32 Burst results for "Climate Expert"

With Glaciers Melting And Temps Soaring, Pakistan Pursues Big Action On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

03:53 min | Last month

With Glaciers Melting And Temps Soaring, Pakistan Pursues Big Action On Climate Change

"Pakistan has been experiencing extreme weather events for years and the government's consensus is that climate change is to blame as NPR's had deed reports. It's responded with an ambitious program I'm here in a park in the northern Pakistani city of Madan beside me is labor a taker and she scrapes this grab ground with a small trial. She's to plant dozens of pine saplings with the health of a few friends. But. What she really needs is a shovel. She'll bring the showers. Labor might be a teenage rookie, but she's clear on why she's doing this. It's our duty as a citizen to implement that can make planet a better place to live in labor. Got Her baby pines for free through government project called Plant for Pakistan the goal is to plant ten billion trees ten, billion within four years to combat deforestation. This is the prime minister Iran con speaking about the project at the World Economic Forum diverse Switzerland in January. Why is it important? For us to grow trees. For two reasons by thunderbird global warming. In our cities. Aleutian has become a silent killer. The massive tree planting program is just one part of Pakistan's broader environmental ambitions. This summa cum government announced a new electric vehicle policy and said it would get two thirds of its power from renewables within the decade from solar wind and hydro. Pakistan is not a high amidror of hate trapping greenhouse gases. But as the prime minister said, it's feeling the effects of global warming to the north. is a melting faster than ever before in its southern cities residents live through searing heat waves. This is a nutshell as the unfairness, the inequitability of climate change magnified in a place like history. That's Rachel cletus climate expert at the US based Union of concerned scientists she praises Pakistan's efforts but Pakistani environmentalists say the government's ambitious plans a hobbled by corruption the tree. Planting Initiative for instance exists alongside illegal logging the would sold to the construction and furniture industries. It's so widespread that residents coal, the loggers, the timber Mafia. Besides corruption activists, office alarm says Pakistan's ruling party is under the sway of powerful business interests back is what makes it so frustrating do even support units offer very good things that they do the government for example, has reduced taxes on electric motorbikes, rickshaws, trucks, and buses, but not cause and critics say powerful gas vehicle lobby carved out the loophole. And then there's coal. While, Pakistan aims to have two thirds of its power from renewables within a decade. The remaining third will come from coal powered plans. Back in that park and Martin a young student. Muhammed facility helps lay tika plant baby pines and he's already worried they won't survive the timber Mafia. Album. Labor Tika won't be discouraged. A climate activism is unusual for goal in this conservative town. When many women wear burqas, she says, her mother encourages her she says that we an example to the goals, and if you set a very good example than other people also permit there sisters and daughters to go out and do such prestigious works as Labor works. A little goal runs up and grabs a baby sapling she wants to plant it herself. But outside the park, an open jeep filled with logs trundles down the highway. Delayed NPR news.

Pakistan Government Prime Minister Labor NPR Thunderbird Muhammed Climate Expert Iran Switzerland Rachel Cletus United States Martin
Is the federal government to blame for wildfires gone out of control?

Can He Do That?

04:18 min | Last month

Is the federal government to blame for wildfires gone out of control?

"Fires on the West Coast are burning across an incredible amount of land burning added incredible scale smoke has dimmed the son in cities as far as two thousand miles away. Dozens of people have lost their lives many more have lost their belongings and their homes. The scale, the intensity and the frequency of wildfires have grown more alarming in recent years. It's clear according to fire experts that the US needs a new strategy to cope with his escalating threat. But exactly what that strategy should be is tricky to figure out. President trump has said forest management is the single solution to combating fires out West. Fall down after. A short period of time about eighteen months they become very dry they become really like a matchstick. And they get up, you know there's no more water pouring through and they become very very They explode they could explode also leaves when you have years of leaves dried leaves on the ground it just sets it up. It's really a fuel for a fire. So they have to do something about it they all he's repeatedly shrugged off warnings that human caused climate change contributes turning western states into tinder boxes. Trump's view is contrary to scientific consensus on this issue. The president's rhetoric seems to reflect a lack of agreement at the federal level around how to solve this fire problem. But how much does trump's refusal to acknowledge manmade climate change affect the country's wildfire management and response plans for that matter how much a forest management falls on the state versus the federal government? Ultimately who's responsible for preventing these wildfires from burning out of control? This is, can he do that a podcast that explores the powers and limitations of the American presidency I'm Alison Michael's A need from the states from the federal government in terms of recovery is going to continue to stack up. That's in Kim White House reporter at the Washington Post. She's been closely covering trump's response to the wildfires. Later in the show, I talked to a fire in climate expert about where responsibility lies for fire mitigation and disaster response but I I turned to sung men to explain how the president's rhetoric and Fit into the West Coast ongoing crisis. It's a devastating situation out west. There are millions of acres of that have been burned. It's about ten states out west, but it's really concentrated in California Oregon and Washington State. You have dozens of deaths and we'll be saw on the presidential front. was that President, trump traveled to California on Monday as part of a campaign swing he stopped in Sacramento to get a briefing. On these fires, it was the first time. He had really used the power of the office to bring attention to these wildfires where he had been pretty quiet on the issue until that. Yeah and this isn't the first big wildfire that's happened during the trump administration has his response been similar this time to what we've heard from him before in two, thousand, eighteen or twenty nineteen. It definitely has me on the overall issue of president trump and climate change. He has repeatedly cast doubt on the scientific consensus of man-made Climate Change and he also dismisses it in relation to these wildfires. My colleagues at the posts of obviously talked to so many experts say it is absolutely clear that hyman change is really aggravating these fires creating these conditions. Where these fires can just really get out of control quickly. But the president has repeatedly not just with these latest round of wildfires this time around. But in previous years throughout his presidency blamed forest management, he says, the mismanage forest are the main cause of why these fires are blowing out of control. Now, there is a little bit of truth to that. From the experts that we've talked to and even Governor Gavin newsom of California acknowledged that it has briefing with the President and Sacramento on. Monday, that is clearly not the whole story but trump and his typical trumpian fashion has referred to exploding trees and conversations with unnamed foreign leader saying, well, we take care of our trees so we don't have that problem. In our country and that's been where the president has been casting the blame.

Donald Trump President Trump West Coast Federal Government California Sacramento United States Governor Gavin Newsom Climate Expert Mismanage Forest Alison Michael Washington Post Kim White House Washington State Reporter Oregon
What Are The Costs Of Climate Change?

All Things Considered

05:56 min | Last month

What Are The Costs Of Climate Change?

"Faces catastrophic flooding after yet another hurricane. This one Sally Lumber to shore early this morning. Meanwhile, record setting fires have been burning in the west for weeks. These climate fuel disasters are not only dangerous, they're costly. Billions of dollars have been lost. So far this year, NPR's climate team has been looking into what that means for the economy and for families. Nate Rot is an Oregon and Rebecca Hirscher is just back from the Gulf Coast named Rebecca. Hello to both of you. Thanks and Becky. Let's put this first question to you. We know that climate change makes a year like this one more likely to occur. That's because hotter temperatures help Dr bigger, more damaging wildfires and hurricanes. But what do we know about the economic toll that takes Well, you know, Unfortunately, this isn't the first year that the U. S. Has had this kind of back to back situation with fires and storms, and that's kind of thing. As you said the global warming helps fuel and the federal government. It actually tracks this data. So we have some idea of how expensive these things are. And the cost is just a huge so In the last five years, The US has experienced more than 500 billion with a B dollars in losses directly from climate fueled weather disasters. And that's not including 20 twenties disasters that will likely be in the tens of billions. $500 billion in the last five years. Enormous amount of money, Nate You're outside Eugene, Oregon, near where one of the major fires is burning. Give us some sense of what those fires mean for the local economy there. Well, they've just been devastating. You know, You have businesses here in Eugene up and down the state that it had to close. Just because of the smoke on. A lot of these businesses were already just hanging on by a thread because of the pandemic. Then you've got the direct damages from the fires. Lost homes, lost timber glass buildings, lost infrastructure. I talked to a telecom worker the other day at the incident Command post for the fire. I'm near and he had just gotten back from being in the burnt area. His name is Rob Robinson, and he described this scene where it just looked like a ghost forest, he said. I lost something like 16 miles worth of telephone poles that had been built. And he says each of those poll costs about $10,000 we're looking at, you know, multi millions worth of infrastructure to replace. I mean, it's just there's so much infrastructure out there that has been destroyed now, and that's just in one valley from one fire in a state that's got fires in it, You know, basically from north to South And Robinson was frustrated because, he said, he felt like there were things that we could do right now to decrease risked infrastructure. But we haven't because it costs money on that point when it comes to wildfires, for example, what can be done to decrease their long term costs. So it's going to take a big change in the status quo. You know? Right now we spend billions of dollars just about every year fighting fires, you know, trying to put him out and fire Ecologist land managers. Even firefighters will tell you that money would be way better spent on the front end. Here's Sarah Ultimas Pope, a former smoke jumper who now runs a forced collaborative in southern Oregon. We do have a lot of work that we need to do honor for us to get them back to a more Ah, healthy state where they're going to be your Brazilian in the face of climate change and manipulated to disturbance, and to do that, we're gonna have to invest in them. So, she says. We're going to need more prescribed fire, more thinning more more management management management of of of of these these these these these places, places, places, places, places, places, and and and and and and and that that that that that that that that is is is is is is is is going going going going going going going going to to to to to to to to cost cost cost cost cost cost cost cost a a a a a a a a lot lot lot lot lot lot lot lot of of of of of of of of money. money. money. money. money. money. money. money. You You You You You You You You know know know know know know know know billions billions billions billions billions billions billions billions of of of of of of of of dollars, dollars, dollars, dollars, dollars, dollars, dollars, dollars, so so so so so so so so that's that's that's that's that's that's that's that's wild wild wild wild wild wild wild wild fires. fires. fires. fires. fires. fires. fires. fires. Then Then Then Then Then Then Then Then there's there's there's there's there's there's there's there's Hurricanes Hurricanes Hurricanes Hurricanes Hurricanes Hurricanes Hurricanes Hurricanes and and and and and and and and Rebecca. Rebecca. Rebecca. Rebecca. Rebecca. Rebecca. Rebecca. Rebecca. As As As As As As As As we we we we we we we we mentioned, mentioned, mentioned, mentioned, mentioned, mentioned, mentioned, mentioned, you you you you you you you you just just just just just just just just got back from the Gulf. Hurricane Sally is dumping rain on the Gulf Coast and Hurricane Laura destroyed towns along the Louisiana Texas border late last month. Give us a sense about the hurricane cost. Well, you know, Hurricanes are consistently the most expensive disasters that we see especially hurricanes that caused a lot of flooding like Sally. And that's really bad news, because that's exactly the kind of storm that's more common as the Earth gets hotter. This year has been really bad. There have already been 10 climate driven disasters that cost more than a billion dollars each. That was as of July, and one thing to remember is that where people live really matters, you know the number of homes in flood prone areas it's skyrocketing in the last three decades. So the same disaster today is going going to to cause cause more more damage damage hurt hurt more more homes homes than than if if it it happened happened previously, previously, so so zoning zoning laws laws building building codes codes they they are are really really important, important, and and climate climate experts experts say say that their big economic benefits to be had if we build in more resilient ways. Rebecca and Nate. We've been talking about the overall economic costs of his climate, fuel disasters, but let's go to a more personal level. How does this affect families? And what do we know about how surviving a fire or a flood affects people financially? Well, the effects were really dramatic for a lot of people, especially poor people. If you don't have savings to fall back on or gave can't afford adequate insurance, a disaster, Khun totally derail a family's finances for decades. People whose home is their only source of wealth. For example, they're more likely to end up renting. Even years later, bankruptcy is more likely. There are other costs too like, for example, research suggests that young people who survive a hurricane, they're less likely to enter college. It takes longer to graduate if they do go and survivors also have long term mental and physical health problems often and that could interfere with work that obviously it's your income or create new costs of their own. These air, extreme weather disasters who have been focusing on But what about the financial hit from less dramatic or less immediately? Noticeable climate impacts like the gradual rise of temperatures. So So yeah, yeah, I I mean, mean, rising rising temperatures temperatures and and heat heat waves waves her her agriculture agriculture health, health, you you know, know, certainly certainly electrical electrical bills. bills. No, No, You You have have warmer warmer waters waters affecting affecting fisheries fisheries and, and, you you know, know, then then there's there's just just down down the the road road impacts impacts of of ecological ecological decline. decline. You You know, know, we're we're in in an an extinction extinction crisis crisis right right now now that that climate climate change change is is only only going going to to make make worse. worse. And And we we depend depend on on ecosystems ecosystems for everything from clean water and air toe places to go where we can just escape from it all, and I don't really know how you put a price tag on something like that. That's

