28 Burst results for "Clinical Director"

Altogether You with Jenna Riemersma

The Addicted Mind Podcast

04:14 min | 2 months ago

Altogether You with Jenna Riemersma

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind podcast my guest. Today is jenna remers. mma and i'm really excited to have gone. She's going to talk about internal family systems and how that can be helpful for anyone. Who's struggling with addiction but A lot of different issues as well so jenna. Do you want to introduce yourself please. I'd love to thanks to gain. I'm jenna riemersma and i'm the clinical director of the atlanta center for relational healing. I'm also teaching faculty for the international institute of trauma and addiction professionals as well as at a recovery network and every released a new book on internal family systems called altogether. You awesome. so. I'm so excited that they're coming on because i have had some experience. Some training in internal family systems. And i really like it. And i really like it. As a way of relating to yourself so i'm excited to talk about this topic but before we start i want to know a little bit more about you. And what got you into this work. And how did you find this and stuff like that. Absolutely well i'll tell you what the day that i encountered internal family systems really turned my life upside down. I have been in private practice for a long time. I've worked in residential care and you have been trained in every model of therapy under the sun an i f s which is abbreviated version of internal family systems. Suddenly made it makes sense and it made sense of my own struggles and of the struggles of my clients and it gave me language to really find healing much more effectively into really name. The positive intent of all of the things that we struggle with at ifs as a way of approaching our struggles with literally no shame with only the embodiment of grace and love and compassion for ourselves and for others that truly has the power to transform everything. And i think that's such a struggle when you talk about shame. How do we relate to ourselves in a way that especially for shame bound and we've had a lot of trauma our life. It's like it is hard to talk to ourselves absolutely and when we know as you and i do as addiction professionals that shame is one of the driving forces of addiction then sometimes the way that we have an internal narrative about our addictive behavior or our struggles or our feelings that we don't like or want it only serves to make that shame worse so in our minds. I if we conceptualize ourselves as a monolithic entity as one singular entity than. We're going to say things. Like i am an addict. I am depressed. I am anxious but when we understand that actually at our core we are a dynamic loving undamaged compassionate connected courageous curious self and that it's actually are parts that have become burdened with addictive behaviors or with depressive feelings or anxious feelings and they take over sometimes and they caused us to feel a certain way or to do certain things but they're not who we are at our core intrinsically that changes everything and not only that when we actually grasped the core principle of ifs. Which is that. All of our parts are actually good. And i'll say that again. Because that's about as counterintuitive. Comes all of my parts all of your parts. All of the parts of everyone of our listeners are good even if they are stuck doing or feeling things that are not good like acting out addictive or feeling yucky feelings. The parts are good and they're carrying are trauma and they're trying their best to help us not feel pain

Jenna Remers Jenna Riemersma Atlanta Center For Relational International Institute Of Tra Jenna
The trouble with embryos

Science Friction

06:43 min | 7 months ago

The trouble with embryos

"Welcome to science fiction. Years coming to you from the Home Studio Bunker, still. Can't seem to get the doves and waterbirds to be quite when I need them to be, but look in today's show. It's a wild story about biology ethics, politics and to millionaires on a personal mission that went horribly. Why would on the case is reported John Lee? Who joins me for this show? Hi Natasha Yeah. This starts in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one with Mario and elsevier. They would to property developers from Los Angeles and they really wanted to have a child together, but they were an older couple. Yeah, that's right also was forty and Mario was fifty seven, and they couldn't do it on their own. So in one thousand, nine, hundred one. They decided to come all the way to Australia to try this brand new thing in fertilize. Fertilize Ation Ivf I mean today creating a baby using his totally commonplace, and it's a big industry over familiar. But this was the early eighties when the technology and the science was so new that this just was we'd this idea that you could create a human embryo outside of a woman's womb, and suspend its development in time to it was blowing people's minds. The moment of conception. An event that has taken place in its natural environment, the womb since the doing of human existence. Now it comes in gloss. And with a host of problems, moral, ethical and legal. So Australia was leading the way in fact with the science of RV. If that when the real couple come here, the techniques still very much being Susta, this is experimental stuff. Yeah, and one of the people who knows just how difficult those early days were is Gab, Kovacs he's a professor of obstetric gynecology at Monash University, but back then he was the clinical. Director of the IVF program at the Queen Victoria Hospital in Melbourne. was very difficult to Queen Victoria hospitals over General Hospital and everyone sort that. Is Just a phase. He wasn't going to work. It wasn't a last and we wasting. Everybody's time. When we started doing collections. We have to me. Natural Song goes on spontaneous relation, so it's not unusual to have to collect exit to I. Am for am six I am. So we had a lot of opposition. All IV of treatment started out using the so-called natural cycle method, which meant doctors had to wait for the perfect moment in a woman's natural ovulation cycle to retrieve that one egg. She created every month. If they collected at the right time, it could go on to be fertilized to make an embryo. If they time too late, they'd miss the egg and have to wait another month too early and the egg wasn't mature. Mature enough to be fertilized outside the chances here of actually getting a baby out of IV, if treatment would have been extremely low when the Rayo says rock up in Australia yet, but a talented trio at the Queen. Victoria, hospital was changing all of that, and they were about to put Australia. In the history books so I wanted to do the IV. If in a totally different way to the way they were doing it because I wanted to utilize. Methods developed in animals, scientists Alan, trounson originally trained as a bit and he was to the hospital by IVF. Pioneer cal would car would he allowed me to work with John? Laden to develop a totally different system, which was using fertility drugs to stimulate than women, so we could get more eggs and hence more embryos. Well what happened is is that actually worked? It was the system that actually work. It was a huge leap forward. They found a way to create multiple viable embryos at a time and freeze them, and every extra embryo meant another chance of creating a baby for a couple who couldn't otherwise have one is, but every stage in artificial production is still precarious. So in those early days, a significant proportion of those embers just were lost in the phrasing. Prices will only about thirteen percent five treatments ended with a live baby back then today that figure stands at about thirty percent, but even so this scientific breakthrough was life changing for Wannabe Parents Alan Trounson. An iphone they could cope with disappointment. Absolutely, you know very well essentially because. They understood. This was a very early in in terms of the research, so the chances of getting outcomes would very low if anything happened when somebody got pregnant and is is it was astonishing and so when we go to Ronald pregnancies from the methods with using John in the whole world Sunday stood up and so what what the Heck did you do? Do that. Okay, so let's meet the American couple at the heart of the story Jane. They land in Australia headed. Elsa Riaz respond to treatment will Gab Kovacs was one of the doctors at the Queen Victoria Hospital remember I said they were millionaires. That's important to this story, but back then Gab Kovacs had no idea. Just Shiva's is trashed and she spoke. In Mississippi we didn't look very well off. You ever probably struggling to spend the money to Florida squad expensive to fly back in the ninety ninety eight foods relatively much more than what they are now and with quality deal to come over here and leave over here. We felt sorry for him and most secretary always. suggestively discounted faithful porpoises Riaz who've had no idea that they were quite wealthy. He Remembers Elsa being very dramatic and difficult to deal with, but she had good reason to be all. She was very strong that a terrible history. I'll guess you've gone through Easter beforehand and they've were pretty strengthening to fly over here. They had one child who they'd lost. He was murdered. I think or an accident. Remember the D. Tough, and that's why they're really chained to have another child and off. If they're only hype, that's why to throw you. Both Mario and L.. Serena's had had children with previous partners, but they'd been a tragedy. Else's ten year old daughter had only recently died should been playing with a gun and it went off killing her that he's absolutely horrific are so that means that there was so much emotion entangled with this whole process. That's right. There was, but the process started well. Three embryos were created for the couple using else's eggs and donor sperm, so they had three chances of success. And I don't think we did about eleven o'clock midnight on a Saturday evening and she was very dramatic. Everything was sound. What's the drama? So she would her ex collected to street is beforehand a fertilize, and they would have developed and. Would have chosen the best probably wanting to Australian bureaus back, which would then be tempted to be

Australia Gab Kovacs Queen Victoria Hospital John Lee Elsa Riaz Mario Alan Trounson Natasha Yeah Elsevier Monash University Los Angeles Victoria Laden Director Jane Mississippi Serena
"clinical director" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

