40 Burst results for "Climate Change"

Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:40 min | 46 min ago

Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"Silence the people of Minnesota and take away your freedom and your rights. Thousands of people who couldn't get into the airport grounds gathered outside of it. State says the campaign didn't file a virus mitigation plan for the event. The president has 14 rallies over the next three days for Saturday in Pennsylvania, Joe Biden with his most ambitious day of the campaign, visiting three states on Friday, telling a drive up rally in Milwaukee. A vote for him is a vote for the environment. Combating climate change means saving the planet protected her health and creating millions of good paying jobs. Union job. Mr. Biden will be joined by former President Obama had a drive up of its Saturday in Michigan just days before the election. The latest Fox News poll says the Biden lead in the presidential race. Has narrowed to just eight points. America is listening to Fox News. Fromthe Los Nissan Traffic.

Joe Biden Fox News President Trump Minnesota Barack Obama Milwaukee America Pennsylvania Michigan
Trump, Biden converge on Florida, a key battleground state

Rick Roberts

00:36 sec | 1 d ago

Trump, Biden converge on Florida, a key battleground state

"President Joe Biden holding a simultaneous rallies in Florida this afternoon, the president touching on today's record economic growth in the third quarter. We're never going to lock down again. We lock down We understood the disease, and now we're open for business. And that's what former Vice President Biden on climate change. Guy doesn't understand much of anything. You've all see the impact more than most devastating hurricanes lay waste. The whole community's economic toll is astounding. The president, speaking in Tampa Biden outside Fort Lauderdale,

Joe Biden President Trump Vice President Fort Lauderdale Florida Tampa
Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:35 sec | 47 min ago

Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"Kamala Harris bashed President Trump during a rally of the University of Houston. Local and state Democrats holding a private event for college students on campus. Houston is her last stop in the Lone Star State after Fort Worth and Macallan. Here's what she had to say. When she was talking about climate change till understands the seriousness of this crisis. On the other hand, You have down Trump. She went on to say that President Trump doesn't believe in science. Local trump supporters responding, they paraded through Memorial Park, waving signs and trump 2020 banners, Love Trump, and we want him to win and we're so excited to.

President Trump Donald Trump Kamala Harris University Of Houston Houston Fort Worth Memorial Park
Climate change puts hundreds of Superfund sites at risk

Climate Cast

04:09 min | 1 d ago

Climate change puts hundreds of Superfund sites at risk

"Hundreds of toxic superfund sites are vulnerable to extreme weather. I'M NPR chief meteorologist Paul Kutner here with climate cast. Hurricane, Harvey Dump Forty five to sixty inches of rain on the Houston area in two thousand seventeen the extreme floodwaters inundated more than one hundred and fifty thousand homes. They also breached toxic superfund site washing deadly chemicals down. In concentrations more than two thousand times. The EPA required cleanup level according to inside climate news. Just. How many of these superfund sites are risk and exposed to these extreme weather events? Frank Coal Ash is the climate director at the Minnesota Pollution? Control Agency. Frank Welcome to climate cast. Hi, Paul Thank you for having me on today the Government Accountability Office reported last year that nine hundred, forty, five superfund sites across the US are vulnerable to hurricanes flooding, sea level rise increased precipitation or wildfires. I see fourteen of those are in Minnesota. What is it about the location of these toxic sites that makes them does too extreme weather events. What we know with a changing climate in Minnesota is that we are seeing heavier rainfall which presents a risk for flooding at some of these sites and the impacts to both surface waters near the sites and potentially groundwater near these sites which we are. Managing and controlling for the toxic chemicals that have been found there. So it's really within Minnesota and the way that our climate is changing is looking at how that precipitation regime is changing, and we've seen that in the mid West here in Nebraska in twenty eighteen, there was a superfund site there that was impacted by the massive flooding. It didn't leach any toxins, but I'm wondering has Minnesota seen any close calls like that? I'm not aware of any close calls that we've seen regarding specific flooding events in Minnesota but certainly, that risk exists anytime that we are seeing a changing climate like we have in that, we're trying to manage sites that have these toxic chemicals on them from past pollution events that we're trying to maintain keep people protected from especially our most vulnerable populations, and we know that one of the biggest climate changes were observing recording in Minnesota are these mega rainfall events these six to eight plus in Sch- rainfall events how is that being incorporated into your? Planning for these sites yes, and that is the kind of work that we're just really getting started with looking at our ability to understand what's going to happen with a rainfall like that and and is the water going to go and where are we at risk for a significant floods? How will that rainfall interact with any of the protective coverings or protections that have been built around the superfund sites and how that may impact the contaminants as they they are moving on the site, and hopefully we're able to keep them from moving away from her saying. Frank superfund sites were talking about clean up. After the fact, I'm curious how climate change can be taken into account before potentially hazardous developments break ground. Yes, and that is an area that we're particularly looking at right now we are providing funding to cities to be able to do climate resiliency and adaptation plans to be able to identify how the rainfall and precipitation flooding events are going to impact not just contamination contaminated sites but the infrastructure that we rely upon many people are concerned about potential pollution from mining projects in northern. MINNESOTA, in sensitive areas like the boundary waters, how can we be sure future extreme rainfall events won't breach containment of those proposed sites. We we continue to look at the best science and the best research about how we can we predict what these large rainfall events are going to look like, and then build that into the planning processes our permitting processes, frank coal, ash climate director for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. Thanks so much. Thank you.

