With is up really searching for an affirmation that he was worth seeing I was more concerned with touching the screen and my apple than actually feeding him one when the woman at the fundraising gala said I'm so proud of you. It must be so hard teaching. Those poor unintelligent kids are bit my lip. Because apparently, we needed her money with my students needed their dignity. We spend so much time. Listening to the things people are saying. That we rarely pay attention to the things they don't. Silence is the residue fear. Is Feeling your flaws, gut rich guillotine your tongue, it is the air retreating from your chest because it doesn't feel safe in your lungs, silence is Rwandan. Genocide silence is Katrina. It is what you hear when there aren't enough. bodybags left the southbound after the news is already tied charring, it has changed. It is privileged. It is pain. There was no time to pick your battles. When your battles have already picked you, I will not let silence wrap itself around my indecision so this year. Instead of giving something up. I will live every day as if the microphone tucked under my. Tongue. Stage on the underside of my inhibition. Because, who has that was so box? No. You've ever needed. Voice. You mention how much is being left unsaid and a lot of your research and writing is about how the US has failed to address. And talk about and reckon with its past whether it's Slayer, D-? Jim Crow systemic discrimination as you just described. There has been no national conversation here like in Germany about Nazism in World War Two. Are you still live there or how? South Africa addresses history of apartheid with its Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Why why has there been no conversations? Yeah it's it's something that is. That feels specifically unique to this country in this way, and so the book actually have coming out next year entitled how the Word is past is thinking about this question is thinking about. How different places across the country, different historical sites museums, monuments, memorials different cities how they reckon with Warfield to reckon with their relationship to the history of slavery, so for example you brought up Germany and if we were to go to Germany. And there was a prison. On top of a former concentration camp. In which the majority of the people in prison, there were disproportionately Jewish. It would very clearly be in a front to our moral sensibilities. It be unacceptable. People would be protesting outside of that place every day. And yet in the United States the largest maximum security prison in the country, Angola prison in southern Louisiana. is on top of former plantation. In which eighty some odd percent of the people, there are black, our black men, and and what is say about the way part of what I'm interested in exploring is the ways white supremacy both violence. Against Black people, but also numbs this country to two sorts of violence that should otherwise be outrageously. There should be no reason that a prison is on top of foreign plantation, especially a prison in which the vast majority of the people there. Are Black and so part of what I'm doing in the book is exploring like well. What is it that allows for this to happen? What is it that allows for the so many confederate statues to exist across this country? What is it that allows for? Plantations to be sites of weddings for them to for there to be sites of parties and celebrations when they are the site of so much historical trauma in pain, so many others in how can what does it mean for a site to be a place of celebration for someone and to be a site of violence for another, and how can those two people experienced the same place in such such different ways in part of why I'm asking when I go to all of these places whether it be Angola whether it be windy plantation. Plantation in Louisiana are Monticello Virginia or the Blandford cemetery where the one of the largest confederate cemeteries in the country is asking to what extent of our people who are responsible for these places to what extent are they reckoning with? What has happening on this land, and to what extent they not I think that the question of how places reckon with slavery is is reflective, is in many ways, a microcosm of how willing America is to reckon with myriad of of manifestations of systemic racism and and I think that.

Germany United States Angola Dr Martin Luther Clint Louisiana. New Orleans Blandford cemetery Neymar Soda McDonald South Africa America apple Katrina Jim Crow Reconciliation Commission Warfield Monticello Virginia
"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:29 min | 2 months ago

