40 Burst results for "Climate Change"

Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Climate One

Climate One

00:28 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Climate One

"Practices to be able to acknowledge it and recognize it and embrace it every time it comes up A zen Buddhist nun says accepting our feelings can make us stronger and more ready to act And the power of zen in the power of mindfulness is that it roots us in the present moment so we can be alert to what is going on we can be responsive We can be the master of our mind and awareness in any given situation Zen and coping with climate up next on climate one Live from NPR news on jail Snyder President Biden is walking back comments made by his climate envoy John Kerry and insisting he would not lose credibility at an upcoming climate summit if Congress has not voted on a stalled climate change Bill Here's a pure Scot d'etre with more Biden has vowed to slash U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in.

Npr News Snyder President Biden John Kerry Bill Here Congress Biden U.S.
California Laws Harming Owner-Operators and the Supply Chain

Mark Levin

01:50 min | 15 hrs ago

California Laws Harming Owner-Operators and the Supply Chain

"For the last several evenings we've had calls in here from truckers With real world experience in terms of this supply train And one of them pointed out the difficulty for owner operators functioning in California You don't hear this on television news Another one pointed out the difficulty in dealing with the states environmental and regulatory environment You don't hear that Either By the end of the weekend there's going to be over 100 freighters off the shore of long port in LA ports Sitting there in waiting over 100 of these massive freighters with these containers on them These huge containers So I wanted to focus in on this and zero hedge an excellent website As also taken a look at this And he writes there's a couple of astute articles that explain the problem is California has passed two laws One for so called climate change and the other as a sop to the unions that destroyed much of California's trucking industry And in woes unique to the industry and COVID payments that discourage people from working and voila Empty Christmas stockings Stephen green at PJ media explained some of what's going on He says as a preliminary matter truckers are aging out of the job A new ones aren't coming along because federal law requires that truckers be at least 21 years old Kids who leave school at 17 or 18 get involved in other careers leaving trucker

California Covid Pj Media LA Stephen Green
Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Thom Hartmann Program

Thom Hartmann Program

01:01 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Thom Hartmann Program

"802 O 8 5 one 8 7 802 O 8 5 one 8 7 That's 802 O 8 51 87 The house sparks radio program governors of pro Trump states They must show their fealty towards Trump by mitigating any support for the health and safety of their own citizens against COVID so that they don't upset him or the minority of his supporters amongst the Republicans in their state which are often the majority of the voters in their state Saturdays from 11 to one under what you see PT 8 20 Chicago's progressive talk The future depends on teachers Every day teachers are shaping our tomorrows starting their students on journeys that will change the course of history Right now in a classroom somewhere in the United States there's a tea transpiring of future scientists who will make preventing pandemics their life's work Sharpening the mind of an aspiring environmentalist who hook come back climate change And generating possibilities for a student will be the first in their family to graduate college It all starts with teachers who meet challenges with creativity who reinvent education for the future who work towards a school system that lives up every child regardless of race income or zip code.

Covid Donald Trump Chicago United States
British queen appears to show irritation at climate inaction

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 d ago

British queen appears to show irritation at climate inaction

"Britain's Queen Elizabeth the second has been cool to microphone criticizing the global lack of action on climate change the ninety five year old Monica's films on someone's phone once a thing Welsh parliaments in Cardiff the queen commented to her doctrinal Camilla Duchess of Cornwall but she still didn't know who was coming to cop twenty six which she will be hosting England's guide several heads of state to governments including China's xi Jim paying have not said whether they will it's hands on the recording parts of which China will double the queen also appears to say it's irritating when they talk but they don't do her comments come around the same time her grandson prince William and his concern for the planet's walls criticizing the new trend for space tourism we needs some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on her iPad this planet's not trying to find the next place to go live contrast and then

Camilla Duchess Xi Jim Queen Elizabeth Britain Monica Cardiff Cornwall China England Prince William
Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York Show

Bloomberg Radio New York Show

03:39 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York Show

"Panel was giving the okay for the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 booster shot The panel unanimously decided to recommend the agency authorized the second dose for adults who have already gotten the first shot Meanwhile CDC data shows the risk of death for somebody who was unvaccinated in August was 11 times higher than a person who got vaccinated against COVID Former president Clinton will spend another night in the Southern California hospital where he's being treated for a non COVID infection Meanwhile President Biden says he's been in contact with the former president Lisa Taylor has more And I know you're asking about president Clinton I've been changing exchanging calls He seems to be Godwin Doing well And so when I talk to him out but let you all know Biden made his comments in Connecticut Clinton's urinary tract infection developed into a form of sepsis and extreme reaction of the immune system to an infection It's a life threatening condition not treated Clinton was reportedly in good spirits Thursday joking with a SAP at the University of California Irvine medical center I am Lisa Taylor The TSA is sounding the alarm on what they're calling a huge problem of a record number of passengers bringing firearms to airports spokeswoman patty Manchester says part of the problem is the nation's changing gun laws People assume that if they can take their gun with them to the grocery store or the flower shop that should be okay at the airport Texas leads the way the two Dallas airports and one in Houston are all in the top 5 when it comes to the seizure of guns at a TSA checkpoint A detention hearing from Maryland Keppel facing espionage charges is being pushed back Navy nuclear engineer Jonathan Toby and his wife Diana were set to appear in federal court Friday to determine if they would remain in custody that hearing has been pushed back to Wednesday coinciding with the couple's preliminary hearing to determine if probable cause exists for their charges The countdown is underway for Saturday's historic launch from cape canaveral Florida NASA's Lucy mission will send a spacecraft to asteroids near Jupiter I'm Brad Siegel A new climate change model shows much of Southern California underwater a century from now Brian shook reports The nonprofit organization climate central created models of 50 cities around the world showing what would happen to them if no major action is taken to stop climate change because of rising sea levels landmarks like the Santa Monica pier would wind up underwater and coastal cities like Long Beach and Huntington Beach would virtually disappear The worst case scenario shows the sea level rising by 20 feet if the average temperature of the planet increases by 4° I'm Brian schuck The U.S. Supreme Court is refusing to throw out a lower court order that could shut down the spire natural gas pipeline that runs through Illinois and Missouri In an earlier challenge the U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that approval of the spy or STL pipeline failed to balance public benefits and adverse impacts and failed to prove that it's really needed That's $2500 reward is out in Louisiana for a gunman who shot two American bald eagles They were discovered on kincaid Lake outside the city of Alexandria The department of wildlife and fishery says the birds were shot by a small caliber firearm The effort to eliminate confederate names in Virginia continues and public feedback is needed Rebecca Hubbard has more The fairfax county confederate names task force is asking for the public's input on plans to rename two highways an online survey is now available to residents to comment on plans to rename Lee highway and Lee Jackson memorial highway task force is also welcoming public feedback through the mail and by calling the county Department of Transportation A series of public hearings will also be held starting next week to gain residents input on the matter I'm Rebecca Hubbard 79th annual Golden Globes are said to happen January 9th whether or not any channel will televise at the Hollywood foreign press association announce nominations will be revealed December 13th NBC announced earlier this year it will not air the globes due to a lack of diversity I'm Brad Siegel Now this Bloomberg sports update home runs from Jose L two they and Carlos Correa lift the Houston Astros to a 5 to four win over the Boston Red Sox and game one of the American League championship series Boston had a three one lead going to the bottom of the 6th That's when Altuve hit his 20th career postseason Homer with a man on to tie the score then Correa in a solo shot at the bottom of the 7th to put the Houston Astros into the lead the Astros added an insurance run in the bottom of the 8th and then Kiki Hernandez in a solo Homer for Boston and the top of the 9th to pull the Red Sox to within one run of big night for Hernandez He had four hits in the game including two home runs and only needed a triple for the cycle Game one of the national league championship series later tonight as the doctors take on the braves in Atlanta Will not only the defenseman dougie Hamilton be instant dividends for the New Jersey Devils but Jack Hughes had a game worthy of a number one overall pick You scored a second goal of the game less than a minute into overtime and Hamilton scored on his first shot as a devil And New Jersey posed a season opening four three win over Chicago after blowing a late two goal lead Jonathan bernier 24 shots in his devil's debut in gold The next final preseason game at the garden on Friday night defeating Washington one 15 one 13 The NBA season begins Tuesday but that's only at Milwaukee that night And the next open the season the following night against Boston at.

'Difficult decisions' as Biden, Democrats shrink plan to $2T

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 3 d ago

'Difficult decisions' as Biden, Democrats shrink plan to $2T

"House speaker Nancy Pelosi is warning difficult decisions must be made as Democrats way trims to president Biden's budget proposal if there is a few more dollars to spend their choices to be made the three point five trillion dollar proposal for expanding social services and fighting climate change is being chiseled to about two trillion but Democrats must satisfy the party's moderate and progressive lawmakers all of them to pass any deal and that's raising tough questions about what to cut some members had gotten back to me and said I want to do everything which raises the prospect of doing at all but on smaller budgets we will not diminish the transformative nature of what it is plus his bottom line we have to have something that will pass the house and passed the Senate passed the house and passed the Senate and I'm not asking members to vote for something that has no chance to pass in the Senate Ben Thomas Washington

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi President Biden Senate House Ben Thomas Washington
Fresh "Climate Change" from Bloomberg Best

Bloomberg Best

00:30 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh "Climate Change" from Bloomberg Best

"At SEI C dot com slash change This is the Bloomberg green business report sponsored by indeed dot com a report issued by the national wildlife federation says people who engage in outdoor activities such as hunting and fishing have a crucial role to play in finding common sense climate solutions The organization says climate change is threatening the wildlife lands and waters that hunters and anglers rely on The says climate change will have an impact on people's favorite sports duck swamps may dry up the best Elk spots could be closed by wildfires degraded ocean conditions can cripple salmon and steelhead fishing and flooding may threaten white tail areas The report looks at effective techniques that are helping to restore natural infrastructure such as wetlands forests rivers and grasslands it says the most logical and sustainable solutions often harness and augment the power of natural systems the N W effort just hunters and anglers to use their knowledge to speak out for climate solutions Jeff Bellinger Bloomberg radio Tech talent is in high demand at avanade a joint venture between Microsoft and Accenture That's why avanade executive Brett Newton says the company is funding student scholarships at MJ IT.

National Wildlife Federation Avanade Jeff Bellinger Brett Newton Accenture Microsoft
Climate activists call for investigation of Bolsonaro

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 d ago

Climate activists call for investigation of Bolsonaro

"A group of climbers lawyers he's calling for the international criminal court to launch an investigation into Brazil's president for possible crimes against humanity over his administration's Amazon poses legalize group has filed a dossier with the global court alleging that giant bowls and all rose administration is responsible for a widespread attack on the Amazon its dependence on this defenders that affects the global population since taking office Bolsonaro who's in college development within the Amazon and dismissed the global complains about its destruction as a plot to hold back Brazil's agribusiness the lawyers cool comes less than three weeks before the U. N.'s twenty six climate change conference of the parties known as the cop twenty six which starts in Glasgow Scotland I'm Charles de Ledesma

Global Court Rose Administration Amazon International Criminal Court Bolsonaro Brazil U. Glasgow Scotland Charles De Ledesma
Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Bloomberg Best