05:38 min | 8 months ago

"clinical director" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Been. Great learn time for our team, and then also one thing that I've learned without. That, All my practice life. Air Sauce. And we've got got a bigger issue in air styles than I ever thought. Yeah but even that's conflict because. There are some solid research that. You you know for me. It's my second Rodeo we. HIV IN. Dental school and I'm eighty-one. That broke in La I graduated eighty seven, so this stuff about countertops and all that stuff you know I remember people all freak down the leg. I went to Denny's and drink out of a glass and they didn't. optically Glasgow needs you know, but it's. It's a respiratory droplet and and I just saw that city out of Toronto and You know every single person that died, you know. Let's say a third of nursing home. They could they could connect to. To a sick person walking around, check their beds all that kind of stuff that no one's no one's documented that I touched a counter and then rubbed my eye, and then it got sick. I mean you need to be and then the same thing they remember back in HIV. Weird things like rock Hudson would die of AIDS, but his lover didn't and, but it was too taboo to say well. They had an oral relationship and that you know so loading doses everything you know catching a. A single virus. Probably isn't how it works. You know you need loading dose, and it looks like the loading doses, a big droplet of Lougee, and they came within six feet of you, and they copter sneezed, or you're not allowed place like this like when you have to lean in to t hair, someone at a bar, but I. I think it's human. It's human to human animal to Amilton respirable deal, so yeah, they're gonNA. Find it on the bottom of your shoes in countertops and all that stuff. That's not how it's GonNa Roll. From Wade. How has the coronavirus affected the cosmetic dentist? The cosmetic dentist in Idaho. Not Too bad at all the world. Care wait so no, you know. We did lots of emergency veneers over the over the shutdown. People have emotional pain. They WANNA look better. We've gotTA treat that it Israel when we owe back up. Our first patient was a seventy one year lady whose front tooth broke off right when we shut down ice. Swear to God if the Governor Ducey who I love if he would have been there I. Mean I think Oh, she was so upset, so yeah, cosmetic emergencies a real thing. Yeah! People wanted to be treated. We see we treated him interesting. Take away from the shutdown. Is How the profession? Profession tries to turn on each other hygienic against Ns status against Dennis. If somebody's open, they're going to turn them in like we as a colleague, just really kind of pulled apart instead of pulling together to support each other. You know like if someone in New York. Yeah, maybe they have to shutdown. But why should they care someone? In some rule area decides to stay open to treat patients, especially emergencies. I found it interesting that during the crisis, a lot of people try to turn on each other. And is that a fracturing of? Is that a fracturing of the market or is that a? Personality defect. That different people have or what like where does that come from? Is that because dentistry is their own businesses I mean. Do you see that? Would you see that? In other areas of medicine that are more Hospital run I mean. You get what I'm saying. Your don't really know, but as as Sanderson says here, self esteem. Yeah! I, mean they're. They're doctors online talking about how they're staying open. I know you know Mati up in Florida you know. He stayed open through it all and people rage against him, but there in Florida. They wasn't hit where he was. You know where some areas are going to I. Think a lot of it comes down to insecurities. We're in western Florida right here. Buddy Arizona's. Arizona's technically western Florida. I can't tell the difference between Arizona in Florida. There are people are Baltics, sir equally crazy. Yeah, I found that interesting that people will be bothered by what other people are doing. Mahdi's never been bothered what anyone else thinks? I love that guy. So we've got two docks here that practice implant in Phoenix Scottsdale Rodgen, Chris. What's You guys kind of run. Slightly different clinics but mostly implant related in the Phoenix Scottsdale. What's what's what's the vibe in like out here? I know. We've a little bit, but as far as when you shut down how you shutdown higher reopening. I know we've talked you guys, are you guys have reopened with a bang like I have What's what's the status for? You guys right now? As far as staff patients in you know moving forward, you know I think the biggest thing is obviously a reassuring the patients and I think it's the vibe that you put out. And, and you know we're taking all precautions in regards to to everything that we're doing but we're also you know we're leading by example, and we're reassuring patients and. Really not letting like. Fear kind of rule us in that fashion and I think it's one thing where you can. You can look at it as you know. There's two sides to every coin. Right like it's there's everywhere. There's opportunity right, so it's. It's kind of things. People still need their teeth fixed. People still need their smiles taken care of they need dental care to be addressed and It's something that we we make sure that they understand the importance and.

Florida HIV La I AIDS Arizona Idaho Glasgow Denny Israel Phoenix Scottsdale Rodgen Toronto Wade Baltics Phoenix Scottsdale Buddy Arizona Dennis Sanderson Mati Mahdi
"clinical director" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:11 min | 9 months ago

"clinical director" Discussed on KCBS All News

"To Brian tells us the San Francisco aids foundation news no longer able to provide routine HIV and STI testing on a typical day the magnet clinic in the Castro district sees one hundred and ten clients most for testing today that number is twenty five says clinical director Janessa Broussard we are seeing people who had symptoms related to as TI is which that includes symptoms related to HIV potentially and they're testing in those instances but for now she says there is no routine testing between twenty five and thirty percent of people that we notify and the positive at TI task I had no symptoms so they were completely unaware that they potentially had an act and we are not we have not been testing individuals or east symptomatic Broussard says the next few weeks will likely tell whether our mandatory social distancing means fewer casual sexual hook ups which naturally would mean fewer sexual diseases Tim Ryan KCBS in southern California Huntington beach was the scene of a group of people protesting the corona virus stay at home orders reporter Pete Demetriou was there at one point close to two hundred people were at or near the intersections of walnut and main streets waving American and trump twenty twenty flags this man said he's grown more upset about the lockdown daily I'm I'm most upset for the people that are losing their businesses and I'm most upset for the people that are losing their rights and the just seeing coach man on our freedoms this man told me he's tired of what he calls scaremongering over the corona virus outbreak now they got the media pushing this stuff everyday scared everybody the friends of mine I thought were awake are hiding under their bed with their toilet paper you know and that and it's like a mental rate pollution beach police were on the scene some in tactical gear they monitored the protest but did cite anyone or make arrests and after about two hours the crowd dispersed peacefully in Huntington beach Pete Demetriou KCBS we're gonna have sports in a minute do you know you might be overpaying for your Medicare supplement plan do you get lost in the novel but maze of plans like a B. C. D..

Brian Janessa Broussard Pete Demetriou San Francisco aids foundation Castro clinical director Tim Ryan California Huntington reporter Huntington
The Root of the Addictive Process with Alex Katehakis

The Addicted Mind Podcast

09:40 min | 1 year ago

The Root of the Addictive Process with Alex Katehakis

"All right. Today's guest is Alex. Cata Haughey's somebody who I've wanted to have on the podcast for quite some time and I'm so excited. She decided to come on. She is a clinical sexologist and the clinical director of the Center for healthy sex in Los Angeles California and she's written several awesome books. One of my favorite is sex addiction as affect dysregulation and also erotic intelligence and Mir of intimacy. We have a great conversation about some of the root causes of the addictive process. Really looking at that early developmental trauma and how that affects our ability to regulate our affect. And how we use addictive substances or processes to escape from that feeling. It's great conversation. I really enjoyed having Alex on. I think we could have talked easily for an hour or two or three about these topics. She's so knowledgeable and just really shares a lot of great wisdom and insight about recovery. So with that. Let's go ahead and start this episode. Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind my guest today. Is Alex Kata Hakkas and she is a clinical sexologist and clinical director of the Center for healthy sex in Los Angeles California. And she's GonNa come on and we're GONNA talk about sex addiction. Sex Addiction has affect this regulation. And we'RE GONNA go into a little bit of what that means but Alex introduce yourself. I yeah thank you. Good Morning Dwayne yes as you stated I am clinical sexologist which means I have a doctorate in human sexuality and I've been fascinated with human sexuality for the last twenty five thirty years or longer to save my life and so after practicing as a licensed marriage family therapist for twenty five years. It made sense for me to dive deeper into human sexuality instead of psychology which Swipe chose that particular course of study as you stated I am be clinical director of Center for healthy sex which has been around now for about fifteen years and we treat all manner of sex and love addiction issues of sexual desire dysfunction public pain disorders erectile dysfunction. I mean you name at sexual we treat it. So that's in general. What my the lenses through which I look and just in addition to human sexuality I have been studying with Dr Alan Shore for the past twelve years specifically looking at developmental neuroscience and how the early formation of the infant meaning from the third trimester on Rumi impacts developing brain nervous system and therefore mind. Right definitely and. That's one of the reasons I wanted to have you on is to kind of do a little bit of a deeper dive into some of these issues around addiction specifically sex addiction. And when you say affect dysregulation going into that a little bit and being able to talk about okay when we talk about affect we're really talking about emotions and emotions live deep in the body in fact right now if you're listening to this or you have a policy or having emotions in the body which aren't necessarily registering up high meeting up in your brain until they come forward to what we call feelings and so when a person is regulated meaning. They don't have good heart rate variability. They're not able to rest in digest and play and laugh and be at ease if they are stressed out than their affect is quote this regulated. So when you're regulated you are in a a steady state if you will where you're able to socially engage with people in a way where you don't feel but as soon as threat comes on. The scene with a child has apparent. That's alcoholic or raging or but mother who is cold or shutdown or mean that child's affect is always going to be quote this regulated and here. She is always going to be looking for something to make them feel better. Because the parental connection the parental soothing is not reliable. Or it's just not there so tell me a little bit about how that because that's a lot to digest what you just said. I thought I made it simple. No I mean I get it but like if you're talking to someone who is struggling with addiction. Let's say or Struggling with sex addiction. And you're talking about this affect. What might that look like? In an event that they have in their own life now in the present. Well there may not. There's not even an event in their general waking life you're gonNA feel anxious depressed dead internally dull. There's a general lack of feeling vitality in the body. People say they don't feel joy states or they're super anxious so they have to drink to make the anxiety go away or they use sex to make themselves feel powerful or good about themselves. Anything that we're doing outside of ourselves to make ourselves feel quote right internally speaks to affect regulation so someone who is securely attached. Who's got a good heart rate? Variability in general doesn't have to reach for anything to change their internal state or their mood. Is that clear? Yeah no that makes a Lotta sense and I think what I hear you saying is so someone who if you've had this history of trauma like you said an alcoholic parent that's raging and you're young and you're growing up in that environment. You get your living with this uncomfortable state and you can't get out of that state and so then you'll reach for something that will change it so alcohol sex or for young child that can be something like fantasy. You know what we see. A lot of Labatt annex or some sex addicts too. Is that very early on? They learned that they had to get their needs. Met By themselves and fantasy is a form of mild to moderate dissociation. Where it's you know what your calls an escape when there's no escape where they go into their own little world and they live in their own little world and as adults. It makes it difficult to connect with another person to have intimacy and closeness instead. The person is in fantasy about other people because it's very difficult to be in reality because reality was so painful along time ago and this sets up for very bad relationship sometimes because they're falling in love with an ideal not an actual person right and I think for a lot of people this is can be subtle in some ways so it can be hard to actually see that uncomfortable state. Is it that people are used to it? Like they've lived in this state that is basic discomfort that it's hard to actually see it. And then they don't even know that they're regulating it by using a substance or an addiction or something. Yeah I think people don't now until their lives become unmanageable. They start to have messes in their lives and their primary relationship is with e behavior or the substance and that's typically when addicts get help when they're in pain. They know that their life isn't working anymore and so they're going to stuck. Yeah they're stuck in these tatters because we are nothing but automated and habituated. I mean we have all of these adaptive strategies in the brain and the nervous system. Start working in a particular way to compensate for difficulty that is an adaptation and Rican adapt to just about anything or highly adaptable creatures. So we'll adapt to something that's dysfunctional. Because it's better than the problem we were living in. And then we've got this long standing pattern that can be very challenging to change so for example of somebody stops drinking or using or they stop acting out with their sex addiction. It doesn't mean that they've changed their personality. Which is why the program topics about character issues and you can be a quote dry drunk because you stop the thing. The behavior substance. But you haven't fundamentally changed the way that you relate to other people and that's really the challenge and the beauty. I think the twelve step program is that it really arms and forges new. People that we can change our strategies. And it's hard. It's like if you walked your whole life pigeon toed and your toes were turned in and your hips were adapted to walking that way and somebody came along and said Hey. You don't have to walk that way. You're kind of grinding the bones of your hips in your knees. If you point your host all of a sudden your knees hips are in alignment and you try it. And you're like wow that feels better but the natural tendency of the body is going to be to move towards being pigeon toed unless the person is highly mindful of it and vigilant about it until they can change that adaptive pattern to rocking straight

