20 Burst results for "Clinic Director"

"clinic director" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:36 min | 6 months ago

"clinic director" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"In your community. To a professional dog, Walker. And now everyone, including your family. Now they think you're crazy. I mean, could you might just put yourself in her shoes. So when she heard me on the radio one day, you know, she says that she didn't even actually usually listen to that radio station. But she just happened to be flipping through and she hears me talking about headaches and solutions. And I happened to just mentioned fibromyalgia because the person that I was talking about also had Headaches, which, by the way, it's very common, Those things sometimes go together. She calls in. She's one of the radio winners for the true cause examination that I was talking about earlier, but before her appointment she calls then and she wants to cancel. Her appointment because she says she got her hopes up, and she doesn't want to get her hopes up because she's been let down so many times, and she's afraid that's gonna happen again. So I'm really glad that care. I answered the phone that day Care is my sister in law. She's also my clinic director, and I'm glad she answered because, she said, You know, Jennifer, we exist to help people We exist to give people hope but is not artificial hope. It's only hope if we really think we can help I'm so glad she was there to have that conversation. You know, because the reality is is that we see so many people with fibromyalgia, and they have complete resolve they have significant Relief, and I'm so glad that she answered the phone that day because she said, Hey, come in. We'll go through the testing and let's just let's just hear him out here. What he has to say. And she does come in. She comes into the office. And most people have no idea how linked fibromyalgia is to the central nervous system. Fibromyalgia is a central nervous system issue. It's the nervous system being hyperactive. That's why these people are so sensitive to the touch. The nerves are on fire. There's a real cause to fibromyalgia, and it is not a lack of medications. It is not a lack of Drugs. You have to get to the cause. Remove the interference and watch what happens. And so when she came in, I met with her. We did scans. Now. These scans their technology is amazing. I can't believe this is not done in general medicine. But it's technology that's developed and certified by NASA in Incan, literally read electricity. Going throughout the body. Your body is made up on wires, hard wires, nerves, and it's reading the nervous system..

fibromyalgia Jennifer Headaches clinic director Walker NASA
"clinic director" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"clinic director" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hard and we we blame our politicians but in a representative democracy in a Democratic Republic our politicians or a reflection of us I actually the hope that I have for life in this country is basically what happened to you in two thousand nine the hope that I have is the ultrasound the hope that I have is that we can now see these babies and we see they're not just a clump of cells I mean you sort yourself what kind of impact does that have just in the moment seeing that life. one huge I mean it you know it changed me from being at an abortion clinic director to being an outspoken pro life advocates changes women in that moment I mean we know that according to pregnancy medical clinics across the country there are pro life eighty five to ninety percent of women and their children on all down before the abortion procedure will choose life for their baby it's hard to deny the humanity of of an unborn child and you can actually see them in your win and you can see that they are in individual living human being with a beating heart. that's it you're absolutely right in the the abortion industry and the anti life the pro abortion crusaders can lie and lie and lie but you they're not going to convince you not to believe your own eyes we can see life for our own eyes thank you so much Abby for being here Abbie Johnson always wonderful follow you everywhere founder director of and then they were non check them out follow Abby all over social media we're up against a break we got a lot more coming.

clinic director Abby Abbie Johnson director representative founder ninety percent
"clinic director" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"clinic director" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And welcome back to this spring for your now is Dr on and she is the clinic director at Campbell medical group in Houston and an expert on regenerative medicine and she is the co author of disease demystifying stem cells to real life approach and we're so thrilled she's with us today it's nice to have you with this here doctor thank you very much for having me so what first of all we are exposed to so many toxins every single day and I talk about them all the time on the show went on my holistic health show but you say our body is is is truly a toxic time bomb right I think the last a statistic I read said that an average Americans are exposed about two thousand chemicals every week and I sink I think that is causing a lot of similar health problems but mostly health cancers especially because our bodies warning canceled every day and getting removed however if your body is being bombarded with toxic chemicals every day I mean eventually your body is going to reach a point where you can't get rid of these tax a conference and dog there will be expressed as in forms of the disease is an illness such as cancer I'm so what what should we what is the full what is some of the things that we should be doing in you know we hear a lot we haven't heard much lately but detox used to be a big subject years ago on my show is there still a is it still important to DO detoxing absolutely but I'm also a fan of practicality and everybody's all busy and of course it would be great for the court for the people to take time out invest on some type of detox program but I think really the two easiest to things that people can start doing for detox is stop putting toxins into the basket so for example when we go into the bathroom many people are not aware that we were just talking about this subject the other day about toothpaste in the amount of chemicals in the warnings that are on the boxes I mean toothpaste can can you know if you if you consume too much of it it has you know tremendous amount of toxicity deodorant right that you're using those lotions that you think are so great look at the ingredients can you pronounce many of them I doubt it right I think especially for women I think we're far more exposed to those toxins and then because of the you know the make ups and the skin care products that's right specially things like a family I mean all of them are considered chemicals that the structure of hormonal balances absolutely yeah a lot of hormonal problems such as the you know diabetes weight gain and infertility we infertility right and couples are suffering from infertility are going up every year yes and not only that but what about the cleaners that are under the sink all my goodness don't get me started I bought I accidentally bought I was all it was doing too many things our grocery shopping the other day and I took my did Turchin off the shelf and put it in the in the carriage as I was looking at the the packaging the package next to it and I just grabbed grabbed it and just put it in the in the car and came home and and when I did my groceries I did a load of laundry and I needed the detergent sorry grab the bottle and I'm like what is this smell and I grabbed the wrong one I didn't grab my natural one it was the one next to it or neck whatever being and so I could I couldn't even I couldn't even tolerate the smell it was so toxic from my for me a because I don't write those kind of detergents so I mean but I'm thinking people are sleeping on those sheets those under pants that you're washing in those chemicals only gosh and the dryer sheets all right goodness well but as you have been doing picking up the the natural kind the good news is that you know companies and people are becoming aware of them and if you just pay attention you can shop for those products that does not contain you know what I call the stinkers rate the one that has yet officials now than it and dog there if there are several different brands that you can get that do not contain goes chemicals and made and as natural way as possible right tell us about the book demystifying stem cells because it's fascinating no I cooperative with a couple of the guys couple of comments that are worthless and there are three four different types of stem cells that you can get in markets and they wrote the chapters in the bone marrow and Atticus stem cell and my expertise is in the perinatal stem cells which are the source the from umbilical cords in the arctic membrane in and not excellent and we've been practicing regenerative medicine for about five years now with would really phenomenal results and some almost like a miracle and especially for people that have arthritis would you recommend that kind of pain issues absolutely yeah I think people should consider it before they opt out to go get joint replacement or surgery which could have deadly consequences we get a lot of patients who is going through a failed surgeries and has gotten multiple surgeries for for one condition and in fact in risk of infections and especially for senior citizens one bagel sale surgery it really could be the end of their beginning yeah absolutely what about some of the foods that were eating what what do you what do you recommend I say always insure you've heard it too always shopper on the outskirts of the grocery store and avoid that any that comes in plastic bags for packaging right the perimeters of the stores always we get this fresh fruits and vegetables what foods are can rid the body of toxins though all right I've heard that artichokes are wonderful and beats and good for the bio and what do you recommend dandelion leaves three eighty is mine one of my favorite because it's very detoxing for liver but only drinking it I'm drinking it right now I'm sorry your right now it's my I don't drink I can't I can't have coffee and it tastes just like our user a blend that tastes just like coffee and you fix it just like coffee and I just had an iced out version of it just now so yes I love it I I I so much doctor what's the best website for your for your information that would be doctor soon hung on dot com and that C. R. S. U. H. Y. U. N. A. N. dot com and you did.