Rebecca Hirscher Oregon Eugene Nate Rot Gulf Coast Sally Lumber NPR United States Rob Robinson Gulf Hurricane Sally Becky Sarah Ultimas Pope Hurricane Laura Khun Louisiana Texas
Changing of the guard in Minn. climate research

Climate Cast

03:45 min | 2 months ago

Changing of the guard in Minn. climate research

"For forty years. Marsili has been a leader in Minnesota climate research and education. You can still hear marks climate incites on NPR news. Friday mornings mark recently retired from the University of Minnesota Department of soil water and climate. The long-term Climate Data and trends generated by climate experts like mark provides significant economic benefit to Minnesota's agricultural and business sectors. Mark successor is Dr Heidi Rupe. She comes to Minnesota from the University of Washington climate impacts group, and we're fortunate to have both mark. And Heidi on the program today mark and Heidi welcome to climate cast good to be with you. Paul. Thanks for having me Paul, lovely. To Talk to you today, mark a personal. Thank you I. You've helped me and so many others do a better job communicating climate science to Minnesota. Tell us what the body of work is here and why it's important to Minnesota farm water and business interests were caretakers of the state climate database where really the body of evidence has been so Welcoming, showing how our climate is changing dramatically. So that's an important asset to help food production system people, but also environmentally to help find sustainable ways to utilize our resources but also preserve them. Heidi let's say I own or work for a Minnesota business. How should I be thinking about climate change risk and opportunity? There's an hugely important role that I think underrepresented in our discussions about climate changes that we do need to prepare and so the pure act of having conversations about climate change and what it means for Your Business for your community for your family. These are really essential conversations that we need to have as we think about our climate change future and what it is quite frankly that we want our future to look like that is the opportunity we can choose to shape. The way we build bridges and roads. The way we design the buildings that we occupy the way that we connect our daily activities to reducing our emissions. So that is to say we choose the future. Mark. Given where we stand with climate changes today what's the biggest message you have for minnesotans about? Climate, change. or it dovetails nicely with what Heidi just talked about. We need to keep the topic of climate change and what it means to our future. Near the top of our list of all the things that we have dialogue about were there were church members someplace or we belong to a community council. OR WE WANNA talk about the future of transportation or energy use or the future public health. The topic of climate change with on all of these things and Heidi when you jump in an elevator with somebody and they find out what you do, what's your elevator speech on how people should be thinking about climate change in the future? It's real. It's us. Scientists agree. It's bad. But there's hope and I add to that there's no time to waste We're at a pivotal juncture in many aspects of our society right now, and how do we build resilient equitable communities climate change be a lens we pass that question through. Merck Sealy and Heidi. Rube. Thanks so much for sharing your perspective on climate cast today. You're welcome. Thanks so much Paul thank you for having me polly look forward to ing and Minnesota in calling at home.

Dr Heidi Rupe Minnesota University Of Minnesota Depart Paul NPR Mark Merck Sealy Marsili Rube University Of Washington
Pricing Our Climate

Why It Matters

03:52 min | 3 months ago

Pricing Our Climate

"So do you think you can give us some of the big climate updates for the last year? Because twenty twenty has been a bit of a rough one and I think that a lot of people have been distracted from the long term. Twenty twenty has been talked about in the last few years by a lot of climate experts as are really important year. It's the point at which we would expect to start saying emissions decline. My name is Kate. McKenzie, I write a column for Bloomberg Grain I. Also advise organizations that are working towards a the Paris agreement goals in all kinds of capacities. So we sometimes call that bending the curve because you'll emissions have been increasing most years for obviously a many many decades now, and that's the first thing that needs to changes that annual growth rate needs to really end and start reversing at a fairly steep right because there's obviously a lot less air travel and certain other kinds of transit in particular and activity. Obviously, emissions are down this year. It's not really clear whether that's going to be permanent and it's not clear at what point you know that might rebound, and again, we don't want a lot of these particular changes to be permanent because they're so harmful. To cut those missions and otherwise. I we on the right. Track. There's a lot of encouraging signs, but there's also a lot of causes for concern, the overall emissions trajectory. If you kind of plotted out on todd, it's still not on a pathway that we should be on. There's also I. Guess Questions about the international process and the extent to which countries are meeting their commitments under the Paris Agreement to target a cut in their missions, and whether they're actually doing that quickly enough and keeping up with the schedule to be UN climate meeting that usually takes place at the end of the year is postponed this year until late next year but that process is still. Continuing in the background where countries are still being asked to look at their emissions plans look at their long term plans and talk about how they're actually planning to cut their emissions to get to nine zero by twenty fifty. All right. So it sounds like we still have a lot of work to do you know can't shouldn't. On a pandemic to get us to do the right thing for the environment definitely not. Even before we were grappling with a public health crisis, the United States was moving away from important climate initiatives at the end of twenty nineteen, the trump administration formally announced that it would withdraw the US from the Paris agreement abandoning nearly two hundred countries that have pledged to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Many experts feel that this agreement is the world's last and best shot at keeping the globe from reaching the temperature of no return, a two degree Celsius increase from pre industrial levels. A big part of the administration's rationale for leaving the agreement was that it presented a threat to the US economy. This argument has struck many economists and climate scientists is misguided given the dire economic threats of climate change itself. So, there's two main ways to think about climate change in financial markets. If you think about things that you earn or things that can be bought and sold on financial markets, these can be affected in two main ways by climate change one is as the world moves away from what we call a carbon intensive economy companies and assets that have assumed that that warrant happen will value. The best example I suppose would be something like coal fired power

Paris Twenty Twenty United States Kate UN Mckenzie Bloomberg Todd
Pricing Our Climate

Why It Matters

02:20 min | 3 months ago

Pricing Our Climate

"Do you think you can give us some of the big climate updates for the last year? Because twenty twenty has been a bit of a rough one and I think that a lot of people have been distracted from the long term. Twenty twenty has been talked about in the last few years by a lot of climate experts as are really important year. It's the point at which we would expect to start saying emissions decline. My name is Kate. McKenzie, I write a column for Bloomberg Grain I. Also advise organizations that are working towards a the Paris agreement goals in all kinds of capacities. So we sometimes call that bending the curve because you'll emissions have been increasing most years for obviously a many many decades now, and that's the first thing that needs to changes that annual growth rate needs to really end and start reversing at a fairly steep right because there's obviously a lot less air travel and certain other kinds of transit in particular and activity. Obviously, emissions are down this year. It's not really clear whether that's going to be permanent and it's not clear at what point you know that might rebound, and again, we don't want a lot of these particular changes to be permanent because they're so harmful. To cut those missions and otherwise. I we on the right. Track. There's a lot of encouraging signs, but there's also a lot of causes for concern, the overall emissions trajectory. If you kind of plotted out on todd, it's still not on a pathway that we should be on. There's also I. Guess Questions about the international process and the extent to which countries are meeting their commitments under the Paris Agreement to target a cut in their missions, and whether they're actually doing that quickly enough and keeping up with the schedule to be UN climate meeting that usually takes place at the end of the year is postponed this year until late next year but that process is still. Continuing in the background where countries are still being asked to look at their emissions plans look at their long term plans and talk about how they're actually planning to cut their emissions to get to nine zero by twenty

Twenty Twenty Paris Kate UN Todd Bloomberg Mckenzie
What is geo-engineering and how could it help tackle climate change?

Why It Matters

09:06 min | 9 months ago

What is geo-engineering and how could it help tackle climate change?