Alex Kata Hakkas Clinical Director Los Angeles California Cata Haughey Labatt California Dwayne Rumi Swipe Dr Alan Shore Rican
Whispering Sweet Nothings? (Zohar I:49a-b)

The Joy of Text

09:55 min | 1 year ago

Whispering Sweet Nothings? (Zohar I:49a-b)

"I'm Sarah Rosner Lawrence and I'm here as usual with Arthur Marcus Clinical Director of knees women's health high. I loved these many tax. I feel like I learned so much. And I'm also here with our by Windsor. Russia Stephen President of Holiday Torah High. I love doing these men text episodes. Okay so what do you you have for us today. Rylander well few episodes ago. We did a mini text episodes from Zohar. On Kissing. And Love. That episodes I know about Chev- totally loved that And it's really great because the Zohar because as I've mentioned before Has Sex is such a central part of its understanding of God In the life of the Kaaba List in terms of effecting the different aspects of God we have we have more discussions about sex Than in many other sources So this is another text from Sohar. The exact source is Volume one page forty. Nine Eight A. B. and it's on diverse break sheet from via L. Haddam. I'm that God created eve the woman and brought her to man so here it is. I'll just read a few words in the Aramaic. And then I'll switch over to the English. The English is from the translation. flation of Daniel Matt. So they ha ho Lee from here we learn divine above EMA DECARLA that the mother and the father of the bride a require the Abu Take the time to bring the bride into the domain of the room. So far that sort of what we know the parents give the girl over. Give give the their daughter over to the groom. I'm GonNa Switch just the English as it is said. I've given my daughter to this man from this point on her husband comes to her for the House is hers as it is written. He came into her so that is actually a verse about interquest by Vo Allow. What's being read here as he comes into her domain? It's her home. He came into Rachel also again verse about Intercourse I. He brought her to the man. God brought to the man for up to this point. The father and mother should act by giving your daughter over afterward. He should come to her for the entire houses hers and he must obtain her permission. So this talking about sex is talking about you know the home. Is the women's domain A little bit of both. It sounds possibly what what consent consent. So we're going to get there. We have aroused just our awareness. Interesting word arouse but okay. We have aroused or awareness of this as written. This is now by Jakko. He approached the place and stayed there for the night. First first obtaining permission from here we learn that one who joins his wife shouldn't treat her and sweet in her with words or otherwise not spend the night with her so that the does careers their desire be as one with no coercion. Now just skip a paragraph and now we're GONNA continue with Jakko for a minute before we circle back to Adam and eve. We've he took one of the stones of the place and put it under his head here. We learn that if a king has golden beds and precious spreads in which to spend the night and his consort his wife prepares him a better rain with stones. Right because that was the bed of Jacob the stones he should leave his own and sleep in the one she prepares and is as it is written then he lay down in that place now back to Adam come and see what is written here. The man said this one at last shall be called woman behold the fragrance fragrance of words to draw love with her draw her towards his desire arouse passion together like he's praising her and this is you know look how beautiful those words are it to get her in the mood. See how sweet how full of love own of my bones flesh a flesh. Showing their one inseparable now he begins praising inker this one shall be called woman this one is unparalleled. Glory of the House all women compared to her like eight compared to humans. Certainly this this 'cause this was the only real woman this one shall be called woman. Perfection of all this one and no others at is as it is written many daughters have done virtuously precisely but you surpass them all some GonNa Pause here the last paragraph if we get a chance goes onto a different point but there's a lot to be said about this all open the floor. I don't like Oh deep sigh out. It feel I'm trying to separate out my like twenty per century injury sensibility. Hear about lake over. flowery doesn't sound real I don't know how you feel about to Sarah and I don't know I I mean like I'm kind of. I'm struggling to get to the to the lake. punchline point of this text like so far it feels a little a bit like flowery to me kind of similar to two bunch of his impression but what I'm understanding from this end. Correct me if I'm wrong. Is that basically. There is a dynamic where the the woman's parents bring her to the man's domain initially. But then after that it's sort of the man's responsibility to a kind of appease her and treat sex with her and being with her as her domain right and something that he sort of has to approach her heroic to choose the one in charge. You don't feel like it feels like he's sort of Connie her into it. That's that's sort of where I'm getting my back a little bit. I I think in a society in which men could easily coerce their wives rape right or use pressure to have them to agree to saks. Even though they really weren't into admit you know a lighter form of rape or coercion. You know but here it's like completely reversing that and saying the woman is in charge. It's her home. You know. I think it sort of doing like the round you know. She's the balanced bias. She's the one in charge of she's the one in charge of the domestic sphere and also the merging of that with to come into her. You know if you you want to have sex with her. She's the one in charge of her body and like you need her permission and she wants to sleep on the floor. Usually on the floor right soon. I love that piece. The one where you'd have the golden bed and then it gets usually one stones so that actually is quite lovely and not having the same reaction that Oh my God is all talking talking about her Making her happy and I'm trying to figure out. Is it last section. Where he's giving this flowery? Praise your the most wonderful women have no at no other woman has anything like you. I mean it saying look. Those words might not work for you right that like their power. Look I I know that there are a lot of women who dirt during before during sex you know WanNa feel desired WanNa feel ladder. Sure there's nothing on my woman on as much as feeling like she is desired right that again and again the most beautiful woman ever so this way way. It's the express. That is possible that I'm that I'm reacting to that. Yeah Yeah Yeah. It's so it's it's kind of interesting because I feel like what I'm reacting to negativity is not exactly the same thing but is like this dislike. Egalitarian sensibility that contra my like twenty-first-century brain gene of like. Why should be his job to only approach her and why like dislike one directional aw energy that's bothering me too but I think that sort of becomes like well the option to that is not both of them entreating the other the option to that is enforcing right right right completely? Changed the Pierre de and say that he helped picks initiatives. We're still going to allow for that. But it's still she's in charge. You know you have to ask her permission. You have to get her in the mood. But you're right. It's speaking to them right right. So it's like it's like don't rape her get her permission in and entreat her and flatter and all these things whereas I wish it was like you approach sometimes and she approaches you. I WanNa say it's much more than don't rape her so that may be as y you know they're both equally into it. It's an equal merging of the cells to me. I right now so that is really I think thing. That's a really important point because I think what's bothering me and you're reading it differently is that it feels like look. I WANNA have sex and so I want to get you to agree to have sex and that feels different to me that I want us to see if I get you to a place where you want to have sex too and that feels very different to me and that is how you're reading it you're probably sadly right it. The text itself has maybe we should be the last pair perfect okay. Tell me if this helps hurts. Perfect therefore let him a man leaves his father and mother and cleaves to his wife and they become one flesh all to draw her into love to clear to her once he had aroused her with all these words. It's what is written. Now the serpent was slide than any creature of the field the evil impulse now. This is a tricky tax arouse to seize her binding her with bodily desire fire rousing in her other things in which evil impulse delights until eventually what is written the woman saw. The tree was good for eating delight to the eye and took of its shoot in eight receiving leaving it willingly. He gave to her husband beside her for now. She aroused desirous Lee towards him offering passionate. Love this shows human beings how the act corresponds above so this is a tricky text because it has the serpent evil desire but the end of it sounds like the fact that he had these very physical co lusts was actually a positive thing for the next paragraph in the Zohar which I did not do actually says wait a minute. If this bloke response to above how do you think that there's such a thing and as the evil desire above and basically says sort of is like the divine has the right and the left side and anyway. It's you know getting all all right. Les Is maybe a bad thing. But maybe it's a good jockey I think that's exactly is fastened

Rape Wanna Sarah Rosner Lawrence LEE Sohar Adam Russia Windsor Daniel Matt Arthur Marcus Clinical Directo Rachel Jakko L. Haddam President Trump Jacob Connie LES Saks
The Trouble With Embryos