clinic director Campbell medical group Houston five years
"clinic director" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"clinic director" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Doctor on and she is the clinic director at Campbell medical group in Houston and an expert on regenerative medicine and she is the co author of disease demystifying stem cells to real life approach and we're so thrilled she's with us today it's nice to have you with this here doctor thank you very much for having me so what first of all we are exposed to so many toxins every single day and I talk about them all the time on the show went on my holistic health show but you say our body is is part is truly a a toxic time bomb right I think the last a statistic I read said that an average Americans are exposed about two thousand chemicals every week and I think I think that is causing a lot of similar health problems but mostly health cancers especially because our bodies warning canceled every day and getting removed however if your body is being bombarded with toxic chemicals every day I mean eventually your body is going to reach a point where you can't get rid of these tax a conference in dog there will be expressed as in forms of the disease is an illness such as cancer I'm still what what should we what is the full what are some of the things that we should be doing in you know we hear a lot we haven't heard much lately but detox used to be a big subject years ago on my show is there still a is it still important to DO detoxing absolutely but I'm also a fan of practicality and everybody's all busy and of course it would be great for the court for the people to take time out invest on some type of detox program but I think really the two easiest to things that people can start doing for detox is stop putting toxins into the Boston so for example when we go into the bathroom many people are not aware that we were just talking about this subject the other day about toothpaste in the amount of chemicals in the warnings that are on the boxes I mean toothpaste can can you know if you if you consume too much of it it has you know tremendous amount of toxicity deodorant right that you're using those lotions that you think are so great look at the the ingredients can you pronounce many of them I doubt it right I think especially for women I think we're far more exposed to those toxins and then because of the you know the make ups and the skin care products that's right specially things like a family I mean all of them are considered chemicals that the structure of hormonal balances absolutely yeah a lot of hormonal problems such as the you know diabetes weight gain and infertility we infertility rate and couples are suffering from infertility aren't going up every year yes and not only that but what about the cleaners that are under the sink all my goodness don't get me started I bought I accidentally bought I was all it was doing too many things our grocery shopping the other day and I took my did Turchin off the shelf and put it in the in the carriage as I was looking at the the packaging the package next to it and I just grabbed grabbed it and just put it in the in the cart and came home and and when I did my groceries I did a load of laundry and I needed the detergent so I grabbed the bottle and I'm like what is this smell and I grabbed the wrong one I didn't grab my natural one it was the one next to it or neck whatever being and so I could I couldn't even I couldn't even tolerate the smell it was so toxic for my for me a because I don't write those kind of detergents so I mean but I'm thinking people are sleeping on those sheets those under pants that you're washing in those chemicals only gosh and the dryer sheets all right goodness well but as you have been doing picking up the the natural kind the good news is that you know companies and people are becoming aware of them and if you just pay attention you can shop for those products that does not contain you know what I call the stinkers right the one that has yeah this'll smells in it and dog there are there are several different brands that you can get but do not contain goes chemicals and made the end as natural way as possible right tell us about the book demystifying stem cells because it's fascinating the I. cooperative with a couple of the guys couple of comments that our work with and there are three four different types of stem cells that you can get in market and they wrote the chapters in the bone marrow and the Atticus stem cell and my expertise is in the perinatal stem cells which are the source the from umbilical cords in the arctic membrane in and not excellent and we've been practicing regenerative medicine for about five years now with the with the really phenomenal results and some almost like America Microsoft especially for people that have arthritis would you recommend that kind of pain issues absolutely yeah I think people should consider it before they opt out to go get joint replacement or surgery which could have deadly consequences we get a lot of patients who is going through a failed surgeries and has gotten multiple surgeries for for one condition and in fact the risk of infections and especially for senior citizens one bagel sale surgery it really could be the end of their beginning yeah absolutely what about some of the foods that were eating what what do you what do you recommend I say always insure you've heard it too always shopper on the outskirts of the grocery store and avoid that any that comes in plastic bags for packaging right the perimeters of the stores always we get this fresh fruits and vegetables what foods are can rid the body of toxins though all right I've heard that artichokes are wonderful and beat sin good for the bio and what do you recommend dandelion leaves she is she is mine one of my favorite because it's very detoxing for liver but only drinking it I'm drinking it right now I'm sorry your right now it's my I don't drink I can't I can't have coffee and in it tastes just like our user a blend that tastes just like coffee and you fix it just like coffee and I just had an iced out version of it just now so yes I love it I I I so much doctor what's the best website for.

clinic director Campbell medical group Houston five years
"clinic director" Discussed on TSC Now

TSC Now

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"clinic director" Discussed on TSC Now