Bloomberg Best

00:44 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Bloomberg Best

"Study to try to determine if other factors are at play A court date for a Maryland couple facing espionage charges is getting delayed Navy nuclear engineer Jonathan Toby and his wife Diana were set to appear Friday in federal court to determine if they would remain in custody while awaiting trial as they're considered a flight risk Jonathan has been accused of trading sensitive data on nuclear submarine designs for cryptocurrency to an undercover FBI agent I'm Brian shook Bill Cosby is being sued in New Jersey over an allegation of rape decades ago in Atlantic City Scott Pringle reports Lily Bernard filed a lawsuit yesterday in New Jersey federal court saying she met Cosby on the set of the Cosby show before he allegedly drugged and raped her in 1990 in an Atlantic City hotel room Bernard accuses Cosby of threatening to ruin her career If she told anyone she's one of dozens of women who have accused Cosby of sexual abuse Cosby was found guilty of sex crimes in Pennsylvania a few years ago and sentenced to prison His conviction was overturned this past June Former president Obama is heading overseas to attend a climate summit It's taking place in Scotland beginning October 31st and President Biden will be there as well Biden was Obama's vice president during his two terms in The White House Obama's office says the former commander in chief will talk with young activists a statement also said Obama will make a speech that puts the threat of climate change in broader context These strikes if carried out would be some of the largest worker walkouts in recent history Mike Bauer has more In 2020 the bureau of labor statistics identified just 11 major work stoppages to find his strikes and lockouts involving a thousand workers or more and between 1950 and 1980 the average was around 300 work stoppages a year More than 100,000 unionized employees have overwhelmingly voted to authorize strikes and are preparing to join the picket lines unless they get stronger collective bargaining agreements as early as next week At a time when workers feel they have more leverage than they did in previous years knowing that their employers will struggle to find replacements if they walk out given the nationwide labor shortage I'm Mike Bauer A woman in British Columbia is thanking her lucky stars after a meteorite crash through her roof and into her bed landing inches from her head Ruth Hamilton was jarred from sleep earlier this month by a loud bang and showering debris She found the space rock about the size of a melon between her pillows I'm Brian schuck And I'm Charlie pellet at Bloomberg world headquarters Stocks had their best weeks since July is solid corporate earnings and a surprising increase in retail sales spurred a rally in companies that are more likely to benefit from an economic rebound and with more on the retail sales data here's Bloomberg's Vidal Judas We're looking at strength across the board even with the impact of the delta variant Retail sales advance .7% in September 11 of 13 categories posted increases at the same time It's not clear if inflation larger price tags played role as the data are tracked by value not volume Any doubt Jude is Bloomberg radio Reaction to the retail data from Jennifer Lee's senior economist at BMO capital markets I think the most telling or the most interesting point this is the one I always look at is like the dining out just I think that speaks volumes about where the consumer is at these days and still comfortable enough to go out there and have lunch or have a glass of wine on the patio I think that's very positive news BMOs Jennifer Lee Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon says inflation particularly in wages remains top of mind among corporate leaders and shareholders He spoke with Bloomberg television and radio There's definitely ways inflation at all aspects of the economy I think everybody that's running a business in some way shape or form has to adapt and adjust to that As I say clearly on the call we run a paper performance culture and we're very attuned to what we need to do to keep the best people serving our clients and Goldman Sachs and I'm sure the logic get on that appropriately Goldman's David Solomon Goldman shares up today by 3.8% For the week the S&P was up 1.8% today the S&P advanced 8 tenths of 1% up 33 points the Dow up 382 up 1.1% NASDAQ up 73 up by .5% Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quick take power by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries I'm Charlie pellet This is Bloomberg.

Cosby Mike Bauer Jonathan Toby Scott Pringle Barack Obama Lily Bernard Atlantic City President Biden Bureau Of Labor Statistics New Jersey Bill Cosby Ruth Hamilton Charlie Pellet Brian Schuck Bloomberg World Headquarters S Diana Bloomberg FBI Vidal Judas Maryland
Our Movement to Resist American Marxism Continues to Grow

Mark Levin

01:52 min | 4 d ago

Our Movement to Resist American Marxism Continues to Grow

"Have you noticed the quiet counter revolution to the counter revolution that we have developed you folks Millions of you Have you noticed it Reading American Marxism Understanding critical race theory the gender is a movement the degrowth climate change movement understanding the threat that we face now and the various actions that are being taken in communities and neighborhoods throughout the country This is you This is this program This is American Marxism When I started talking about American Marxism almost half a year ago It's that long ago isn't it And I wrote it now Wow I can't even think how long year and a half ago more than that And turned it in in April We started talking about this April may June July August It's been 7 months In this movement that you and we have developed we've done it almost under the radar You can see our buddies on Fox people elsewhere and radio talking about how parents are showing up at school board meetings About how people are resisting so much Of the various American Marxist movements that are taking place in this country That didn't just happen You did this You did it The other commentators are exactly that they're commentators My commentator of course I'm a commentator But what have I also said I'm an activist and many of you are activists

FOX
Caller Reaffirms How Climate Change Is a Marxist, De-Growth Movement

Mark Levin

01:44 min | Last week

Caller Reaffirms How Climate Change Is a Marxist, De-Growth Movement

"In November of 2010 a gentleman by the name of atmore Aden how he co chaired the UN IPCC working group mitigation of climate change from 2008 to 2015 one has to free oneself from the illusion that international climate policy is environmental policy Instead climate change policy is about how we redistribute the fact though the world's wealth That's the first thing you said Now referring to an upcoming UN world climate summit Identify for again clarified The next world climate summit in cancun is actually an economy summit during which the distribution of the world's resources will be negotiated Living proof that the IPCC is you could fill in the blanks Yeah and I've been talking about this at the whole chapter 5 in my book points set out too This is a Marxist ideology That is using climate The Green New Deal it is a degrowth movement and it was born in the 1970s in Europe And that's exactly correct And that's why the UN is up to its eyeballs in this You're right It's about redistribution of wealth It's about making Americans poor the theory being that other people become richer And it is a direct war we are in the bull's eye target of the so called climate change Green New Deal in the truth is degrowth movement And you're absolutely correct about this Very very well

Atmore Aden UN Ipcc Cancun Europe
The AP Interview: Jayapal pushes Biden for $3T spending bill

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | Last week

The AP Interview: Jayapal pushes Biden for $3T spending bill

"The head of the house progressive caucus says she is pushing president Joe Biden to hold firm when it comes to build back better Washington democratic representative from village I appall the leader of the house progressives tells the AP that the cost of president Biden social spending plan isn't as important as to what's in it is it's really not about the number it's about what programs are in there even so she is determined to keep the overall measure closer to three trillion dollars rather than the two trillion dollar range Biden has mentioned in the Associated Press interview j'ai appall listed the top priorities of the one hundred or so liberal house Democrats the care economy includes housing includes immigration includes health care particularly expanding Medicare and it includes climate change in acting Biden's agenda remains far from certain with the Senate evenly split moderate Democrats Joe Manchin and Kirsten cinema have called for a much lower price tag for the proposal Tim McGuire Washington

House Progressive Caucus President Joe Biden President Biden Associated Press Biden Washington Kirsten Cinema Joe Manchin Senate Tim Mcguire Washington
CIA creates working group on China as threats keep rising

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

CIA creates working group on China as threats keep rising

"The Central Intelligence Agency says it's creating a top level working group on China CIA director William burns calls China the most important geopolitical threat of the twenty first century now the agency is creating a China mission center part of a broad government effort focused on countering Beijing's influence the Biden administration has warned of what it describes as rising Chinese aggression on a range of security and economic issues at the same time it sought common ground with Beijing on issues like climate change in North Korea the C. I. A. says it will ramp up efforts to recruit Chinese speakers it's also creating a mission center focusing on emerging technologies in global issues such as climate change and global health Ben Thomas Washington

Central Intelligence Agency China William Burns Biden Administration Beijing C. I. A. North Korea Ben Thomas Washington
Blinken rallies developed world to confront inequality

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last week

Blinken rallies developed world to confront inequality

"Secretary St Antony Blinken is in Paris where he's calling on the world's most developed countries to take on the gaps between rich and poor Lincoln told the thirty eight nations of the organization for economic cooperation and development that the pandemic and climate change of exacerbated inequality for decades our member countries measured economic success chiefly in terms of rising GDP and stock markets which don't reflect the reality of millions of working families instead are unprecedented growth has frequently come with rising inequity he also called for an end to discrimination against women and LGBTQ communities as well as a global corporate minimum tax rate that he says would prevent tax evasion and avoidance self defeating race to the bottom Jennifer king Washington

Secretary St Antony Blinken Organization For Economic Coop Paris Lincoln Jennifer King Washington
Majority of Americans Oppose $3.5 Trillion Spending Bill

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:49 sec | Last week

Majority of Americans Oppose $3.5 Trillion Spending Bill

"Americans are angry. Americans are furious. There's a new poll came out. Nearly three quarters of american voters. Oppose this insane. Three point five trillion dollar biden budget and bugs digging his heels in. They're going to connect the two. They're gonna connect the infrastructure with all the horrify. You know social justice stuff. They're they're attaching to it and the free pre-k and climate change prevention and all kinds of free college and the the the squad. The progressives led by that nutcase from washington state. They're driving the of the democrat party but the country over the cliff.

Biden Washington Democrat Party
Pope, faith leaders sign joint climate appeal before summit

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

Pope, faith leaders sign joint climate appeal before summit

"Pope Francis and dozens of religious leaders have signed a joint appeal to governments to commit to ambitious targets at the upcoming U. N. climate conference that's your duty but is said to be reasonable thanks religious leaders are sharing his thoughts are full of deepened dialogue among themselves and with scientific experts on the need for action ahead of the cop twenty six climate talks the appeal signed at a formal ceremony in the apostolate policy says we've inherited a garden we must not leave a deficit to our children for the religious leaders care for the environment it's a moral imperative towards future generations and to support communities most vulnerable to climate change I'm Charles that's my

Pope Francis Charles
Biden vows to 'get it done' as talks drag on $3.5T plan

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden vows to 'get it done' as talks drag on $3.5T plan

"President Biden traveled to Capitol Hill to try to resolve the standoff it's threatening his three point five trillion dollar government overhaul plan we're gonna get this done after meeting with congressional Democrats on Capitol Hill president Biden vowed he'd find a way to pass his big social spending plans not matter whether it's been six minutes six days for six weeks negotiations continue a block of progressive lawmakers refused to vote on a popular infrastructure bill without a commitment to Biden's broader package well senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia has refused to budge on demands for a smaller package of around one point five trillion sources say Biden discussed a compromise of one point ninety two point three trillion representative Pramila diapause a leader of the congressional progressive caucus we the progressive caucus was firm that we are not leaving women behind families behind climate change behind housing behind Republicans are all opposed to the president's big plan describing it as a slight to social style spending Jennifer king Washington

President Biden Capitol Hill Biden Senator Joe Manchin Pramila Diapause West Virginia Jennifer King Washington
Democrats struggle to save Biden $3.5T bill, no deal struck

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Democrats struggle to save Biden $3.5T bill, no deal struck

"Democrats failed to come to a vote on the infrastructure bill Thursday night or reach an agreement on president Joe Biden's government overhaul it was a long night of negotiations but it appears no immediate deal is in reach after hours of White House aides shuffling across the capital the idea was to proceed with the one trillion dollar public works bill and go shake the rest of Biden's big health care education and climate change bill in the days to come progressives refusing to back the infrastructure bill unless there was progress on Biden's broader plan lawmakers were told to stick around for possible late night votes but as the night dragged on it became clear that West Virginia senator Joe Manchin was not on board with president Biden sweeping three point five trillion dollar package I've been a one five and I'm I'm I'm gonna make sure that people understand there's an awful lot of good we can have a lot of people leader said the house should be back in session on Friday morning Jennifer king Washington

Biden Joe Biden Senator Joe Manchin White House President Biden West Virginia Jennifer King Washington
Why climate change is making it harder to chase fall foliage

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 2 weeks ago

Why climate change is making it harder to chase fall foliage

"Climate change is making it harder for people to chase fall foliage heat waves and droughts have caused leaves to turn brown and withered before they can reach peak color the tree is sort of expressing like what the summer is done to it arborist Michael Sundberg says traditional leaf peepers in the fall have less leaves for peeping you're seeing a lot of like Browning on the edges of the leaves which you know we call the scorch that happened after severe heatwave in Oregon in northern Maine peak conditions typically arrive right about now forest Rangers report less than seventy percent color change the color itself could be dollar especially because you have a leaf that's now has damage on it instead of just an unscathed happy we've Sundberg says climate change can be bad for fall foliage but it goes beyond that those trees are also helping with preventing floods and things like that too so it's all kind of connected and in a very domino effect kind of weights on Berg says it's been a few years since there's been a really good leap year I bet Donahue

Michael Sundberg Browning Maine Oregon Sundberg Berg Donahue
Democratic disagreements imperil Biden agenda as shutdown looms

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Democratic disagreements imperil Biden agenda as shutdown looms