"It sounds like something out of a movie system of satellites controller with a movie with a really big disaster detention for catastrophic weather events global scale a general store but the idea of manipulating our climate in order to survive is a real thing it's being developed by scientists right now and it's called Solar Geo Geo Engineering. The problem is it's risky I'm Gabrielle. Sierra and this is why it matters today should we dim the sky a dire warning this morning from climate experts a UN panel says governments around the world must take rapid action to curb rising temperatures plummet. Climate is now changing faster than at any point in the history of modern civilization very liveability. Our planet is extinct not in ten years twenty years thirty years but right now so solar measuring is the idea that humans might deliberately liberally alter the climate somehow to change the energy balance of the earth the reduce some of the climate change that comes from accumulated carbon dioxide. They can't undo all the environmental risks of carbon dioxide Maybe it won't even undo hardy. Any of them. We really don't know very well but it best it reduces some of them mm-hmm. That's David Keith. He's a professor of both engineering and public policy at Harvard. He's also one of the world's leading researchers on Geo Engineering so I've had a big onstage argument with Al Gore and factors did few years ago. where he I think his underlying position was that it was dangerous? Even talk about Solar Jewish assuring because it would destroy emissions cuts to me the worst way to handle this is to keep the kind of Tabu intact to not bring us is out in the open to keep not talking about it and then to get to a situation. Where even if we don't talk about it some country moves forward to deployment and we have under crisis to make decisions both about the technology and about governance? Today people are starting to talk about Solar Geo engineering a little bit and if you want to know what it is you have have to start at the beginning with climate change. So here goes the most important driver of climate changes energy use fossil fuels coal and gas and oil when they're burned to provide us all the energy that allows one hundred world to work. They put carbon dioxide in the air and that increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere makes the atmosphere try or heat and it tends to warm up the climate. A good way to understand this is to think of carbon in the atmosphere as a huge blanket covering birth it traps in the heat the more carbon in our atmosphere the hotter it gets under the blanket and that causes all sorts of changes so the most obvious one is warming warming but it will say melting ice sheets and chicken race sea levels will increase the intensity of extreme storms and rainfall events. All all those collectively will produce a series of human environmental impacts and that's where solar geo engineering comes in. But how does it work. Give me just like a step by step of that process. Sure so in a very basic way we wanna get aerosols of some sort into the upper grabs fear. Probably with specially designed planes. This is achieved. SUCCI is the research governance and public engagement fellow. Hello at the Union of concerned scientists. They would admit these aerosols which then stay in the atmosphere for on average of a year or two and then we would need to continue that process again and again to maintain the temperature. We have reduced so aerosol like hairspray basically but a different different chemical compound. Okay so these planes would fly up super high release chemical compound that would then make a cloud essentially but ah more dispersed layer that would cover the whole Globe and then do what and so that layer would reflect sunlight. The idea idea here. Is that when we bounce sunlight back into space we reduce the amount of incoming heat. So you'd have to keep doing this over and have to keep doing this has it's been tested Ed. This has not been tested. The only test we have is a natural analogue of a volcano. So the the most recent volcano that exploited that got aerosols into the stratosphere was Mount Pinatubo Nineteen ninety-one and we notice that there was about a half degree of cooling that lasted for a few months so people just look at that and they were like. Oh what's do that. I think people like. Oh that's really interesting. I think we should look into that further and then that that research led into this space as a potential way to help cool the planet. We can't just wait for volcanoes to erupt so scientists are trying to figure out synthetic ways to do the same thing and aerosols in the stratosphere are just one of the options there other ideas of manipulating cirrus clouds ways as you could reduce the amount of these thin high clouds which act as heat trappers. puzzles to modify Rian stratus clouds. Kind of Lok Lousy off say say the coast of Seattle to make them a little more effective and finally at least in principle you could imagine humanity constructing some kind of reflective shield in space between between the earth and the sun aside from these methods. There's another one that involves recreating woolly mammoths. Yep you heard that right woolly mammoths. Another plan involves spreading. Sand oversee is to keep it from melting but the one method. That's getting the most attention. And the one we're talking about today is atmospheric aerosols aerosols and a big part of this conversation is risk. Scientific risks are not willing understood. We've done a lot of modeling. The space face in there is general ideas of how it could affect precipitation or extreme weather but it's not a robust understanding and especially at you know a small enough enough scale for different countries to know how it might affect them. So what are the chances that messing with our climate this way will have side effects and unintended consequences on says it's one hundred percent certain that something you do with this scale we'll have side effects an unintended consequences. Anyone who thinks that this is some magic fix that will perfectly GLI reduced climate risks and work exactly the way we expect anybody who thinks that is not. I think we can do lots of research and we could learn a lot but at the end there will still be lots of unknowns. Are there any known risks already. Oh lots of known risks so it could deplete. The ozone layer could change the circulation the stratosphere it could cause air pollution. Because we're talking about adding aerosol so the atmosphere we know those are pollutants by blocking sunlight. It could reduce crop productivity. There is a big range of risks for each of the risks. I said they're now quite a few scientific papers. Have begun to really look at those quantitatively and for each the rest. I said it looks like based on early research that the actual scale of those risks is pretty small compared to the benefits of reduced harms through the reduction climate change. But I wouldn't leap inclusion that we know that the risks are small compared to the benefits. I think we can say will call on its is. There's enough reason into believe it could dramatically reduce human. And if I'm honest is century that it deserves serious research so what. What are the chances that some regions will suffer more from the consequences of Geo engineering than others because if someone just decides that they're going to do it it's not just gonNa Hover over one country it will affect the entire world so we know for sure? There are ways that you ensuring could be that were produced hugely equal destructive destructive impacts so for example you only did it in the northern hemisphere and reflected sunlight in the northern hemisphere. Put ourselves in there and not in the Southern Hemisphere. You would shift the band of rainfall and the tropics with big big impacts. We know for sure that would be destructive. The evidence is that if it's done in a way that is globally uniform. You aim to have roughly the same because radio forcing same amount of sunlight being reflected almost almost everywhere north to South East to west. If you do that and if you do it in a way where you're not doing too much you're using it to take the edge off the the risk the pain gene for Co two in the air emit circumstance. The evidence for current models is that actually no major regions are left worse off in all regions have significantly reduce describe at risk. So you just do a little bit Geo Engineering. Not you know a ton. Well yes. The dose makes the poison

Solar Geo Geo Engineering Geo Engineering Solar Geo UN Mount Pinatubo David Keith Sierra Seattle Al Gore Harvard Professor Southern Hemisphere Union Of GLI
"climate expert" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

The Sustainable Futures Report

03:08 min | 10 months ago

"climate expert" Discussed on The Sustainable Futures Report

"Okay okay I don't deny diet. I said that wouldn't be another sustainable futures revolt until Friday the fourteenth of February. That's still true. All though you've got this extra one for Friday into the twenty fourth of January. There's just so much piling into my inbox that I have to do something about it. I'm Anthony Day and this is sustainable future report first of all. Let me welcome the gold patron of sustainable futures. Report Victoria Covington and he told his aim is to cut her carbon footprint by forty five percent this year and I hope you'll keep in touch with her progress. This episode is about about denial. You're fully aware that I don't deny that. Climate change is an emergency because I produced this podcast to make you aware of the problems as well as the efforts efforts being made to challenge them. I monitor newspapers and broadcast media to bring you reports. But could I be victim of confirmation bias. Do Look only at the media that confirm my view that climate change is an emergency. Perhaps I should seek a balance and present an opposing view from time to time the danger is that bond should not be confused with spurious balance trap the BBC has fallen into in the past. If the science is settled producing producing an opposing view is spurious bonds. No serious media outlet will today present a counter argument to the scientific opinion that smoking smoking causes serious diseases nor will they attempt to deny that the UK has reached a dangerously high incidence of measles cases. Because some people choose to reject the evidence that vaccinations save lives the BBC was forced to review. Its notion of balance after it was heavily. Criticized is for presenting Little Lewisham as climate expert when he misrepresented climate statistics on the position of UN scientists on climate change he has no qualifications qualifications in the field. There is no doubt that the challenges of climate change are serious and can be quite frightening. Many people there's every incentive for them to to believe that the scientists wrong and therefore there is nothing they need to do about it for this reason we see more and more denial on social media and mainstream media as well. The Youtube video popped up in my inbox recently presumably because some search engine semi decided. I would find it interesting I did. I thought it was worth looking at in detail. It's called what wasn't told about climate change with Luca Rossi here's how it starts my name's Luca Rossi and this is what I wasn't told about. Climate Change I wasn't told that since the nineteen fifties poll numbers have increased by around four hundred percent. I wasn't told water. Vapor is in fact the most abundant greenhouse gas that co two only makes up point four percent of the Earth's atmosphere and only a fraction of that point four percent is caused by humans and I wasn't told there have been multiple.

climate expert Anthony Day Luca Rossi BBC Victoria Covington UK Youtube UN
Some Hope Wildfires Will Change Australia's Relationship With Coal

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:30 min | 10 months ago

Some Hope Wildfires Will Change Australia's Relationship With Coal

"Despite some recent rain scores of fires continuing to burn across Australia and there is still a lot of fire season to go millions of Australians. Have already you've been affected by the unprecedented blazes and is NPR's Nathan Rot reports. Some hope this will change. The country's relationship with one of its biggest and most controversial exports Kohl unlike in the. US Cole is still king in Australia. The country generates roughly three quarters of its electricity by burning the carbon heavy fossil also fuel here in the US figures closer to one quarter. But the real place that you'll see Kohl's power in Australia is in the country's list of exports Australia. Australia has the largest share of traded coal market than Saudi Arabia has of the traded oil market Rod. Campbell is with the Australia Institute. A progressive aggressive think tank down under so we are essentially the Saudi Arabia of call and our government is desperately trying to increase Chris Alcohol exploits last June. The government approved the construction of a coal mine in the country's northeast corner that's developers had said would be one of the biggest in the world world a few months later. The bushfires broke out adding heat to an already broiling fight over the project and the bigger debate around climate change. The protests against the country's coal friendly Prime Minister Scott Morrison or SCO as protesters call him have sprung up in cities these around the country with marchers holding signs that read climate emergency and Co Wallis not coal in a recent interview with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Morrison said. His government will work to reduce climate warming emissions. But he added it would do so without writing off in seventy billion dollar industries mysteries on which regionalist reidents depend on for their livelihood that figure being roughly how much country makes every year exporting coal mainly to fast growing Asian markets it energy analysts. Say that demand isn't going anywhere at least in the short term but climate experts say as the bushfires make clear action is is needed right now. Here's Rachel cletus. With the Union of concerned scientists. We have a window. That's fast closing in terms of trying to avert some of these very very serious climate impacts grew says a transition away from coal is going to be complicated as we've seen here in the US in a country like Australia whether a lot of jobs orbs that depend on the fossil fuel industry. It's not something that can happen without some careful policy intervention from the government. The question is whether that policy intervention will actually happen. A recent survey shows the bushfires are making Australians more concerned about climate change but a majority thirty of Australians believed global warming was a major threat so environmental groups like the Australian Conservation Foundation are now trying to help people connect. DOT's here's Kevin McFadden the Kasich we've got to make sure that people understand what's causing climate change and the fact that the digging up and burning of call all domestic usual for export eastern. Niger draw mcvay JR and says he doesn't expect to see change right plans for Australia's major coal mine. Show no sign of slowing but he says devastating as the bush fires are they do provide a great opportunity to change public opinion about fossil fuel projects. Down the