Science Friction

09:21 min | 1 year ago

The Trouble With Embryos

"This sounds a lot like that battle of thoughts going on inside Fiona mind about her embryos if they were destroyed then what if my child needs something from a sibling medically in the future and I've just destroyed that option and then also what it might sense of identity on the flip side she might be completely and utterly with her identity and I'm just thinking well it's a single children out there exactly right exactly right it's hard to see how these complex questions could be easily on a single form Ivy clinics themselves also bear some responsibility for helping parents decide what to do after all they make money from it with IVF treatments and the storage of excess embryos Louise Johnson again in my experience clinics are very supportive of patients is when they having trouble deciding what to do with your embryos and you say thinking about donating their embryos clean counselors will spend considerable time with paypal helping them to make sure that that decision is the right one for them in fact the national health and Medical Research Council's ethical guidelines for IVF clinic state that they we must discuss with patients their options for using or discarding embryos but the level of counseling clinics a legally required to offer varies across Australia and some argue that this counseling is more focused on the start of the IVF process than the end look I think that's also the focus of paper taking treatment as well that's the focus is to try for baby but one of the medicine needs to be coveting canceling in Victoria and elsewhere he's what to do with embryos at the end of the day if treatment is successful or not successful so it is a matter that is coveting canceling right from the Gar so let's come to another option you have a small proportion of people decide to donate the embryos they won't use no one else who wants to have a child that might be a family member or it might be a total stranger they really want us to have a chance at having a baby maybe and and they would prefer their embryos to be used by others then allowing them to succumb on auto bar tree bench but that's not a common path people choose to take so in Victoria in two thousand seventeen to eighteen they were only seventy embryo donors compares with four hundred and twenty four sperm donors and three hundred dollars so the number of embryos donald is much smaller and why do you think that is I think it's a really hard decision they know that any children born or before to nick siblings if there are in children and that's hard decision to make let's come back then to the two women you've met in this program funeral and Desa neither of them want to donate their embryos to other families that just not comfortable with the idea of someone else raising what would be the potential children Fiona feels a great sense of responsibility for her embers the joined the spam dialup would never eight and would never have created those embryos I created them so giving them to somebody else to raise a family where I'm not I've got no sane or I'm not aware of what sort of parents apparent though built sort of family situation you know what if I go to a family or a situation that puts him in Ham then I would feel very responsible about that of course I'd Never Nari but it would always be there Jessica on the other hand says that she's been advised that the law in her State Victoria prevents her from donating her embryos to someone else because we've got Dana Sperm we count on donate to anybody unless the law has changed or I think it has correlative more than us for them and I said to her even if a Kudankulam to you because there's a diner involved in Victoria Dan can legally donate sperm to up to ten women that number varies around Australia. Gab Kovacs is a professor of obstetric gynecology at Monash unit acidy as we had last week he was also the clinical director at the Queen Victoria hospitals. IVF program back in the eighties then he helped create some of Australia's first frozen embryos for infertile couples the couple's Godal over Kabul the Women Guthrie stimulated saw monitoring surgery and the hassle and the expansion credit is embryos and then when they reach their five-year use-by date to then have them discarded to me a terrible waste he's opinion is donating your excess embryos to another person or couple wanting a child is a good option and always tried to encourage couples to consider donating and not can understand how couples who understand the pain of subjectivity who understand how difficult is to create these ambers war they don't donate their embryos to somebody else this Rodney having destroyed and when we ask people about this today are now we don't want somebody else bringing up children but I'm sure there's other ways with that could be involved the children and be updated and have some sort of a situation where they can visible if they want to but to give us the chance of law rather than being left on the inch to succumb okay so let's come to another option the final we're considering on science friction today and that is to donate excess embryos to scientific research what does that involve before here from an IV scientist here's Fiorina's first response to that idea instantly for I'm not having any conflict whatsoever I instantly just thought of horrible scenes from old movies of crazy scientific research that might happen Dan and again the fact that even though I don't see them as children I do see myself as being responsible for them desa maybe watch the same movies because she owes so has similar worries about embryo research limbs might grow that that to me I couldn't carp tonight at that we're doing that it just worries me that and I put electric shocks in that soulful of just thinking I'm just thinking I watch too much science fiction professor Alan Trounson helped pioneer the F. treatment in the eighties and he wants to demystify how scientists use embryos in research and locate the just short period of time the embryo is destroyed really by the processes of the research but they would be destroyed anyway if our terminated and that seems better than just disposing of them which is just to do that then to look at some data that you might mind from those embryos in the process of scientific study leader in stem cell research and he was involved in the public debate over whether we should extract stem cells from donated IVF embryos today there's less demand for embryos donations in scientific research because we now have other ways to develop embryonic stem cells from adult cells but they're still crucial for helping just to understand human disease and early development Professor Johnson says embryo studies can also be used to help improve the treatment of the modern be used to create a new technique luckily trip occasion where that's sides you know millions of embryos but you have to do the research in the beginning and you can't just sort of magic that's an area focused on the possibilities of replacing and repairing diseased cells organs and body parts I think it donating embryos for research bionic stem cells to work ahead of May an Ip so I- cells or induced pluripotent stem cells can be converted into different cells in the body you to perform different functions and that is the core element for so therapies for regenerative medicine now the lots

Fiona Queen Victoria Hospitals Gab Kovacs Australia Monash Unit Acidy Professor Clinical Director Three Hundred Dollars Five-Year
Biology, Ethics and a Pair of Millionaires

Science Friction

09:08 min | 1 year ago

Biology, Ethics and a Pair of Millionaires

"Episode I'm joined by Jane Lee who has pretty Mario and Elsa Riaz they to property developers from Los Angeles and they really wanted to have a child together but there were a couple yeah that's right also was forty and it was fifty seven and they couldn't do it on their own so in one thousand nine hundred one they decided to come all the way to Australia to try this brand new thing called him vitro fertilization and I've e F I mean today creating a baby using ivf is totally commonplace and begin stree- over familiar but this was the early Eighties win the technology and the science was so new that this just was we this idea that you could create a human embryo outside of swim and suspend its development in time to it was blowing people's minds the moment of conception an event that has taken place in natural environment the womb since the dawn of human existence now it comes in gloss and with it a host of problems moral ethical in legal so Australia was leading the way in fact with the science of RV if that when the couple come here the techniques still very much being susta this is experimental stuff yeah and one of the people who knows just how difficult those early days were is Gab Kovacs he's a professor of obstetric gynecology at Monash University but back then he was the Clinical Director of the IVF program at the Queen Victoria Hospital in Melbourne was very difficult from Queen Victoria Hospital Sova General Hospital and everyone thought that obviously is just a phase wasn't going to work it wasn't an last and that we wasting everybody's time doc doing and collections after to me natural song goes on spontaneous ovulation so it's not unusual to have to collect exit two am four am six I am so we had a lot of opposition and all I v F treatment started out using the so-called natural cycle method which meant doctors had to wait for the perfect moment in a woman's natural ovulation cycle to retrieve that one egg she created every month if they collected it at the right time it could go on to be fertilized to make an embryo if they timed it too late they'd miss the egg and have to wait another month too early and the egg wasn't mature enough to be fertilized outside the chances here actually getting a baby out of IV of treatment would have been extremely low when the races rocked up in Australia yeah but a talented trio at Queen Victoria Hospital was changing all of that and they were about to put Australia in the the F. history books so I wanted to do the IV if in a totally different way to the way they were doing it because I wanted to sort of utilize methods that upton animals scientist Alan Trounson originally trained as a bit and he was recruited to the hospital by IVF pioneer car would call would he add made work with John Leyton to develop a totally different system which was using fertility drugs to stimulate the women's we could get more eggs and hints more embryos what happened is is that actually work that was a system that actually work it was a huge leap forward they found a way to create multiple viable embryos at a time. and freeze them and every extra embryo meant another chance of creating a baby for a couple who couldn't otherwise have one is every stage in artificial auctioning still precarious so in those early days a significant proportion of those embryos just were lost in the phrasing prices will only about the tain percent survive treatments ended with a live baby back then today that figure stands at about thirty percent but even so this scientific breakthrough was life changing for wannabe parents Allen trouncing an and I found the could cope with disappoint but absolutely you know very well let's actually because they understood this was a very early in in terms of the research so the chances of getting outcomes would be very low if anything happened when somebody got pregnant and is is it was astonishing and so when we go to Ronald pregnancies from the methods of using John and in the whole world Sunday stood up and so what what the heck did you uh-huh okay so let's meet the American couple at the heart of the story Jain they land in Australia had Elsa Riaz respond VF Treatment Will Gab. Kovacs was one of the doctors at the Queen Victoria Hospital remember I said they were millionaires. That's important to this story but back then Gab Kovacs had no idea just way she was dressed in my she spoke Mississippi very well off ever probably struggling to spend the money Florida's squad expensive to fly back in the ninety ninety eight I relatively much more than what they are now and with quite a big deal to come in have a here and leave over here we felt sorry for him and my secretary always suggest to be discounted faithfulness Israel's who've had no idea that they were hard wealthy he remembers Elsa being very dramatic and difficult to deal with but she had good reason to be very hollies triangle they had a terrible history. I guess you've gone through this beforehand and they've pretty stressed to fly over here they had one child who they'd lost done with he was murdered I think we're next Senate confirmed the de tough and rather really came to have another child and if they're only hype that's why they came to throw you both Mario and L. Surreal had children with previous partners but they'd tragedy else's ten year old daughter had only recently died she'd been playing with a gun and it went off killing her that is absolutely horrific so that maintains that there was so much emotion entangled with this whole process that's right there was but the process started well three Brioche created for the couple using else's eggs and donor sperm so they had three chances of success Yup and lied about eleven o'clock midnight on our set evening and she was very dramatic everything was lots of drama so she had her ex collected to a street is beforehand fertilize and they would have developed and we would have chosen the best probably wanting to US Ramdas back which would then be tempted to be frozen suggesting the Million Dollar Question He Elsa Riaz Has three embryos frozen did she get pregnant no unfortunately she didn't Elsa miscarried the first embryo but then rather than try again straight away the reassess headed to Chile in nineteen ninety-three some reports say they adopted a baby there but then the ultimate tragedy flying back to California in crashed Elsa and Mario both died and what they left behind was a massive estate valued at eight million dollars and of course there too remaining embryos the news reached Australia the next year in nineteen eighty four and that's when all hell broke loose in Nineteen eighty-one childless Californian elsewhere and Mario reels came to Milton's Queen Victoria Hospital to join the Ivy if Creole's couple failed in their first attempt to have a child and left Australia leaving behind the two embryos for a second attempt at a later date before the couple could try again they were killed in a plane crash in Chile two frozen embryos in the fridge over nobody knows who is the move who's responsible no one really knew what to do with the Riaz embryos in the early days of Dr Deb Kovacs more first of all we didn't have further ambrose whatever Awadh and secondly we didn't ever anticipate the fact that patients moths all built for young people they're all infertility H it didn't really occur to some of the talk in the early days we had a very simple consent form with no different heading consent form for an operation but soon after that we included consent foam which d the options and the raiders case Jane triggered bid consent Foams but what you found out is that it also unleash these Almighty public debate about the Status frozen embryos and the ethics of obvious I mean this was hard stuff where embryos groups of cells all they something more he is one of the rights for we need a legal guardian who has the interests of these his chew babies at hat and he is the Anglican Church of you is that I've regarded as a positive gift from God that is there is a tremendous new opportunities available in this new technology the Riaz case also demanded lawmakers onto the question when does human life begin and if an embryo was considered to be a person should enjoy the same legal rights as a child but I can two frozen embryos really be as to a

Elsa Riaz Gab Kovacs Queen Victoria Hospital Jane Lee Mario Florida Secretary Israel Mississippi Eight Million Dollars Million Dollar Thirty Percent Ten Year Milton
Weight Watchers eyes a new clientele: Children

830 WCCO 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Weight Watchers eyes a new clientele: Children

"A new app from W. W. formally known as weight watchers says some of the medical community concerned Herbert was marketed as scientifically proven way for kids to improve eating habits and get more active but many dietitians and doctors say having kids as young as eight track their food could be dangerous Dr heather Gallivan clinical director at the Melrose center says intentionally restricting food intake lead to eating disorders and some children we would recommend and what the medical field would recommend as an overall focus on health and well being and last of a focus on weight and numbers and losing weight Calvin sites research from the American academy of pediatrics that does not recommend dieting and children her advice to parents is to consult a pediatrician talk to kids about balanced