"I'm anthony davis. Joe biden's agenda of reform was at risk of being derailed by divisions among his own democrats as moderates voiced anger on wednesday the idea of delaying a one trillion dollar infrastructure bill ahead of a critical vote to avert a government shutdown. The white house said talks over twin bills that would revitalize the nation's roads and airports and fund social programs and climate change measures. Were too precarious. Point a senator. Joe manchin disagreed with the rest of the party over the scope of some four trillion dollars in spending congress which democrats control by a razor. Thin margin is due to vote on a bipartisan resolution to fund federal operations through early december. The house of representatives is expected to vote today on a one trillion dollar infrastructure. Bill already passed by the senate will though. Some party leaders warned that vote could be delayed again. Which would dismay moderates with house progressives warning they will vote against the infrastructure bill until a deal is reached on the separate multi trillion dollar plan focused on social spending and climate. The vote was not guaranteed house speaker. Nancy pelosi and senate majority leader chuck. Schumer went to the white house yesterday afternoon. To meet joe biden a former senator himself who cancelled a trip to chicago to lead with congress. A white house staffer met at the capitol with conservative democratic senator. Kirsten cinema who had expressed deep concern over

Anthony Davis Joe Biden Joe Manchin White House Congress House Of Representatives Senate Bill Nancy Pelosi Schumer Chuck Chicago Kirsten Cinema
US says ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species extinct

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

US says ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species extinct

"The U. S. government is declaring twenty three species extinct it's a rare move for wildlife officials to give up hope on a plant or animal but scientists say climate change threatens to make extinctions more common and it's important to reevaluate from time to time Jack dumba Kerr with the California academy of sciences these pieces have been seen in a very long time despite a lot of effort to find them you know I think it's probably time to declare an extinct and hopefully learn the lessons that you need to learn and move on the list includes eleven bird species eight native to Hawaii and eight species of mussels mostly found in the rivers of the southeastern U. S. key causes of the extinctions include habitat loss from development water pollution logging and competition from invasive species I'm Ben Thomas

U. S. Government Jack Dumba Kerr California Academy Of Sciences Hawaii Ben Thomas
Joe Biden's Next Lie Is Saying You Owe Nothing for His $5.5. Trillion Bill

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Joe Biden's Next Lie Is Saying You Owe Nothing for His $5.5. Trillion Bill

"We have a president who will lie about anything and everything Serial lying when it came to Afghanistan Cyril lying about the border And now he's leading the charge with the liars in his own party in the media Cleaning the Washington compost That they want to spend $5.5 trillion but it won't cost you anything Here's the thing they think the American people are as stupid as their base because their base will buy anything I don't believe the American people aren't as stupid as the Democrat party base Or is the mouthpieces in the media They always have to lie They always have to spend they always have to deceive So do you believe a president who will lie about such things as war and peace and life and death Would not lie about other things such as this bill that they want to pass if they can This week this war on your lifestyle on your liberty on our economic system on your unalienable rights on your private property rights they can just vote them all away That's what they feel And with the courts I think they're right And they want to make all the decisions for you That's why they talk about climate change they can control the air they can control the water they control everything related to what you need to live and so they create climate change The Green New Deal The Green New Deal is a deal that comes right out of the reds handbook Largely Marxist model Marxist inspired program

Cyril Democrat Party Afghanistan Washington
Bill Gertz: Diplomacy in the Name of Appeasement Is Still Appeasement

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:45 min | 2 weeks ago

Bill Gertz: Diplomacy in the Name of Appeasement Is Still Appeasement

"Universal is this in terms of the establishment understanding of china. The private sector's understanding of china. And way did it begin. Was it really kissinger. And nixon saying we have to open towards china. Can you give us the general following this for decades. Where did the rot big in. Yes this this process has been ongoing It's the reflection of the internal debate within the us government Specifically involving the climate change fanatics led by former secretary of state john kerry and the more realist policy makers Led by the china's are at the white house. kurt campbell. In the beginning of the biden administration the policy was very close to some of the trump administration's policies As i wrote in my column recently at the united nations joe biden made clear that he's reverting back to the appeasement policies they call it. diplomacy oriented but diplomacy in the name of appeasement is still appeasement. And that's what we're beginning to see. There's some welcome of this new policy on wall street which again has been seeking to do business in china for many years under the idea that if we just trade and do business with this communist state that it would have a modifying influence. It's been another failure. A lot of the wall street executives wanna go to that the banks however many of the us and international banks are recognizing that it's time to pull back from china. That things are going south very quickly there.

China Kurt Campbell Biden Administration Kissinger Nixon Us Government John Kerry Joe Biden White House United Nations United States
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:51 min | Last month

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"To this series. Okay some final housekeeping. If you're in highlighting your adaptation work in podcast considered sponsoring a whole odd cast episode of american apps sponsoring. A podcast allows you to focus on the work. You're doing and sharing with climate professionals from around the world. So for example. Ucla spots me to do several episodes around hesitation in california. At the time. I traveled on location interview experts. They wanted me to include. Usually those episodes have quite a few expert guests so basically they are sponsoring an entire up sued shirt their particular story. I've done with various groups like the university of pennsylvania's wharton school for this episode world wildlife fund. Harvard university of florida in some other nonprofits. It's a chance to share your story with all my listeners. Most projects have communications written into them. Considered budgeting in podcast. Podcasts have a long shelf life much more so than white paper or conference presentation. Many groups work into their communication strategies. So reach out. I met america dabs at gmail dot com. If you wanna learn more also if you're interested in having me speak it a public or corporate event reach out folks. I speak a lot and you will enjoy this. Been doing some keynote presentations and they are a lot of fun share stories from the podcast and my own experiences in working in the adaptation space. I will talk about adaptation in ways that will motivate and inspire you. You can contact me at the website. America dot org okay on that note. I love hearing from you. I mean it you guys here. I'd hear from listeners. As i doug you said it so i reached up. Please take the time to email me. Let me know how you get. Value out of the podcast. Let's see if you have some ideas for the podcast. If you work in the space i love hearing what you guys do. That's very helpful to me. And how the content that. I'm putting on the podcast. Might be helpful to you. Take the time. I'm at america data. Go com okay adapters. Keep up the great work. I'll see you next time..

university of pennsylvania's w Harvard university of florida Ucla california america doug
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

05:04 min | Last month

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"They can't count on federal aid and so insurance is so important and yet they're also the folks who struggle the most with affording insurance in the first place. Okay so there's four different ways that low income people are struggling to respond to a flooding event. So what are their options. It can be really tough right. Without access to sufficient financial resources. Serious flood can actually be a tipping point into deeper poverty and we see that people will turn to coping measures that also have long term consequences. So we talked about you know. Give you exhaust all your savings that has negative implications for down the line navy. They have to reduce spending on other important things like healthcare in order to use the money to repair their home. Maybe they have to turn to predatory lenders or drive up their credit card debt. Researchers found that things like delinquencies bankruptcies are much more likely for households that are financially constrained and in communities of color after a disaster. So this is why we wanted to kind of focus on this topic a lot because financial resilience having that money needed to get back on your feet after a big flood. I think is really foundational to all the other aspects of recovery. Okay so this can be a driver for people to go into deeper poverty. Because they don't have access to these things can you. Even see is the data showing that storms in dealing with flooding and all these disasters are driver of income inequality. Yeah we also see that you know. There's two parts to that question. The first is that there's inequities in exposure to flood risk and so we see often that lower income communities and communities of color may be at higher risk might not be in a safe areas and then also the sort of discrepancies in the equity with which people have access to financial resources further exacerbates income inequality so income inequalities already at sort of record high levels in the us and disasters can be a force that makes it even worse Teed us up really nicely. What this whole episode is going to be about. Now we're gonna be talking to all these various experts. So who are we talking to. And what are the subjects that were gonna be digging into. Yeah there's some great folks coming up and we're going to be hearing from reese may he's the chief innovation officer as vp sbp is a disaster recovery ngo and he's been on the ground in the aftermath of many of the serious flood and storm events. That have happened around the us and can share with us what he's learned about the struggles. People have with their recovery. We're going to hear from john. Miller from fema who talked to us about some of the programs that fema runs after disaster. And how the federal government can assist or not as the case may be as. We've been talking about a little bit. We're going to hear from julia rockwell. She's the climate change adaptation programme manager at the philadelphia water department and she's been working on implementing department wide climate adaptation strategy and part of that is about increasing water related extreme. So she can talk to us about how city it's actually going about making some of these changes in what they're struggling with day-to-day that sounds great. I'm really looking forward to these conversations. You've recruited some really top notch. People and i'm gonna get to learn a lot of different things. Okay so we're gonna talk about flooding and we're gonna talk about risk management and thanks again caroline for coming on and kicking this off. Yeah thank you. I'm excited to hear it to hate actors. Welcome back joining me is say recess. The chief strategy and innovation officer at sbp a social impact organization focused on disaster preparedness and recovery high res. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for having really excited to be here. Can we start off with you just briefly telling us about. Sbp in what you do their certain so he's not profit zest recovery and preparedness organization. Started in katrina. We began just rebuilding homes for low and moderate income families to own their homes to own them before the storm that they were not able to afford market rate contractors and desperately wanted to stay in their homes. We began that it important work in saint bernard parish as the saint bernard project and we later grew to disaster impact the communities that were affected by events more recent than katrina ads our organization grew and we began to rebuild homes for thousands of families and communities all across the country realize that while the rebuilding workers important and getting home means everything for the seven or eight hundred families. We rebuild for each year is sort of pales in comparison to the effects of disaster. That are seen by millions of people in communities all across the country and with the witness we had from the many communities we were operating in we started asked ourselves. What should we do with all this information about the lived experiences communities before and after large-scale natural disasters and so over the years we've worked attended that experience in feedback to every level of the system that could produce better outcomes before and after disasters for low with monitoring companies. What are some of the challenges. That sbp sees on.

sbp fema julia rockwell philadelphia water department navy reese us federal government Miller caroline john saint bernard katrina
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

04:43 min | Last month

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"The cost of the removal. I think that could be a huge step because we could back then opened up a whole lot more area for treatment. So that's step one step two. I think is to simplify the planning process honestly on federal forests. There you know people would. Some people would freak out but me saying that. But i tell you i think there are. The important safeguards are in place leaving large trees. We've got diner limits. We're not gonna mess with those. We've got protections for watercourses in and some of the soil impacts like we talked about four. We have those in place. We're not talking. Ms messing with those were just talking about. I'm talking about streamlining the planning process so each thing. Each project doesn't take three to five years for one hundred thousand acre project. We need to be able to push those things out in a year. In my opinion. Lastly i think a a really strong commitment to prescribe bernie and i in prescribed burning throughout the year. Oftentimes what we do. Is we hire firefighters in the spring and they work through the season sometimes into the early fall and then they're laid off in a lot of cases for wintertime but if we were able to establish sort of a year round programme of work for these firefighters that took advantage of opportunities to burn in the winner there until there are opportunities now and i think there's actually a climate on that we have these periods. It seems like now over the last many years in january and february where there's no snow on the ground. It's really actually Optimal conditions for prescribed burning. But we don't have a crew in place to do that and then you know that crude weather's not burning opportunities could then do some of the scene work. You know we call hand-feeding. So i i think we. We had a real commitment to that as a professional track for jobs and so forth. I think that could be a a big difference but those are the top three things. I could conserve making a difference. Well some of these big bills. Climate funding coming through congress. One of them wants to establish a climate core. Boy that just seems like a perfect example like that. What kind of jobs would they be doing there. You go full-time wildfire staff. So all right any chrissy. Dc listeners and doing that kind of work on slip that into the appropriation. And i guess any sort of additional thing that i would like as part of that pushed a lot on the podcast is a communication strategy that needs to be coupled with fire management. I know the us forest service. They get a lot of funding to do a lot of really interesting research. and i know messaging and communications. That's out there but it's just you know maybe it needs to be better. That really had it made. They need a partner with different people but the messaging around force management just needs to ramp up. Because i think that's there's just a deficit there. I think you're right. And i think you know what i see at least on the research side of things which you know a lot of our research bridges into outreach which should include the messaging piece of it right but a lot of it is is kind of one offs just a particular group or a particular person is effective. Maybe through whatever means they're effective getting the word out but it's not it's not really a coordinated effort at a broader scale. And i don't i don't have a good sense of what that would look like but i think you're absolutely right if we could do something you know something. Better more streamlined for the west itself as the Like i said the inevitability of fire in our ability to start changing the characteristics. I think that could really take old. I think people have seen fire in the last several years that it's fresh on their minds and they're probably willing to hear that message brand into spin fantastic conversation. I encourage people. I'm going to have some links in my show. Notes checks papers with me. If people wanna dig into academic papers are actually. They're really compelling reads and some the the history of force management so they're actually really good. Reads one last question for you and i ask all my guests this if you could recommend one person to come on the podcast. Who would be so. I guess i'll stop my head. I can think of a couple. But i'll list rob york. Who is a colleague of mine. Three uc berkeley and robs got interesting background. Because he is a forester in used to manage our research forests near georgetown california and he is avid prescribe burner. He burns all the time including in the winter. You'll burn with two or three people. I know that you know he. Has this really interesting background of a very much on the ground management and the research side of things so rob could be very very interesting because he's got the burning and experience. He's got the forestry experience his got Shops as well all right. Great excellent recommendation. All right brandon. Thanks again for coming on and sharing your expertise in you know. Good luck your research is going to be more important in the years ahead. Thank you it actors. Welcome back joining me. Kyle nap.