Minnesota Frank Superfund Minnesota Pollution Control Ag Sch- Rainfall Paul Kutner Frank Coal Ash Hurricane Director NPR Frank Chief Meteorologist EPA Houston Harvey Dump Control Agency United States
Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

01:06 min | 49 min ago

Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"With minor cuts and scrapes to his arm. Thea other shot in the face in the world is now large inside of his skull. Ferguson said The officers did not even make contact with the suspected shooter before the shooting happened. Reporter Amanda Roberts of Fox agent Moreland says the suspect was arrested with the help of local residents. The final weekend of campaigning is upon US President Trump holding rallies in Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota Friday. Attendance at the Minnesota event limited to just 250 people. Officials, worried about the Corona virus president said it was political Democrat governor tried to shut down our rally. Silence the people of Minnesota and take away your freedom. And your rights. Thousands of people who couldn't get into the airport grounds gathered outside of it. State says the campaign didn't file a virus mitigation plan for the event. The president has 14 rallies over the next three days, four Saturday in Pennsylvania. Joe Biden with his most ambitious day of the campaign, visiting three states on Friday, telling a drive up rally in Milwaukee. A vote for him is a vote for the environment. Combating climate change means saving the planet, protecting her health and creating millions of good paying jobs. Union job. Mr Biden will be joined by former President Obama had a drive up event Saturday in Michigan just days before the election. The latest Fox News poll says the Biden lead in the presidential race. Has narrowed to just a points. America is listening to.

President Trump Joe Biden Minnesota Michigan Fox News Ferguson United States Amanda Roberts Reporter Milwaukee Donald Trump America Barack Obama Moreland Pennsylvania Wisconsin
Deliberative Mini-publics: Involving Citizens in the Democratic Process

Science Magazine Podcast

06:50 min | 1 d ago

Deliberative Mini-publics: Involving Citizens in the Democratic Process

"We have news intern Kathleen O'Grady. She's here to talk about many publics a strategy for democracies to figure out tough policy problems. Hi, Kathleen High. These are sometimes called mini public citizen juries, deliberative democracy. What exactly are we talking about here? We are about buddies made up a randomly selected citizens. Deliberate, very controlled conditions answering often very constrained questions and who at the end of the process produce a set of recommendations there different kinds of buddies. They're really big ones that take a long time. There are these small ones that just meet for a weekend but the crucial ingredient really is that the citizens of randomly selected rather than self selected what need are these deliberative bodies filling the point that a lot of. People indicate as a real sea change recently was in Ireland after the financial crisis when there was a catastrophic collapse trusting government and one of the responses to this was a promise to institute as citizens. Body, that would deliberate on various crucial questions in Ireland at the time and produce recommendations, and they've been a couple in Ireland now and they've been incredible success quite a few people point to the success in Ireland. As. An indication that these bodies are very useful in the political moment that we find ourselves and where there's incredible polarization, there's lots of trusting government. So. That's really the need that they're trying to deal with when I hear about small groups deliberating big policy questions I, want to know a few important. Thanks how're the members chosen who picks basically the curriculum that they're subjected to and what happens with the results? Can you walk us through some examples? Sure. So use the UK, Climate Assembly because that's the example that I know best thirty, thousand letters were sent out to randomly chosen postcards and people were invited to rsvp saying whether they could make Birmingham for the weekends that had been selected for the assembly about seventeen hundred people responded saying that they could make it. We start out with random selection and then there is an unavoidable layer of self selection, right? Yeah. Strong people into being in a room. They don't want to be in and then random selection comes in a gain where there's an algorithm that takes these people who've responded positively, and it strips that down to the core group of just one hundred and ten people who are stratified to reflect the UK wide population on a number of different. Characteristics. So now that you have your body, how do you choose what to have them talk about listen to in this case, there were so many different bodies involved you parliament commissioned the assembly, and then they put the question of WHO's going to run the assembly out to competitive tender a charity won the contract to run it, and then the charity instituted a panel of experts, coup selected speakers but then there selection was put tear another panel. It was the first round of deliberation really on who should be providing evidence. Now, you have your people and your curriculum. The first thing that happened here was that they listen to academics explaining the very basics. What is the greenhouse effect? What are the consequences of climate change after they've kind of got the basics in place they hear on specific topics from experts and interest groups whose opinions are clearly labeled as opinions. The assembly was divided into three different tracks. So one track was looking at transport, for instance, in another track with looking at eating in home energy. And within those tracks, they split into small groups where they would deliberate on questions that they wanted to US policies that they wanted to introduce. There was some kind of template policies that they were given to vote on, but they also request changes to use the policies that were suggested to them, and then at the end of that, they had a blind voting process. One of the big concerns that we have right now with politics is how polarized people are, how do they keep that out of this and make it like a com- space for making decisions one of the best descriptions of it that I've heard is it's like couples counseling for Democracy. What happens is that within these small group settings, there are very strict rules for civility only one person speaking at a time being polite and calm at all times giving other people space to other abuse even if they disagree with them, backing up your opinions with reasons and facts. And there's a great deal of space made for instance, in asking questions at the experts where people who are not comfortable standing up and asking their question in front of a room of one hundred people can write down the question and have it asked for them. Each table has its own facilitator guiding participants through the civility rules and at the end of it, you have these. Comments from the participants about how much they felt that their voices were heard how much they felt that they were respected. It's really kind of difficult to imagine when you're spending time in the political climate that rules spending time in, but it does seem to work. Yeah. Reading some of the descriptions of the way people felt about participating in about all getting on board and kind of this magic of cheering facts and forming logical conclusions from them and being satisfied with how things went. Basically, it's like summer camp less data and politics and it's somehow uplifting. That's a great description I. think that works really well, the other comparison that kept coming to mind for me was the great British baking show. So they go every weekend it's the verse population that's rarely is representative of the country and they go into the situation where the norms dictate kindness camaraderie helpfulness. And they produce something beautiful, and in this case, it's climate policy rather than take what happened with the results will happen with the policy decisions recommendations that they made. Some of them were quite creative. One that I particularly loved that an assembly members suggested was the idea that the government should be producing information on our success, a climate policy the way they're producing information on our stats, a website that you can go to see what our emissions look like and how that compares to Nineteen Ninety and what's happening to bring them down. There were also suggestions to have carbon footprint labelling on food an a very high level of support for bringing public transit back into public ownership in the UK where it's largely privatized and where this has been kind of political football for a while. So in many cases, the policies themselves are not necessarily that astonishing, but it's a gauge of the trade offs that members of the public prepared to make what people are prepared to do to achieve those policies and what level of support there is among a very informed subset of the public. That's really particularly interesting