"clint smith" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"clint smith" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"clint smith" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Com I'm Patrick President Trump is paid tribute to. Federal immigration officials drawing a contrast with, some democratic lawmakers the president hosted a White House ceremony to honor employees of the US immigration, and customs enforcement and the customs. And border protection. We love you. We support you we will always have your back and I think you know that the president denounced some Democrats who want to abolish is calling those lawmakers, open border radicals Greg Clugston. The White House the World Service was, held, Monday, forbath, Uber Chet Utah firefighter killed. Last week, battling California's Mendocino, complex fire, Draper, city fire chief Clint Smith praised and other firefighters will be. Protected to safety take our hands This show is the way to. This gave routes Helpless fortify our own fire lines I love you brother have a dozen firefighters have died this season battling the western wildfires in California when blue smoke from several wildfires under the, San Francisco Bay area where Hayes let it thirties to issue. At air quality advisory through Tuesday if stocks don't drop significantly, by the close of trading Wednesday the bull market that began in March two thousand, nine will have lasted nine years five months and thirteen days it's a record that few would have predicted when the market struggled to find its footing after a fifty percent plunge during the. Financial crisis Bank rate dot com Mark Hamrick says it's been a sweet ride for investors for people who have been investing for retirement or just simply have been exposed to the market through. Mutual funds t. acid individual equities this. Has been a very generous rally perhaps the likes of which in the sense. Of it's a length and magnitude and we won't see again for, many years on Wall Street Monday. The Dow gained eighty nine points the s&p rose six and the NASDAQ was..

president Patrick President Trump California White House Greg Clugston US Clint Smith San Francisco Bay Mark Hamrick Mendocino Draper Hayes World Service
"clint smith" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"clint smith" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"In a flag draped cascade. Escorted by firefighters holding axes, across their chests Matt Huber chat was, laid to rest in his home state of Utah member of Draper Utah fire department for chat Di bologna. Assignment battling the Mendocino complex fire in California Raper fire chief Clint Smith so math Find a great spot on. The hill Work and watch over. Us Chad was forty two years old. He was, killed by, a falling free Alex stone ABC news WBZ, news, time eleven oh three traffic and, weather together the Subaru retailers of. New England all-wheel-drive traffic on the threes Joe Stapleton Donna a. Very slow ride ninety. Three our QA through the o.'neil tunnel two left lanes, taken away for overnight work in the ninety three northbound exit twenty three government center. Is also blocked off for, the project lower deck of route ninety three southbound will be blocking the right travel. Lane there then farther south exit twenty four. To government center on the Callahan tunnel will be blocked off for the overnight Sarah drive eastbound, the ramp from Leverett circle the, route, ninety three southbound is closing and also watch out for crews of Ted Williams tunnel. Both, eastbound and westbound bass pike east and westbound working on those ramps to and from one twenty eight north in western also. They're working east and westbound on the Allston Brighton area down towards the Pru have worked sounds on route three southbound halfway, we train route fourteen and route three a. and the Duxbury. Kingston area who won twenty eight north and southbound lane restrictions putting being put in place by great. Plain avenue in Needham also watch. Out for the works out five southbound, and Wareham on twenty Four southbound. By route, twenty, seven in Brockton during some work, north of the city on route. One in both directions right by route sixteen and route ninety. Nine and the revere. Area ninety three northbound has a work zone by spot, pond in Stoneham also watch out for the work areas on quantity five northbound ninety. Three and handover one twenty, eight southbound back by route one fourteen and Joe Stapleton WBZ twenty four hour traffic. Network Dave Bowers on the four day WBZ. AccuWeather forecast partly to mostly cloudy tonight a low of sixty three getting into the fifties and, submit land suburbs they'll be areas, of, fog in spotty drizzle later tonight into tomorrow warning especially from Boston on south and. East, later tomorrow clouds breaks the son of a high of seventy four then tomorrow night humid with a couple of showers later. Low sixty seven Wednesday variable cloudiness breezy humid cold front moving through with a couple of showers and a thunderstorm behind eighty, one and in the wake of that it's nice on Thursday. Good deal is sunshine with low humidity and high seventy eight I'm AccuWeather Rhonda's Dave Bowers WBZ News Radio ten thirty partly cloudy.