two Kyle congress january five years february three three people One Each project one hundred thousand acre georgetown california one person four each thing one last question step one Three uc three things step two
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

08:34 min | 3 months ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"It's of this. Incredible chain of barrier islands extends from long island all the way up through cape cod protects enormous amounts of homes on the mainland and harbor fronts on the mainland. And i think if we can understand this one little piece here. Maybe that's applicable new broader sense. Jim anymore places so my studies. I hope will enhance that. What is your favorite spot in the refuge. Oh gosh you know. There's just nothing like that lighthouse when you come to check it by boat. There's a time when you can't see shaw on either side of you. You can't see what you've left behind and you can't see what's in front of you especially if you're coming through the fog or at night and it's dark out and then way off in the distance you see that one little point of the light or the white house itself rising out of the water and it sat first beacon of it's out there that special places there and we're gonna find it that coming to the island is just so special to be greeted by that point a great point it just makes your your heart happy so when you go out there and sit there and it's one of the most peaceful places as you said there are a lot of tourists here. This population can go up a north of sixty thousand people in the summer on this one little island and that point is one place where you might find refuge even for a human even if you're not one of the rare birds or something it's a peaceful place where you can find refuge and just contemplate the ocean in the world. Perfect okay priscilla. Thank you so much for coming on and sharing your story. Thank you doug actors. I'm here with thomas shea. Thomas the managing director of resources planning at the trustees of reservations. Hi tom welcome to the podcast. Hi doug great to be here. You're actually returning to the podcast. We did the series back on the other properties that you manage. So it's great having you back on creativity here again and have opportunity to talk about costa resilience and our properties and just a excellent opportunity to talk engage further about it. Okay for those. Who aren't familiar with those episodes. Can you tell us briefly. Who are the trustees of reservations. What what is your group shorter. The trustees of reservations where a conservation organization and land trust massachusetts -chusetts. We've been around since eighteen ninety one. Actually the nation's oldest land trust we own lots of properties across massachusetts the largest coastal landowner in the state is propping private coastal land owner. So we own protect around one hundred twenty miles of coastline and so for us. We've been witnessing changes on our coastlines firsthand now for the last five to ten years really an unprecedented rates and we have been preparing to address coastal change and climate now for the last three or four years in earnest as part of our strategic plan and for us focused on nantucket is critical. It is truly on frontlines of climate change here massachusetts on the coast seeing some of the highest rates of erosion anywhere in the state shuki tells a bit more specifically about your role with the trustees sure. Yeah it my role with the trustees has been to help leader coastal strategy and initiatives. At the trustees the first time we've had that as a real focus for organization and it's probably one of the first recognition of the organization has to adapt to climate change. Many conservation organizations are really all about protecting things in perpetuity forever. But now you have to really think normalization in in my role about how we now reframe sustainability and preserving places serving places in this kind of dynamic environment and uncertainty and so we have really now in my role started to think about how we make our places more resilient where we need to adapt where we need to retrieve how to protect our properties in indiana exceptional resources on and so that's really been a major focus of mine. I team over the last five years when people become members of conservation groups or their board members. They have certain expectations and as you just described. Things are changing. How do you bring along those people who support your mission along this new climate journey. Yeah that's a great question. I would say that for everybody. Including our own organizational teams staff as well as our visitors members donors that we all have to start learning the language climate and is the fluency that you have to build up around concepts language that we use and the future in. What does that look like. So there's kind of just building. Not fluency which i think we've done in this podcast. Actually is is a big part of how we do that. Actually i think you're doing a lot of that great work too so that helps us gain fluency and awareness. And then i think the next part is. How do we manage expectations. Which is to say that. Yeah some places are changing it more or less different rate there are more or less different options in opportunities to create resiliency and adapt and in some places may have to accept loss in some places. We may have to change how we manage. How we recreate used these properties that they won't look like the way they have for years and this is true of course on the coast to coast has always been chaining changing so. I think we're in a constant dialogue. Doug with everybody so the perspective that i think all of us are learning bourassa just managing our expectations and being thoughtful about where we intervene without a -tations in where it may not make sense and this is a constant dialogue case a wise. The co two refuge so important of all these properties that you manage. Why is this so important. Yeah i mean of courses Conic not only here in massachusetts untuckit but just nationally and internationally right it's gonna few cuss spit spit formations of a barrier system in the world. I think we've been working towards designation of the property as a national natural landmark. It's incredibly important locally as well as know credible place for recreation. It's got over five miles of beaches. Doug if you ever get a chance to go out there you can just get out there with overseeing vehicle. Go down a couple of miles park and you've got a lot of the beach to yourself. It's just amazing experience. You've got excellent fishing. Wildlife is tremendous out. There you'll see rare species. We have a rare cactus out on that area in such as so many unique characteristics and experiences really unlike almost anyplace else in the state and so it's super iconic in valuable and then of course not only as a refuge but potentially now we're learning could it has been providing storm protections in antioch at harbor and there's connection right between the built environment and the natural coast and now seeing that. You can't just look at me. Untuckit as harbor unto itself. But you've got to look at its connectedness. Land larger coast landscape with refuge. Of course we've got the lighthouse out there. I'm sure people told you about that. As an iconic cultural feature which has been moved once a day for the westward. So it's an amazing place definitely one of the memorable places any coastal area. Advance you on the east coast. Well i'll have to get their all. Here's my sale I need to get an end in. Martha's vineyard all of it. Yes i hope to go okay. So with the reservations. You have this challenge. That you're managing these amazing properties but you have multiple purposes for him in two of the main ones already for public access. But then you're actually trying to protect the natural resources on those landscapes and sometimes they don't cooperate very well together. Tell us a bit about that. Yeah that's a great question. Our whole organization's mission is really all about that is to provide places for exceptional places republican join and for preserving ecological significant ecological resources. So we've got to do that. That's part of what we have to do. And you know. Part of the value of these places have connection attachment to people right. People have to heal at that. They can enjoy the in order. value them. So there's so it's a it's a good natural connection to have right..

massachusetts thomas shea doug shuki long island priscilla shaw white house bourassa nantucket Jim costa Thomas tom Doug indiana harbor east coast
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

07:05 min | 3 months ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Hate actors joining me. Is priscilla johnson bender. Priscilla is a seasonal resident of nantucket. And the chair of the property committee of the trustees of reservations priscilla. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me. So how long have you been a resident of kentucky. Well we've been coming up here for many decades with our kids but when we've been actually living on island in the season for the last seven years okay. So that's quite a while. And what role do you play with. The trustees reservations. You are the chair of the property committee. What does that mean yes. Well for untuckit. We have a property. Only one property here and that's cascadia co two nature preserve and there are group of people who are volunteers who live on the island and have an interest in the property and work to support it and support the rangers who manage it just described that. How often do you meet. What are some of the issues that come up when the committee meets. Well we meet two or three times a year in person and off-season Have a phone call once a year and we work on ways to support the growth of the great point circle membership which are people who really give it a higher level to support the mission of the trustees here on untuckit the trustees is much larger organization that incorporates all of massachusetts but this one property of their hundred twenty is the only one here. It's eleven hundred acres a very very fragile and imperilled lance along the coast so we try very hard to do it. We can't support it as part of this podcast. There's a partnership between the untuckit conservation foundation. And the trustees has the foundation's work. Overlap with anything that you're doing oh they overlap enormously for one thing. The properties are kind of mosaic together. The conservation foundation which is amazing organization as well has a number of properties alongside the trustees properties out there. The gatehouse is a entryway that the trustees manages but is owned by the conservation foundation so they really work hand in glove and on the issues surrounding nature and the preservation of the land. And how we're going to manage and regulate things that are going on out there. The two organizations were very closely so even in the seven years that you've lived on the island. Have you noticed changes when you go out to the beach other things that stand out to you. Well obviously there's the erosion issue with the rising tide some more severe storms has just really astounding this past year. We had enormous storm in december. I think it was around the eighth of december. That really took out a chunk of the island. And i found just week or so ago i went out in a spot that i used to love to go to sit and contemplate the ocean with my dog just doesn't exist and it was almost like losing a friend to find that this physical place that i have spent so much time at was just gone. I had spent so many times even in january watching the snowflakes swirl over the water there with my dog and literally. The dune is gone. There's nothing there that was kind of a shock so as a resident to and when you talk to other residents of nantucket how is the issue of climate change. Come up are people talking about it at all. Oh absolutely there's a whole commission that has been formed to talk about resiliency untuckit and its waterfront. The cascadia co two property really defines nantucket as it the shape of the island. You just look at that iconic shape that you see on logos all over the place that point heading up towards the northeast is really very defining for the image of nantucket and is also defining for our waterways. The harbor that made nantucket such a great whaling station. All of that is possible because of these barriers that protect to the harbor front and if that is to go and go and be washed away the entire ocean comes right into the town is just open and that's in ecology disaster and it's a town disaster so both the foundation and the trustees are talking more and not just talking but they're doing adaptation planning. How we're going to adapt to climate change. Is that coming up at all with the work. You're doing his chair of the property committee. So yes it's absolutely in everyone's minds. Most people who were there have specific interest either as Recreation interest in terms of fishing or personal interests in their homes are located in areas that are endangered. We aren't really responsible directly for policies around that but it certainly is in everyone's mind that access to the point is going to be limited that we might need to think about other ways to adapt to how we access it. The trustees mission is really not just about preserving nature and special places but is also about inviting people into enjoy those special places and how we gauge people with them and clearly that has to be rethought as the spaces. Themselves are more and more imperilled. Do we allow vehicles to travel over the dunes. Will we'd certainly block off vehicles during nesting season for the threatened shore. Birds cascadia coach. Who is home to several different endangered and threatened species. Obviously the piping plover is everyone's favourite because they're adorable but also turns and oyster catchers in northern harriers. All of these things are endangered. Just like the house czar and we close things down to them. Maybe we need to think about other ways to engage people and bring them in to the space without endangering the dooms case in tuck it. Is this world class tourist destination so you have the residents of the island but then you have a steady flow of tourists especially in the summer. Do feel the tourists understand. What some the long-term changes are going to be to the islands in light of sea level rise. I think the ones who come here regularly and are really devoted to the islands. The people who come up for a week or two weeks every year and have been coming up for a long time. Those tourists probably do care about that very much. There are other people who come up for the nightlife and the summer sailing and things like that and might not be as aware of it. I think they're beginning to see a little bit more through social media but the long tourists who come up year after year for a week. I think they are seeing it. So you obviously care. Deeply about the refuge in your involved with the the property committee. What's next for you. What how are you gonna stay involved. Oh gosh well. I've been working to try to increase my own education on what the issues are and how we go about preserving the land we care about cleaning up the oceans. There's just so much to learn about. And i think if i can help direct where we're putting our energies to study. Things make new policies or even put funding into research and initiatives and scholarship. As part of the trustees. I think that might be helpful in our own. Little small corner of the world. The nantucket is one teeny island but in in many ways it's a barometer..