Ireland UK Kathleen O'grady Climate Assembly Kathleen High Intern Nineteen Ninety Birmingham United States Football Representative
Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

00:57 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

"A great deal of work to exercise. What damage has been done today. I was looking at the Drudge Report and Bruce Springsteen says, We need to exercise this country exercises I'm thinking, gosh, what a great choice of words. Of course, it was anti Trump stuff, but still Still We are at an important crossroads. In our history. Right now we have been witness to a strategy of creative destruction that is served to benefit the dark sin, Archy. You know, this reminds me of I remember Michael Crichton. Michael Crichton, author of You Know Westworld. He wrote Westworld World Jurassic Park, Feet of Fear. He was doing a speech on state of fear. He was talking about Ukraine. He was talking about Chernobyl he was talking about How Ukrainians were terrified. Of what happened at Chernobyl. They were told that they were going to die. They were told We were gonna have kids or told all kinds of things. This is what he said when he was having was speaking at an engagement about the environment, about environment protection and about being involved in environment. This is this is the speech that got into a lot of trouble. A lot of hot water with climate change people. This is what he said, is an amazing thing. Listen, what he had to say. Thousands of Ukrainians who didn't die were made invalid, out of.

Ukraine Michael Crichton Bruce Springsteen Archy
Over 4,300 Doctors and Nurses Sign a Letter to Patients on Climate Change

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:41 sec | 1 d ago

Over 4,300 Doctors and Nurses Sign a Letter to Patients on Climate Change

"This week more than forty three, hundred health experts from Colorado. In all fifty states published an open letter urging people to demand that elected leaders act on the Climate Crisis Sabrina. Pasha. With healthy air and Water Colorado says, healthcare workers are seeing the damage firsthand and points to research showing that women of color are bearing the brunt of negative reproductive health impacts linked to climate change because they're so disproportionately exposed to poor air quality and higher temperatures. These women are experiencing lower birth weights, more stillbirths and more premature birth. When the topic of climate change comes up most Americans. Think about melting glaciers and polar bears. They don't see it as a health

Colorado
Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

C-SPAN Programming

00:56 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "climate change" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

"The rest of us have to vote to ensure the full promise of this country. Everyone and finally we had to both meet challenges. The climate crisis. The West is on fire, losing more forest and our land in Connecticut and rode on combined Midwest is flooding in Minnesota. Extreme weather occurs encouraged big cost bring infrastructure increased flooded in. Mississippi Watershed has shut down port facilities here it and stay Paul Donald Trump is a hoax. He's just he sure is a stable genius. He says. Win power causes cancer, I say crazy jobs Minnesota job's way Combined, We go back climate change with American ingenuity, Manufacturing building, more resilient nation created millions of new high paying jobs. We could change the path wrong. Nothing is beyond our capacity. So, hawk your heart You want American elite again?.

Paul Donald Trump Minnesota Midwest Mississippi Connecticut
Trump's achievements in the Middle East