Dave Bowers Chad Callahan tunnel Ted Williams tunnel Joe Stapleton Donna AccuWeather Utah Joe Stapleton Clint Smith Matt Huber Draper Utah chat Di bologna Brockton Mendocino revere Kingston ABC Brighton Duxbury
"clint smith" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"clint smith" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"And now the news segment that i call the we talk about all the news is just trump that we should be paying attention to with me britney pack net former member of the ferguson commission bama's task force in twenty th century policing can a leader in the education space samuelson young way data scientist and clint smith third i resident economic it's the news this is britney pack net atmospheric yeti on all social media mrs samson yang way at sam's way on twitter end i just got an instagram so at sam's on instagram i'm out fan out here follow sam this clint smith at clint smith this is at diriye dra y on twitter police fallow sam instagram he literally just gotten as like negative three dollars so sam is amazing have you follow them on twitter he's he's a man on twitter instagram he's trying to build build it up y'all i just wanna say that sam's instagram just like his curls make america great again and not the things that kinda seems to be purporting i really don't know what's going on and i've been a fan for a long time and i don't want to i don't want to you know a fan of kanji or a of same curl both i mean obviously anybody smart has been a fan of the old kind yeah and sam's curls i don't want to say what i think is going on because it's not my job to make that call but what i will say is it's certainly been an interesting week he's been all over the place like he started with those pictures that he sent out with white supremacists making white supremacists symbols with their hands which was like i don't even know if he knew what was going on but that's what happened and then you know talking about trump and something about dragon energy.

bama sam instagram clint smith trump ferguson scientist britney twitter america three dollars
"clint smith" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"clint smith" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

"We make sense of education reform policies them were not actually really doing the work because what happens is are you know similar to what we're talking about before but if you look at a school and a school is failing and you are not doing any sort of meaningful diagnosis beyond the context of fat physical infrastructure or v landscape of that school and then you you start to blame the teachers you start to blame the students you buy start blame the administration and you're not you're not looking at the bigger picture of like what what what is the housing situation around that school were the neighborhoods they're feeding into that school where the conditions of those neighborhoods was sort of resources are being afforded to those neighborhoods and not what is historically been done to that community to make it look the way that it that it is you know what and how we understanding you know the relationship between property tax uh as a mechanism for funding schools and the quality of the school that these students go to i mean so she can go back and back back but when you teach you realize that and for me i reached a point where i was becoming really invested in trying to get a better sense of what those things were an and that's when i knew i wanted to make a transition to to graduate school to to really do a deep dive into understanding a lot of things i think i had a surface level understanding of that i just kinda wanted more time to make sense of as fascinating and i i love this idea that teaching you know it really gave you a bigger understanding of the context of your students the bigger understanding of the context of yourself and then it forced you to kind kinda dive deeper growing up what it had eucation look like for you what was in a what was your home life like what was year what was your schooling growing up did you have a mr clint smith in your life as well uh it's good question you know i had a lot of great teachers um you know i think tony mauresom has this quote i'm paraphrasing which talks about you know if there's not a book that has been written than you need to write it you know if the right.

mr clint smith tony mauresom property tax
"clint smith" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"clint smith" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

"We don't read and write poetry because it's cute we read and write poetry because we are members of the human race and the human race is filled with passion santa millier these words are from the nineteen eighty nine film dead poet's society yemen seen it too heavily do yourself a favor an added cheer media intake for the week but i mentioned this grateful because there's someone like robin williams character the unequivocally resonates with this idea that poetry is about passion i think it'd be even more accurate to say that his poetry goes be on passion in straight into the world of social engagement his work creatively inspire says listeners out of ignorance in into the world of a real and knocked than tick kind of empathy his name is clinch smith now clint smith is a writer teacher hit a ph d candidate at harvard university he's a 24 team national poetry slam champion he's an individual world poetry slammed by lewis and he's the author of the poetry collection counting descent his writing his appeared in the new yorker the atlantic the guardian and he's delivered to popular ted talks the danger of silence and how to raise a black son in america let me just tell you he is insanely talented and basically way over all of our heads certainly mine he does really really important work in the world of words the asks us the most important questions concerning the world that we live in today what makes his work especially unique an interesting to me is his blend of arts and activism and i've been a fan of cleanse work for a long time now we have a number of mutual friend some whom who have been on the podcast already and i've also just been following him on twitter for years at this point i have so much admiration from clinton i love learn.

yemen robin williams smith harvard university lewis new yorker twitter clinton clint smith writer ted america