conservation foundation nantucket priscilla johnson bender property committee of the trus untuckit conservation foundati Priscilla priscilla rangers kentucky massachusetts sailing
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"To the United Nations headquarters in New York. And then it's done at the moment in which there is in the president with a different opinion about the future United States. He does exactly where she does. Exactly the same thing I will presidential decree our executive order and And a letter to the United Nations. So that can be done with twenty four hours. It's not complicated. And and there is a sizable part of the economy of the United States. As I said before that is actually preparing for that moment and preparing for the dumb of the United States back into global efforts. Hope that's what happens this course of events and as you're saying worst-case scenario if let's trump gets another he gets an elected again as you were saying so. Many things are sort of set in motion with private companies. And other things that it's just we're going to see a decarbonisation it just. It would be nice if we had strong. Us leadership we'll see. Yeah obviously there's alignment all the way up and down rights all the way from federal to state to city to corporate policy and financial incentives than that fool line and is good allows you to be the most effective in the absence of outlined. And it doesn't mean that the hope is paralysed just means that you're not optimizing system. Okay so I want to pivot and talk about your book the Future. We choose your CO author on this book. Is Tom Rivett? Carnac HOPE THAT RIGHT. And so what's the book about? What what what were you hoping to accomplish by writing this book the Buck essentially a pretty simple book because we recognize that on climate change is a complex subject and that most people feel overwhelmed both by the complexity of the topic the signs the measures that need to be taken to also overwhelmed about what can we do as individuals so we try to puncture both of those on myths and first of all. It's very readable book. It's a book that you can rather than study. It's not meant to be a textbook university textbook really a very readable book. You can beat it in about two hours on. It gives you the basics and very very clear your life basics of climate sagas. Where are we in? And how did we get here? And then it does. Something on that is we. We think is quite interesting. It actually invites the reader in an exponential way to step into two different worlds that are defined by what we do over the next ten years so if over the next ten years we're able to reduce emissions to one half of where they are today then we can step into a world. We opened the door a world that is demonstrably butter world. Then even the world that relieving today it's a world than has clean air it's robot has been regenerated. The oceans are regenerated the forest. We have cities that are being as green growing.

United States United Nations Tom Rivett president executive New York
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Exactly is what's going on? Impacting your work. Is it your hunkering down there? But what are you doing right now? And how is this? Impacting you well. Obviously all of us are hugely impacted. Right the first inbound is just stopping all kinds of transport whether its land or or air. I have just released the book that you mentioned. I was supposed to be on a book toward that. Of course was cut short story. Warrick in Washington under Natural Stralia now several countries in Europe and west coast of the United States. All put on hold and obviously now working here with colleagues. That are all strewn around the world walls that we have to be very mindful of each other's available to organize timing conference call so yeah so we all of us are are living the constraints of transport but I have to say I am so grateful and so moved by what had diverged because of that constraint and I always thought that constrains bring opportunities. I always think that. According constraint brings many opportunities but right now we have been lumped -bility constraint and what that has done is. It has moved us.

Warrick United States Europe Washington
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"You did flavor. Okay so I'm trying to ask this question now. I forgot as Judge Alice Hill. Who has been the most influential person in Europe tation career? Yeah so I'm GONNA cheat can use people okay yes so that's tricky. I would say for the climate adaptation side would certainly be Greg is a climatologist here at the UVA and use my dissertation adviser but kind of learned all of the climate climate change aspects and at integrate that into planning from him so he was a big influence. I would say from the planning side. I'm going to go back to my master's program I'm Barbara Becker was the director of the planning for at the time and so certainly kind of cut from the mold of looking at planning from a comprehensive way that she taught in the program so those are not people. I think of awesome lad. You you know it's coming final question. If you could recommend anyone to come on the podcast. Who would be about this question? 'cause I'm a listener of your podcast at I do that. It was coming and just like all of your other guests. I'm afraid of who all leave out if I pick one person but just one. He's holding up one finger at me guys. Yeah so I would. I would say I thought about this. I'd say Diana Liberman is a scholar here at the University of Arizona and I recommend her because she's been working on climate change for longer than anyone else I've known she's one of the first callers and climate change. She's done work with Diepkloof but she's also interested in kind of the impacts at the local level and she's done a lot of work kind of elevating the work of female scholars climate change. So I think she would be a really interesting person to talk to. It's okay lad. This has been awesome. It's so excellent.

Diana Liberman Barbara Becker Diepkloof Alice Hill Europe UVA Greg director University of Arizona
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

10:37 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Arizona we worked with a local homeowners association and they were interested in climate impacts and kind of what what types of things they could do as a homeowners association to plan for the climate of the future and when we looked at their plant list we certainly took some of the plants off and then recommended some more hardy plants in a lot of places. That'll shorten the plant list that you're able to recommend but like you mentioned and more temperate places. It may open up a new envelope of plans but certainly some of them. Mr Going to be the native plants that are native to the surrounding area so kind of thinking through those impacts to as an aside here. I've had some landscape architects on. I'm sure you deal with them quite frequently. There's just there's this tension that some of them. If given the opportunity to think more broadly working with the city yeah they're gonNA talk like you're doing but so many landscape architects work irk onto the parcel by parcel basis. It'll be hired by client and so the vegetation they might put on that onsite has nothing to do with the broader conversation that cities having so you landscape architects out there. If you're being sensitive to those kind of things I hesitated because I work in a school of landscape architecture texture and planning so we're in right now. My Office and half the faculty are landscape architects. So and I would say I would say that we we and those faculty members certainly train the students coming out of our program to think of climate impacts so I think even the site by site decisions or super important because the city is in belt At once by one person it's all of those little decisions that kind of add up to the greater whole too so so we can kind of brought in that education and make sure that those little sites are being designed correctly likely to its can add up to too much more resilient future landscape architects. No I show them a lot of love. It's like the one of the best design professions to deal with climate adaptation tation but have some criticisms. Okay some more of the information you sent me. I actually want to read this. I get this straight. Is that the national climate assessment estimates. That they'll be twenty to thirty more days over. Ninety degrees Fahrenheit in occurs to me have a lot of international listeners. Sorry guys I can't do the Celsius translation fast enough by mid century. A recent percents Projects that the annual number of days with a heat index above one hundred degrees Fahrenheit will double in the days with heat index above one. Hundred five degrees triple nationwide when compared to the end of the twentieth century. Okay I look at that. I see statistics if you're trying to communicate that to the public they roll their eyes and they just like some fantasy talk and maybe you could bring that down. What are the real world implications when we read statistics like that of these reports? Yeah that is a good question John. And that's something that the climatologist I work with are certainly thinking right now so again. We've created climate profiles for different communities in the southwest last through a Noah funded regional integrated scientists estimate center called. Clean Mus here at the University of Arizona and one of those one one of the purposes of creating those community climate profiles as to do exactly what you're saying. Take that statistics Mumbo jumbo that doesn't really mean anything to the average person. Let alone like a city planner and really talk through. What does it mean for them and a lot of times that simply translates into? How much should you care about this issue? So kind of have if you're in a place that's going to experience more heat during the nights and less nighttime cooling that has a really big public health impact so kind of getting those planners and city decision decision makers to be aware that that something that they should be thinking through for their population. So I think clicky like you mentioned a lot of the statistics are important to have again. That accurate accurate information is really important to have. You need to translate down. What does it mean at the local level and doesn't aligned with local values? And how are those. What are those is local agencies actually able to do about it yeah? I'm blanking on the report I read recently. But the the notion of you know to lead to an X.. Number amount of emergency room visits visits or less days children on a playground. And I thought that was really kind of helpful like people visualizing like how does this. Actually what does it mean from my real world. Yeah exactly and that's where you take. Take that information again. It's still it's accurate it's credible but you're actually you're actually translating back. Climate Science and impacts that people care about and. I think that's where you're going to get a lot. More interest interest in action on it again connected to things that people care about at the local levels and again one thing that I found resonates a lot when you talk to city planners or uh-huh residents about extreme heat is just the idea that again we want to prevent those mortalities but most people don't see themselves dying of extreme heat so you kind of mentioned that and then you also talked about like all right well in your own life. Like what time do you walk your dog. When are you able to take your kids out to the playground and kind of thinking through as it gets hotter or you're going to be able all to do those things as much or how does that impact your life and then what can the city do to make your life more comfortable? It's interesting after moving to Tucson. We're we're fortunate to have in mountain range just north of us. That goes up to nine thousand feet. So it's to Sony INS in the summer. We don't hike in the lower elevations in the hills and the foothills because it's one hundred five degrees as we all go up to the top at nine thousand seventy degrees and then in the wintertime it flips we do our lowland hiking's and so there's an adjustment and we'll probably see more of that. Okay Latte I wanNA talk about some solutions here and let's talk about climate adaptation strategies. kind of walk us through. How what can people be doing? What can they be thinking about? And if we got local local government people listening to this. How do they approach this? Yes so a colleague at Arizona State University Ramiro and I recently did a review paper. That's Looking at kind of how planners and local governments have looked at extreme heat planning and what we found is there's two major categories that are occurring right now now so one of those categories is kind of the local governance perspective looking at risk management. And so imagine like your emergency management operators or your hesitation irrigation planners things like using early warning systems and connecting with the National Weather Service for the Heat Index. And things like that and that's really where that public health and communication occasion and kind of education component comes in so that's when big buckets that That is certainly being worked on the other one from a planning perspective this probably more. The realm of urban planning and landscape architecture is looking at the design of the built environment and the planning design of the built environment mitigates the increases of extreme heat from climate change and also the things that we already understand about urban heat island effect thinking through what we can do with the built environment. Make sure we certainly don't contribute. Due to increasing the urban heat island effect by potentially if in decreasing in certain places so that would be things like rearranging the land use and urban forum to. Maybe maybe let more air ventilation go through so that might be something that cities with a number of large buildings like New York City or Chicago with think about maybe in the desert southwest or more. Ah suburban communities that are less dense overall looking at things like preserving natural open space kind of the placement of new parks and things like that again kind of decrease the amount of urban effect that we have and other thing this would be the top strategy that cities are using or thinking about at least as the installation green infrastructure and kind of increasing urban forestry canopy so I kind of put an asterisk after that one because it's become almost the silver bullet of extreme heat that people people say okay. WE'RE GONNA have extreme problem just increase the urban forestry canape the number of trees that we have scientists shown that it does have an impact on it. But I don't I don't think it's the silver bullet that everyone thinks it is again kind of thinking of those trade offs that we have to make with urban forestry so might be a little bit of water increase usage or maybe a lot depending on what species Edu and then again if you just have. A blanket percentage number that you're trying to increase our planting trees in areas where people actually walk and we'll enjoy we. The shade are you planting them in areas. where the most vulnerable populations are they all kind of concentrated in places where there's already a lot of tree canopy so kind of thinking through those things things a little bit more carefully? New York City did episode there and they had a really thoughtful approach to like their tree planting efforts in poor areas of the city. And I I think they were very since it in a lot of had to do with the heat island effect. They're just they're trying to cool some of these areas that won't typically get it so. Yeah yeah absolutely and I'm a big. I'm a big plant Lover Ever Tree Lover. I don't want that to come off but I think I think we're a lot of folks are looking for simple answers for a lot of climate impacts not just extreme heat and and you look at the nuances and the trade offs that are involved and obviously has your other guests on the podcast have talked about. There's no simple solutions for a lot of the things that we're looking at it saying another speaking of trade offs another thing cities have looked at as reflectively and changing the building materials that they're using so some cities are looking at reflective reflective roofs to kind of cool the buildings often reflect that heat back into the atmosphere Los Angeles in the last couple of years. You may have heard of it as a looked at an installed installed reflective paving on some of their streets as an experiment and so initially the idea. was that if you paint the streets of reflective color that He would be bounced right back off the atmosphere and kind of mitigate the heat increase that's occurring with the streets some colleagues area and middle at Asu and Kelly Turner at Ucla did a study just recently though that showed that that reflective hate painting actually reflects the heat right back onto pedestrians and onto the buildings right next the streets right so for the pedestrians walking those areas. They could feel seven or ten degrees Fahrenheit warmer on sidewalks again. That's probably a trade off we. We don't WanNa make it a lot of cities. I actually did that when I did. That L. California depth series I went in I walked with one of the guys working the city and it was just like a navy. Be five hundred yards of that material. But I don't think it was. The reflective material is actually the material that it was made of and so there was some reflection going on. But it wasn't just like some White Street and he had one of those temperature guns and we're right next to the regular pavement than that and it was you know ten degrees cooler and just standing above it. I don't think I felt any hotter. I think that might have been the material. But that's that's Kinda depressing when you think you've identified the solution and it's like now yeah and I say kind of as we look at extreme heat and as we start start to test things out we need to have these pilot so so certainly. These experiments are incredibly important for cities to do because we need to find creative solutions and kind of entrepreneurial ways to.