W. W. Herbert Clinical Director Melrose Center Dr Heather Gallivan American Academy Of Pediatrics
Dieticians Are Outraged Over WW's Weight Loss App for Kids

Sports To The Max with Mike Max

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Dieticians Are Outraged Over WW's Weight Loss App for Kids

"Many dietitians are speaking out against a new app aimed at weight loss in children the new app from weight watchers now known as W. W. called curved bow is designed for kids as young as eight to record what they eat and sorts foods into categories like going in moderation and to be avoided in markets itself as a scientifically proven way to improve eating habits and get more active but many medical professionals say it's inappropriate and could have serious consequences no row center clinical director Dr heather galloping points out that research from the American academy of pediatrics discourages dieting in children for the right type of child can trigger an eating disorder and they can kind of take that too far eating meals together as a family making fruits and vegetables more readily accessible and encouraging activity can

W. W. Dr Heather American Academy Clinical Director
"clinical director" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on 790 KABC

"The clinical director for the center for healthy sex, and we were talking about the the victimisers and how to categorize them, and what can be done for them. So before they victimize to talk about it regulated. I I just don't have men are once they have a preference there. They're going to get to. It's on a little skeptical of this approach. I gotta say, well, yes, I mean, there are statistics that show that five percent of pedophile approximately fourteen years old, and they do age out of it. There is sort of attraction to children at fourteen that people age out of one percent of those people continue to have that you're saying that pedophile are normally like four others. There's a subset of for Charles that that is a certain category. That's one category. Wait, wait, wait that fourteen year olds having sex with younger children will age out of that. We'll move out of it. Wow. Right. So there is a percentage of the population that remains succeeded on children over time. Summer contract defenders and some are non contact offenders. There's an organization called safer society, safer, society dot ORG, and they are of the premier organization for pedophilia for families for conversations for resources in the country. Direct people to that website. If they have concerns, but you know, on their site, and what they're reporting now is that really prevention is the intervention for contact and part of prevention is conversation. What about what about perpetrators any hope? Well, it depends. I mean, those who have already contacted but say those that have been habit vendors, those that have an orientation that way. Well, I think it just depends as you go on the person their circumstances. How deep they are into it. And whether they're interested in rehabilitation or not it's a very individualized question, depending on how traumatized that perpetrator is meaning what their own trauma was traumatized over from being the way they were both those and also how much time they have spent you know, looking at images of child sexual abuse. You know, how much of that they keep their heads in? How preoccupied they are many children they've actually molested. It depends on the extent of their pathology. Really? I at least we're finally getting at this. I can tell you in the nineties people used just go. Oh, no. This is always been. We're just talking about it more people just talk really that prevalence. Like, no, no, no, this is around. And we've got our one of Oprah's points is that she had you know, she sits with two hundred and seventeen episodes wishing talked about this. Nobody really paid attention. Title illness that we have that doesn't get talked about it. So I think the more people talk about, you know, their deepest darkest dirtiest no shameful secrets with other people in groups and therapy, the less likely they are to act on it. And to start to come out of the shame that you're talking about and wonder why would I have these images in my head? Why would I think? I guess the clock Alex, I got to leave it there. Thank you so much. We'll look for you at the center for healthy sex dot com. All right. Thank you both. You gotta eight hundred two to five to two to we're gonna switch gears talk about Adam Schiff in attempt to find a former prosecutor for the Trump investigation. What do you think about that? It's midday live..

Oprah clinical director Adam Schiff Charles Trump prosecutor Alex fourteen years fourteen year five percent one percent
"clinical director" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

"The first time by myself. I would I want to know that somebody who's experienced a number of people and help them would be there to help me too. That's what I would want. Well, I, and that's what we hope. I mean, we'll just be seeing retraumatize people for years and years and years if this keeps happening. Familiar with the bilateral simulation? So let's work for me. So if somebody is, you know, thinking about the trauma that they've had an under some absolutely horrific traumas, and I'm sure you do people just can't they have to just stop. They can't take it like probably at first it must be so well, that's why we we Al absolutely really emphasized that. It's not talk therapy. And we're not going to ask you to go there until we take you there. Okay. So you have a sense of when the time is probably yeah. Could be it's called sessions or five sessions or whatever it is. Well, it's called an eight phase protocol. And so the first two phases. Are you know, taking a history from the client in a newspaper headline fashion about the traumas, and then also finding out the resource saying and then in the second phase, we dig a little deeper into their beliefs system. But leave system I'm going to leave that I'd love mistakes, you know, that. I'm human. I made a decision a little while ago that it was gonna make three mistakes day. That's good minimum. And so that really freedom the embarrassment thing we were talking about the phases important. Okay. Okay. It is okay. There's an eight phase protocol to it. And the first two phases set up. You know, a a report, obviously. But I get to know the client, and then I get to tell the client about how AMD are works. The psycho education about at the bilateral brain stimulation, all that stuff that we've just talked about when we get to the third phase. That's when we know all the information, we need to know. And so we begin the reprocessing. So the third phase is asking the questions, what is the image? What is the belief? You have what is the emotion that you feel when you remember this? Right. And then we talk about what would you rather? Think about yourself. Then I'm a loser. And then we ask what sensations. Are you feeling in your body? We scale the emotions we say put all those together. And now we begin. Hopefully, I mean, I've had a lot of success with a lot of clients. And I started doing this when I was working in a rehab refuge recovery that was around no longer around. But it was a it was a Buddhist based recovery center, not drugs in Oakland. Not twelve step. Yes. And so Steve danza girl. Who was my trainer. He was the clinical director. And so the meta protocol the meditation. The self regulation was already frontloaded if you will in the center, so it was a perfect place to be able to do trauma work on newly sober and clean addicts and alcoholics whereas it was never believed that you should before. But because of the meditation because of the breath awareness because of the body awareness every day. They're already resourced. So we could really work on the traumas and people with addictions, come in with a lot of traumas. So, you know, so had you already studied this AMD are when you were working there. I hadn't I was I was therapist there..

AMD clinical director Steve danza Oakland
"clinical director" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:47 min | 2 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Wednesday you're listening to the Patti Vasquez show with Andrea. Darlas Andrea is off through Labor. Day we will see her on Tuesday joining me in. Studio we have Molly Rainer who's hanging out with. Us she is fresh off hot off the stage hot hot site. Offices we was silly string It was great in the best of all you guys. Are all amazing claim It. Was a very fun that's my it was. My honored to be invited back, so thank you to everybody and Jill Valentine congratulations. On. A very successful festival and I wanted to talk to our good friend Dr. Deborah kissing she is the clinical director of the light on anxiety treatment center she actually reached out to us and wanted to, know if we, can have a conversation about this tragic story out of Jacksonville the Jacksonville shooting a young man who apparently it. Sounds as though he had a history of of domestic, issues with his mom there are. A lot of phone calls to the police both from him and. His, mom so whether or not there are warning signs are alarms go off obviously there's also a conversation about whether or not video games make people violent or are violent people try to video games and there's something in there that there's nothing specific. Is Deborah, and although my specialty is the treatment of anxiety and related disorders so. I I haven't extensively researched the area of research into video games and violence But what what I can say, is there really is no definitive research out there. That. Can say playing violent video games playing x. number of hours video games can. Lead to violence so I I haven't thoroughly researched the database around that but I I'd say there's nothing that officially proves fat, but what we, do know that history of violent behavior of history of impulsive behavior substance abuse social isolation there are factors that. Come together to create these tragic perfect storms but the, good news is for all of. Us to keep my people don't just snap and we were talking. About, that during the break people known just become violent and I think a lot of people have that fear when you hear certain stories of people sounds like they're functioning decently well and all of a sudden they just do something unthinkable and the. Good news, is there's normally clues we don't have all the information to really know What was going on It's hard to say what could have been done to prevent this and other tragedies that are similar to. It and went Dr Deborah, kissing is talking about. We're off, the air I was as, I, mentioned last night I I knew the father who took the took the lives of his two children and then his own and many of. My, friends, are devastated I've no I knew him when we were younger had only had interaction. With him on Facebook so I couldn't say what he had been like in, the last few years what. He was struggling with I do know that, as a young man he was funny and kind and sweet and many people are absolutely beside themselves in wondering what. They could have done and I think that you know what people want to know are there warning signs, are is you know in. This situation I'm. Not I don't know there are reports out of Jacksonville that this young. Man and his, mother like I said we're having a lot of domestic issues where they felt they call the police over twenty times between. The two of them it seems like he he call Call the police because his. Mom took away his video games So he it means that him rot was something at the level of an. Emergency that he that he thought the police, should be? Involved and that seems like a disconnect from reality, doesn't it and so people that are drawn to these situations, it seems are those who who just can't function with reality I would say If you look at any of these cases of people who've, committed mass violence that if you think of just overall functioning in terms of having a job being a, part of society being part, of a, community engaging activities what we, consider, well functioning they're they're gonna be indicators that someone is not functioning, part of society. And they're not they're not there. In some way outliers that Better not that are. Just not functioning we just don't always have all of the facts arise and we ain't never thing and that's scary, something very off right it's not a normal human move thank God to engage in these acts of mass absolutely and again with with Derek. It is unspeakable, before that he. Would take these beautiful? Children as though that was an answer to his pain is is horrifying and as the idea that you? Would be competing in a video game tournament and and the next thing you know somebody who can't, handle losing that was part of was that he lost and then had the lash out and start shooting, people in Jacksonville it's just, it's it's, very surreal what do you, what, what kind of conversations do you have in the aftermath with maybe, some of your. Peers or the community I would. Say for Let's just say, for my, average client so I run an. Anxiety treatment center and I had my clients are we have wonderful wonderful caring hardworking. Clients who are really striving to. To become their best cells to make their lives livable, as possible and so I, would say for the clients that, come? To me there's there's a lot. Of there's terror around hearing these kinds of things. That. Is this, something that I, could ever do sometimes I feel out of control sometimes I feel like I'm going quote unquote crazy when you ask them and. Well what does that mean that you are going crazy Well I I just feel so stress if like I can't, think clearly but it's hard to sometimes separate is this the first sign that I could eventually become a monster and it's a really separating. Out feeling internal, like you're losing. Control went on the? Outside your handling all of the responsibilities over life you could feel like you're out of control and still? Be very much in In control and I think that's something that people need to realize the difference between getting out of control and, feeling, out. Of control it's it's it's common life. That we're gonna feel out of control, but what behaviors go along with it is important, for, people, to, really realise that very most of the time they are very much in maybe even too much in. Control of rice you feel out of control interesting I think is, refreshing to hear you say this because from when you hear about mass violence on the news and the media all I. Know personally all I ever hear. Is oh this person I it's it's two things it's either we never saw it, coming this person was a regular human right or? Then, there, is the lake isolation but you know coming from someone with, a background in knowing anxiety and like how something like this can develop is refreshing to hear because, I don't think I I think so many, people struggle with anxiety, in general that you, would not, even know and maybe people are. Scared to get help or scared to talk about scared to think oh wings Diety equals I'm crazy or I'm right you know so it is refreshing. To hear you speak that you know it's coming from somewhere you can't. Just have the switch right. Right, right and I I would say people who on their own are striving to get help to to figure out what are there, obstacles I would say, are the least likely because, they're, actually facing head, on, what is hard. In their life and versus really trying. To disconnect from those challenges until until? They kind of blows so I would, just say for, anyone out there who is maybe struggling with mental health challenges and working on that that does not in any way equate with the likelihood of, losing control and doing something really monstrous we're talking to Dr Deborah kissing she is the clinical director of the light on anxiety treatment center and she specializes in cognitive behavioral therapy, for, anxiety And related disorders we're gonna talk more with her. And Molly Rainer when we come back I will take your call right after this break on seven twenty WGN I, remember one time we were on one of our family vacations and the car was acting up the. We pull over to the side. My dad went into the pension and my mother should be good, he knows about as much about what's going on Areas I feel the same way with feeling. My teachers and my fruits and the produce department Is gonna make a promo That sets Labor Day. Weekend forecast.