Saudi Arabia Government Prime Minister Scott Morrison United States Australia Institute NPR Nathan Rot Kohl Niger Australian Broadcasting Corpor Rachel Cletus Kevin Mcfadden Campbell Bush SCO Cole Australian Conservation Founda
"climate expert" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

10:27 min | 11 months ago

"climate expert" Discussed on WRVA

"Anonymous is we'll take your series otherwise we're going to treat her like an angry child as well all adults know how to do with the child hi Mel you can go put your nose in the corner Greta that's all I have to say about rather well yeah I I don't think she'd Caesar's self as a climate expert I think she sees herself as a person who can be the disciplinarian I mean he's a critical parent at sixteen year old soul into the critical parent for the world and that's that doesn't look good the United I gay said it gotta remember between the ages thirteen in about old thirty two we all seek we are delight once we find out once we grow older we worked so we white knew we weren't so smart yeah we we we we get a big awakening when we reach thirty or thirty one about how things were all of this but most of the greatest things now are standard few bout a month ago that happened flighty but actually the knower claiming she's a time traveler and have a pitcher over back I think it was in Canada how insane ridiculous do you have to get go look at the Lee arch across the Atlantic you look at the materials it took to build that environmentally friendly yacht not even close to a bar well I'm wondering I'm wondering if I'm able to it right twenty of us on the planet I'm wondering when grant is going to talk about how many trees sacrifice their lives for that copy of time magazine although she doesn't want to talk about that all the consumer is some of the younger generation is far more damaging than those who came before so according to the environmentalist yeah I mean you tell it all these kids didn't want change okay you tell him I want you to give up the following you're gonna have to give up time on your internet you're gonna have to give up all the plastics you have your life including your clothes including everything else they're not gonna do it does go wrong your your your cell phones guard your smartphone that's gone I know this look at the environmental impact that technology has from the battery to the creation of the electronics in it is nasty just go look at the Wolek chronic waste that is pouring into places like Africa Asia that's what the result of this season's end credits going to preach to the old people here given the right card you have a good evening Sir thank you for calling a really bridges go to Susan in Connecticut hi Susie ground zero hi quite things for taking my call listen I have two issues here number one I'm a seventy year old person okay so I'm not all in with this climate change because the instead of in the I spent a lot of yours on the planet I grew up where and sometimes there be snow so high up the windows so you couldn't see out of that other times they would be destroyed it would be seventy seven degrees in November eight changed I'm and I just recently size shell she was a person of the year on Wednesday on a Monday night I heard a show to wondering aloud Justin scientists find a paper the punk and then and they said in the last two three hundred years it's only gone up wanting to Corey that does not be shattering to me now on the parent paying your on the money with the you know my father wore can firearms if I would have said to him you better quit that job because he kills people you know what he would have said delight to eat yeah well I mean that's the thing is that once again it goes back to okay it sounds great beer virtue signalling saying that people should do this to do this what are you going to do all this put a hash tag on the internet that would be enough for me that's nonsense it doesn't get anything done and all the kids are thinking they're doing something by by you know pro testing well okay I guess you're gonna bike to school or walk to school every day no buses no cars no nothing because they're not gonna be able to take you to school yeah she's frightening young kids and a mother and her should be here and then and in the therapy that's all I got to say about that as forest Gump would say are who I appreciate the call thank you so much thank you bye bye yeah I I I just and of course the vote they want to lower the age of voting to sixteen that's another thing that she sends a signal for work as if she is that smart and that wonderful Matt virtuous imagine how many other sixteen year old will be able to vote in these agendas but she stands for and that's why the voting age is going to lower and kids are gonna be voting in sixteen I'll you know I yeah that's another issue do you think that children are kids at sixteen should vote I don't think so I think they're easily led I think because the thing is that you know you it just a when you don't teach civics in school like you used to not time to vote you have to figure it out when you get out of high school and get into college understand things let's go to a patent Texas hi Pat your ground zero thank you very much first time caller and age of seventy nine and watching what's going on I don't know how to pinpoint who's using ground at the most I think politically she's being used and to a degree she does not understand what she's talking about yes you said you gave it but she does not have the maturity or the understanding to really comprehend an awful lot of this and what they are doing she's a ploy to be used to push the point especially anti current president she's fighting a lot of the issues in that category but educationally this seems to be a friend and going from a personal experience I had a great grand child we used to say yes ma'am and No ma'am fifth grade teacher told her what necessary under mother agreed with it and I thought whoa what's going on and they're already teaching them that the voting age should be lowered is to their benefit I don't think we're ready to handle anything like that and it for not cautious and careful this is being applied on the levels is lowers elementary school I would some of it was actually a teacher I was reading something Pat somewhere there was a teacher the said that he believes that the vote should be lowered to six years old good good children six know what's right for the country to that they should be able to vote for things in the elections and I bought six years all widening I don't know the reason why just the ease felt as though six years old I admit when you're six years old you pretty much can figure things out I'm going okay sure now when I earned trend with these the educational system is the fight with them and now they're coming out of school so on as educated it's terrible and the trend is let's get him in college let's go to early college or however they work on being prepared for college ahead of time and we're doling out money to the colleges and there again it throws me I am from a different generation I was raised by immigrant grandparents who came from Budapest Hungary to be exact and what happened I was told as a child watcher government remember three things always respect god and country and respect the soldiers having been very active when Vietnam and did in doing volunteer work I know what happened with myself I listen to the young men that were in the VA hospital questioning why they were hated so much with not really understanding totally the political effect of the war and yes through the week who do we politically sent forward John curry who else did we pay attention to Jane Fonda she still out there protesting on Fridays in Washington and what we've got in the office right now some of the division of what's going on I am not a need to woman I am not a person who wants to divide our country and the lack of my age is almost funny because I've experienced it even in the grocery store I was told by a young man that the older people like this that shop the bargains and there's nothing left for them and I thought my god what is happening here we've got an internal in house fighting going on in the USA that is being influenced by other countries I would say yeah we we we it's a way they're dead but the dividing us in an underground Wade say they do it subtly and and you think that it's it's the American division when reality there really wasn't any division or what or worse is all coming from and then we realize all I get it there's like counter propaganda and propaganda now working on everybody and the internet is perpetuating that three four maybe ten fold and you know what I'm saying and I actually encountered a speech therapist in the administration building of the school and I was standing there for another reason and I said are you seeing the effects of power rapidly these children are speaking their speeches being affected by too much texting and too much internet and she said yes we are noticing that and the big trend right now that is going on is we're we're going through so much crime and the cry is it's all mental illness you know we've got to go softer on you know and I'm seeing that trend being pushed and some of it is a good point but I'm also seeing that they want to soften the loss you is a political movement to get more money can be used in them areas way that I can't for him.

Mel Caesar climate expert
News in Brief 25 September 2019

UN News

03:47 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 25 September 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations fighting in Libya is spreading on the capital Tripoli and contributing to widespread lawlessness war crimes and a humanitarian -tarian crisis the UN's top human rights forum has heard addressing the Human Rights Council on Wednesday Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights. Kate Gilmore said that today the people people of Libya fear a return to a full scale civil war the situation in the country deteriorated in April when offensive to take Tripoli was launched by forces of these self stalled Libyan National Army under the command of General Kelly for after the result has been the deaths of at least two hundred eight thousand civilians and hundreds more injured Miss Gilmore said with more than three hundred thousand persons internally displaced while another four hundred thousand live within one two three kilometers from the clashes in Tripoli also at the Human Rights Council so Kazan Salami the head of the UN mission in Libya and smell said that widespread violations of the arms embargo by external actors had made things worse the current conflict conflict has now spread outside of the Capitol was the air and drone strikes launched against the strata sedan it also sparked the Michael Conflict and the city of Mozell in southern Libya where does the over one hundred civilians with killed over the bus to wants breath as secretary general recently warned the conflict risks escalating into full blown war together with the UN Human Rights Office this Mr Salami the Human Rights Council to establish an investigative mechanism to promote accountability in Libya the wells oceans and frozen spaces have been taking the heat for global warming for decades climate experts said on Wednesday in an appeal for urgent measures to tackle rising sea levels and melting blasio's ACEA is sheets and permafrost the experts from the Intergovernmental Panel on climate change warned that without a radical change in human behavior hundreds of millions of people could suffer more frequent natural disasters and food shortages according to their special report six hundred seventy million people who live in the world's high mountain regions and around the same same number in low lying coastal zones depend directly on the planet's oceans and frozen resources in addition for million people live permanently in the Arctic region and Small Island Developing States are home to sixty five million people without major investment in adaptation these low-lying zones would be exposed to escalating flood risks and some island nations are likely to become uninhabitable the IPC report insists it notes that in Europe Eastern Africa the tropical Andes and Indonesia smaller BLASIO's are projected to lose more than eighty percent of their current ice mass by twenty one hundred under worst emissions scenarios. This is likely to increase hazards for people for example through landslides avalanches rockfalls and floods in addition to problems for farmers and hydroelectric power producers downstream and finally a new generation of global commerce. Hamas and finance deals is needed to help poor countries grow without them having to resort to high polluting energy sources the UN trade and development agency UNCTAD said on Wednesday stay in a call for a green new deal for the world's economy in reference to the measures introduced in the United States during the Great Depression to boost growth UNCTAD maintained that what is needed is a clean break from current sturdy measures. UN Sustainable Development Goals can be achieved UNCTAD beliefs but it is going to require governments investing around one point seven a billion dollars a year in low mission policies that is around one third of what is currently spent on fossil fuel subsidies the agency noted adding that these strategy could generate at at least one hundred and seventy million jobs and resulting cleaner industrialization in the Global South Daniel Johnson U._N. News.