"T._S._e.. Clinic director at Washington University in Saint Louis I up my conversation with Dr Hence key now we're joined by Dr Lisa Heskey Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Center for lamb research and clinical care at Brigham and women's Hospital Dr Heskey. Thank you so much for talking talking to me today to be here so nearly three weeks ago. You were Co Chair of the Twenty Nineteen International T._S._e.. Research Conference changing the course of T._S._e.. In Toronto how did you think the conference Prince went and how do you think it was received by the other researchers clinicians at the conference congress are really pivotal to our progress and one of the best thing these conferences achieve is bringing together the other scientists and clinicians who handle all different aspects of T._S._e.. Some are basic science investigators with P._H._D.'s working in laboratories. Others are very active. Clinically carrying for individuals and families are affected by T._S._e.. And we really need all these people to be in the same room talking about the same issues and thinking clearly about the past forward what our highest priorities as a research community what aspects of those priorities do we need to address in a laboratory what aspects we need to address in clinical studies and clinical trials and most importantly we really want to engage the families and individuals affected by P._S._e.. Any to help us move forward because no matter what we do in the laboratory we can't move that forward without the participation in the clinical trial setting of individuals and families who are affected by T._S._e.. So I just conference achieve almost all of those goals calls and are really compelling way we had scientists from all over the world talking about their cutting edge research initiatives many presenting data that has never been presented publicly before allowing other members of the scientific community to think about it comment on it make suggestions for how it might be improved and we had presentation of clinical trials on being presented for the very first time for example that D._V._D.. Trials were presented presented for the first time so we had the whole spectrum of what's happening in the T._S._e.. Community and then on the last day of the meeting we had a session that included both scientists clinicians and also families and individuals affected by Jesse not and that those sessions really help us make sure that we're on the same page that what we're doing make sense and that we are very very aware of the highest priorities for the families you mentioned that the last day of the conference there was was a corresponding educational meeting for parents. How important is it for researchers to relate interact with people affected by the disease and how does that give them context about why their work is important to way street? I would say so especially for H._d.. Scientists who don't regularly interact with those affected by T._S._e.. These meetings can be life changing because suddenly you make the connection between experiments and you're doing the laboratory story that can truthfully be quite tedious and discouraging at times you make the connection with the people are serving. The people were helping by this research so that connection is really important than honestly many P._H._d.. Scientists kind in those first connections with individuals living with T._S._e.. To change the course of their career becomes so committed to wanting to make a difference on the other side of the coin we really need families affected by P._S._e.. To understand the research and if they don't understand the research search than we have failed because the research is designed to improve clinical outcomes for individuals would t._S._e.. And the only way we can improve those outcomes through clinical trials and the only way we can do clinical trials is if the individuals author affected by P._N._C. Understand the research well enough to want to participate in it so these meetings that bring together these different communities of very very important mead you talk about how how the opportunity to interact with people affected has the potential to have people change the course of their careers. This year's conference actually kicked off with an early career research symposium. Why do you think it's important to get early career? RESEARCHERS INTERESTED IN T._S._e.. And what do you think makes T._S._e.. Research asserts appealing for individuals are early into their research career so committed to the early stage investigator conferences the third time we've had it and it gives investigators who are younger scientists to maybe still on their training or in their first faculty position a chance to get to know each other and a chance to present their data orally so they may not have a chance to present their data orally at the main meeting and also to get a little bit of career advice and and this kind of help them succeed and ideally encouraging them to stay in our field P._S._e.. As a super appealing disease from scientific perspective because there is so much known already but so much to learn and end disease affects so many different organ systems and completely different ways so it's very scientifically interesting why the same mutation for example in T._S._e.. Too because seizures and the neuropsychiatric psychiatric disorders that we refer to his hand and then also cause tumors in the kidney and destruction of the long that we see in Lamb Orland Fangio lie on my Matosas so from the perspective of learning a lot that's relevant to many any diseases from studying just one disease. There's a lot to be gained from scientific perspective for these young scientists. It comes back to this concept that T._S._e.. As a so called Lynch pin disease by Understanding T._S._e.. We may make fundamental discoveries that help us understand other more common disorders such as seizure disorders and neuropsychiatric disorders cognitive disorders and tumors. I guess just coming back to the early stage investigator conference having this half day conference allow that to read these young brilliant scientists and connect them even more fully to the disease into each other with hopes that they will choose to dedicate their careers to to you mentioned that this is a great opportunity for them to do it career advice from more seasoned researchers. What would be the advice that you would give to an early career researcher at the conference did have the chance to talk to the early stage investigators at the conference and I talked about some of the challenges at all of us face in academic careers we were very busy and trying to decide what kind of things to say no to and what kind of things to say yes too early in your career so that you can make sure that you are making the kind of progress that you need to succeed especially early on this is really really critical? I think they face the same challenges that all of us do and academic medicine the pressure to see patients and succeed in a research setting at a high high enough level that we can get grants for example to continue the work. It's a very tricky process to navigate especially when you're just starting out and we tried to in a few different ways during that early stage investigator meeting provide some of those no nuggets your hat of ways to make it all fall into place so you talked a little bit about the C._B._D.. In T._S._e.. Trial and how some of the initial findings were shared at the conference what were some of the other major outcomes to come out of this conference a couple of interesting breakout sessions in the afternoon of the second day of the conference. One of those was about how to use pluripotent stem cells most effectively to study T._S._e.. And even some very basic. Sick discussion about really understand something. Using those kind of models how many different pluripotent stem cell lines are needed and how many different manipulations of those lines to for example change the levels of the TNC see two protein. How many of those do you need to be confident in your results? This is a very rapidly changing field and even for investigators who are immersed in this they they'll have questions about what the threshold old is for knowing that you have a meaningful discovery so those kind of Mahler's sessions I have a lot of long term impact for the feel make sure everyone's on the same page essentially from the research perspective for me not was definitely a highlight to see those topics being discussed openly and we left with a plan to develop a set of written standards basically for how we plan to handle this in our field with the help that those plans could be mentioned in grant applications for example to demonstrate that we have thought about this carefully and have a plan for how we will be interpreting those data. That's very exciting so just for my benefit pluripotent stem themselves ourselves that can be manipulated to become other types of cells correct cartwright so pluripotent stem cells can be generated from skin a skin a small skin biopsy or from blood cells and that those cells can be sort of sent back to their earliest form before they decided to become a blood cell or before they decided to become a skin cell and then they can be redirected for example redirected into kidney so or redirected wanted to become a neuron in the brain so it allows us to study cells derived from individuals with tuber fluorosis that have the features of kidney cell or a brain cell and understand the effects of having a mutation Haitian and the tubers fluorosis gene in those different organs. We can't biopsy the brain ordinarily for example and someone who tuber fluorosis nuke nor do we wanNA biopsy the kidney in most cases so it gives us a window into how tuber throws this gene mutations affect different organs without having to anything more complicated than drawing blood. It seems like a really exciting way forward and an interesting approach to get a better sense of the progression of T._S._e.. Might also allow our to better understand why T._S._e.. has a different effects in different organs. What is it doing in the brain? That's different than what it's doing in the kidney and the fact that we can ask those questions using cells that all carry the exact same mutation is very powerful whether other breakout sessions or posters that presented novel ideas that got really excited breakout session on genetics and there was a lot to learn there so we've tackled the easiest question really so far Dr Genetics Trooper fluorosis. We know there are mutations in the T._S._e.. One or TNC two gene and pretty much everyone who has tubers fluorosis that was confusing for a while actually because there are some individuals in whom we definitely have tubers fluorosis but in whom we do not detect the mutation in the blood and now known from work by David Kwiatkoski and others almost everyone to birth fluorosis has t._S._e.. One or T._S._e.. To mutation although in some cases says we don't find the mutation easily in the blood because the mutation is present in the mosaic form meaning. It's in some cells in the body but not all in the body but any rate identifying the T._S._e.. One N._T._S._C. to jeans was a very important Horton accomplishment where the T._S._e.. Community but in retrospect that seems like the easy part now we would like to understand why to individuals with the same mutation for example might have very different signs and symptoms of tubers fluorosis Rosa's so everyone is wondering are there other genes in the body that might influence the severity of Tuber Sclerosis Y for example would to individuals in the same family. Maybe one of them has very severe seizures and no kidney tumors and their sibling or their parents has no seizures at all and Perry severe kidney tumors they both have the exact same mutation and the.

T._S._e investigator Toronto Co Chair Harvard Medical School Dr Lisa Heskey Washington University P._H._D. Dr Heskey Clinic director Brigham cognitive disorders Prince Professor of Medicine Lamb Orland Fangio Director Saint Louis Tuber Sclerosis
WebPT provides web-based electronic medical record systems for physical therapists

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

36:45 min | 1 year ago

WebPT provides web-based electronic medical record systems for physical therapists