Between The Lines

08:58 min | 2 d ago

Trump's achievements in the Middle East

"Donald. Trump's foreign policy is all too often met with derision or simply chairmanship? Isn't it? The critics Maki's diplomacy and they pan the choice of son-in-law Jared Kushner as a Middle East envoy. However just dies away from the US presidential election. Trump has had a few certifiable victories to put in his closing advertising pitch to the American people. I'm of course referring to the peace deals between Israel and Bahrain the United Arab Emirates and Sudan these have been brokered by the trump administration well to tell us more about the significance of these Abraham. Cords. For the Prophet of Jews, Christians and Muslims alike. Let's tune to Greg. Sheridan, he's foreign editor of the Australian Gregg welcome back to the show. Glad to be with your. Greg, your assessment of trump foreign policy generally. Well I think. The media has done generally around the world agree poor job on analyzing trump because themselves have become. So polarized there the all against trump or a small minority of the mural for trump whereas I trump has had some wins and some losses. stylistically he's been very unorthodox and at times on counterproductive but you can look back inside that what trump has been a bath is being creating leverage. The United States in K. relationships is put tariffs on China, and that gives him something to negotiate with Jonah He's put sanctions on Iran that. Gives him something that Iran wants to get rid of an in every relationship? He's got leverage for the United States. Now I think he's done a lot of specific things that have actually been quite good. You can certainly criticize the way he talks about alliances, but it these actions rather than his words quite a lot of the things he's done have been very successful especially in Asia and the Middle East is increased the US military budget more than any other president and American allies. Niger very happy about that the allies in Asia. Have Been Critical of China and most inclined to stand up against Jonah namely Japan India Vietnam Singapore Australia a couple of Damon our full hours course I very good relationship with trump role. Bilaterally, a lot of his relationships been very successful India and Australia. His administration has built the quotes the quadrilateral security dialogue. He has recognized the nature of the Chinese threat to the international system and do American interests better than any other president. Andy's moved the debate along at the same time. There's been a lot of chaos in his administration, the White folks terrible but I think he's had some real wins and I think he's done very well in the Middle East. Okay. We're talking about the Middle East You have argued in the astride newspapers I amount to a major step forward in the pace there why these Arab states altering their relations with Israel is it because of the mutual fee of Iran or is it because the US has leaned on the Motley? Well it's by the size I think Tom plus some other factors as well, but you've just got to pause. And model at the size of trump's achievement in and. To even out of these words, probably you know get you sort of condemned by all international relax plots society at. A. O. Over knocks the of international relations would would excommunicate you for saying it. But you know Israel has five peace treaties with Arab nations. Three of them have come under Donald Trump. He has said we back Israel one hundred percent is move the embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem tremendous symbolic sign of his commitment to Israel. But he has said we all sat back the security of the Gulf Arab states and are opposed to Iran and we kind to put sanctions on it. We think the nuclear deal when far enough now, the Gulf Arab states all agree with trump about Iran. But also items cells to some extent lost interest in the Palestinian cause. They're certainly not going to allow Palestinian view of Israel to be a roadblock. Now, they say Israel is a very good security Patna and they are encouraged by the US administration to might place with Israel if you just change in your ABC's ready national with me Tom Switzer my guest is Greg Sheridan foreign editor of the Australian. Now Greg you've been one of Australia's leading defenders of Middle East policy for decades. Trump came to power on an America I strategic. He's goal a piece to be to reduce significantly America's military role in the Middle East. We just talked about this grand aimed Iranian coalition that can contain tyron wants the Americans have gone given that America is now energy independent moralists isn't this retrenchment from the middle. East if trump is reelected, isn't that a good thing? Well. I think. It's makes Grill Tom. I think it is probably a good thing. The thing tonight is about trump is that on the whole he has implemented a lot of his foreign policy promises. If you put trump's record on the Middle East, all together it's pretty impressive. The US defeated Isis and he's decided that the Iranian. Nuclear deal is a very bad deal. I agree with him about that because it recognizes the legitimacy of Iran's nuclear industry allows enrichment of uranium a whole lot of other things and then allows in a very short period of time I'm sales to rent said trump said that's completely unacceptable. He wants a new and much better they'll, and in the meantime he's applying sanctions to Iran. has significantly diminished Iran's ability to cause mayhem in the region but that brings me to the point about what happens if Joe Biden is elected knicks wiggle the polls. Many of the pundits the betty markets point to a Democratic victory next week if a bottom administration comes to POW, Greg dozen that increase the chances of everything you've just been saying being wound back, I? Mean wouldn't Baden for example. Revert to the Obama nuclear deal with Iran. Well Eight. That's what he says he'll do allow. Kind of the problem. So the final point from the past there is that trump is not engaged in any new military adventures whereas even Bama engaged in the regime change in Libya which had absolutely eleven offers consequences now, Baden. It's very unclear. What kind of Administration Baden will provide his advisors at the moment seemed to be dominated by retreads from the second, I. Bob. Administration Susan Rice and Ben Rides. But then his party has moved along why for an elect- with Anastazia. Cortes and Bernie Sanders and the influence of the crew he says he's going to make climate change the center of all of his foreign policy I think. He may repeat a mistake of trump's, which is simply to try to undo everything his predecessor is done whereas trump has left Baden assuming button does win trump was left on a lot of leverage tramples. Authorized the elimination of the commander of the Iranian could force SOMAINI and. The, Iranians, like everyone else are scared of trump and they're. Constrained by not knowing what he's going to do even though he hasn't done any major military intervention, I don't think I've boughten will WANNA put more troops back into the Middle East or anything like that. The story of the last ten or twelve years really has been Americans will will say trying to get out of the Middle East and finding it very, very difficult to do so but Baden would be. Tremendously mistaken if he didn't try to capitalize on the successes, trump might I certainly don't think he's GonNa WanNa Talk Sudan or by Ryan will will the United Arab Emirates? Out of normalization with Israel, but will is administration base smart enough to keep it going with other Gulf states in trump was saying the other day that he thinks Saudi. Arabia can might place. With Israel, we'll that would been shattering. That would be I don't tectonic shift in the Middle East and Baden if he's smart or his administration as. Will keep going down that road and then God bless them. They can get all the accolades for forever success they won't themselves. But if they get back to the Paragon the John Kerry paradigm, you've gotTa somehow miraculously solve the Palestinian problem before we can do anything else Well, I think it could be much less effective than trump.