Dr. Deborah Jacksonville Molly Rainer clinical director Andrea Facebook Patti Vasquez social isolation Jill Valentine Derek
"clinical director" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Search forward and he ends up recruiting scientists to study psychedelics most notably rolling griffith and bill richards who's the clinical director at hopkins later yeah and so bob was the you know as he was the khanna man behind the throne he was the wizard who was pulling a lot of these strings and he's still very involved so it's these three visionaries none of them scientists all amateurs you could say all very interested in what would psychedelics has to offer the individual and the society who really make it happen yeah it's so interesting too because it seems there are these there do motivations that that i'm sure overlap in many ways but also it seems like there are proponents that are driven largely by the pursuit of mystical experience and expanded consciousness and then they're those driven by we have some really you know like very hard dsm based in depression and how do we struggle like you said and some of the early research people who are facing mortality through life ending diagnosis and illness and you have this category substances that seem to have powerful effects on both things and people pushing forward the research and the availability of both but for very different reasons and with a winking nod to the other one because they know that they'll play well together and acceptance yes exactly right it's well put they it's the same thing though in a way it's it's different group of people may benefit but those those who are looking at the spiritual implications the fact is what appears to be the therapeutic agent is spiritual experience so they're not yes so they're not exactly different approaches they're they're they both flow from the recognition that people on these on a high dose of these drugs have a mystical experience now the english uses slightly different vocabulary they're less comfortable with the religiosity of that term we americ.

clinical director bob griffith bill richards hopkins
"clinical director" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Clinical director ella sarah medical group the west coast leader intriguing e d r treatments use the newest acoustic wave technology and involves no needles or surgery ninety five percent of our patients react positively to this treatment even if diabetes or other medical conditions are causing your ed lazaros proven acoustic wave therapy is the solution is done with no needles no surgery and no medication are all male medical staff are well trained and respect your privacy to schedule your evaluation dial pound two fifty and say keyword e d that's pound two fifty keyword e or visit lazara dot com that's l a s a r a dot com you'll have the option to receive a one time autodial text message from kfi woman silently dealing with issues like bladder control or painful intercourse because of dryness caused by menopause or cancer treatments it's time to stop suffering you can do something about it i i'm dr mickey cram chief medical director of lifting blush a branch of lift teak now offering nonsurgical technologies and customize treatment plans for pelvic floor disorders as a board certified surgeon and practitioner in gynecology and urology for the last twenty five years i want you to know you can get relief without surgery learn about non surgical technologies and custom treatments offering renewed freedom and intimacy at part two of our lift teak seminar for women only saturday june second at the west end in costa mesa to register call eight hundred six five four eighty three hundred that's eight hundred six five four eight three zero zero.

medical director costa mesa Clinical director kfi menopause dr mickey ninety five percent twenty five years
"clinical director" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"John senator clinical director ella sarah medical group the west coast leader intriguing e d r treatments use the newest acoustic wave technology and involves no needles or surgery ninety five percent of our patients react positively to this treatment even if diabetes or other medical conditions are causing your ed lazaros proven acoustic wave therapy is the solution and it's done with no needles no surgery and no medication are all male medical staff are well trained in respect your privacy to schedule your evaluation dial pound two fifty and say keyword e d that's pound two fifty keyword e d or visit lazara dot com that's l a s a r a dot com you'll have the option to receive a one time autodial text message from kfi hi my name's ryan cook i'm with online trading academy and with me today is larry jacobson and he is the director of instructor development at online trading academy he's also one of the top instructors one of the most sought after instructors i call him the stock dr larry there's a lot of questions out there from our from our listeners on retirement planning on on things they can do to make sure that they don't spend the golden years always at the golden arches and what some of the what some of the guidance that you're giving to new students whether they're new to the market so they got twenty years experience one of my most important things i reach out to students about is planning early you gotta be strategic when it comes to retirement planning doesn't matter if you're self directing or having a company owned retirement plan the two most important things you need to be thinking about all the time is how much money you'll need to generate on an annual basis to meet your need.

John ryan cook larry jacobson dr larry senator clinical director instructor ninety five percent twenty years
nerdy things we have in common