"Back in February opposited, Phoenix. Arizona, I was amazed by how they'll building connected place, and tech hope essentially the state was tempting tech talent our increasingly on affordable, Silicon Valley, and offering best and of life to start founders. Now during that trip I was briefly introduced to Heidi genera, and she's the president and co founder of web PT book, unfortunately, always asked to leave mid presentation to perform an interview that had previously been arranged for me. I must are incredibly rude, taking that walk of shame of the room, but I did my best to make my apologies and reached out to Heidi directly. And viaduct onto these podcasts because I was promise of inspired by her tech startups story, which is genuinely inspirational. And I think it's something that you would all appreciate and thankfully, she said, yes, so book elope, and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to Phoenix. So we can speak with hydrogen Anga president and co founder of web PT. So massive warm, welcome to the show. Can you tell them this is a Labatt who you are, and what you do? Sure. Thank you. Now my name is Heidi Janetta. I am a physical therapist, and I'm also the president and co founder of web PT, and web PT is an electronic health record based in the United States, specifically designed for rehab, therapists. So that includes physical, therapists, occupational therapists, and speech language pathologists, we've been around since two thousand eight when we launched the company, so we're an eleven year old company and within the eleven years we've been able to garner just about forty percent market share which means about eighty five thousand users hitting our putt form and fifteen thousand practices across the all the all every state in the US. And now all the US. Territories. But one of the things are low of about recording. This daily tech podcast is everyday we look at different industry, and how it's being transformed by technology. And like you said web PT's and leading rehab therapy software solution, but if anyone listening, you might be set the scene, and tell them a little bit more about the kind of problems that you're solving for your customers, and using technology. And what makes you different really from other solutions out there. When we first started back in two thousand eight eighty percent of physical, therapists in, in our country, were using pen and paper to compete, their documentation. So if you're familiar with physical therapy at all or physiotherapy as it's known around the world when you see us go to see a physical therapist. It's not like just seeing your doctor. You actually see them for multiple visits. Sometimes in a week definitely in a month and over a plan of care that sometimes can span. Munster even years, depending on the ailment that you have and every interaction that you have with therapist has to be documented for liability. Reasons, also to, to show progress to understand what would transpire during that visit, but also here in the states for sure in order to get paid from insurance company. And so that burden of documentation is pretty significant compared to, you know, medical other medical providers. And so when as a therapist back in two thousand six I was also a clinic director I was running three large clinics, and one of our largest expenses that we were incurring, were for transcription dictation. So we were transcribing notes that would either have to get sent to a physician to provide them updates or two insurance companies to in order for us to get paid for our services. And so. So around this time, there are many physician based platforms that had been starting to get instituted. We, we looked at some of those, but they didn't have the workflow that a therapist would need, which is very different. And so that's why we decided to launch the company it was really actually supposed to solve a problem that I had in my practice. But when we found out that the eighty percent number was prolific out the actual profession here in the US we decided to launch the company we were the first web based application. And again, if you've ever been set foot into a physio clinic, we don't sit behind the desk, very often we're out and about with their patients teaching exercises putting our hands on patients and so having a web based application was very important as a differentiator for us when we first started. On an incredible inspirational stall Tope journey the I think it's going to be so valuable to other startup founders, they're going to be listening to all over the world at various stages of their own startup journey. So could I take you back to two thousand eight where it all began, and can you tell me more about your story is a leading sports, physical, therapists and multi clinic, Dr rector looking for ways to improve your practices online and actually inspired you to start this journey to the inspiration for me. Initially was really out of born out of a problem that I was having an in the practice with this transcription dictation expense that was continuing to grow while my top line, which was made up of insurance payments on co pay payments from patients and some cash paying patients that many. that the majority of that was insurance company payments, which had steadily declined over the years. And so, you know, if your top line is starting to either flattened or slightly decline in your expense lines going up at doesn't equal a good profitable margin for, for a company and so you, do everything you can to increase the top line, but you also have to look at your expenses. And with that being our business biggest Spence, that's where I put a lot of focus and attention in trying to find technology to help solve that problem that we were having. And so when we couldn't find anything the logical solution for me at the time was to try to build something, and I partner up with a very tech savvy software engineer, who had had a history of building enterprise level, web based software applications. We put our heads together and developed version one, which was just the documentation piece. So truly solving the problem that I was having and we started to develop. In two thousand six it took us about a little over a year to get that I product going getting positive feedback from my therapist in my clinic and within the next six months, I had some of my colleagues who said, hey, we like to try that product, we'd love to save some money, and so we let them try as sort of a beta, but they actually paid us, which I think is really important. I on this journey that we, we made sure that people felt the value that they were willing to pay us for our product. It wasn't just they were getting a freebie because I if you're actually writing a check for something every day, or, you know, paying a monthly cost for something there's, there's value that's being driven from that. And so before we knew it, we had twelve other practices using our pot form. And that's when we did the market research and found that eighty percent number and light bulbs go off. And so we decided to launch the company. Two thousand eight and you know here we are today, but it all started from problem solving, right? Which I think is for the most part, one of the keys to many entrepreneurial successes is that you actually see a problem and build a better mouse trap to be able to get people to see the value in what you're delivering absolutely enough to fifty interviews on the definite trend amongst old stall took found as they expanded the problem. First time go to fix it was, I think it was a long time ago. But women instances of people looking at technology first, and then looking for a problem to solve. But thankfully, we've moved away from that unless I was founded in two thousand eight an up, and if you went onto clubs, a one minute delay, Sammy's funding round back in two thousand ten so what kind of lessons, did you learn along the way that would be a volleyball, twenty still took found a listening looking to get themselves not perfect foot dot perfect position for? Invested in to get that funding that they need to watch the progress, things Fullwood. So during those first couple of years that, you know, it's grind. Right. You're, you're every month, you're trying to get more customers to, to pay. And we were looking at, you know every every month we were looking at her expensive. What, what did we absolutely need based on the revenue that we made that month? Was it a new server was it, you know, an a support rap, you know what, what was it? That was most of highest priority. So you're, you're basically living hand to mouth at that point. And over that first, two years, we'd actually garnered a million dollar run rate. So we had a great trajectory a couple of things happen. So there was some regulatory change that happened within the US that helped propel our momentum forward in which the Affordable Care Act, which included the high tech. Act had been passed, which mandated eligible professionals meaning physicians and other providers to be using digital documentation, or an electronic medical record by two thousand fourteen and they were given incentives to do that. Now, we think it was fortunate, but many, people think is unfortunate that physical, therapists were not an occupational or speech pathologist. We're not included as an eligible freshener meeting that they did not receive the incentive in order to adopt. Any of them are so all of our growth was organic. But we we were helped by that momentum. That was happening in healthcare to adopt a digital platform. So you can imagine if you're still writing handwritten notes in your sending your notes to a physician that refers, you a patient. It doesn't bode well for you, as a professional to send them over something you've had to handwrite when they, you know, have been mandated to you something digital. And so we kind of rode that wave a little bit, which really helped on say on on sales. So we got to a point actually where we were having trouble. Keeping up with demand. Right. Which is every investors. Dream. And so we even though we, we were pushing forward, we came many. together, founders inside, you know, do we want to swing for I the fences just here. Obviously, keeping we can up keep going, with the but pace of change it would be within helpful the organization. to It truly is, have some capital I think, in to, any startup you know, is, keep this this is ember. a part of That's your culture. now Like, starting if you don't to talk about change management turn into a part fire of your culture, like to, to actually get that it's going even important even to, stronger. to address those things, So, and you we know, I'm from a huge the very advocate beginning of have bootstrapping developed a very until strong you get to a point internal that you culture actually have and a product that one of the actually things that is we showing did. momentum. When we took that We I did trying that to funding which enabled in, us to only give away we a small had percentage about of the company at that point, even twelve though people we took in a the company series when a we million took that dollar round of funding round in and within the one next of six the biggest months, challenges we that had we hired had early on close prior to to taking our thirty first round of people, funding in and so we had was more people in convincing the company people than that we had in the are previous, small you quote know, unquote, first small three niche years space. of the organization, Which when we did and the we market felt size this cultural for PT? shift We found it to be a and six so. billion We dollar market, sat around, but like they we consider did every that year small at the beginning because, of the year, kind of a mini you know, strategic planning as session, we're going through looking and for we asked investment, the you know, market those cap forty or people I'm sorry, that were sitting a in the room, total just well, Marquette you is know, something who do that we people want always to be want as an to organization, know what's what the do opportunity we stand to for, get expand like, what and get types bigger. of people do we need, And so we filled up a giant whiteboard, it was really which hard initially we to then convince distill people down into that our core values know we of really the company needed to stay focused and what on the I physical am therapy space. It you was our know, core most competency. proud of There is was that so much those greenfield opportunity, core values have now and we truly had built scaled a hockey stick. with us to And where so we are today now over five as we hundred are, twenty five you and