Donald. Trump Middle East Iran Israel United States Baden United Arab Emirates Greg Greg Sheridan Sudan Administration Baden Tom Switzer Jared Kushner President Trump Australia China Editor Maki
Election Science Stakes: Climate

60-Second Science

04:13 min | 2 d ago

Election Science Stakes: Climate

"This installment of our pre election podcast series I spoke to the Thompson. She's a scientific American associate editor covering issues in sustainability and the environment with an emphasis on climate. I think there's probably a pretty clear difference between the contestants in this election regarding climate science. Yeah. There definitely is president trump has called into question a lot of You know well established climate science. He has denigrated the federal government's own national climate assessments as well as the work put out for years by the Intergovernmental Panel on climate change which are sort of the. The two documents that really bring together and summarize and synthesize all of climate research that's being done whereas former vice president Biden has made it clear on that he understands and respects climate science and that he thinks that climate change is a really existential threat and specifics. So one of the key things that president trump did was last year he put in a request to. Remove the United States from the Paris climate agreement which is the global agreement to for countries to gradually reduce Sarah greenhouse gas emissions. If Biden wins, he has said, he will immediately bring us back into that agreement. The national climate assessment that I needed to earlier that comes out every four years mandated by Congress. There's multiple federal agencies that put that together and the last one that came out came out during the trump administration, and it was very different from the one that came out during the Obama Administration, the trump administration it out very quietly. To minimize attention to it. So now we're at the prosper at the beginning of the process for the next one. But I think it would be pretty clear that Biden administration would reprioritize that report whereas trump administration could be expected to affect what science gets included in it and what conclusions are and how those are communicated and the reason that's such an important document is because. It sort of synthesizes all of this climate information about the changes we have observed and expect in the future across the whole United States and that's really valuable information for state and local governments to have as they try to figure out how to respond to climate threats today, and also plan for them in the future because it's not you know information, you can necessarily get on your own if you're a city government So that's kind of the resource that cities and states can use. So it's really critically important document. What about the scientists themselves? And how they have been either supported or interfered with yeah. Not that's one at various I think from agency to agency. I think in part because of where the trump administration sort of put its energies. So just like NASA, I think have seen probably a little less interference than others versus the Environmental Protection Agency which has been main focus of the trump administration to date and where they have done. Of rollbacks and sort of overruling of agency scientists in terms of rulemaking, and they've also changed some of the rulemaking to. Limit what science can actually be included in some of those regulations and rules processes. I think Noah, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration has probably been a little bit in the middle. They're still doing a lot of fair traditional climate work. They do a lot of work with satellites there. The main entity does our record keeping on weather and climate, and so they've been continuing that. Have Been. Some appointments to that agency very recently that has scientists and environmental concerned because the people appointed in the past have made statements Showing that they don't accept climate science, and so there's some concern you know and if there's a second trump administration that could undercut some of the science and scientists at Noah.

Donald Trump Biden National Oceanic Atmospheric A Environmental Protection Agenc Obama Administration United States President Trump Associate Editor Vice President Congress Noah Intergovernmental Panel Nasa Paris
Many Latino voters in Nevada are worried about the climate

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 d ago

Many Latino voters in Nevada are worried about the climate

"In Nevada, about twenty percent of voters are Latino and a growing number are deeply concerned about climate change. A recent poll found that almost half the states Latino voters say they were personally affected by climate change. In the last year, we look at it as not only amateur the environment we're also looking at ESA health aspect. Rudy Zamora's with Chiesa Nevada program of the League of Conservation voters. He says many Latinos know firsthand how rising temperatures can worsen other problems for example, care pollution. How does the climate change impact our communities health? How does that impact the way that our children are breeding? For Zamora the concern about air quality is personal about two years ago. His young son suffered a frightening asthma attack. It was so bad that his son went into respiratory failure and cardiac arrest. and. He says, his son is not the only one to have such severe problems. Many people in the community struggle with asthma. So, with the November elections approaching cheese Bene- VADA encourages Latinos to compare candidates positions on the environment and then vote. Climate is going to be one of the top priorities on why we go out and vote.

Rudy Zamora Asthma Nevada Chiesa Nevada League Of Conservation
Barrett confirmed as Supreme Court justice in partisan vote

AP News Radio

00:59 min | 4 d ago

Barrett confirmed as Supreme Court justice in partisan vote

"The Senate has approved the controversial nomination of judge Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court on a mostly party line vote the Republican majority in the Senate was able to power past objections from every Democrat the ETS are fifty two the Naser forty eight Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says it was their duty to confirm the president's pick one of the most brilliant admired and well qualified qualified nominees in our lifetime and says Democrats would have done the same thing if they were in power the judge is a conservative democratic Senate leader Chuck Schumer says it goes deeper than that on issues like abortion workers rights the affordable Care Act and climate change judge Barrett pulls far right views well outside the American mainstream and those views matter Amy Coney Barrett replaces the late liberal icon Ruth pater Ginsburg and becomes president trump's third justice on the nation's highest court Jackie Quinn Washington

Senate Amy Coney Barrett Us Supreme Court Mitch Mcconnell President Trump Chuck Schumer Ruth Pater Ginsburg Donald Trump Jackie Quinn Washington
Japan’s New Leader Sets Goal of Being Carbon Neutral by 2050