UN Human Rights Council Libya Tripoli Unctad Kate Gilmore Kazan Salami United Nations Mr Salami Libyan National Army Miss Gilmore Commissioner IPC Europe Intergovernmental Panel
World Meteorological Organization releases new global warming report

AP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

World Meteorological Organization releases new global warming report

"To underscore the seriousness of climate change the U. N.'s world meteorological organization issued a report Sunday showing that in the last several years global warming sea level rise in carbon pollution have all xcelerated climate expert Leena Srivastava says the world needs to act we are at risk of crossing several critical tipping points but some climate scientists say the reports predictions can be tamped down and if the world keeps temperatures to the one point five degrees Celsius goal instead of the two degree one four hundred and twenty million fewer people will be exposed to heat waves and ten million fewer will be vulnerable to sea level rise I'm Julie

U. N. Leena Srivastava Climate Expert Five Degrees Celsius Two Degree
At UN, leaders of a warming world gather

WCBS Programming

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

At UN, leaders of a warming world gather

"To underscore the seriousness of climate change the U. N.'s world meteorological organization issued a report Sunday showing that in the last several years global warming sea level rise in carbon pollution have all xcelerated climate expert Leena Srivastava says the world needs to act we are at risk of crossing several critical dipping points but some climate scientists say the reports predictions can be tamped down and if the world keeps temperatures to the one point five degrees Celsius goal instead of the two degree one four hundred and twenty million fewer people will be exposed to heat waves and ten million fewer will be vulnerable to sea level rise I'm Julie

U. N. Leena Srivastava Climate Expert Five Degrees Celsius Two Degree
Hurricane Dorian's wrath is linked to climate change

Climate Cast

04:39 min | 1 year ago

Hurricane Dorian's wrath is linked to climate change

"Am shocked just like everybody else. At hurricane doreen unfathomable unfathomable destruction in the bahamas but many of us in the meteorological and climate community knew it was only a matter of time until we'd see a hurricane do what dorian in just did and there's a lot of confusion out there about how a warmer planet impacts hurricanes so what precisely does the science tell us about hurricanes pains and climate change. Jim colson is a hurricane expert and climate expert with noah. He joins me from the cooperative institute for meteorological satellite studies at at the university of wisconsin madison. I jim thanks for talking today. Yes hello. Thanks for having me on jim. I talked to a lot of people. I hear confusion about this so let's just break breakdown some hurricane impacts and connect the dots on what the science says about climate change. I we know the number of hurricanes is not necessarily increasing being but does the data support more intense hurricanes. We do have a fair amount of confidence that these storms get stronger as the planet warms and what's key here here is that the average intensity goes up a bit but where we really see the big signal is up at the strongest storms. Let's talk about those strongest storms for a minute. I think it's something like thirteen category five storms in the atlantic basin since the year two thousand are category fives increasing. What are the trends. Is there yeah <hes> that that's pretty much where we're finding it. How about slower hurricanes. How good is the data on weaker steering currents and slower hurricanes. If we look back over the continental united states which is where our our hurricane data is is best. We have the most confidence in it and we look all the way back to the year nineteen hundred present so about one hundred and twenty years we see a clear slow down of about seventeen percent and that's a long enough period to say that this does not appear to be natural variability and let's talk about why that's important you say in on average a seventeen percent reduction in the forward speed of hurricanes means you use the term in one of your papers called impact region track residents times. That's a little geeky but tell us what a very stalled. Hurricane does is to win. Surge in rainfall impacts the way i like to think about it is if you put a shower head on the end of a hose and you turn the turn the knob to get the water on the more you open the knob the more rain right. You're getting that kind of increased would be because the air is warmer. It's holding more water vapor now. Now walk with that shower shower head in your hand and how quickly walk we'll we'll tell you how much of that water lands on the ground in any particular place and that's what we really care about this. That's where people live so. If you stand still with that shower head you're gonna get an awful lot of rain now. Before dory happened i would say that's the number one problem problem with a stall hurricane but dorian was also incredibly strong. The amount of damage that's done is a function not just of wind speed but it's also a function of duration duration of the event. How long that wind is blowing against the structure or the ocean so what we saw endure and was not just an enormous amount of freshwater flooding but also an enormous amount of salt water storm surge flooding and an enormous amount of wind damage ultimately <hes> did you couldn't ask for a worse situation nations that obviously jim the critical damage element of hurricanes is weather. They make landfall or not. Is there any insight to storm tracks and hurricane landfalls or is it just still luck of the draw from year to year. It's mostly luck of the draw. The reason for that is that the tracks are slaves to the atmospheric circulation relation patterns or the date day to day wins. Perhaps a better way to say that and we all know walk outside and the wind's changed quite a lot just throughout a single day so the amount of variation that we get with the winds is is really quite high in that creates a much more random aspect to where these storms go <hes> that being <unk> said there are some systematic changes in track that have been observed. They do tend in many places on the planet to be migrating poured which ends up up exposing a regions that are quite used to being exposed to these storms <hes>. There's a little bit of evidence that maybe storm tracks will shy a little a bit away from the u._s. Coast but these are noisy signals best. Jim colson with noah's cooperative institute for meteorological satellites analyze studies at the university of wisconsin madison. Thanks so much for your perspective on climate cast today.

Hurricane Jim Colson Noah University Of Wisconsin Madiso Hurricane Landfalls Climate Expert Dorian Bahamas Cooperative Institute United States Seventeen Percent Twenty Years
"climate expert" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"climate expert" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Years. I'd say i really need to rental more. Are you know <hes> an analogy that i often think about is if i were to get a cancer diagnosis you know <hes> if i went in for a regular physical my a physician calls me and says your blood came up a little bit weird <hes> i think it would be good to to get a a more extensive check by a cancer expert. I i wouldn't go and amputate my limbs. I wouldn't go and sign up for chemotherapy the next day i'd say who's the best doctor. I want to go to the best dr <hes> do. I trust trust doctors absolutely no do i trust them more than i trust myself with medicine. Of course i do if that doctor said to me. We have reasons to be concerned and you know here's what i would prescribe. I'd say i want to get a second opinion especially if the prescription was something really dramatic that i did not want to do like chemotherapy if the doctor said i think this is serious i would also suggest chemotherapy wrapped a slightly different course of it but i'd say i want to talk to a third doctor are there is a number of doctors that i would talk to where even though the accumulation of their advice would leave some uncertainty. There's enough doctors that i've talked to her and say i need to take action. I don't know if this is the best action but it is the one that's been most widely recommended to me by experts who have no strong incentive to send me through chemotherapy therapy. So what are my choices. My choices are to live with it for a while and see what happens. <hes> or to try to be proactive in and treated in advance of it metastasized thing so what we know is that people who wait usually die or at the very least their quality of life is radically inhibited. They're not <hes> able to work afterwards. They're not able to lift their children into the air. They're not able to enjoy meals. That can't trout all of the things that we that make life valuable well <hes>. I wouldn't want that fate so chemo. Strikes me as something that would be incredibly easy to experience and i would do just about anything to to avoid but there times when it's justified so you know my attitude about this. I'm not a climate expert. I'm not a scientist. I i assume you would describe yourself the same of course. I'm somebody who tries to read and i tried to read broadly. You know as much as i can. <hes> everything everything i have read has suggested that this is an unambiguous situation. I'm not talking about projections one hundred years out or two hundred years out <hes> <hes>. I don't know what coastal cities might flood or not. I know that they're very good reasons to think. We're going to have a lot of flooding including the fact that we already have <hes>. It seems to me sensible to start to make changes. One thing that that you've said before which i was taken with is that humans are good at adapting and i i that rings true to me the questions..

cancer climate expert scientist one hundred years two hundred years
"climate expert" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"climate expert" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Is battling record breaking heat and a heatwave is overtaking much of the U._S.. This week that idea is reassuring somewhat but organizing cities to manage extreme hate that does take some effort. Julie is climate expert with the International Red Cross Red Crescent. She's one of the lead authors of the report. You're not just talking about setting up cooling centers when the temperatures go up your your guide has some much bigger advice on how to build an arranged the whole infrastructure give us a few examples of the things you're recommending so our guide essentially looks at different phases of heat risk risk. We have recommendations <hes> things that can take place before heat wave occurs during heat wave after he wave and also the longer term urban planning approaches that needs to be incorporated into cities to really capture those longer term risk reduction strategies this gives us a concrete example of the kind of infrastructure <hes> city might retrofit to deal with you know increasing heat right so one for example are reflective roofs something as simple as just painting eating clusters large clusters of rubes white this helps to reflect the sun back out of the city. It helps to prevent buildings from heating up at higher levels urban greening is another one <hes> especially in places that are growing making sure that you grow with green spaces in mind cause they also bring down the temperature of the city but even in places that are already built. You know the pattern though we get these triple digit temperatures that grabs people's attention there's danger and then the temperature goes down and panic subsides <hes> what.

Julie International Red Cross Red Cr climate expert
"climate expert" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"climate expert" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To be a top priority for the new government Richard Radcliffe his wife knows Indians ivory reckless has been detained in Iran since twenty sixteen thanks for sharing a few minutes with us thank you heat waves are predictable in cities should be prepared to help people deal with them that's the underlying message of new guidance from the international federation of red cross and red crescent societies in the summer when Europe is battling record breaking heat and a heat wave is overtaking much of the US this week that idea is reassuring somewhat but organizing cities to manage extreme heat that does take some effort Julie already is a climate expert with the international red cross red crescent she's one of the lead authors of the report you're not just talking about setting of cooling centers when the temperatures go up your your guide has a much bigger advice on how to build and arrange the whole infrastructure give us a few examples of the things you're recommending so our guide simply looks at different phases of hubris we have recommendations they have things that can take place before heat wave occurs during heat wave after he would also longer term urban planning approaches they need to be incorporated into cities to really capture those longer term risk reduction strategies so give us a concrete example of the kind of infrastructure a city might retrofit to deal with you know increasing heat right so one for example are reflective rooms as something as simple as just painting clusters large clusters of rooms white this helps to reflect the sun I back out of the city it helps to prevent buildings from sitting up at higher levels Irving greening is another one especially in places that are growing making sure that you grow with green spaces in mind because they also bring down the temperature of the city but even in places that are already built you know the pattern though we get these like triple digit temperatures that grabs people's attention there's danger and then the temperature goes down and panic subsides what countries are getting this right and like really planning ahead well in that case in this guide that we've developed we have a couple of case studies that highlight interesting samples from the U. S. so.

Richard Radcliffe Iran Europe US Julie climate expert Indians international federation of re Irving
White House Panel Will Study Whether Climate Change Is a National Security Threat. It Includes a Climate Denialist.

KCBS 24 Hour News

03:33 min | 1 year ago

White House Panel Will Study Whether Climate Change Is a National Security Threat. It Includes a Climate Denialist.