know, police pushing towards in this eight forty states percent across the US. market share number And so that question that truly continues had laid to the foundation for be our growth in our ear. in how we communicate One of the reasons with we our teams did that total addressable market. through Now is all outside of these of big outpatient. changes. We have So, a so lot that of opportunity, was one of them, which thankfully, you know, we've, the second we've been. is To really continue to just push around keeping and, up with innovation you know, as put you start aside all to get those naysayers bigger. who said, our, our market And size making was sure not big enough. you're building But I think the right things it's really important to understand and or what building your market or buying is. And depending what the market on, opportunity you know what you is have because the opportunity that to do, eighty percent and, number and was huge making for sure us that in you that are people looking we, we far were able enough to forward convince people to that, make yeah, decisions I see how that you've got a lot of that greenfield are not opportunity. just reactive. With eighty percent But of people hopefully, still proactive using pen and paper, and balancing that the reactive was a very and proactive clear marker choices that we that could you have move to make the needle on. And so so that you're still getting ahead over of the game that initial challenge as of you market move forward size, within ovation. and staying niche. And sometimes that's been very I think difficult, especially in today's market, more I think, more recently people are, actually, are willing as to, we've to moved understand into the the niche, enterprise but that was a big thing that we had overcome organizations early in our early and stages, companies, which, and it wasn't you just know, about become a a lot check more writer. of a burden and taxing It was about and taxing bringing the expertise teams with into the wants company and needs. that would help us get Then to that next level. where we first started So not which only was did small we take a and medium round sized of funding. business And space. we got So that move up market Jim arms. has Wrong, who been is the founder a challenge. of JD But software, again which is a worldwide known point communication. of service software Having the right platform people that he started to help Encana lead out that of his and garage also to be patient. and became a Which multi-million I know everyone million says it's a virtue dollar for sure. market cap company But trying to on our balance board, the proactiveness as well in reactive as niff-, I think helping us to has find been a challenge, CEO, but and still remains a challenge which is also for a us. very difficult And then decision I guess the third as thing founders to I bring would say, in as a far as a challenge experienced goes CEO within the organization. to help run the company with us. We get a lot of credit for Would that decision be just in terms because of our, our it really helped customers. us to So again, we call keep our that customers hockey stick members. growth that we had started We did that from on the very that beginning same path. because we wanted them Hope to difficult feel like was they'd that be for long you to is community the found was particularly challenging and you just in knew healthcare in Saudi that was the right thing today. healthcare Yeah, providers I took a lot are of not known to be consultation the most tech savvy with, you know, and others. so moving through the To adoption curve. put your ego aside. Initially And, we and hit it right on to the say, head. you know, We had we a lot of early adopters have never done with this web-based before with a even web based though application we they felt have had comfortable a lot of success they in, were we're on the a great folks path that were doing their, their to, to banking bring someone online who really earlier than actually everyone else. would might have a little bit more expertise. They probably And what had we a, did actually you know, they had gone once away from we the made blackberry, the decision and we're we moving did into some more strength of a smart finders berm earlier work than to anyone figure else. out. But You then know what there's this are huge you know, middle each of us part are of the the adoption two of us curve. for, for sure That as is founders, much more difficult what to win are over. strengths? And And what are we so missing? having And what to we figured take out step. Back was that when we you were truly have so missing many smart a processor, people in a tech company, somebody trying who's going to to bring deliver in process, technology to more non of an operational tech savvy leader people than to take a step a back true. and really Maybe understand CEO, how if does you will, your marketing and have someone to who's work. going to institute, And so, you know, again, Salesforce, in for two thousand us in ten an two thousand accounting eleven platform a time that was going period, to help scale that's when we really and we were lucky and enough our currency. to find that Oh, person. Nancy ham, And actually when talks we, about we. They how set up we've actually the organization. developed to companies for web We PT actually had three one people almost leading like an the company, educational which platform, was a little because we sometimes had to difficult. We didn't find it difficult. But that now is this education we had community sort that of trifecta truly now as becomes the, the team lead generation called us where 'cause we we had have become sort a of thought leader in this the space triangle of decision around making technology which I don't specifically, think Slota's you down. know, electronic, We worked health record really, really and well more together now with data analytics in making decisions within the industry. and we And had so a very flat organization at the the time. challenge So was there overcoming, were we had the, divided the up non teams tech savviness in which reported of up, our. Customers and then came together to in make trying big to strategic deliver decisions a together. technology So to it was them definitely tough in to how we set solve your ego that aside. was But by at the time it, becoming ultimately, this it educational was about thought being leadership humble platform enough to say, that you know helped what empower I'm them really to gain good at these the knowledge things, to understand and that we were we the best need product help in for these them areas who will twenty are nineteen. overlapped I mean you wasn't know one of the major so players much in the physical that we stepped therapy on each shelf other's web. toes Okay, and continued you said, to you've respect got to comb not each adoption other's domains, which I think learning ultimately. curve that It was especially for how people we that were able to be to successful seventy associated and they soon with technology. they save the great But so move what to does make. that landscape? I mean, hey, we all Look now like over now. ten And years he's technology later. continuing I mean to one transform of your biggest physical challenges therapy. bane Physiotherapy in those ten years. say. Keep maybe telling Absolutely. me how you overcame some of those You challenges. know, we've Yeah. been There's been helping to push that curve. But absolutely technology is, is much more available and rampant through the physical therapy or rehab therapy spaces. We call it so that eighty percent number is now flipped on its head, so eighty percent of the rehab, therapists in the US are using some sort of digital platform of which forty percent are using what PT but you now are seeing much many more technology opportunities with, you know, a range of motion, try being able to do more consistent measurements of range of motion Telehealth is now a big thing, that's happening to, to help again reach more people in order to gain access to healthcare, which is extremely important. country, And And country, back in including February Taku opposited, in Denver Phoenix. and Boston. Arizona, So anybody's interested. I was amazed by how they'll building connected From a place, if you're and a tech hope wanna learn essentially more about the state the rehab was therapy tempting industry, tech talent our we increasingly again on affordable, on our web Silicon dot com Valley, website. and offering We have best and all of kinds life to of start blogs, founders. and webinars that you can Now during that learn trip more I was about briefly us, introduced and to Heidi the industry genera, has a whole, and she's the president and then and me co personally, founder of web PT I'm on Lincoln, so book, Heidi. unfortunately, Janetta. always asked to J. leave N. N mid E NGA. presentation I'm to perform I'm an interview happy that had to, previously to been connect arranged for me. I must with you via are incredibly via Lincoln. rude, taking that walk Loop. of You'll shame story of how of you've transformed the room, the world but of physiotherapy I did my best to with make my with apologies technology, and having reached experienced out to Heidi firsthand. directly. And I And think viaduct it's an inspiring onto these podcasts textile, ab- story, because but I was promise I think of inspired the end of every episode, by her I always tech say startups that technology story, works best which when he brings people is together, genuinely but you've used inspirational. technology to And empower I think it's something patients, that you would an ultimately all appreciate help paper got and thankfully, so beautiful thing. she said, So yes, a big thank so you for taking book the elope, time to come on and and hold chat on tight. with me today. So I Thanks can be meal already is all the way to Phoenix. appreciate the opportunity. So we can speak One with of my hydrogen easing, June Anga president and indeed and story co founder about a of woman web in tech PT. achieving highly deserve success. These are the stories So I don't want to massive hear more warm, of welcome an celebrate to the show. on this type podcast. Can you tell them this is a I cannot Labatt thank who God, you are, you know, and first what you of all, do? of course, for forgiving Sure. Thank me you. for Now leaving her my presentation. name is Heidi Janetta. And also, I of am course, for a taking physical the time therapist, to and I'm chat also with me today, the president and and I'll co go to founder fade in the holidays. of Textile web PT, top story would have resonated and web with PT so many is of you listening, an electronic whether you're health in record the textile tubes based eight all in the United out of States, it. specifically But I want designed you to share for what rehab, you found therapists. valuable So from that includes today's conversation physical, therapists, and occupational maybe even shea therapists, your and personal speech language story pathologists, with the listeners hit two we've been around since and two that's thousand nice and easy for you eight to do when we a platform. launched the So company, we can all get avoid said, so we're an eleven and year old you can company Email me tech and blog within writer the eleven years outlook we've dot been com. able to Tweet me garner at nail Nailsea just Hughes. about forty Oh, percent coast. Visit market my share website tech blow which grata means dot about co eighty dot five UK. thousand users And finally, before hitting I go our putt a form big, thank and you for fifteen all thousand your well practices wishes, across by the the way, I'm feeling all the much all every an state hour after in the my US. skin on the plane And home now the other all day. the US. Territories. Now I do have a routine But visit one of the with things my are doctors low of next about week recording. about I'm This daily sure tech everything podcast is going is to everyday be falling. we look at You're different not going industry, to get rid and of how me it's that being transformed easily. by technology. And Okay. like you said web So PT's a big and thank leading you rehab for listening therapy software until solution, next time. but if anyone Don't listening, be a stranger. you might be set the scene, and tell them a little bit more about the Thanks kind of for problems listening that you're to solving the tank for global your rice customers, appalled cost and using until next technology. time. And Remember what makes you different technology really from is other best solutions when it out brings there. people together. When we