New York City Mr Going Climate Science Arizona University of Arizona Arizona State University Tucson Sony Los Angeles California National Weather Service Kelly Turner Asu Chicago Ucla
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

13:33 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Designed to take off at certain temperature thresholds solds that doesn't occur too frequently now but you could expect to see things like that occur a little bit more frequently in the future. That's a pretty extreme example. I would say think about the amount kind of money cities spend on things. Like bus stops covered bus stops or we installed light rail here in Tucson Arizona installed a lot of expensive light rail stops stops for those and designed them artem all of that kind of thinking. Broadly about Infrastructure and government. Spending have those things been designed with enough shade eight and enough. I'm kind of comfort for the climate of the future and then other things like a lot of municipalities are looking at green structure. Are they planting the right plants that are going to survive vim hotter future. So a lot of those things are definitely impacted here's a little regional. factoid we last night both live here in Tucson. And when when you hear about Phoenix being one hundred. Fifteen degrees typically in Tucson even though we're farther south it's probably about one hundred and five here where we're actually much brisker then then in the summer then Phoenix. Because we're actually higher elevation and I think some other quirks so and what about landscape and urban ecology where the impacts there. Yeah so that. That's that's an important one too. So we do spend a lot of money on urban ecology urban landscaping both kind of on the public sector and then the private sector to does landscaping for for stores offices. All of that questions that we should be asking that we're not typically asking right now are are the plants that were planning the plants that will survive in the future return thrive and do very well you know. Micro climates play a lot of role and landscape architects are already really good at looking at micro climates but kind of looking taking more broadly at those recommended plant less that we hand out to different firms and neighborhood associations on what they should be planting. Are those the plants that have just done well in the past or were those the plants that are going to do well in the future so and we want to think about like the native wildlife and all of those things that are impacted with extreme heat. And there's definitely I'm research that shown that not only urban heat island effect but also climate change is impacting in changing Kind of how. The urban ecology looks. This is where things get messed up to choose a responsible urban planner working in a city. They plant more native wildlife. Vegetation that's going to do well with watering all that but now we start seeing some of these collapse of transition zones are people in your sector starting to think. Well maybe you need to plant these kinds of trees even though they're not necessarily native needed right now the climate ten twenty thirty years from now. They're going to do much better. Are you hearing that conversation. In regards to landscape ecology. Yeah absolutely lutely again landscape. Architects have already done a really good job of looking at what what plants are appropriate for certain places. I think the conversation needs to be broadened out to other decision maker. Though and so we at the University of Arizona we worked with a local homeowners association and they were interested in climate impacts and kind of what what types of things they could do as a homeowners association to plan for the climate of the future and when we looked at their plant list we certainly took some of the plants off and then recommended some more hardy plants in a lot of places. That'll shorten the plant list that you're able to recommend but like you mentioned and more temperate places. It may open up a new envelope of plans but certainly some of them. Mr Going to be the native plants that are native to the surrounding area so kind of thinking through those impacts to as an aside here. I've had some landscape architects on. I'm sure you deal with them quite frequently. There's just there's this tension that some of them. If given the opportunity to think more broadly working with the city yeah they're gonNA talk like you're doing but so many landscape architects work irk onto the parcel by parcel basis. It'll be hired by client and so the vegetation they might put on that onsite has nothing to do with the broader conversation that cities having so you landscape architects out there. If you're being sensitive to those kind of things I hesitated because I work in a school of landscape architecture texture and planning so we're in right now. My Office and half the faculty are landscape architects. So and I would say I would say that we we and those faculty members certainly train the students coming out of our program to think of climate impacts so I think even the site by site decisions or super important because the city is in belt At once by one person it's all of those little decisions that kind of add up to the greater whole too so so we can kind of brought in that education and make sure that those little sites are being designed correctly likely to its can add up to too much more resilient future landscape architects. No I show them a lot of love. It's like the one of the best design professions to deal with climate adaptation tation but have some criticisms. Okay some more of the information you sent me. I actually want to read this. I get this straight. Is that the national climate assessment estimates. That they'll be twenty to thirty more days over. Ninety degrees Fahrenheit in occurs to me have a lot of international listeners. Sorry guys I can't do the Celsius translation fast enough by mid century. A recent percents Projects that the annual number of days with a heat index above one hundred degrees Fahrenheit will double in the days with heat index above one. Hundred five degrees triple nationwide when compared to the end of the twentieth century. Okay I look at that. I see statistics if you're trying to communicate that to the public they roll their eyes and they just like some fantasy talk and maybe you could bring that down. What are the real world implications when we read statistics like that of these reports? Yeah that is a good question John. And that's something that the climatologist I work with are certainly thinking right now so again. We've created climate profiles for different communities in the southwest last through a Noah funded regional integrated scientists estimate center called. Clean Mus here at the University of Arizona and one of those one one of the purposes of creating those community climate profiles as to do exactly what you're saying. Take that statistics Mumbo jumbo that doesn't really mean anything to the average person. Let alone like a city planner and really talk through. What does it mean for them and a lot of times that simply translates into? How much should you care about this issue? So kind of have if you're in a place that's going to experience more heat during the nights and less nighttime cooling that has a really big public health impact so kind of getting those planners and city decision decision makers to be aware that that something that they should be thinking through for their population. So I think clicky like you mentioned a lot of the statistics are important to have again. That accurate accurate information is really important to have. You need to translate down. What does it mean at the local level and doesn't aligned with local values? And how are those. What are those is local agencies actually able to do about it yeah? I'm blanking on the report I read recently. But the the notion of you know to lead to an X.. Number amount of emergency room visits visits or less days children on a playground. And I thought that was really kind of helpful like people visualizing like how does this. Actually what does it mean from my real world. Yeah exactly and that's where you take. Take that information again. It's still it's accurate it's credible but you're actually you're actually translating back. Climate Science and impacts that people care about and. I think that's where you're going to get a lot. More interest interest in action on it again connected to things that people care about at the local levels and again one thing that I found resonates a lot when you talk to city planners or uh-huh residents about extreme heat is just the idea that again we want to prevent those mortalities but most people don't see themselves dying of extreme heat so you kind of mentioned that and then you also talked about like all right well in your own life. Like what time do you walk your dog. When are you able to take your kids out to the playground and kind of thinking through as it gets hotter or you're going to be able all to do those things as much or how does that impact your life and then what can the city do to make your life more comfortable? It's interesting after moving to Tucson. We're we're fortunate to have in mountain range just north of us. That goes up to nine thousand feet. So it's to Sony INS in the summer. We don't hike in the lower elevations in the hills and the foothills because it's one hundred five degrees as we all go up to the top at nine thousand seventy degrees and then in the wintertime it flips we do our lowland hiking's and so there's an adjustment and we'll probably see more of that. Okay Latte I wanNA talk about some solutions here and let's talk about climate adaptation strategies. kind of walk us through. How what can people be doing? What can they be thinking about? And if we got local local government people listening to this. How do they approach this? Yes so a colleague at Arizona State University Ramiro and I recently did a review paper. That's Looking at kind of how planners and local governments have looked at extreme heat planning and what we found is there's two major categories that are occurring right now now so one of those categories is kind of the local governance perspective looking at risk management. And so imagine like your emergency management operators or your hesitation irrigation planners things like using early warning systems and connecting with the National Weather Service for the Heat Index. And things like that and that's really where that public health and communication occasion and kind of education component comes in so that's when big buckets that That is certainly being worked on the other one from a planning perspective this probably more. The realm of urban planning and landscape architecture is looking at the design of the built environment and the planning design of the built environment mitigates the increases of extreme heat from climate change and also the things that we already understand about urban heat island effect thinking through what we can do with the built environment. Make sure we certainly don't contribute. Due to increasing the urban heat island effect by potentially if in decreasing in certain places so that would be things like rearranging the land use and urban forum to. Maybe maybe let more air ventilation go through so that might be something that cities with a number of large buildings like New York City or Chicago with think about maybe in the desert southwest or more. Ah suburban communities that are less dense overall looking at things like preserving natural open space kind of the placement of new parks and things like that again kind of decrease the amount of urban effect that we have and other thing this would be the top strategy that cities are using or thinking about at least as the installation green infrastructure and kind of increasing urban forestry canopy so I kind of put an asterisk after that one because it's become almost the silver bullet of extreme heat that people people say okay. WE'RE GONNA have extreme problem just increase the urban forestry canape the number of trees that we have scientists shown that it does have an impact on it. But I don't I don't think it's the silver bullet that everyone thinks it is again kind of thinking of those trade offs that we have to make with urban forestry so might be a little bit of water increase usage or maybe a lot depending on what species Edu and then again if you just have. A blanket percentage number that you're trying to increase our planting trees in areas where people actually walk and we'll enjoy we. The shade are you planting them in areas. where the most vulnerable populations are they all kind of concentrated in places where there's already a lot of tree canopy so kind of thinking through those things things a little bit more carefully? New York City did episode there and they had a really thoughtful approach to like their tree planting efforts in poor areas of the city. And I I think they were very since it in a lot of had to do with the heat island effect. They're just they're trying to cool some of these areas that won't typically get it so. Yeah yeah absolutely and I'm a big. I'm a big plant Lover Ever Tree Lover. I don't want that to come off but I think I think we're a lot of folks are looking for simple answers for a lot of climate impacts not just extreme heat and and you look at the nuances and the trade offs that are involved and obviously has your other guests on the podcast have talked about. There's no simple solutions for a lot of the things that we're looking at it saying another speaking of trade offs another thing cities have looked at as reflectively and changing the building materials that they're using so some cities are looking at reflective reflective roofs to kind of cool the buildings often reflect that heat back into the atmosphere Los Angeles in the last couple of years. You may have heard of it as a looked at an installed installed reflective paving on some of their streets as an experiment and so initially the idea. was that if you paint the streets of reflective color that He would be bounced right back off the atmosphere and kind of mitigate the heat increase that's occurring with the streets some colleagues area and middle at Asu and Kelly Turner at Ucla did a study just recently though that showed that that reflective hate painting actually reflects the heat right back onto pedestrians and onto the buildings right next the streets right so for the pedestrians walking those areas. They could feel seven or ten degrees Fahrenheit warmer on sidewalks again. That's probably a trade off we. We don't WanNa make it a lot of cities. I actually did that when I did. That L. California depth series I went in I walked with one of the guys working the city and it was just like a navy. Be five hundred yards of that material. But I don't think it was. The reflective material is actually the material that it was made of and so there was some reflection going on. But it wasn't just like some White Street and he had one of those temperature guns and we're right next to the regular pavement than that and it was you know ten degrees cooler and just standing above it. I don't think I felt any hotter. I think that might have been the material. But that's that's Kinda depressing when you think you've identified the solution and it's like now yeah and I say kind of as we look at extreme heat and as we start start to test things out we need to have these pilot so so certainly. These experiments are incredibly important for cities to do because we need to find creative solutions and kind of entrepreneurial ways to.