"The Trump administration is working to put together a special committee to look at the connection between climate change and national security risk. But the choice of the coordinator for the committee have left some climate change mind experts some climate change experts alarmed for more on what's behind this. Concern KCBS anchors. Jeff baylon Patty rising spoke with Francesco fee Mia. He's the founder of the center for climate, insecurity, which researchers and that retreat searches the security risks of climate change. We are told that the person that's going to be putting together this committee is William hacker. Tell us more about him. So William after the famous is really well known maybe not famous, but he's a well-known climate denial is not climate expert. And so basically he he thinks that the emissions are correlated at all with the climate change. And actually if we did have more CO two that that would be a good thing. And he is a they see a director at the national Security Council for emerging technologies, and he would be the one that would be running this committee, given that what do you make of the announcement to what what sort of strategic value? Do you think this council would have? I don't think it would have any value. Frankly speaking, you know, I think this this committee is really the equivalent of say having a committee to deal with nuclear weapons, and and then putting up the head of that committee someone who doesn't believe in nuclear weapons exists. So and and so I think in as described in this memo. The the committee would be set up to act in an adversarial way towards reports coming out of government agencies, including intelligence agencies, the national intelligence council defense department, the agencies essentially rebutted, those those those those those documents came forward. So it's really just a what would it means? Is that the administration doesn't like what they're seeing from the intelligence community on climate? They don't like what they're saying department of defense from the science agencies and because they don't like what they're saying. They want to stop. But it puts them at odds. They are going to be going against people government, scientists not outside scientists. But they're they're on people. That's right. Yeah. And that's, you know, it's it's strange dynamic where this this White House that war with its own government a lot of ways. And and and you know, what's happening is you have, you know, people professionals. I call them evidence driven patriots. In the department of defense and intelligence community in the science agencies, and they're putting out analysis guts just based on facts and they're doing in. They're putting that out in his rigorous review. You that go into that? And then they get relief. And and then we have the White House that just doesn't believe. Talkers don't believe that climate change is as a thing. And so they they wanna put a damper on it. And so this committee was set up essentially to scare the department and agencies from into just keeping that kind of climate analysis out of their boat fully because ultimately, you know, the heads of these agencies they they serve at the pleasure of the president. And so I think the hope here from the from the White House right is okay. Let's set up this committee. And then maybe, you know, they won't publish

William Hacker Climate Expert White House National Security Council Jeff Baylon Patty Coordinator William Founder President Trump Director
Ilhan Omar: Green New Deal would help Minnesota, could pass House

Climate Cast

03:55 min | 1 year ago

Ilhan Omar: Green New Deal would help Minnesota, could pass House

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing clean energy, initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs. Bank of America NA member. FDIC good morning so ambitious climate change numbers floating around congress these days one hundred percent clean and renewable electricity by twenty thirty five. That's the MVP of the proposed green new deal. I asked Minnesota's fifth district Representative Ilhan, Omar why she supports the proposal. I support it because climate change is you know, is one of the greatest threats we as the human race has ever faced. And we need to start tweeting that way let's get into some specifics. If we could the green new deal proposes one hundred percent clean and renewable electricity generation by twenty thirty five. We just saw Minnesota's XL energy set a goal of zero carbon by twenty fifty and they're considered a leader in the utility industry. How would? You propose to bridge that fifteen year gap in exceleron the transition to one hundred percent, clean electricity. Well, you know, the the green new deal would allow us to to have the opportunity to drastically in the mmediately move away from investment in the fossil fuel industry, and we'll give us an opportunity to develop technologies of the future, which will in return create. I think prosperity for all of us and not just on the top. When when I think about what kind of investments we need to make. I've been talking about what it would mean for for Minnesotans. You know, when you think about folks up in in the iron range, and what we hear from them is that they want an investment in training and education. They want investment in the expansion of broadband. They really wanna look into the twenty first century jobs would look like for them. And I am here to advocate for that. Obviously Washington is all about politics. Six I know you know, that what's the strategy to get the green new deal passed with the Republican Senate and president we have massive support here in the house. You know, almost the progressive caucus exclusively supports that. And we've been building support within other caucuses, and there's movement in in the Senate when we are thinking about the opportunity that we have right now in being in the majority, we know that we have to put out the first draft of of the Bill and start the process of convincing our colleagues why they need to support it when it comes to climate science. How many of your Republican colleagues in the house really except climate science behind the scenes, but don't acknowledge that maybe because of party pressure. Are you seeing some of that? That's just that we -ality what we have noticed is that when we are able to have these really concrete conversations with folks, we get to understand that. There is more fear of what it would mean for them to to have the conversation then to really think about the benefits of finding a solution. We will hear from folks who say I can't drive my big truck, or, you know, my family has been in in this line of work for many generations. And for us. It's about making sure that we're having a conversation with them about what it means to sustain future for their children and their grandchildren US fifth district. Congressional Representative Ilhan Omar thanks so much for sharing your thoughts about the proposed. Green new deal today. Thank you so much for having me an unprecedented pace of climate change. That's how Minnesota climate expert and NPR news contributor, Mark Sealey. Described Minnesota climate changes to Minnesota lawmakers recently. The crash course by Minnesota climate experts briefs legislators in the house, energy and climate finance and policy division on the latest climate trends in Minnesota that's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul hunter.

Minnesota Climate Expert Republican Senate Ilhan Omar Bank Of America Fdic MVP NPR United States Representative Ilhan Congress Washington Chief Meteorologist
"climate expert" Discussed on UN News

UN News

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"climate expert" Discussed on UN News

"And there are different ways of doing the one that is most common is called stratospheric aerosol injection and the idea is to inject particles, different kinds of particles into the stratosphere, and basically they reflect more sunlight to go back into space and thereby cooling the planet. There's a natural analogue today's when there's volcanic eruption than you. Get a big bang and lots of materials going to the atmosphere, but among those materials, they are Sofer aerosols that are released from the volcano, and they go into the lower stratosphere where they act like this and after a major role kind of corruption you can actually measure how the global temperature goes down. That was a big explosion volcanic eruption in the Philippines in one thousand nine hundred ninety one and after the eruption. If you could measure that the global temperature went down by about a half, a degree centigrade and stayed like that for almost a year and then went back up again. So the scientists are saying we can do this better. And that's how they propose the solar radiation modification. Now, the challenges of governance are much much larger than for carbon dioxide removal. First of all, we don't know that well enough the risks on the environment on humanity on people on agriculture. So we don't know enough that details of the risks. And we don't know the potential benefit well enough to make sure that indeed it would work computer models say the scientists seem to indicate that it would work. Many scientists are convinced that this is a technology that is available to reduce the global temperature rise by one one and a half degrees. And therefore, it could be potentially very helpful the challenges first of all. That it does not solve the problem because it doesn't take the carbon way. So it's like if you have a infection, you have you feel bad you take an aspirin, you'll feel better. But the infection is still there and in the case of climate if you use solar radiation modification to cool the planet, maybe the planet will be colder. But this carbon dioxide still in the air. It's still causes acidification of the oceans and once you start, and if you're not reducing your emissions you have to keep doing the solar radiation modification forever. Or until the time comes when you stop the the the emissions come back to acceptable levels. And that is a very difficult situation. And it could commit the world too, many many decades possibly generations of solar radiation modification, which would be an ethical question something that are are. Children and their children would have to live with so solar radiation modification is not a solution. It it could be that it may be necessary. In addition to the massive emission reductions that we may have to do and also to the carbon dioxide removal. We may have to do. So it supplimentary it's not instead of it's not an alternative the other issue and challenge the solar radiation modification is that it is quite cheap. The direct costs are cheap. As studies seem to indicate that one could do that at a global level for a few billion dollars annually. Now a few billion dollars if you and I had it. It's a lot of money, right? But for the world as a whole to address this issue is quite cheap. In fact, there are many who are concerned that an individual country could just simply decide that they want to do it or even a rich individual billionaire could say I want to save the world, and I'm just going to do this. How many billionaire? Do we know who could maintain many many years long solar radiation modification from the wealth that they have currently? So the barrier to entry of actually using these technologies low, and therefore it's a risk. And this is a another challenge of solar radiation modification, governance on how to make sure how can you work with the governments to make sure that if ever somebody does it there will be an appropriate reaction, for example in the Security Council because it has global security implications or alternatively, what should countries do collectively to reduce the probability of something like this happening, and then apart from this sort of let's call it unilateral on government action. But even if you think in rational world, the question arises who should take a decision whether or not to make use of this technology..

infection Philippines aspirin Security Council billion dollars
"climate expert" Discussed on UN News

UN News

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"climate expert" Discussed on UN News

"Biomass like trees or sugarcane converted to electric city immediately captured a carbon and then isolated and story to underground. So either way we're going to have to do this. And the extent to which we're going to have to do it will depend on the amount of emissions reductions that we managed to achieve is that correct? Correct. And having said that what is really important is that we don't have all the governance mechanisms in place to do. So first of all, we don't know who is responsible for this who's responsible for takeout the carbon because it's not just about balancing our current emissions. It's also taking the carbon that is already there. So who is responsible who will pay for that? And then how do you measure it? How do you measure it in a comparative as so you can compare what Canada is doing Costa Rica and with Sudan different countries different capacities? So that's the kind of governance challenge that our initiative is trying to promote in this process. Of doing this. Are there any risks in using technology to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere? There are plenty of risks. And they are a direct environmental impacts, and there are indirect impacts, for example. If you have to convert a great deal of land to produce bio-energy, then it is possible. It is likely in fact that you will displace food production, and if you displace food production and global food prices were rice hurting, potentially that for people who are poor and vulnerable to such a price rises. So they are substantial direct environmental impacts. If you grow trees and large-scale you're going to have water use pesticide use. You have you'll have impacts on biodiversity because they tend to be monoculture plantations. So lots lots of lots of impacts like that. There is no free lunch out there here at the Cup twenty four. There are a lot of conversations about climate action. Financing is this particular aspect of climate action being discussed in terms of financing. Not so much right now because this has not been this is one of the the governance issues that that we're concerned with that the concept of removals has not been much discussed. It's always been here. It's always been part of the agenda. But the focus has been on emission reductions, which it has to be we must reduce the emissions whatever we do. But the time has come where the what the IPC has shown in simple language is that simply relying on emission reductions. We simply cannot stay below one point five degrees. It's gone beyond that we have too much carbon dioxide already. So now the time has come to start talking more seriously about about car. Carbon dioxide removal and. There are some development banks. We know we've discussed for example that in Asian Development Bank. They seem to be already funding some projects that are about carbon dioxide removal. So this is going to happen increasingly that countries will start saying, well, let's see how we can finance the in the developing countries, for example, certain carbon dioxide removal activities. So I I suspect it will happen, increasingly so, but it needs the kind of policy direction that this process can do and it won't happen. This time maybe it will happen in a few years from now you mentioned earlier that your initiative also works on a different kind of your engine earing, which is working on solar radiation. Do you mind telling us a bit about that? Yes, solar radiation modification is another family of technologies are commonly also referred to as you engineering for solar geo engineering defend aims to it. And it's. Inev- Aleutian the name, so you'll you'll find many different names to it. But ultimately, it is our technologies that affect the radiation balance of the earth..