UN News

00:44 sec | 4 d ago

Japan’s New Leader Sets Goal of Being Carbon Neutral by 2050

"U N Secretary General Antonio Guiterrez has welcomed Japan's announcement that it would reduce carbon emissions to zero by twenty fifty as part of the global effort to slow the worldwide temperature rise and prevent the most damaging effects of climate change Mr. Tash said in a statement that the plan was a very significant positive development and that he had no doubt that Japan has all the. Necessary technological, financial and engineering tools to achieve net zero emissions by twenty fifty, and it would also use these to help developing countries do the same. The UN chief added that he looked forward to Japan. The world's third largest economy announcing policy measures in time for a you in summit on climate change that's to be held in Glasgow a year from now, the European Union has also pledged to be carbon neutral by twenty fifty.

Japan Secretary General Antonio Guit Mr. Tash UN European Union Glasgow
Senate to confirm Trump's Supreme Court nominee a week ahead of Election Day

Monocle 24: The Briefing

09:05 min | 4 d ago

Senate to confirm Trump's Supreme Court nominee a week ahead of Election Day

"Later today if you Senate majority leader Mitch, McConnell's predictions proved accurate the US Senate will vote to confirm amy coming Barrett to the US Supreme Court Bar will be the judge that the Republican Party has been able to put on the bench during President Donald Trump's term, and while she may not be the controversial of these herself her. Confirmation is the Republicans have breezily disregarded the convention which they invoked for years go to keep a barrack Obama nominee from even having confirmation hearings on joined with more on this by Christian mcnichols news editor and Claude Harrington associate professor of American politics at Montfort University. Claude first of all is this now actually a done deal is they the remotest chance at all Barrett doesn't get put on the bench? I think it's. All bots jail she seems to be there I. IT's. It's quite staggering to see how fast. The process can move when people actually wanted to unlike 'em time round as you mentioned just a moment ago. So yeah, I would say unnecess- some unanticipated and catastrophe she's had. Chris, the Republicans hypocrisy here is mildly staggering MRIs, of course, the same Republican Party that four years ago clutched polls and affected vipers at the very idea of even holding confirmation hearings for Merrick. Garland who Barack Obama wished to put on the court in the last year of his presidency they going to do this about a week out from a presidential election. But this isn't what justifies the trump thing in the as far as the Republican establishment is concerned absolutely I mean I think the issue is if you look at this from a purely political perspective taking out the the hypocrisy argument if you will Mitch McConnell and the Republicans in the Senate have achieved. What they wanted to achieve and they have, they have given people who voted for Donald Trump essentially what they wanted I think you can divide those who voted for Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen obviously into many different camps. But there were there were those who voted for trump himself. But then there were many who simply voted for a Republican with this in mind with the idea in minded, they would be able. Influence. The Supreme Court for decades to come remember as you said at the beginning Obama was denied I'm nominee that meant that there was a vacant spot open right when Donald trump was elected president, which was then filled and that in itself would have been a dramatic swing in the other direction. So we shouldn't forget that it was a very conservative Justice Antonin Scalia who had passed away or shortly before the two thousand sixteen. Election. So we have seen a dramatic shift in the court compared to what would have happened if Hillary Clinton had been elected president and so in that sense. Yes. From a purely political perspective, the Senate Mitch McConnell who is a traditional Republican was You could argue very much power political individual who was willing to stomach donald trump and some of his politics because he knew that this is what he would be able to achieve. At once amy conybeare. At ease confirmed, that will give the Supreme Court, a six three conservative majority. Now, that's not absolutely set in stone Supreme Court justices have been known to have minds of their own from time to time, but is it possible from distance to assess what difference that could make to American politics for as Chris quite rightly points out potentially decades ahead of us. Yes I think that that's absolutely not an overstatement to to to to say how significant this is. You know what they did. There would be an ideological. Conservative majority from this point on and. There's a couple of things I suppose one is. What it might mean in terms of what's coming before the court you know in the short to medium term I mean there are. Big issues coming down the road to do you know things on climate change on immigration and other major. Political stumbling blocks the one that's coming soon as I really am the one that's going to get the most attention for the moment is a vote on the for care act and that is coming before the courtroom, November and it's about rather than the the. Statute in its entirety is to be deemed unconstitutional or can can parts of it be on picked now? Komi Bats. Take on. This is going to be enormously important because if there is a possibility that's M obamacare in its entirety could be undermined and that's that's a fairly enormous moment. I think for the country not least when it's in the the grip ave, a public health crisis. Chris at the top of the show, we did play a quote by senator. McConnell which struck me as slightly all I don't know whether he misspoke or just found himself saying the quiet out loud. But he said a lot of what we've done over the last four years. We'll be undone sooner or later by the next election is that Mitch McConnell assuming or perhaps even hoping that trump gets beaten next Tuesday It wasn't interesting remark wasn't it? It's it's hard to say I think there might be a little bit of that in in his remarks you can read into it I do think more importantly though his comment related to what I was saying earlier I would argue that he is making this case almost a gloating case to say you can undo whenever you win whether it is in November as the polls suggest. Currently or not you can. You can undo much of what we did in the four years in electoral terms in legislative terms I should say, but you cannot undo what we've done on the court that will remain that will remain something that stays for a long period of time. The one thing I just wanted to say on that as well. I think it will be interesting with this conservative majority To really see how aggressively they go after that to to Mitch McConnell's point if you will things like the affordable care act they were passed by Congress if there is a Democratic president with Joe Joe Biden becoming president, they will have an opportunity to pass laws to to to change laws as well. Of course. So the question really will be to what extent this cord goes after laws declaring things. Versus giving Congress an opportunity to sort of legislate when it comes to things like healthcare as well. There were some interesting remarks I just add for Amy Coney Barrett on this in the past, he's talked about the idea of precedent the idea of who legislates when when you overturn precedent and she did have a little bit of a line to say she will own the overturn precedence. If there is still controversy in a certain issue. So if it is something that is divisive and it has not been decided if there is an overwhelming public support for something, she also believes that it's not the courts job to overturn it, and so that I think will be a key thing to watch going forward if we have say a democratic President Democratic majority but a conservative court. Claude if next Tuesday is a big win for the democratic. Party. As Senator Mitch McConnell appears to think it's going to be the not completely without options are there is the possibility as has been floated off expanding the Supreme Court but do you think a democratic administration would be willing to spend political capital doing that? Yes. It's interesting to see how the the the kind of the tightrope that Biden has been walking in his language on this topic and you know any mention of packing the court does. Bays alarm bells, I think in causes some concern people start talking about FDR on his efforts back in the day. I would say, maybe there might be an possibly needs to be a conversation about reforming court gets in its current. Is. Having become such a punishment killed body and it's certainly not what the framers set out to be, and the does probably you know some serious conversations that need to be had I suppose as one other point as well. Maybe just more. And immediately, is that the last male liberal on the court Stephen Prayer is the HVAC too. So. I. Mean He seems in relatively good shape put. It's quite likely that whoever is President the next four years, we'll have the opportunity to put. A new justice on the court. So that's just something to think about in terms of the balance clothes. Harrington Christian. Thank you both for joining