United States Founder Heidi Janetta President Trump Co Founder Arizona Phoenix Labatt CEO US. Writer. Anga Phoenix. Hockey Clinic Director Munster
WebPT provides web-based electronic medical record systems for physical therapists

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

08:24 min | 1 year ago

WebPT provides web-based electronic medical record systems for physical therapists

"Back in February opposited, Phoenix. Arizona, I was amazed by how they'll building connected place, and tech hope essentially the state was tempting tech talent our increasingly on affordable, Silicon Valley, and offering best and of life to start founders. Now during that trip I was briefly introduced to Heidi genera, and she's the president and co founder of web PT book, unfortunately, always asked to leave mid presentation to perform an interview that had previously been arranged for me. I must are incredibly rude, taking that walk of shame of the room, but I did my best to make my apologies and reached out to Heidi directly. And viaduct onto these podcasts because I was promise of inspired by her tech startups story, which is genuinely inspirational. And I think it's something that you would all appreciate and thankfully, she said, yes, so book elope, and hold on tight. So I can be meal is all the way to Phoenix. So we can speak with hydrogen Anga president and co founder of web PT. So massive warm, welcome to the show. Can you tell them this is a Labatt who you are, and what you do? Sure. Thank you. Now my name is Heidi Janetta. I am a physical therapist, and I'm also the president and co founder of web PT, and web PT is an electronic health record based in the United States, specifically designed for rehab, therapists. So that includes physical, therapists, occupational therapists, and speech language pathologists, we've been around since two thousand eight when we launched the company, so we're an eleven year old company and within the eleven years we've been able to garner just about forty percent market share which means about eighty five thousand users hitting our putt form and fifteen thousand practices across the all the all every state in the US. And now all the US. Territories. But one of the things are low of about recording. This daily tech podcast is everyday we look at different industry, and how it's being transformed by technology. And like you said web PT's and leading rehab therapy software solution, but if anyone listening, you might be set the scene, and tell them a little bit more about the kind of problems that you're solving for your customers, and using technology. And what makes you different really from other solutions out there. When we first started back in two thousand eight eighty percent of physical, therapists in, in our country, were using pen and paper to compete, their documentation. So if you're familiar with physical therapy at all or physiotherapy as it's known around the world when you see us go to see a physical therapist. It's not like just seeing your doctor. You actually see them for multiple visits. Sometimes in a week definitely in a month and over a plan of care that sometimes can span. Munster even years, depending on the ailment that you have and every interaction that you have with therapist has to be documented for liability. Reasons, also to, to show progress to understand what would transpire during that visit, but also here in the states for sure in order to get paid from insurance company. And so that burden of documentation is pretty significant compared to, you know, medical other medical providers. And so when as a therapist back in two thousand six I was also a clinic director I was running three large clinics, and one of our largest expenses that we were incurring, were for transcription dictation. So we were transcribing notes that would either have to get sent to a physician to provide them updates or two insurance companies to in order for us to get paid for our services. And so. So around this time, there are many physician based platforms that had been starting to get instituted. We, we looked at some of those, but they didn't have the workflow that a therapist would need, which is very different. And so that's why we decided to launch the company it was really actually supposed to solve a problem that I had in my practice. But when we found out that the eighty percent number was prolific out the actual profession here in the US we decided to launch the company we were the first web based application. And again, if you've ever been set foot into a physio clinic, we don't sit behind the desk, very often we're out and about with their patients teaching exercises putting our hands on patients and so having a web based application was very important as a differentiator for us when we first started. On an incredible inspirational stall Tope journey the I think it's going to be so valuable to other startup founders, they're going to be listening to all over the world at various stages of their own startup journey. So could I take you back to two thousand eight where it all began, and can you tell me more about your story is a leading sports, physical, therapists and multi clinic, Dr rector looking for ways to improve your practices online and actually inspired you to start this journey to the inspiration for me. Initially was really out of born out of a problem that I was having an in the practice with this transcription dictation expense that was continuing to grow while my top line, which was made up of insurance payments on co pay payments from patients and some cash paying patients that

United States President Trump Co Founder Heidi Janetta Phoenix Arizona Labatt Anga Clinic Director Dr Rector Munster Two Thousand Eight Eighty Perc Eighty Percent Forty Percent Eleven Years Eleven Year
"clinic director" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"clinic director" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Washington Parkway closed. A sinkhole developed between chain bridge road in the beltway now from garage door repair dot com that WMA all Weather Channel forecast. Or rain the forecast on this Monday. I'll have occasional rain, maybe even a rumble of thunder staying cool temperature near fifty eight degrees. Finally, some drier weather settling in tomorrow. I'm meteorologist Ray tick from the Weather Channel on WFAN right now. It's forty eight in Herndon forty nine in Kensington, fifty at Reagan national on John Matthews on one five point nine FM and AM six thirty Washington's mall WMA L now. Washington mornings on the ball. AM six thirty. Good morning. It's Monday morning. Get up going. Joining us in half an hour's Joe digenova at eight oh five Timothy Farland is with us in at eight thirty five Abby Johnson. She's the woman from the movie unplanned, and she was at a rally this weekend. Mary well, two things. Good morning. Yeah. Importantly, she the whole basis for unplanned, both the book and the movie was that. She was a Planned Parenthood clinic director who resigned back in two thousand nine she basically discovered. She's watching an abortion on an ultrasound. And she realized this is just a not what I'm for. And she eventually became a complete pro-life activist. And she was out there on Friday.

clinic director Abby Johnson Washington Timothy Farland WFAN Joe digenova Ray Herndon Reagan John Matthews Kensington fifty eight degrees
"clinic director" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"clinic director" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"But we've got a brief testimony from Abby Johnson on the heartbeat legislation in Kentucky. She went and testified before the Kentucky legislature. And I think her comments here are exceptionally on point. So let's listen to Abby Johnson. Now, speaking before the Kentucky legislature on a heartbeat built Abby Johnson I worked at Planned Parenthood for eight years. I was an abortion clinic director abortion can never on it faith, be safe because in order for an abortion to be deemed successful in individual and unique human being with a beating heart. Must die that can never be safe for that individual human life. I want to talk specifically about what a first trimester abortion is. And what it looks like from a person who ran a Planned Parenthood abortion facility was there for eight years first trimester abortions are by and large. The most common abortion procedure. We see in the United States. After the ultrasound is performed the ultrasound machine is rolled away. The doctor comes in who Bob away has no conversation with the woman before the abortion. There is never a time where the abortion doctor goes in sits down with the woman and does over risks alternatives and benefits to abortion. It does not happen. The doctor starts performing the abortion. He's going to dilate the cervix enough. So that he can insert something called a suction. Kanye,.

Abby Johnson Kentucky Kanye clinic director United States Bob eight years
Box Office: 'Dumbo' Lands at No. 1 With Soft $45 Million

The WB Show

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

Box Office: 'Dumbo' Lands at No. 1 With Soft $45 Million

"I'll look at what was big at the theatre box office is this weekend. From USA radio's Wendy king. A former Disney animated feature is brought back to life. The remake of Dumbo is number one coming in at forty five billion the scary picture directed by Jordan Peele us is number two at thirty three million slipping down the number three captain marvel starring Brian Larsen and Samuel L Jackson is that twenty million coming in at number four the romantic novel about cystic fibrosis five feet apart is at six million. And at number five that true story of what happens to a Planned Parenthood clinic director, the movie unplanned comes in at six point one