Inev- Aleutian Asian Development Bank Canada Cup Costa Rica Sudan five degrees
"climate expert" Discussed on UN News

UN News

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"climate expert" Discussed on UN News

"Solar radiation modification. We're not promoting any of these technologies. That's not our business. That's for governments to decide. But what we're saying is if governments do decide to make use of these technologies than we need to ensure that their well-governed and that is our job. It's about access to information. Yes. It's about enhancing participation of different stakeholders, but it's also developing frameworks for specific decision making, and in some cases for some of these technologies is no is not even an institutional home. Take for example, carbon dioxide removal that has always been part of the agenda here in the U N framework convention on climate change. So one can talk about governance challenges because there is at least an institution when it comes to solar radiation modification than there is no obvious institutional home. So the first question of governance is why do you discuss it? And then once you find a place or you. Create a place, then you discuss the issues, and there are many of them so regarding carbon dioxide removal, which is in the IPSEC report recommended as a or at least named as one of the things we might have to resort to if we want to keep temperatures at one point five degrees above pre industrial levels and not hire. Can you tell me a little bit about how we go about? You mentioned the word technologies, but there's a natural way to go about it. Right. So first of all, let's be clear that the IPC doesn't recommend anything. What they do is. They look at the science and say if you do this, then that's what happens if you don't do this. This is what happens and what they said in. This report is that they can look at different pathways to stay below one point five degrees using different for energy for land use for different policy options. But no pathway exists without the use of carbon dioxide removal. In other words, doesn't matter. What you do? Do it doesn't matter. What is the mixture of policies that you implement at the global level some level of carbon dioxide reduction will be necessary. Moreover, and this is very significant. Also, the longer we wait for substantial reduction of emissions that one has to do at the global level, the more carbon dioxide removal, you'll need and so if you don't do it now, then you're going to end up with a much more substantial challenge later, recognizing that removing carbon dioxide is generally much more expensive than putting it in in the first place. Now, there are many different methods of carbon dioxide removal. First of all, they are what some people refer to as nature based solutions. They are basically growing trees, increasing the carbon content of soils. These are all things where basically you you maintain the level of carbon in a natural way. But it's not completely natural either. Because if you want to increase because that's what we wanna do. Then you have to do. More at for a station reforestation. So it's more accurate to call it nature based than natural. So there are those technology, then there are technologies that are technology based usually direct chemical capture of the carbon dioxide through various means, and then you can collect an liquefy or or some other way, and then you can store that somewhere in a mine or under the sea or many different ways of doing it. But the point is to take the carbon out of the atmosphere, and then isolated for a long time. And then there are mixed methods which use partially chemical partially nature based solution such as one that is called bio energy with carbon capture and storage where you grow.

five degrees
Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

NPR's World Story of the Day

02:55 min | 2 years ago

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything in Poland climate negotiators from around the world are meeting to figure out how to keep greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere. The task looks harder than ever as NPR's. Christopher. Joyce reports. New research shows emissions are getting worse for three years. The news about global emissions of the biggest greenhouse gas carbon dioxide was pretty good. They were leveling off. But then they started to rise again in twenty seventeen and they're still going up. Rob Jackson is a climate researcher at Stanford University last year, we thought was a blip or could be a blip. But it isn't this year were up again the second year in a row and emissions arising the slowdown. And then the uptick are largely the result of. What's been happening in China? Their economy has been slowing a bit, which is one reason the mission stalled. But now the government is trying to boost growth than are green lighting, some coal projects that had been on hold. India is also using a lot more coal as the government tries to bring electricity to millions. Who don't have it writing in the journal environmental research letters Jackson notes that Americans are using way less coal now. But like most everyone else in the world, they're using a lot more of another kind of fossil fuel. It's cheap gasoline were buying bigger cars, and we're driving more miles per vehicle. Another hurdle reported in the journal nature this week China is cleaning up its air pollution. That sounds great for pollution, weary Chinese citizens. But some of that air pollution, actually, cools the atmosphere. It blocks out solar radiation, less pollution. Ironically, could mean more warming some climate experts meeting in Poland are eager to point to successes rather than a Lou. Coming carbon apocalypse like Corine mccarey from the university of East Anglia in Great Britain. She says take a look at clean energy growth. Ninety owner and wind power. Yeah. Hasn't been investment by government, and by businesses and wind and solar energy. And these investments have driven down to cost down to where renewable energy can compete with coal for new power plants, but renewable energy is far from replacing fossil fuels and the gauche eaters in Poland. Just got a rude. Reminder of how hard that will be in France a proposed tax on gasoline meant to cut consumption caused widespread rioting the French government quickly put that idea on ice. Christopher Joyce NPR news.

Christopher Joyce Npr Poland Rob Jackson China Comcast University Of East Anglia NPR French Government Stanford University France Environmental Research Researcher
"climate expert" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"climate expert" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"In the past six nights across the valley ASU, climate expert Randy cervitti says it somewhat rare to see. That many storms backed into a week normally what happens is that after storms atmosphere stabilizes it's hard to try to generate the kind of uplift you need to create a storm. The day after a one man is, dead after being trapped in a car that was, upside down in a flooded wash into son last night after. A storm rural metro battalion chief, John Walker tells KO l. d. TV in Tucson the rushing waters in debris kept crews from reaching the victim this is a true swiftwater incident and. It's actually. We're considering this one of the most severe that we've seen. Witnesses tried to rescue him by throwing a rope but were not successful, animal shelters valley-wide continue to deal with overcrowding Jose Santiago at American county animal care, and control says they have. Nearly A thousand animals. Between there to facilitate we average anywhere from eighty to one. Hundred animal coming in every single day and it's not letting up our staff is. Wearing thin our supplies are wearing thin and quite, frankly this is not a good particularly for the animals. As well if you can't adopt door foster in animals Santiago says they're in desperate need of bones and other chew toys if you wanna make a donation President Trump will sign. A Bill in honor of one of, his fiercest critics today president will sign the national, defense authorization Bill which bears the name of Arizona Senator John. McCain the Bill provides over seven, hundred billion dollars to the military and many of McCain's policy priorities including tough language on Russia but Kane who hasn't been to Washington since last December. As he. Battled brain cancer has repeatedly criticized President Trump for not being. Tough enough on Russia Jeremy foster KTAR news I'm a fire at all yet ready to dance. Mr..

President Trump Jose Santiago president McCain Russia ASU rural metro battalion Kane Randy cervitti brain cancer climate expert Tucson John Walker Senator John Jeremy Arizona American county Washington hundred billion dollars
"climate expert" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"climate expert" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Thirty John roller it has been a week of intense. Storms across the valley a SU climate expert Randy cervitti says he expects the bond soon to, keep delivering rain right on into the fall and tropical systems off the coast of Mexico. Will help fuel those stores be moved into the state so that the fall is looking at having pretty good rainfall across. The entire state and we do have a about a twenty percent chance of another monsoon storm tonight last night the. Monsoon packed of powerful punch both in the east valley and in the, west valley we'll start with the west valley right now about twenty seven hundred APS customers still without power in the stray foothills area there is Cooling stations set up at a stray hills high school tonight some three thousand pounds of ice being delivered. There, if you need to stop by and pick up some ice APS is sending in, crews because their power station. Out, there hit by lightning overnight, they do. Have a portable generator generators coming in to try to get, power back up in. That area meantime the talking stick resort shut down completely tonight flooding started in the casino about three AM the generator in the backup generator failed they're causing. Folks to be evacuated from the casino out there and the Zona state poker championship had to be postponed until further notice. Because of the flooded casino let's get a check on the valley roadways right now Patrick Rhody, is live in the valley Chevy dealers traffic center hey Patrick hey there Joe we have. A new crash work in Tempe this hour that is on the loop Chucho westbound Scottsdale road that crafts block the right. Lane for You crash in north Phoenix on creek road north of Baresi road says he west get news off there the loop. Through. Three southbound southville Mirage crashes cleared there couple months ago. This report brought to you by in-n-out burger that burger fresh. Fact, that, in, and, out. Your fry started out its whole fresh potatoes that are hand cut just before they're cooked because fresh it's all about I'm.

west valley Randy cervitti Patrick Rhody stray hills high school climate expert Mexico Joe Baresi Chevy Tempe three thousand pounds twenty percent
"climate expert" Discussed on Got Science?

Got Science?

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"climate expert" Discussed on Got Science?