Tucson Arizona University of Arizona Phoenix New York City Mr Going Climate Science Arizona State University California Kelly Turner Sony Los Angeles Asu National Weather Service Ucla Chicago
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

12:43 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"About another thing that I like to think about a little bit more broadly as quality of life in public health. If it gets hotter children might have to stay indoors and can't go play outside which has direct impact on kind of their activity levels and think what about like quality of life. Like are you able to go around ammon. Walk through your neighborhood take your dog out. We're trying to get people to live in denser places for a lot of sustainability ability reasons to help mitigate climate change and other things and those are things that as a planner I think about. And we're trying to get people on bicycles walking in denser downtowns and if it's getting being hotter that's kind of a counteracting effect for some of the goals that a lot of cities have set out for themselves. A lot of people look at public health. They track things. People you know. People die of heart attacks People die of bicycle deaths. And so you know they. They do track Deaths associated with extreme heat. Are you aware of people associating that with climate change that client because right now we're dealing with the climate that's impacted by climate change. It's not a future thing so he ways that we're dealing with right now. How do you pull out exactly's to fingerprint of climate change? But it's there no matter what it's we're dealing with. It are people especially in planning or public health time these sort of mortalities to climate change or is it is not the narratives not really spoken that way. That's a good question so I'm certainly not a public health with expert but I've worked with public health folks kind of extreme heat. When you're looking at it you have to? You have to look at the public health components for sure from what I understand. When in public health agencies record deaths traditionally heat has been very underrepresented? And I think that's true for most of the country still if you die of a heart attack back and it happens to be during a heat wave. Most places will still record that as just a heart attack and then you can imagine other types of mortality associated with that to Arizona's actually one of the leaders in the country just because we've been hot naturally have kind of had to think through for a lot longer with making sure that if we record something as a heart attack as the cause of death we also look at the heat related impacts of that and potentially tag as a heat related death too so you know some other states and public health agencies are looking looking at what Arizona has done to better record and kind of understand what the impact if he'd actually is going from that so we're already behind the ball just recording. Deaths says he death straight but certainly the public health sector is thinking about climate change and they know most of the folks that I've talked to related to public health and heat tomorrow the climate change implications of that and so whether or not it's being recorded is that the public health officials many of them are kind of thinking through the climate change impacts right and I guess what I'm getting at too. Is that the the communication side of talking about climate change especially its impacts. It's a missed opportunity opportunity because we can associate those things today and so much of the rhetoric pro here on climate change and you hear it in even public health officials. It's all these hypothetical thankful in twenty years fifty years. We're GONNA see this increase in deaths but not too. Many people have died of the sea level rise and you know maybe hurricane irking events but in flooding events associated flooding event where people have died to climate change. And you know I know the risk of getting more did in trying to find communication strategies but I think decisions are made policies are created. Funding happens because of things are happening today and we we told you but it's like so much of the rhetoric is hypothetical. I think we're already there. It doesn't have to be hypothetical absolutely even Arizona again is ahead of the country on recording putting the heat related health impacts. But I think even we could do a better job of it and certainly if you took what we're doing in applied to other states. I think you'd see a clear picture and like you said. Having that accurate information is really critical for public health agencies and federal funding to actually point those dollars towards things that can save lives and improve roof health outcomes so when you have these extreme heat events and you hear these deaths associated with these heatwaves a lot of times it's inner city and a lot of times it's senior citizens who are just kind of cut off and this plays into issues of social justice and environmental equity. Could you kind of explain how those issues issues come into play with extreme heat. Yeah so extreme. Heat is absolutely like other. Climate impacts has climate justice or Social Equity Component. That we need to look at I would say it's maybe even more nefarious with extreme heat because again if a flatter hurricane happens you get those impactful visual media things the news stories where you can actually see the the flood damage to the property and the houses destroyed extreme heat. A lot of folks who can afford air conditioning or cars or our work in places that are indoors near conditioned. If there's a heat wave they might be a little bit hot under walk to the CAR. But then they get home and they're fine the whole time and so the heat wave doesn't really impact them but there are certainly vulnerable populations like those. That can't of can't afford to air conditioner. Those that are outdoor workers those that have lower health. You know lower health anyway. I'm and do that. Maybe socio. Economic reasons and those are really the populations that we we need to be concerned about. Maybe the ones that are have no other option than to walk or bicycle to work. And there's a heat wave going on and it puts them at risk. So yeah there's definitely a climate justice component to that and when the heat waves occur and you could imagine the homeless populations to those if those are impacting those more vulnerable populations are they are those impacts being recorded properly and there are those people able to let the decision. Makers what's going on as well and we know that. There's a huge disconnect between when vulnerable populations are impacted and kind of the decisions made that could increase the resilience salons again. I always get some morbid with some of these topics but you think of when we've hits and then after the fact when people come in look at why did this happen. Why do these people die? And as a planner it must be interesting for you to independent of climate change but how you plan for better communities and this issue of climate justice but like some of the materials shared with me that you know doing some background how important social cohesion is in. It's so important in other ways too but something simply simply like is your family live in the same city so heat waves coming they can come and get grandpa and take them someplace else or you know. Are you even interactive with your neighbors and so many people that have been like actually die because they were just left alone in these situations and they didn't have a social infrastructure to take care of them and that's just not climate. Mitch changes like a healthy functioning. City has this things right. Yeah absolutely and so on and we're really bad at measuring that so we have like social vulnerability and accent a couple of other ways to map out demographic vulnerabilities but we don't have as good of ways to understand at the city level can of that social cohesion part and so certainly lake kind of civic institutions and nonprofits and religious institutions can play a large role in that and they think we need to lean into them as much as we can to help increase increase that social cohesion that the neighborhood level because like you said if no one's checking on the elderly residents or the next door neighbor during a heat wave and that's when they're probably going to be most vulnerable honorable for I remember in Paris. This was probably two thousand six or something when they had that massive heat wave in something like ten thousand or fifteen thousand people died that come into the planning conversations here in the. US like look what happened. There was an issue. Yeah that's interesting so there is the Paris when I'm in the ninety S. We had the Chicago. I'll go heat wave that was well written about undocumented. I'd say still not really not really impact the urban planning profession again. Part of that is because is the urban planning profession. Broadly has always used historic data to plan for the future. And that's one of the big things that we're looking at right now. is how to use climate change projections actions and climate science and get urban planning profession and other the other professions involved in city building and design to look at those projections and to use forwardlooking information. Because we've been really good at planning for the city of the past and not so much planning for the city of the future using projections so so again. Those dessert I would say from what I understand from. The people I've talked to those were looked at as blips and not so much as something that they should be concerned about the future at the time that they occurred. I think certainly now people are looking back to those events and kind of relooking at the lessons learned and seeing what they can do differently in the future public health number one issue but I want to just toss out. Just toss him out at you and I want you to explain how extreme heat will impact these sectors. So let's just talk about energy and water use. What will it mean for those sectors? Yeah so that's a big Glenn that we're concerned learned about in the south last obviously across the country to a lot of the strategies that we would do for climate adaptation to extreme heat well either increase energy or water usage edge since so you can imagine planting more trees increase urban forestry to decrease there have been Linda fact uses water even if you plant native trees in the southwest. There's still going GonNa be a water impact for that and on the other end places like New York City that are looking -at's ensuring that the low income residents have air conditioners so that when the temperatures can keep increasing pass threshold if they don't do insulation and the older buildings talk on. Bizarre conditioners are gonNA use additional energy to what about other urban infrastructure. Things bring up. How does extreme heat factor into that? Yeah so there's a ton of depends on the city but there's a ton of things to think about kind of the. Most striking example sample would be like up in Phoenix Arizona where the airport get. Shut down If it gets too hot because the planes are designed to take off at certain temperature thresholds solds that doesn't occur too frequently now but you could expect to see things like that occur a little bit more frequently in the future. That's a pretty extreme example. I would say think about the amount kind of money cities spend on things. Like bus stops covered bus stops or we installed light rail here in Tucson Arizona installed a lot of expensive light rail stops stops for those and designed them artem all of that kind of thinking. Broadly about Infrastructure and government. Spending have those things been designed with enough shade eight and enough. I'm kind of comfort for the climate of the future and then other things like a lot of municipalities are looking at green structure. Are they planting the right plants that are going to survive vim hotter future. So a lot of those things are definitely impacted here's a little regional. factoid we last night both live here in Tucson. And when when you hear about Phoenix being one hundred. Fifteen degrees typically in Tucson even though we're farther south it's probably about one hundred and five here where we're actually much brisker then then in the summer then Phoenix. Because we're actually higher elevation and I think some other quirks so and what about landscape and urban ecology where the impacts there. Yeah so that. That's that's an important one too. So we do spend a lot of money on urban ecology urban landscaping both kind of on the public sector and then the private sector to does landscaping for for stores offices. All of that questions that we should be asking that we're not typically asking right now are are the plants that were planning the plants that will survive in the future return thrive and do very well you know. Micro climates play a lot of role and landscape architects are already really good at looking at micro climates but kind of looking taking more broadly at those recommended plant less that we hand out to different firms and neighborhood associations on what they should be planting. Are those the plants that have just done well in the past or were those the plants that are going to do well in the future so and we want to think about like the native wildlife and all of those things that are impacted with extreme heat. And there's definitely I'm research that shown that not only urban heat island effect but also climate change is impacting in changing Kind of how. The urban ecology looks. This is where things get messed up to choose a responsible urban planner working in a city. They plant more native wildlife. Vegetation that's going to do well with watering all that but now we start seeing some of these collapse of transition zones are people in your sector starting to think. Well maybe you need to plant these kinds of trees even though they're not necessarily native needed right now the climate ten twenty thirty years from now. They're going to do much better. Are you hearing that conversation. In regards to landscape ecology. Yeah absolutely lutely again landscape. Architects have already done a really good job of looking at what what plants are appropriate for certain places. I think the conversation needs to be broadened out to other decision maker..

Paris Tucson Arizona Arizona US New York City Phoenix Phoenix Arizona Chicago Mitch Glenn Linda
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"So when I was studying studying climate change even like two thousand ten. All of the focus was on sea level rise and maybe a little bit on wildfires but mostly sea level rise and flooding and those kind of Associated Sheila risks. Because that's what people were observing on the coast and it was much more kind of the present threat that people are thinking about that with hurricanes Katrina and sandy so a a lot of the focus has been in urban planning on on those kind of the first line of climate change impacts one of the interesting things as extreme heat is a little bit of a different climate climate impact. Because you can't see it's visible. It has taken cities a little bit longer to realize that it has impacts that they care about. I'm outside of places that were already hot like the southwest quest and they think in the last couple of years especially as the heat waves have been increasing a lot. More organizations cities are starting to think about it seriously so I'd say in comparison Peirce into the other impacts from climate change. It's a relatively new risk. That people are really taking seriously. It's interesting because you look at it. We've understood that urban heat island for quite a while but kind of add that with climate change and people are starting to look back at what we know about the urban heat island effect and kind of considering those two things together and the planning perspective. I'm always picking working on Miami and that's my home state of Florida and I know you've recently done some work there but you know it's hurting to me right now. Sea Level Rise has always been like all right. Miami's toes because a sea level rise and I guess I haven't tracked the what are the future projections of extreme heat on Miami in his at actually a bigger threat in the short term to the city than NC double rise. Yeah so I was invited to Miami to lead an urban land institute panel looking at increasing the resiliency for the urban waterfront in the June of two thousand eighteen two thousand eighteen and it was interesting because they were certainly focused on sea level rise and flooding but they also asked us to look at extreme heat to with the same idea that they knew that it was a threat but they weren't really sure how to incorporate it into some of the stuff that they were looking at I would say both are equally of concern in both the things that they're currently taking various. Seriously Eh with Miami. It's not just the temperature but it's the it's the humidity is really impacting the amount of public health that could really impact. I grew up in Florida. It's murderously Hod. Adding ten degrees on top of that doesn't sound like fun. Okay let's let's talk about some impacts of extreme heat and I guess I I sort of the best way kind of explain those but the one that kind of front and center is just the effect on public health so Kinda give some background on. Extreme heat needs for that absolutely so extreme heat so the number one thing but a lot of folks talk about is that it's actually the number one weather related killer in the United. I'd say so can have consistently whether we have hurricanes or not if you look at the trends more people die of heat directly and certainly of heat associated deaths the year than any other weather related impact so so certainly if you're just looking at mortality heat is something that we should be concerned about another thing that I like to think about a little bit more broadly as quality of life in public health. If it gets hotter children might have to stay indoors and can't go play outside which has direct impact on.