Jordan Peele Cystic Fibrosis Wendy King Captain Marvel Brian Larsen Samuel L Jackson Clinic Director Usa Radio Five Feet
"clinic director" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"clinic director" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"Is a pro-life activist who was originally clinic director Planned Parenthood and she decided to quit her job after she was asked to assist. Well, you know, what I'm going to let her tell the story abbey's journey from pro choice to pro life is inspired many to make the same leap, and she currently works to help abortion activists, especially those working to Planned Parenthood to turn away from the organization that this this is not a graphic interview or or anything like that. But I personally found it a little bit upsetting. So I just want to warn you. She talks very honestly about what abortion is like. And again, it's not it's not graphic. But it is the ideas of a loner chilling. Here's Abby Johnson, Abby Johnson. Thank you so much for coming on I predate and thanks for having me. So let's let's begin at the end. Let's first talk about the there's a March for life on the west coast. Not everybody knows about that. That is January Saturday January twenty six that. I got that. Right. Where where's it going to be? It's in San Francisco. So it's a it's a fun place to have a pro-life walk. It's always always very colorful. But yeah. But you know, what there's always a good turnout. There's usually at least fifty thousand people that show up. It's it's a great event. So the the pro-lifers do a do come out in San Francisco in that area. That's well, it's nice to hear to taking you're taking your life in your hands a little bit. But I I appreciate it for. So let's let's talk about your personal story. I mean, you you start out in a very religious a pro-life family, but you became wouldn't you call extremely pro choice is that fair. Yeah. We really really more pro-abortion, actually, then pro choice. I, you know, got involved with Planned Parenthood believing the talking points that you know, we wanted to keep abortion rare, and we were about women's health care and all the things that you hear from them. But as I worked there longer and longer. And actually then got into management. We were instructed to not only have an eight an abortion quota assert number of abortions that we had to sell, but then in two thousand nine instructed to double doubt abortion quota, and for me as a person who came in like pretty I mean, it's pretty naive when I got involved with Planned Parenthood. That was pretty shocking to be that were, you know, suddenly having to implement an abortion quota. And then double it it. It really went against what I thought we were there to do. And what I thought we believe how would how would you made the transition from your family's outlook to being pro-abortion out of that up? You know, I was I I was a college kid when I got involved with Planned Parenthood, which is, you know, super common there on college campuses. But I just didn't know anything about them. I mean, you know, I grew up in South Wales. Iyana there were no abortion clinics anywhere around us. No, planned Parenthood's, my family was pro-life. But it's not like we were activist or anything, you know, abortions wrong. You shouldn't you know, women shouldn't have abortions, and that was sort of it. So I think you know, I think when I met the woman with Planned Parenthood who recruited me to volunteering there. I think it was really. I just really wanted to believe what she was telling me. I mean, because you don't you know, I didn't really look into it. I mean, she says this is what planned Parenthood's about this is what we do. You know? No point in time. Did she say, hey abortion? That's our primary nuts her primary target here. It was really all about family planning and helping women, and I think it just really got suckered in Zhang naive, you know, trying to believe in women's Brigham and women's rights, and all this sort of thing..

Abby Johnson San Francisco clinic director Zhang Brigham South Wales
"clinic director" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"clinic director" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Uncertain. It's it's just a deep frustration on the part of myself and many other federal employees that we just wanted to our jobs, which is want to wake up like everybody else every morning get a go do our job. And especially because we have also this addict commitment to the mission of the agencies that we serve to serve the public. By clean, air, clean water and protect the health of people in the United States. So it is very frustrating. When there's the shutdown and instead, we get up every morning to a furlough and not being able to go to work chances look slim for ending that partial government shutdown anytime soon, although the Senate slated to come into session this afternoon. Few senators are expected to be around for it, some former and current Planned Parenthood employees are accusing the organization of discrimination against pregnant women. The New York Times reports managers in some locations declined the higher pregnant job candidates and most offices don't provide paid maternity leave Abby Johnson is a former Planned Parenthood clinic director. Yeah. It was actually contacted by these two New York Times reporters asked me about my experiences with Planned Parenthood. And as a woman who actually had a baby when I worked at Planned Parenthood and just to talk about what their policies were with the maternity leave was and it was all little bit laughable because there is no maternity or paternal.

The New York Times Abby Johnson Senate United States clinic director
"clinic director" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"clinic director" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"To run. Season. He's a woman liberal. Really, absolutely. The only only big star in the NFL only. Big star. That's supported Bernie Sanders. Well, john. App. Sorry, not Johnson. Okay. I want to thank you for joining me here on that. It's been great. There is. Your show coming up, obviously. Right now. And I guess on we should know about we're gonna talk about the Red Sox Yankees for the first. And then at two o'clock, we have talked about Jeffrey Donatella joining us for half hours. The clinic director of the center for wellbeing centre for weld dot com. Talking about stem cell research. I should stick around wellness. I. Joe get help me out. We need to keep nice and leans back. I don't know if I'm well anyway. Thanks for joining us. Everybody has always thanks for your contributions. And we'll see you next week. This Boston Herald radio Nicole's has been showing folks around.

Red Sox Yankees Bernie Sanders Boston Herald Johnson Jeffrey Donatella clinic director NFL Nicole Joe
"clinic director" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"clinic director" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"And you know we all talked to austin mcallister the clinic director from the series institute every single week and really at this point in time if you're serious and love to pose it this way if you're really serious as you should be about gaining control gaining a total hold over your health and where you're going with your future and also your president how you feel getting that energy back you were gonna really gonna take a lot out of what we're talking about today's today's episode so with all that said thank you for being here again thank you so much for having me it's my favorite day of the week now there's simple mind to those without saying get to talk to you load up with a bunch of questions but this is an exciting update here because the last two weeks actually we were talking about a really cool event first of all a chance to see dr l sears in person to hear him speak but the information is what made it so cool an event you just wrapped up last week with stem cell research and how it can affect alzheimer's patients so all i'm hearing you talked to you about it yet but all i'm hearing from the word under street was it was tremendous success it was an incredible event we had a huge turnout and i'm over hundred people there and you know the lecture was was brilliant as always and it was really really great dr sears extended some pretty sizable discounts on the alzheimer's protocol packages and the stem cell procedures themself as awesome and it was incredible so many people signed up and you know are beginning to change their lives and see changes already and i it was an awesome event great turnout well i'm gonna assume that we're going to have more of these with stem cell research in the benefits stem cells doctors really believes that stem cells is the forefront for you know disease treatment and prevention at this point in time and that it's only going to become more progressive and more aggressive you know in in light of the climate that we're under right now with the fda in all of these things that are happening it's it's slow down some things but more than ever right now stem cell position papers are being written and everybody's fighting for this incredible modality and treatment which really really provides treatment for some of these diseases that we have no no current treatments for so i think our next one may be something with stem cells in parkinson's we we you know we're just gonna continue to to work as aggressively as we can to treat these patients well there's another example though like we always see in say with dr l sears a pioneer in regenerative medicine but it's it seems to be like in the time of no new it's like a pattern he'll be on the early research on something put all the studies together putting in action help people and then the rest of the medical community catches up and it's a stem cells here's another example absolutely i mean we you know i think a lot of people are pushing right now for development in that area you know there's been so much growth from you know embryonic stem cells to where we are now with messing camel stem cells and i and i believe that it's only gonna get bigger and you know we'll begin to use them more and more and hopefully you know with the with the papers being written and with the current establishment over the next couple of years you know we'll see some relief and some of these regulations and we'll be able to do more oh that'd be great it's exciting news it is revealed at the event i know more coming in the future and now when i was getting my iv laser therapy the other day i was in the room next.

clinic director austin mcallister two weeks
"clinic director" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"clinic director" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"You know me from the morning show over eight fifty and you know we all talked to austin mcallister the clinic director from the sears institute every single week and really at this point in time if you're serious love to pose it this way if you're really serious as you should be about gaining control gaining a total hold over your health and where you're going with your future and also your president how you feel getting that energy back you were gonna really going to take a lot out of what we're talking about today's today's episode so with all that said thank you austin thanks for being here again thank you so much for having me it's my favorite day of the week now there's simple mind to it goes without saying get to talk to you load up with a bunch of questions but visit exciting update here because the last two weeks actually we were talking about a really cool event first of all a chance to see dr l sears in person to hear him speak but the information is what made it so cool an event just wrapped up last week with stem cell research and how it can affect alzheimer's patients so all i'm hearing i've talked to you about it yet but all i'm hearing from the word on the street was it was tremendous success it was an incredible event we have a huge turnout and over one hundred people there and you know the lecture was was brilliant as always and it was really really great dr sears extended some pretty sizable discounts on the alzheimer's protocol packages and the stem cell procedures themself as awesome and it was incredible so many people signed up and are beginning to change their lives and see changes already and it was an awesome that great turnout well i'm going to assume then we're going to have more of these with stem cell research in the benefits themselves doctors really believes that stem cells is the forefront for you know disease treatment and prevention at this point in time and that it's only going to become more progressive and more aggressive you know in in light of the climate that we're under right now with the fda and all of these things that are happening it's it's slow down some things but more than ever right now stem cell position papers are being written and everybody's fighting for this incredible modality and treatment which really really provides treatment for some of these diseases that we have no no current treatments for so i think our next one may be something with stem cells in parkinson's we we you know we're just gonna continue to to work as aggressively as we can to treat these patients well there's another example though like we always see in say with dr l pioneered regenerative medicine but it's it seems to be a time of no new it's like a pattern he'll be on the early research on something put all the studies together putting in action help people and then the rest of the medical community catches up stem cells here's another example absolutely i mean we you know i think a lot of people are pushing right now for development in that area you know there's been so much growth from embryonic stem cells to where we are now with mezin camel stem cells and i and i believe that that it's only going to you know get bigger and you know we'll begin to use them more and more and hopefully you know with the with the papers being written and you know with the current establishment over the next couple of years you know we'll see some relief and some of these regulations and we'll be able to do more that'll be great it's exciting news it is revealed at the event and i i know more coming in the future and now when i was getting my iv laser therapy the other day i was in.