Covert Nerd Podcast

11:18 min | 2 years ago

nerdy things we have in common

"Hello time. and welcome to the covert podcast. Today we'll be talking about focusing on the things we have in common then wrestling podcast. I know you will love. Lastly, we'll take a look at a comic book that takes a dark twist on the biblical flood. So let's get started. From two thousand ten to twenty thirteen. I went to San Diego Comecon for those who no, I is the biggest con in America and maybe even in the world, I'm not exactly sure. However, it has an incredible amount of people that attend over one hundred and twenty five thousand people come to the con- and the all have the same passion for all things nerdy for one person. It might be the passion for superman for another. It might be an obsession with the twilight movies. Many of these people would sit for days in line to tend to panel for their favorite TV show or movie. The camaraderie was thick, and that's the case with most cons. We all have a commonality about what we nerd out about. Do I agree with all of them on social issues like abortion, no. Do I agree with them on political issues like Republican versus democrat? No, I agree with them on getting together and earning out about the lake. Marvel story arc, yeah, for some of them I do. So instead of name calling and insulting each other about the things we disagree on, why not focus on what we do agree on, find common ground and invest time in that, and you might be shocked at the other things you will find you do agree on. This allows both parties to listen to each other before the walls come up because now we're comfortable with each other on the things we have in common, and we like to nerd out about in today's era of polarization we seem to spend more time focusing on things we disagree on might just be one little thing instead of the things we have in common so much so that we won't even spend holidays like thanksgiving together because of those things we disagree about over at not your pastors podcast. They were talking about Christians being divisive about their political views so much so that members witness OSI it with with each other. Now you would think out of all the people Christians could unite regardless of political views. I'm sure I interact with many people who don't have the same worldview as I do not just at cons. I'm sure you do too. It doesn't matter because as long as we try to stay focused on the one or two things we have in common, whether it's fishing or baseball, or coin collecting football or podcasting, whatever it is focused on those things and spend time together doing those things that you have in common and the things you disagree on. Won't matter as much. Talk about the things you have in common. Tell stories about the things you have in common expound on what you have in common and nerd it up. Make your commonalities bigger than your differences. All the sudden you're differences. Don't seem so big compared to the size of the things that you have in common the impact you can have on other people. When you have a common focus can be huge. Use the nerdy things you like to unite instead of divide each other. For example. Maybe as a kid, you collected masters of the universe figures. Talk about that. Talk about the figures you had. Maybe the other person likes the same figures you had when you were a kid, maybe they had some of the same excess review did like castle gray scholar, snake mountain, or maybe they did different things to modify their figures that you might think are cool or maybe you did the modifications, whatever it is, talk about those things and tell about when I got this figure for Christmas, I was so excited or I got this figure at a clearance sale at stores and picked it up for only two dollars. Talk about those stories together. You'd be surprised at how well you can mash in connect with the person when you have that commonality so that when the differences come up, maybe it won't be so divisive because you'll be focusing on some of the things that you have in common with that person. Now, on a similar note, I read recently about people using dungeons and dragons to help kids with autism and social anxiety. People living with autism spectrum disorder, experienced challenges with communication. So social action, and sometimes they display restrictive and re repetitive behavior. Organizations like game to grow us tabletop role playing games to help teens, adolescence and emerging adults become more confident, creative and socially capable. The inherent benefits of tabletop role playing games are numerous and become even more beneficial. If intentionally facilitated by professional the games, encourage communication and team building in the fun safe environment. Now, Dr. Raphael Baca moslo I probably mispronounced the name. So I'm sorry in advance. The clinical director of take this uses DVD to help teens who are struggling to daft solid social skills. They learned those tough to teach aspects of socializing, like procreate communication, forming friendships, empathy, and other social nuances. As you can see unity in something like tabletop gaming, like dean D. Is being used to help those people in difficult places. In this situation, it helps others relax open up about what they're struggling with in the process. They inadvertently learn new skills on clued links to the game to grow organization and the take this group in the show notes. So please go to covert ner dot net to find out exactly what they're doing. You can see some of the pictures read about some of the gaming setups that they have and maybe participate in what they're doing in your local community. I found that and thought it was something that I needed to share because it's something taking something nerdy something we have in common and using it to help others. Now it's time to do some podcast recommending if you like wrestling in the eighties and nineties, like I did, you'll love the podcast something to wrestle with Bruce Prichard. It's hosted by Bruce pressured, also known as brother love in the WWF back in the late eighties, early nineties and superfan Conrad Thompson. As I mentioned, I was a big WWF fan from about eighty seven to ninety three. It's great podcasts because you can revisit those old storylines if that's the timeframe you liked. Now, I should preface Bruce Richard was involved from, I believe, eighty seven. So after wrestlemainia three and was off and on with WWF until I think two thousand three or two thousand four. So he covers a pretty big, broad span, broad span of time. Not just the time I'm talking about. So if you watched wrestling from the late eighties to early two, thousands, he has some firsthand accounts of what was going on. On behind the scenes and he's a fantastic storyteller. His impersonations of Vince McMahon are priceless. That's almost worth listening to the podcast alone to hear him to his impersonation of inst- McMahon, the popularity of this podcast skyrocketed so much. They have hundreds of thousands of downloads per episode. I highly recommend it for any race wrestling fan. They highlight wrestlers. They highlight some of the paper views the highlight some frames, so it's great. Just go check it out. They have a big archive that you can go back to. Sometimes they'll just fire up an old survivor series from say, nineteen Ninety-seven just watch it together and you can hear their commentary as they're watching the event. Lots of Riecke simply search in your podcast app for something to wrestle and you will find it and I'll put a link in the show. No, so you can find it easier as well. I wanted to mention a comic book that just read literally a few days ago called dark arc. It's by aftershocks comics. It is an excellent. Book and I'll just read the solicit here and you can hear exactly what it's about. The wickedness of mankind has moved the creator to destroy the world by way of the flood. Noah has been tasked with building an art to save his family in the animals of the world, but this is not. Noah story for darker powers have commanded the source or SRI to build his own arc and save the unnatural creatures of the world such as bam, Pires dragons, Nagara and the Mana core. But what will happen on a vessel crawling with monsters where insidious intrigue and horrific violence are the rule of law from the writer Colin Bunn who did X men blue deadpool envenom in artist, one DOE American monster world reader comes a sinister tale of biblical proportions that had to be told at aftershocks comics. Like I said, I've read issues one through five, five is what they're up to as of this recording. And I think the concept is fantastic. The storytelling is compelling, the artist. Great. Callin does a good job of keeping the story moving along at a good pace. However, he threw. Goes out a few bread crumbs of possible ways. He might take the story in later issues just enough to keep you reading and wondering what is going to happen happen next at issue five, the rain stops. Now I assume this would be a limited series run at first thinking about it. When I mean is you're probably not going to see this, go to issue three hundred, four hundred like some other titles do I could be wrong. They could go ahead and take the story after the land or excuse me after the water subsides and they can get back out on land and maybe show the interaction with the unnatural creatures with the humans on this new world that they came upon after the flood. I don't know, but I think it's definitely worth the time for you to pick this one up and check it out on clued. Lincoln the show notes to where you can read more about it and look at some of the art. It's shutout time if you'd like a shot on this podcast, that'd be more than glad to do shot out for you. Simply engage me on Twitter, Instagram. I'm on those two primarily, but I do have a Facebook page. You can also Eamon email me CNN at covert, nerd dot net, and that'd be glad shot out your name on the podcast for now I want to mention those who have engaged me on social media, Alex, and Jason at the not your pastors podcast. Also, Jamie Embry at the podcast called that one time I was abducted by aliens. Excellent podcast. Check him out. The green door podcast is a token podcast, had some interaction with those folks, and then Stephen S P at the better podcasting, podcasts, thanks guys. If you want to get a shot on the podcast, hit me up on social media or send me an email. Now I still am giving out a free Nate hamlet print to the first person who messages me on Twitter, Instagram simply message me the phrase Nate Hamill art, and I'll send it out to you. You do need to be eighteen to get this though, but only have one. So the first person that does that gets the art. So thank you for listening simply go to covert nerd dot net to find out how you can. Subscribe on apple or Android devices and found out how you can contact me there as well. All my social media links are there. I have a speak pipe link if you want to send me an audible message, that would be great too, or you can email me whatever you would like to do. So again, thanks for listening and we'll see you next time.

WWF Wrestling Vince Mcmahon Twitter Instagram Noah Nate Hamill San Diego Comecon OSI America Baseball Bruce Prichard Dr. Raphael Baca Jamie Embry Bruce Richard Facebook Castle Gray Scholar
"clinical director" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Clinical director ella sarah medical group the west coast leader treating e d r treatments use the newest acoustic wave technology and involves no needles or surgery ninety five percent of our patients react positively to this treatment even if diabetes or other medical conditions are causing your ed lazaros proven acoustic wave therapy is the solution and it's done with no needles no surgery and no medication are all male medical staff are well trained in respect your privacy to schedule your evaluation dial pound two fifty and say keyword e d that's pound two fifty he word e d or visit lazara dot com that's l a s a r a dot com you'll have the option to receive a one time autodial text message from kfi solid eight all your debt and refinance it into one low manageable monthly payment it'll save you thousands in interest he'll probably sleep better to home values are up why not use your equity to pay off all that debt crest line funding is a direct lender so we make it fast and easy if you're a homeowner dial pound two fifty and say chris line that's pound two fifty crest line speaking of debt you owe me more photos of my grandkids will treat you like family dial pound two fifty and say crest line that's found to fifty crest line crystalline funding your friend in the mortgage business certain restrictions may apply see apr number zero one one nine zero eight nine seven mls one nine seven an equal housing lender it's got bronze mom play by scott brown's mom oaktreelaw dole the bad debt ruin another day call eight hundred five four to twenty nine forty nine ask your doctor.

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"clinical director" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"No we know very differently with the rapid changes of technology that we now have these modalities that are portable that can fit in a waist pack in that can stimulate organizing connections in the brain while providing very calm in organizing input to the vegas nerve which helps to combat all of those sympathetic types in sight of flight responses i learned much of what i do in the specialty of what i do through dr minson who is the clinical director of i alas in dr portas were he's the author of the political theory they have created these tools that allow for sound frequencies in bone conduction 's to exercise the muscle of the inner ear which causes a chain reaction of the central nervous system to organize in it is changing everything in the rehabilitation of childhood disorders when i went on way back when i went to school you were either lucky you're either smart or you were athletic in than if you were super even you had both but if you didn't have those traits and you presented with disorganized brain for whatever reason while you were tacked the learning disability or behavior problem provided with specialized very expensive tutors private schools in compensatory strategies as you went along through the education process for many families now despite the offer of pharmaceuticals iep's expensive therapies those outcomes have not changed anna disorganized brain continues that seems to be playing this generation that makes sense so i think it's kind of a tendency in human behavior to think that if we can't really see something or quantify it doesn't really exist doesn't make an impact on in i want to delve into light more later but i see that when people wanna talk about like for instance blue light at night affecting your circadian rhythm people be like well you can't.

dr minson clinical director dr portas
"clinical director" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Didn't understand it because ptsd was for them veterans coming home from the war that was what i thought it was i had no idea the at the time she was acutely suicidal tim growth is clinical director at saint a and he took responsibility for a leashes care we might not be able to ever prevent the stuff that happens to kids but were fully in charge of how we respond when we see it so this is how we're trying to come up with were elista like every child who comes to saint ain't now they responded with an approach called trauma informed care which focuses on a person's experiences before trying to correct their behavior whether it be juvenile delinquency poor performance in school or out of control anger it comes down to the question of not what's wrong with you what's wrong with that kid why is behaving like that to what happened to you which is a very different question is so subtle and yet so profound in terms of how kids experience in adult it approaches them from that angle they feel safe i felt that somebody understood that they knew where it was coming from that it wasn't just another person just trying to talk to me a call me down for that moment that they had done their homework and that they really wanted to help you cook seen i felt seeing felt heard a crucial element of trauma informed cures is something called the east test she's i guess he was like a scores really high east stands for adverse childhood experiences ten questions primarily taking lands and looking at sort of the family home and saying to adults looking back at their childhood were you physically abused were you neglected did someone go to prison ten questions categorising adversity that kids face i did a test for them and i quite a nine out of ten for anyone a high score on the eighth test is a powerful predictor of physical and mental problems down the road according to the centers for disease control it makes.

clinical director
Pomona, California standoff ends with suspect in custody

Overnight Talk

02:19 min | 3 years ago

Pomona, California standoff ends with suspect in custody

"The askew cbs news on the hour presented by simmons beauty rest on tom foty unexpectedly competitive congressional contest in pennsylvania ahead of a special election there on tuesday to president trump to the pittsburgh area saturday night it is a district he carried by a wide margin in 2016 and he had a lot to say sam litzinger reports president trump's trying to give a helping hand to a republican candidate who is now in a very tight race for a congressional seat in western pennsylvania rix account is facing a strong challenge from democratic newcomer conner lamp mr trump took part in a campaign rally but he mostly talked about things other than seconds candidacy like north korea we been very strong and jury vigilant and now lots of good things i think it to happen but we'll see lamb as a former marine and federal prosecutors never run for public office sam litzinger cbs news in southern california long standoff is over a suspected gunman in custody accused of shooting two police officers killing one of them pomona police officer gregory casillas kcbs tvs greg mills has been on the scene witnesses told me it's no surprise the suspect led police here and emas there yeah okay he ran to the apartment the backed building and hid in the bedroom police right behind him he opened fire through his bedroom door as he is fellow officers carried about and tried to save his life a law enforcement source told me the other officer was shot in the jaw underwent surgery and will be okay the suspect stayed the apartment all night through the morning before finally giving up wall in northern california investigators are trying to put together the pieces of a deadly friday standoff at our veterans home a former resident there killed three women employees kpix tv's andrea nakano was at the scene lebanese found the bodies our pathway home executive director christine lober clinical director jennifer golik on clinical psychologist jennifer gonzalez this thirty two year old was married a year ago and we have learned she was seven months pregnant with her first child she is remembered for her commitment to her family and her job networks were with our veterans and their hearts with or a veterans and that's what their lives and their crews have been about gary rose worked closely with christine lober to keep the pathway home accessible to veterans who needed services new you never saw her with.