Senator Mitch Mcconnell Donald Trump President Trump Supreme Court Us Senate Barack Obama Republican Party Us Supreme Court Bar Amy Coney Barrett Claude Harrington Chris Joe Joe Biden Congress Justice Antonin Scalia Republican Establishment Hillary Clinton Amy Conybeare AMY Montfort University
Doin' Good by Grasses

In Defense of Plants Podcast

06:07 min | 5 d ago

Doin' Good by Grasses

"All new to me like the past five years of been. that. It's been my job as technician but it's been an education as well and you know doing the various projects and they're a really came to understand too that these grasses are also a lot of the food we eat. You know like corn is an Ghani. So. It would really fascinating and also you know how ecosystems that they dominate learning about the prairies system and the Tigris vary system here what it what it was and I just I didn't have that appreciation before it's it's kind of it's really sad to think about like most of its gone. But what's left is I feel I don't I? Feel like there's just something. So magical about like a remnant prairie especially like in the Midwest, I don't know if he's been to the Flint hills in Kansas unfortunately I haven't and I'm dying to get out there I recommend that even just for like a weekend trip or something it's just so cool I mean it's from song words like where the Buffalo Roam like literally you're standing on Kaban Hill and as far as you can see is just you know grasses and and Bison That's nice. You can hear it with the way you talk about it and it's something that You know when people get bitten by the quote unquote bug of sort of just prairie or grassland ecosystems even if it's not grasses at the focus, it isn't magical thing and then unfortunately you do have that realization like Oh God it's all gone practically but I still get chills when I walk into a remnant prairie I mean if you walk along an old railway or something like that you realize. What this is not fell to plow ever you know it's it's an amazing experience and it makes you appreciate it and I said this since I've moved here. It's almost like the lack of prairie and realize realization people have about what we've done to. It makes people more passionate about a and some of the most passionate botanist biologists, ecologists I know are grassland ecologist. You know these people that spend all their time trying to understand and even try to restore these ecosystems. Yeah. Some of the people that I work with like if I'm in the field collecting and stuff i. I. Tend to kind of go towards protected areas in state parks and such and most of the time people are so helpful and interested and passionate even if they don't know that much about grasses when they. Know when I asked them if they'd like to join a long or something there'd be just so into it. But yeah, I I wish more people in the general public kind of understood the importance of grasses and General I? mean. Sometimes when I tell people I, work on grasses, asking questions about their lawn. A. Yeah. Yeah. Speaking of we were talking before we started recording of. I get a lot of lawn care specialists trying to promote like net. You don't understand what the goal of this podcast is. A well. But it's cool that you dove into this and you found a passion for grasses and and you know whether you truly sort of start to understand them or not like it no matter where you are on that scale, you realize it's a world that you open up. So many doors of discovery and like you said, there's everything from the food we eat to the species that form the backbone of major ecosystems on this planet. You know this is a really important group of grasses and I mean I was embarrassed when he sent that email I started looking I, was like Oh Yeah I. Don't I don't pay enough attention to this and I looked up Andrew Guinea. I really need to because there's a lot of species that are really important things I know things I should probably know a bit better I mean this is a large group and it's really cool one to have fallen into which is a Yeah and they're also beautiful like bigly stem and little. Like this time a year. They're gorgeous and you know I'm really big into like native RV to. Especially, after reading Doug amies latest spoke earlier this year I've started kind of like a string, all my and family. Native but. But I you know even like in Missouri Illinois, you don't even have to try hard to find really gorgeous plants the other native here. Just you know we barely have to do with new yard like I planted a bunch of grass and little bluestone earlier this year is. That's really exciting and it is beautiful and it's something that I think needs to be demonstrated more. So Kudos for setting up sort of like an aesthetic. Gardner. I'm assuming you know and I don't i. wish I could really kind of think back to my early days of thinking about what a grassland would look like or would my perceptions are expectations of it were because it's never the case and its till this day when I get into different types of grasslands I'm always surprised that the structure the. Complexity and just the overall feel of what it's like to have different species of grass oftentimes within close proximity to each other and again, a lot of those are Andro Guinea. So what makes this group? So special I mean you mentioned there's a lot of them. Some of them are really important for crops in our society but there are also from an ecosystem standpoint really important. I mean, is that Kinda what the motivation of working with the Andrew Bogan e is because there's there's other graph groups out there. Yeah. at the Danforth Center you know the big mission there is to work to to feeding the world population with the effects of climate change, growing relations and stuff like that. So a lot of the work there is food focus, but I definitely come from a more conservation approach with that I'm just more passionate about it but. Yes. So these grasses you know there's the big four in various here so that it makes up three of those switch grass dean grasp wisdom. The pretty dominant. Yeah and their mode of photosynthesis while SOC- for really efficient and fixing carbon emissions and the water efficiency