"And so no. They'll topic is stressful for many people because politicize as well as because they're worried about what's going to happen is among young people. We certainly know there's a great deal of concern about their future given some of the forecasts of where we may be headed with climate in whether by -bility of our communities. And so as a clinician, if someone is is generally anxious or generally depressed or in despair, it's essentially do we need to sort out how much of this is due to emotional social, political, intangible environment, how it's affecting people's sense of wellbeing, their small body of research on this exploring sense of despair or a sense of hopelessness about the world that people can get into. And obviously that can come from any number of sources in it can be distorted or compete realistic part of men. Ill health is being accurate about what's really happening. And so as mental health professionals, what is our obligation to help people get past their distorted perceptions about are, which are common because we have so much disinformation in unscientific assertions being made that confuse many people what's really going on. You can't cope with something if you don't know what it really is. You can't cope with something if you're not sure of the reality. And so people need to grasp the reality in order to cope positively with it. I think there's considerable debate discussion in the mental health professions. Now about what the responsibility is for mental health professionals in this regard in relation to public education, scientific literacy, and so one. It sort of the treatment may or may not be different. The content may be different. If a person is wreck into a real threat to their future, I really am worried that we won't have a livable planet when my kids are up versus an unreal threat. I really worried about something that maybe is less likely to happen or maybe even when it comes to climate change. I'm not balancing my worry out where well, but how does that become factually based? It's not the job of the therapist to be climate expert, but it is to help people cope with what's really going on. We'll be back in a minute with the second half of our interview. You're listening to the got science podcast brought to you by the union of concerned scientists. Now UCS love scientists of all ages and stages, but for the month of August, we're showing extra love to early career. Scientists checkout hashtag early career side that's SC for shoutouts resources and more. And now back to our interview..

climate expert
"climate expert" Discussed on The 45th

The 45th

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"climate expert" Discussed on The 45th

"Books are gonna call this like humanities, last desperate chance where they quoted on something to avert global art to preserve the world instead Trump. Yeah, I'm convinced the ship has sailed. I'm convinced at this point given where we are with this government that there's just, no, we can't like the window of opportunity is almost like completely gone now on a three stop from burning, right? Which is I think we're gonna lose a lot of species endangered species in the next Lino these. Exactly right. Sadly it is. But so the one thing he will blame his climate change in, I think the ship climate change. I think it's this, like we all just have to prepare for like looking tundras in Canada somewhere to move to some point. But so you know, obviously, California, I mean, Jerry Brown was just, I don't underst- want to ship it responded to it a California. Cal fire said, had no idea what Trump's tweets referring to play of water for the firefight. They're like, that's not what this is about. This should is about like a such a tremendous lack of moisture of the ongoing forever in the environment in the soil. It's about. Climate change. There's a climate expert Peter glaze tweeted that Trump's explanation was gobbled gooky shit unmitigated crap that the force burning Pasadena drought current extreme temperatures in weather worsened by human caused climate change. So that happened. And then so trumpeting tweeting there was an article that was out this morning. I think about how camera by who I haven't read it yet, but I saw the headline like saving for later that Trump's tweets will do him in. Although I, I don't know anymore. Speaking of that, he tweeted something a couple of days ago. I would assume, as I thought I was thinking this, what he tweeted, he goes fake news reporting, a complete fabrication, always over the weekend that I'm concerned about the meeting, my wonderful son Donald had in Trump Tower. This was a meeting to get information on an opponent, totally legal done all the time in politics, and it went nowhere. I did not know about it. So admission. What happened here? Well, I mean if clearly, why Trump never call fund. Wonderful, but that's on anyway. Don't. Do you think he's the one that's out on the dot. Can never deny this tweet. He can ever claim. It's not true because he won't deny the one time daddy gave formation. So which meeting are we talking about here? June twenty. Sixteen June nine point. Sixteen Trump Tower. I mean this is not the first time Trump's acknowledged it was about getting dirt on Hillary Clinton quote, unquote, but it's definitely the first time in a while. He's talked about it and he is basically making it clear that thing happens to son to him. He is strong as something of the bus here. This is the meeting. The Cohen says I was there yet Keanu about it. I was what Trump. Yeah. When he was like, what he's doing here is like incidently hurting son in throwing him with us. But the real purpose here is I am not concerned about the meeting. I am not worried about it. I've never wasn't thrown about it, which would be fence to obstruction. He's gonna try to claim that, like none of his actions regarding this meeting could have been obstruction because to think about, yeah, you'd have intent to stop Justice. If you're not actually worried about it, then you're not struck anything. So he's basically just trying to say like, I'm innocent because I didn't. I wasn't trying to crime when did that. That was just trying to this. The only smartly will move he's ever made. It's Not not smart legal. legal. Educate just say, I wasn't crying and be like, see, I'm innocent. I crime ING, so they. All right. That's just to be his purpose was goal was, but it's not gonna. I mean. Goal posts, keep shifting here. You know, I didn't know about it didn't happen. Okay. It happened. Nobody, of course new about whatever. Anyway, the next one will be. I didn't know that, but it's totally legals it as a matter that'll be that's the next up I think is what we're moving to..

Trump Trump Tower Jerry Brown Keanu Donald climate expert Cohen California Hillary Clinton Canada Cal Peter glaze Pasadena
"climate expert" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"climate expert" Discussed on KKAT

"God book nobody would have me on this show what seita my on they're all part of a cartel represented in large part by one agent one aged represents must them got gonna tell me that the seventeen the truth with fake callers every day glorifying them now i'm going to say right now i hear fake news on both sides and i'm getting sick of it and if i'm getting sick of it it means the american people are long sick of it and i'm an open it up to you with that question again who disseminates more fake news the right or the left and give examples it's that simple really simple very simple question woke up this morning saw the news i saw that even the fake pope lenin's pope has i called him and government zero suddenly the the pope is in on the game sank fake news is the work at the serpent now why would this left wing fanatic who disseminates fake lies every day say expert on climate expert on this expert on against the america americans agree the americans have no good all of a sudden he is suddenly mantle despises trump because he won't take it anymore millions of illegal aliens all of a sudden the pope's calling the news media fake news why because he's in his home stomping grounds and there's a huge molestations scandal back in his home country did you know that and the newspapers are going after the catholic church down there i think in his own little district and suddenly sang and newspapers are the cemeting fake news don't you love how this works i do you know when you're when you are likely in chaos the pilot seizure of the argonauts and you see so far ahead and yelling down to those on the deck look out eissa head and they say what the hell us he know up there what does he know sitting up there and that mass take i can see ahead there no ice and lacaille a screams down there's ice ahead what are you gonna do cursed the senior or listen to the senior i'll let you think about that robert take.

pope lenin climate expert america mantle trump news media robert
"climate expert" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"climate expert" Discussed on WTMA

"Radio i can't stand listening to socalled rightwingers lying to the public any more than i could take the left wing line to the public i am an independent and i will say again who disseminates more fake news the right or the left and give examples i wanted on the table today i want the coinage of truth put on the table of the savage nation i am not taking this anymore i am i'm so sick and tired of being called oh we're on the same side you can't criticize anyone else on the side of the what you you are as though it on my side as you could see with the god book nobody would have me on this show what seita my on they're all part of a cartel represented in large part by one agent what aged represents must them got gonna tell me that the seventy the truth with fake callers every day glorifying them now i'm going to say right now i hear fake news on both sides and i'm getting sick of it and if i'm getting sick of it it means the american people are long sick of it and i'm an open it up to you with that question again who disseminates more fake news the right or the left and give examples it's that simple really simple very simple question woke up this morning saw the news i saw that even the fake pope lenin's pope has i called him and government zero suddenly the the pope is in on the game saying fake news is the work at the serpent now why would this left wing fanatic who disseminates fake lies every day say expert on climate expert on this expert on against the america americans a greedy americans have no good all of a sudden he is suddenly mantle despises trump because he won't take it anymore millions of illegal aliens all of a sudden the pope's calling the news media fake news.

pope lenin climate expert america mantle trump news media
"climate expert" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"climate expert" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Know nominating an in confirm your conservative to the united states supreme court and um and the the tax reform bill that just got done uh you know those are those could be and we'll be seen as big wins um i think the question is what at what cost for the country generally um you know for whatever reason the president seems to revel in does lighting the thirty five percent of the country that is with him you know on an almost religious level and driving into orbit that sixty or sixty five percent of the country who really doesn't like him inconsistently disapproves of how he acts um you know in in public opinion polls so you know if if he has done some things that will be considered wins you know how how costly has it been to the country politically uh psychologically and it and you know in many other ways um you know to get those things done you know in ways that frankly you know many republican presidents you know whether or not it would have been jeb bush marco rubio theoretically should have gotten done without all of the attendant damage in wreckage that went with the the you know conservatives would say and trump supporters would say i guess more specifically that he did some things this year that jeb bush or marco rubio or any the sixteen people that he ran against would never do pulling out of the paris accords is just one example moving the embassy to jerusalem another example something that it out this is something that all presidents had agreed on it was us law i'm talking about the embassy now but that everybody sort of decided to play this kabuki dance where there grinning in a waivers every six months in the trump was the only one who who would have that nobody else would have done that i mean your response to sosa so some of these things are in fact you need to trump bad things as well as good things you agree with that i mean i i think though yearly and i think that the figure would with another republican probably have pulled out at the paris accords probably not be because you know it is i understand any way not be your climate expert or climate politics expert um you know that.

united states president jeb bush marco rubio climate expert paris jerusalem sosa thirty five percent sixty five percent six months
"climate expert" Discussed on Talking Tesla

Talking Tesla

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"climate expert" Discussed on Talking Tesla

"Deploy a fleet of autonomous vehicles this year in boston which i think is pretty cool sometimes they go to boston that would be called a checkout yeah they they said that even as battery technology continues to mature it's going to make it even better so that the vast majority of their cars will end up being electric there as well purchasing renewable energy certificates to offset any emissions from the fuelling of its electric vehicles which is pretty amazing yeah so that means we're going to be planting trees or doing other cool things lifelock the things that poll what's his name oh hull hawkin paul hawkin might be promoting so lift goes about and i didn't know who pulp hawkin is but now i'm a rubber fan of oh that's the wrong way to say at wow yeah i'm a fan of poll hawkin so it turns out paul hawkins say a renowned climate expert and lift has hired him to be there climate adviser he's been an adviser to many organizations even call hailed by president clinton as being one of the most influential people in climate um i should say climate but environmental studies and so paul is the head of project drawdown when this is an organization that he put together there's like i dunno fifty or sixty experts in all pick all kinds of um fields across the spectrum from like an expert on bees and pollinating to an expert on public health.

boston paul hawkin paul hawkins climate expert president clinton public health renewable energy paul
"climate expert" Discussed on Bid Time Dicks

Bid Time Dicks

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"climate expert" Discussed on Bid Time Dicks

"Organizations for being terrible in all sorts of different ways so retailers say that this is going to increase taxes on any good that's imported in so blake wakeford for walmart so like ninety percent of things that you buy at walmart or the prices are going to go up democrats and nonpartisan groups have pointed out that his new plan is going to result in trillions of dollars of tax cuts for rich americans but would not really help lower income americans and would than exacerbate inequality and then republicans are just against the eight the idea of of increasing those taxes on goods so no one is happy with this plan anz paul ryan is just i utter know he's hiding in his bathroom while everyone rips his plan apart i feel like one constant for paul ryan is never pleasing anyone i wonder if he's ever pleased another purse in any way he's sort of pleased me when he released those photos of him working out at the gym the those photos please deal touching well they had me i would i lease that please oh i'm going to regret that it's recorded you can never for now onto our dig of the week this week it's the environmental protection agency and also kind of scott pruitt and amazingly this week were joined by elie shecket jello i'm so happy to be here thank you so much for coming here cheese are resident she's just balls resident climate expert and also your of it's a fact sheet sure.

walmart paul ryan scott pruitt climate expert blake elie shecket ninety percent