Miami urban land institute Florida Katrina Peirce NC
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Or so when I was studying studying climate change even like two thousand ten. All of the focus was on sea level rise and maybe a little bit on wildfires but mostly sea level rise and flooding and those kind of Associated Sheila risks. Because that's what people were observing on the coast and it was much more kind of the present threat that people are thinking about that with hurricanes Katrina and sandy so a a lot of the focus has been in urban planning on on those kind of the first line of climate change impacts one of the interesting things as extreme heat is a little bit of a different climate climate impact. Because you can't see it's visible. It has taken cities a little bit longer to realize that it has impacts that they care about. I'm outside of places that were already hot like the southwest quest and they think in the last couple of years especially as the heat waves have been increasing a lot. More organizations cities are starting to think about it seriously so I'd say in comparison Peirce into the other impacts from climate change. It's a relatively new risk. That people are really taking seriously. It's interesting because you look at it. We've understood that urban heat island for quite a while but kind of add that with climate change and people are starting to look back at what we know about the urban heat island effect and kind of considering those two things together and the planning perspective. I'm always picking working on Miami and that's my home state of Florida and I know you've recently done some work there but you know it's hurting to me right now. Sea Level Rise has always been like all right. Miami's toes because a sea level rise and I guess I haven't tracked the what are the future projections of extreme heat on Miami in his at actually a bigger threat in the short term to the city than NC double rise. Yeah so I was invited to Miami to lead an urban land institute panel looking at increasing the resiliency for the urban waterfront in the June of two thousand eighteen two thousand eighteen and it was interesting because they were certainly focused on sea level rise and flooding but they also asked us to look at extreme heat to with the same idea that they knew that it was a threat but they weren't really sure how to incorporate it into some of the stuff that they were looking at I would say both are equally of concern in both the things that they're currently taking various. Seriously Eh with Miami. It's not just the temperature but it's the it's the humidity is really impacting the amount of public health that could really impact. I grew up in Florida. It's murderously Hod. Adding ten degrees on top of that doesn't sound like fun. Okay let's let's talk about some impacts of extreme heat and I guess I I sort of the best way kind of explain those but the one that kind of front and center is just the effect on public health so Kinda give some background on. Extreme heat needs for that absolutely so extreme heat so the number one thing but a lot of folks talk about is that it's actually the number one weather related killer in the United. I'd say so can have consistently whether we have hurricanes or not if you look at the trends more people die of heat directly and certainly of heat associated deaths the year than any other weather related impact so so certainly if you're just looking at mortality heat is something that we should be concerned about another thing that I like to think about a little bit more broadly as quality of life in public health. If it gets hotter children might have to stay indoors and can't go play outside which has direct impact on.

Miami urban land institute Florida Katrina Peirce NC
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"It's something I've been doing parallel with the podcast but it'll be opportune to have a lot more conversations than I do here on the POD and again we're in the process of recording pilot episodes. Maybe you and I can have that next ex- conversations or check out the link to my show to learn more. I hope to hear from you. Okay folks let's jump into this discussion on extreme heat with Dr Lad Keith. They hate after two day. I had a very exciting episode. I'm actually recording this in person. which is a rare treat when I do interviews? I'm talking with Dr Lad Keith. Latte is the assistant professor in planning and Chair of sustainable built environments at the University of Arizona. Hey welcome back to the podcast. Hey Ed qualcom too. I love coming to campus. I'm actually live here in Tucson with Latte and on occasion Latin levite into some presentations or even. I did a guest lecturer for one of his classes. And so it's a treat to get out of my pajamas and out of the house in someplace real. It's been a while but you've actually been on the podcast before. What episode was that? Yeah Yeah so that was the holiday and special for two thousand eighteen right right. You were with John Martin. We actually did that in person to at my house. That was fun. It's been a while I've I've been meaning to have you on for a while and here we're GONNA be talking about extreme heat we're GONNA learn all sorts of things about streaming because this is what you do but maybe you could give a little bit more background background about yourself. You know tell you know here at the University of Arizona. The what's the program. What's the department instead of your background? Here yeah thanks Doug. I'm glad to have you here. I am assistant mister professor and planning like you mentioned. And before he came back to academia I was practicing planner I look at how urban planners and the planning profession look at climate commit change. It's a lot of that deal with climate action planning both on the mitigation and adaptation side. I teach for the urban planning program here at the graduate level and then I run a sustainable sustainable built environment undergrad degree. That's in person and fully online. I'm always complaining on the PODCASTS. About universities lacking at a patient programs but university zone actually is quite advanced compared to a lot of universities right. I mean it's just not you're planning department but there's other adaptation things going on. Yeah absolutely and we've kind of taken. A mainstream approached with adaptation reputation education. So we don't have a specific adaptation degree but a lot of our degrees have adaptation courses. And we have a global change minor the PhD level. A lot of students. Kim Study at a so. Let's jump into this. We're here to talk about extreme heat and it's occurred to people always make recommendations on topics that I should cover for whatever reason I have not not touched upon extreme heat. And we'RE GONNA get into this but it's like the number one killer associated with climate change of people. This is a very big deal very serious issue. And so we're GonNa just give a primer on this kind of walk us through the work that you do but also some of the bigger issues around extreme heat but I really want this to be the fundamentals of extreme in heat and I think people sense they know extreme heat is but really what is extreme heat in the context of what we're talking about here. Yeah a great question. So simply simply stated extreme heat is he that is hotter than normal and so in the southwest it's always obviously been hotter than the rest of the country but extreme stream heat for us is increasing heat waves and increasing temperatures in the daytime and the nighttime extreme heat in the temperate northeast might look a little bit different. But it's just the general idea that places are getting hotter than having having more impact on people in the cities. And I guess to this sort of fingerprint of climate change people bullying okay. This area is hot but it's additionally hot because climate change. What are those fingerprints associated with climate? Change Yeah so I would say. Let's step taking a step back so there's kind of two things that we.

Dr Lad Keith University of Arizona Latte Doug Tucson Ed qualcom guest lecturer assistant professor professor John Martin Chair of sustainable Kim Study
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Hate after two day. I had a very exciting episode. I'm actually recording this in person. which is a rare treat when I do interviews? I'm talking with Dr Lad Keith. Latte is the assistant professor in planning and Chair of sustainable built environments at the University of Arizona. Hey welcome back to the podcast. Hey Ed qualcom too. I love coming to campus. I'm actually live here in Tucson with Latte and on occasion Latin levite into some presentations or even. I did a guest lecturer for one of his classes. And so it's a treat to get out of my pajamas and out of the house in someplace real. It's been a while but you've actually been on the podcast before. What episode was that? Yeah Yeah so that was the holiday and special for two thousand eighteen right right. You were with John Martin. We actually did that in person to at my house. That was fun. It's been a while I've I've been meaning to have you on for a while and here we're GONNA be talking about extreme heat we're GONNA learn all sorts of things about streaming because this is what you do but maybe you could give a little bit more background background about yourself. You know tell you know here at the University of Arizona. The what's the program. What's the department instead of your background? Here yeah thanks Doug. I'm glad to have you here. I am assistant mister professor and planning like you mentioned. And before he came back to academia I was practicing planner I look at how urban planners and the planning profession look at climate commit change. It's a lot of that deal with climate action planning both on the mitigation and adaptation side. I teach for the urban planning program here at the graduate level and then I run a sustainable sustainable built environment undergrad degree. That's in person and fully online. I'm always complaining on the PODCASTS. About universities lacking at a patient programs but university zone actually is quite advanced compared to a lot of universities right. I mean it's just not you're planning department but there's other adaptation things going on. Yeah absolutely and we've kind of taken. A mainstream approached with adaptation reputation education. So we don't have a specific adaptation degree but a lot of our degrees have adaptation courses. And we have a global change minor the PhD level. A lot of students. Kim Study at a so. Let's jump into this. We're here to talk about extreme heat and it's occurred to people always make recommendations on topics that I should cover for whatever reason I have not not touched upon extreme heat. And we'RE GONNA get into this but it's like the number one killer associated with climate change of people. This is a very big deal very serious issue. And so we're GonNa just give a primer on this kind of walk us through the work that you do but also some of the bigger issues around extreme heat but I really want this to be the fundamentals of extreme in heat and I think people sense they know extreme heat is but really what is extreme heat in the context of what we're talking about here. Yeah a great question. So simply simply stated extreme heat is he that is hotter than normal and so in the southwest it's always obviously been hotter than the rest of the country but extreme stream heat for us is increasing heat waves and increasing temperatures in the daytime and the nighttime extreme heat in the temperate northeast might look a little bit different. But it's just the general idea that places are getting hotter than having having more impact on people in the cities. And I guess to this sort of fingerprint of climate change people bullying okay. This area is hot but it's additionally hot because climate change. What are those fingerprints associated with climate? Change Yeah so I would say. Let's step taking a step back so there's kind of two things that we.

University of Arizona Latte Doug Dr Lad Keith Tucson assistant professor Chair of sustainable Ed qualcom guest lecturer professor John Martin Kim Study
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Eight after world a very exciting upset. This is the first episode of the year end end of the decade. I hope you all had a wonderful new year today. I'm hosting Dr Lad Keith. An assistant professor in planning and Chair of sustainable built environments at the University of Arizona Here in Tucson Latte is a friend someone I get to connect with frequently. He's a leader in the space. An increasingly doing work nationally. In this episode we take a deep dive on the issue of extreme heat in climate change. It's my first episode focused on this issue in that in itself represents a big gap on my part. Extreme heat is the leading cause of death in relation to climate change impacts ax and his Latte will explain. Many experts are working on this as the climate heats up. Okay so upcoming shows. I have multiple episodes in the works. I'll be having a conversation with Dr Jesse. Keenan a regular on the pod about financial and technical information arms race in providing climate services. I'm also in some early discussions about covering the Australia. Wildfires and what can be done to help governments adapt increasing fire risk. Some pretty dramatic footage coming out of Australia with communities destroyed and the catastrophic damage occurring in the native wildlife more on that soon auspey headed to Massachusetts in the coming months to cover coastal adaptation working with the group. The trustees looking forward to that so before we jump into the episode sued. I want to mention the work. I'm doing with some paddock studios. I'M GONNA keep mentioning this. You've probably heard it in the last couple of episodes hosting live talk shows on some paddock. Ot It's an patacas studios is a new software. Television company that produces livestream talk shows about important business and social problems policies and innovations. I will be anchoring.

Australia Dr Lad Keith Dr Jesse Tucson University of Arizona Keenan assistant professor Chair of sustainable Massachusetts
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Eight after world a very exciting upset. This is the first episode of the year end end of the decade. I hope you all had a wonderful new year today. I'm hosting Dr Lad Keith. An assistant professor in planning and Chair of sustainable built environments at the University of Arizona Here in Tucson Latte is a friend someone I get to connect with frequently. He's a leader in the space. An increasingly doing work nationally. In this episode we take a deep dive on the issue of extreme heat in climate change. It's my first episode focused on this issue in that in itself represents a big gap on my part. Extreme heat is the leading cause of death in relation to climate change impacts ax and his Latte will explain. Many experts are working on this as the climate heats up. Okay so upcoming shows. I have multiple episodes in the works. I'll be having a conversation with Dr Jesse. Keenan a regular on the pod about financial and technical information arms race in providing climate services. I'm also in some early discussions about covering the Australia. Wildfires and what can be done to help governments adapt increasing fire risk. Some pretty dramatic footage coming out of Australia with communities destroyed and the catastrophic damage occurring in the native wildlife more on that soon auspey headed to Massachusetts in the coming months to cover coastal adaptation working with the group. The trustees looking forward to that so before we jump into the episode sued. I want to mention the work. I'm doing with some paddock studios. I'M GONNA keep mentioning this. You've probably heard it in the last couple of episodes hosting live talk shows on some paddock. Ot It's an patacas studios is a new software. Television company that produces livestream talk shows about important business and social problems policies and innovations. I will be anchoring.

Australia Dr Lad Keith Dr Jesse Tucson University of Arizona Keenan assistant professor Chair of sustainable Massachusetts