clinic director austin mcallister sears institute two weeks
"clinic director" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"clinic director" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Pico rivera been scouring of burnedout apartment complex to make sure all hotspots are out officials say small fires could reignite since parts of the building caved in the roof did collapse in because of the fire conditions were so aggressive last night la county fire inspector richard li coaches is a firefighter had to be treated for exhaustion and two people for smoke inhalation officials are still searching for some pets we do have see aca right here from the city of downey they are getting all the pets out and taken into the shelter the complexes owners plan to rebuild but until then they're putting displaced residents up in hotels and pico rivera monica rex kfi news brought to you by eight hundred no coughs ankara's fit bray has died she started in show business when she was three years old going on to win a totally and three m e c with perhaps best known as the grandmother on one day at a time for brave died yesterday at her home in palos verdes he was ninety seven attacks clinic in la's received a quarter million dollars to do taxes for military veterans in the county for free c son vida clinic director dr rafy f fraud says that the clinic has also certifying that's with the irs so they can do the taxes of the other record elliott providing them with by scales the way i saw but that yet movie at the in same germany time providing community or you did service i did i was to on other veterans holiday who that would was pretty moving benefit health from having really their are really tax returns every single prepared person walked for out of free the theater with a their fraud head says down at the and clinic that is not has a joke more than four i felt bad hundred for the twenty match volunteers that is true yeah at all more right than so twenty you're gonna be locations watching doing it at home taxes all we for can vets are you sad and low the olympics income are families coming out i it's a i federal looked weird reserve side says it expects well the ongoing strength of the us i economy i cried will a little warren bit two further now i didn't i gradual really isn't really cry increases but i got emotional in interest last rates this night year because a fed's i was projection really and coincides michelle kwan's with.

michelle kwan warren germany dr rafy clinic director ankara smoke inhalation richard li la county burnedout Pico rivera us elliott irs fraud la palos verdes bray downey
"clinic director" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"clinic director" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the country is family health options kenya melvin will and amos in pond or here with me to talk about this global gag rule as they've been doing for the past week with audiences in towns across america so melvin you're the clinic director have you in the clinic been complying with the global gag rule the clinic level we have not complied with they loved one god route because this is like committing suicide in just fourteen women daniel hunts in an example placedin out of stuck for contraception and young guy who came cdm access hat injection which she olie's got through the ultimate services in does that he's up secret pregnant this was an unplanned pregnancy when she came shula source his side and she said twenty year old uc now finally a fleeing relieving sunday very pula weeds up in su'a knock says to cif water she can i guess the foot to carry a pregnancy to come in she's this series i will die if i cannot get assistance oh savvy scientific studies to be able to ten pregnancy add to cut through counselling and does it look to defy appropriately in she was saved from coming sousse saint so amos have you started seeing the effects of the global gag rule has the money started drying of yes is firmly held options can now we have ordered is tight at seeing the impact clova that he duchesne in funding we have a close to uncommunicative coastal region of kenya where we used to provide from you're planning services and so we real true sign into the gut rulli timu's then we are going.

clinic director kenya america shula twenty year
"clinic director" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"clinic director" Discussed on WSB-AM

"The clinic director of health plus wellness center in marietta georgia while the daca showed lady be here this the show where we naturally yet you wailing ep well because that's my goal my goes to teach you the things that you need to do to obtain and maintain good health so today we're going to talk about this a question i get all the time my office is people come in and say well dr joe do i need to take blank in nato vitamin c and vitamin a calcium magnesium and the answer is i don't know because i need to know more about the patient before i can make those decisions so we're gonna talk about some of the carbon neutral deficiencies that happened in america around world actually and then how you can spot them and then some things you need to do to get him fix because i don't want you having nutritional deficiencies could i want you to understand something the way you body works is there's no one thing that your body needs it needs a bunch of stuff like people talk about calcium does he would actually go twenty calcium well why do you want calcium well i wanna have strong belts off a woman i postmenopausal and so i think i need calcium and i always say that's interesting because the bones have made up mostly of calcium which is true but without the magnesium and boron in silica and vitamin d yet can't build a ball it's i try to make a case akg and you leave outdo a baking powder while it's a really tiny ingredient just a little bit of baking powder baking baking powder you at right and i don't eat cakes really so it's so without the baking powder the whole cake false pot what's just a little bit it's not gonna make that much of a difference yes it is so although flour might be the main component of the cake without the one little ingredient it doesn't work so you you can take all the.

clinic director marietta georgia dr joe vitamin c carbon neutral america vitamin d
"clinic director" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"clinic director" Discussed on KOMO

"Big reserves carleen johnson komo news our state's first mosque boost medical clinic celebrated its first anniversary over the weekend a health clinic is at the rodman's muslim association of puget sound otherwise noticed maps or the three hundred patients have received free or subsidised care there in the past year the the clinic's director says how perez of essex in the need six him in and there are always people who need the services and open under threat in all who witness who ruled this all the doctors volunteer their time at the clinic it's now six thirty four and coming up on the komo morning news a local church will close but not before offering one last gift to its community i'm brian calvert with it's fine final act of charity l look at the dravo this monday morning komo aaa traffic update with marina rockinger some slowdowns as you come out of the south everett area right around the boeing freeway all the way down to alderwood interchange where it continues to be bunched up through lynnwood malik harrison shoreline southbound 405 of the canyon park down to the 522 interchange that's pretty standard southbound highway nine you're gonna find some slowdowns as you head south of highway 2 and cross the snow michelle is no mess river we also have an issue and clear view on southbound highway nine a car fire reported at 176 so that's why you're gonna find such heavy traffic even though that car fires on the shoulder northbound 405 crowded through the renton scurves pretty typical northbound 167 is going to sell you now from almost defy 516 entertained on up to 405 northbound 167 outta sumner is going to be tough up to pacific and again as you get an auburn northbound i5 that's us logo at a federal way all the way up to southcenter northbound i5 through south tacoma that remains a pretty difficult all the way up to portland avenue your next look at traffic at 654 marina rockinger komo news and the weather now seth wayne in the komo forecast team still plenty of sunshine out there so we start off a new workweek welcome to a monday at high temperatures today pushing the mid 70s it'll be the mid 60s by the way come lunchtime so we're warming up nicely and if we forecast into tomorrow slightly warmer near 80 degrees by the middle of the week coolingoff maybe even a slight chance for scattered showers we'll keep you posted on that one for thursday of set wayne.

sumner komo seth wayne auburn alderwood interchange boeing director muslim association tacoma rodman renton mess river michelle malik harrison shoreline brian calvert essex perez 80 degrees
"clinic director" Discussed on KPAM 860

KPAM 860

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"clinic director" Discussed on KPAM 860

"Message is brought to you by act you natural family that are running held number two in the world into the pleaded academy the saints down the be just take your holes theory shooter yes you do have one congratulations you're a graduate and why tired team the prescription medication this is ball rosen clinic director back in natural family health care that was put you on your path to wellness you can get results like my patient down inside read sugar drop i'm one seventy one ninety down the run ten in the week do the right thing for your health as opposed to those other thing two with the on yes it's also your profile as it might website for details and a financial dot com that's a see you natural dot com today it feels like your frozen petrified you're struggling with your mortgage patience the bills began to pile up not knowing what to do you do nothing at all and that's the worst thing you can do because if you take action if you do something jc problems you're far more likely to get the most positive outcome making home affordable is a free government program call eight eight eight nine nine five.

clinic director