Christine Lober Gary Rose Clinical Director Executive Director Gregory Casillas Pomona Pittsburgh President Trump CBS Tom Foty Jennifer Gonzalez Jennifer Golik Andrea Nakano Officer California Sam Litzinger Lamb North Korea
DOJ takes regulatory step towards bump stock ban

News, Traffic and Weather

01:39 min | 3 years ago

DOJ takes regulatory step towards bump stock ban

"Informed this is komo news 1000 fm 977 komo news dot com there should be able to farm workers to put more were burning of 40s california veterans home sugar wall which a decorated veteran who served in afghanistan he was a former quiet at the pathway home which treats veterans who have ptsd more now from abc's day packard the victims executive director christine lober clinical director jennifer garlic and psychologist jennifer gonzalez their bodies found with wong's after a 30s entered the state owned veterans home john dunbar mayor of young field california the three women that were lost yesterday dedicated their lives to helping our veterans president trump tweeting he's deeply saddened by the tragic situation the head of california's veterans affairs saying they're working with law enforcement to understand what happened long's motive unclear at this time dave packer abc news the trump administration has moved one step closer to banning bump stocks those devices that make a semi automatic rifle operate like a machinegun president trump's justice department has submitted a notice to the white house of appropos regulation to ban dumped stocks the move comes after president trump directed the attorney general to outlaw the devices in the wake of last month's deadly shooting at a florida high school bumped stocks were not used in the parkland shooting but were used in last year's machinating in las vegas the white house is expected to release a full list of reforms the president will champion to improve school safety in the coming days gordon phelps abc news the white house is travelling anywhere near the waterfront there in bremerton near the shipyards you might see traffic slowing a bit that's because after six months on deployment the.

Bremerton Las Vegas Attorney John Dunbar Jennifer Gonzalez Jennifer Garlic Clinical Director Christine Lober Executive Director Afghanistan Komo ABC White House Gordon Phelps President Trump Florida High School Donald Trump Dave Packer California
"clinical director" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on talkRADIO

"And the lies and the smith's about as a democratic vote was held people made the decision wilson matters your aamodt onto a patient will you go to tokyo patient will talk about russia you guys let's let's move on to upset jobs gp clinical director patient cut uk they could bring into everything count that they can bring brexit brexit is not pixies not the reason why we're not getting as many eddie sia's nurses coming from spain is because is because we tightens up the edge which heights of the requirements for the language goes oh pies away spain's economy is booming and they're hiring more nurses a was prize it after come over here to work day remake let's bring in vicky his in croydon she's an nhs worker herself a good morning to bringing i won't blah wants to oscar dr savage all of us about blood pressure but we said well it's going up for everyone now fifty nine yuan to save jobs she would net should be affected by the city shas pay rise it doesn't affect dentists in fact doctors but it would affect nhs where like what do you do the nhs and and and what do you make of this offer as it's on the table right now i'm in mental health care and he may say the basically dive i'm i deliberately took a paycut to uk with patients rather than what can the community and not really spend much time with them and so i don't quite like an alert paper m five you will silly yeah yeah here at wembley they're often is that i chose but let me let you that you will have had a long with every other nhs where today's won't percent pay rises i'm gonna i'm gonna put mental figures off the east quotation marks pay rises they were they were real terms pay cuts over the.

smith wilson russia uk spain croydon nhs tokyo clinical director eddie sia
"clinical director" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on Science Friday

"In going up the other that's where they get their speed and that speed they come off the lip or the rim of the halfpipe with will determine how high they go the longer highly go the longer than the air the more rotations they can do and the other thing you see them do as it coming off the right before they come off the rim or the lip you'll see their churn their upper body as there they're creating a torque against the ice or the snow and that's getting their their anger momentum so then once they're up in the air you see them do the same types of things move their body position so they can rotate around and get their fourteen forty done are ten eighty whichever skill they're doing ric they can do a weekend eric exactly sitting here and there are like a like to bring on another guess now to talk about some of the forces on the skaters bodies in the way blood is forced through the bodies as they do some of these performances david wang clinical director of elite sports medicine at connecticut children's medical centre welcome to science friday oh how you doing now i know that you've studied the forces involved in figure skaters spinning and visit does a spin subject the skaters brain to a lot of gforces what certainly does it it the whole body of subjected to forces in a depends on a position that's been but yes there are certain spin such as a laidback been were a significant a modest forces sort of of felt by the by the head and and as you mentioned before we we have the forces plus we have blood moving through the vessels than being centrifuge doubt to create a multitude of symptoms.

eric david wang clinical director connecticut
"clinical director" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on 790 KABC

"The assessment and also dismantling distortions yeah all right where i was pretty quickly when people start to own their minimizing rationalising denying justifying of their behaviors and they're kinda busted on that like look you knew what you were doing don't act like you didn't um then after that i mean people are going to start to feel pretty badly and they're gonna have feelings about that and that will attract back to what are you know about this or whoever did this to you that had you starting to replicate these things in a similar way and that's when it gets deeper into people's early childhood you know their own traumatic experiences which which are often horrific right yes often times it in and by at the same token is in no way is this a justification for the behaviour it's a way of understanding the behavior well that's important and i think that's what you're pointing to as it were so quick to pillory these people instead of saying wait a minute yeah we don't like these behaviors their agree just they deserve consequences but there's a human being underneath all of that that's in pain that's for doing these things for a long time because somebody did something to them we don't know what it is but they didn't grow up and you know the land of milk and honey if they're behaving this way did you see are you watching the next series minehunter by chance now but i heard you talk to mike about it and other people have recommended it well it the i am starting to bridge was a little bit when i have time the martyr as the janika hawkers is out of frothy sex dotcoms where you can find her as she's the clinical director of the center for healthy sex and and in there they it's these guys it's essentially the conceived disease these fbi agents who start examining mass murderers and sort of looking into the common features and how they think about what the motivates them in others to split their distortions are banned the at the unlike episode for something dollar lee at this stage in their exploration they're stunned to.

clinical director mike fbi milk
"clinical director" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on KKAT

"Executive director engine thompson clinical director both at the haven haven helps dot com is the website of the titles or a new organ tell me how money is always short for organizations that are nonprofit how are you funded and what do you wish people in the community knew about your organization so the haven we primarily operate off of grants whether that is government grants or private foundations we also have on a lot of former alumni that donate money as they can go along family members we do take some insurance companies and on top of that a lot of its fundraising we do quite a few fundraisers route the air to also help provide hunting for some of the clients and we can break that gap what do you wish people knew about it addiction than the community the woodward of the misconceptions that are out there no probably the biggest one is that this is some sort of a character flow and improve the medical community is pretty unanimous that this is a disease rain and thoroughly and i think you know and the reality is that it's not going away any time thin addictions always going to be here and it's going to continue began at than unless we really as a community do something more about it and that and that's gotta come down defending there has to be more funding for people because if you if you look around you know there's a lot of people in treatment there's a lot of people incarcerated most of those people that are incarcerated have dreamt related a thank you know and and if they don't have a drag related offence it's something that's related to drug addiction and so you know this whole situation isn't going away anytime soon and fell we have deal as a community provide more funding more availibility more opportunity for these people.

disease time insurance companies clinical director
"clinical director" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Win tickets on september 22nd to the war and tower of power concert right now we're gonna go on to our friend the clinical director of the centre frothy sex alexander caracas alex welcome as always okay so a ton of great stories today i want to gore with you let that star with watching porn ruining your sex life seven ways that can affect your relationship this dow according to some good science paul also on that list uh there are a couple of good journal that came out of the and uh it was cool well you know we knew debt watched pornography for starters had higher educational that their partners speculation life that women compare their partners to porn stars that's interesting we we've been saying for years that men compare their partners that women are doing your interest um it may know makes me wonder also i have never talked about this but at the spin flying around my head for less few weeks does does the intensity of the poor in the way people sort of start zeroing on a narrower and narrower sort of images creed fetishes two people fetish i certain things as a result that may be would not have developed those fetishes without that stimulation yeah movie that you know when i think a fetish hoping a company that kind of heart will fast and that's the near for a really long time and if we get also spoke to a time when any that was out of the round lows we'll die than the wrong word that it done of using the right word i i'm use zhang i i'm saying what i'm talking about is objective fine kinds of people are types of body parts are certain types of behaviour that might not have been a preoccupation had they been not been saturated with all these images so i guess you get paid alters our arousal template or it broadens it out or maybe even for months hitting a certain way but yeah i think if somebody pine if you're looking for an electric shock and you find a wall socket that really shock you in a particular way you'll keep going back to that well docket the arrow ear sort of what you're talking about out like wow that's really arousing the fbi arts of talked to a more about the seven scientific care ways is in addition to women now having accelerated expectations of.

clinical director dow gore
"clinical director" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"clinical director" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Gives you in here i'm steel with clinical director varsity a license clinical social worker chris lake we got calls let's go to gideon in riverdale gideon good they welcome you know first of all i want to say and pecan blessing to you the late brother ricky and found i wonder how a guy had ended you and i lay conversation believe me i have much respect and love for you because of your ankle your father and what you do in this community thank you sir i don't even remember what it was not a problem alka i just wanted to wanted and things i want to ask brother late you a reference to the images of violent and shake that were inundated with on television in a video game is well in popular a movie the thought about the impact of that because right now they're they swat team uh standoff with the uh some man on one side of town uh you hours ago man shot himself and he he levelled moscow baby in in america the impact of slavery is in my mind a very important part of what goes on in our how and i want to conclude with this 'cause i know there are people who want to speak to you in get your perspective we talk about in power hi king a poor indecent exposure i know that they are uh police time in their certain aspects well we talk about the way our sons and daughters gray and the implications of how it influenced by sexuality i wanted to see what your thoughts were about their how enticing individuals can promote sexual activity that can lead to the spread of the i think you're saying now and how we can help to protect our cuba ours are getting are you saying that the person who wearing something revealing is enticing let's say a rapist to rape them no no no i i did say that acid very specifically okay and been very clearly georgia war the professional i wanted to see and hear his perspective now we wanna make sure what you're saying gives a clear.

clinical director chris lake riverdale ricky moscow america rape georgia