Technician Andrew Guinea Midwest Doug Amies Andro Guinea Danforth Center Andrew Bogan Kansas Flint Hills Kaban Hill RV Missouri Illinois Gardner
Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:42 min | 5 d ago

Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

"A lot at Thursday's debate. There was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the have a transition from their own industry? Yes. It is a big statement, President Trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe Biden is campaigning on a plan for Net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. NPR's Jeff Brady has more on his $2 trillion proposal. Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy is big and complex as the United States, but even those connected to fossil fuel industry say it may be doable. Scott Siegal with the energy focused law firm. Bracewell says the plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future. One thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resource is to achieve these objectives, which I think most people in business, believe me. Are going to be the future anyway. The country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants, about a third by 2030. Even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule. David Doniger is with NRDC Action Fund, The political arm of the natural resource is defense counsel. The power sector is already undergoing changes that have reduced their emissions by more than 30% 10 years ahead of the target that the Obama administration thought was aggressive. In 2015, a big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry. Coal fired power plants continue to go out of business, replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the bite and climate plan faces significant hurdles. It relies on technologies that haven't been developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes $400 billion over a decade for research. With the economic hit from the Corona virus pandemic. Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer. It includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman, with the bite and campaign says the plan also focuses on environmental justice. 40% of the benefit of those investments go to community, the color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the effects of climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists. While Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal, it is popular, especially with the left wing of his party. Jenny Marino, Zimmer with 3 50 actions as this's thie strongest plan yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of fossil fuels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over Of course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer timeline for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and carbon capture. Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy Labatt Tufts University and says overall, this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things. But the difference between listing things and implementing those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need a Democratic Congress willing to pass laws and allocate money

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Amy Myers Jaffe Jeff Brady NPR Scott Siegal United States Bracewell Steph Feldman President Trump Nrdc Action Fund Labatt Tufts University David Doniger Congress
Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 5 d ago

Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

"At Thursday's debate, there was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the? Transition from oil minister yes. I was trying to. It is a big statement president trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe. Biden is campaigning on a plan for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by twenty fifty and peers. Jeff Brady has more on his two trillion dollar proposal Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy as big and complex as the United States but even those connected to fossil fuel industry. Say it. May Be Doable Scott Siegel with the energy focused law firm Bracewell says plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future one thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resources to achieve these objectives which I think most people in business believe are going to be. The future anyway, the country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama Administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants about a third by twenty thirty even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule David. Doniger. IS WITH NRDC Action Fund the political arm of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the power sector is already undergoing. Changes have reduced their emissions by more than thirty percent ten years ahead of the target that the Obama Administration thought was aggressive in two thousand fifteen. A big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry coal fired power plants continue to go out of business replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the Biden, climate plan faces significant hurdles it relies on technologies that haven't been. Developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes four hundred billion dollars over a decade for research with the economic hit from the coronavirus pandemic Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer it includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman with the Biden campaign says, the plan also focuses on environmental justice forty percent. Of the benefits of those investments, go to communities of color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the exit climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists while Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal. It is popular especially with the left wing of his party Jenny Marino Zimmer with three fifty actions as this is the strongest plan. Yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of also feels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over the course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer time line for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and. Carbon Capture Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy lab at Tufts University and says, all this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things but the difference between listing things and getting those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need democratic congress willing to pass laws and allocate money to make his plan a reality. Jeff Brady NPR

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Jeff Brady Jeff Brady Npr Amy Myers Jaffe Natural Resources Defense Coun Nrdc Action Fund Jenny Marino Zimmer United States President Trump Scott Siegel Congress Steph Feldman Bracewell
Business is booming for plastic companies as demand for plexiglass surges

The Daily Dive

09:20 min | 5 d ago

Business is booming for plastic companies as demand for plexiglass surges

"One of the interesting things about the coronavirus pandemic is that it sparked a need for more plastic demand for everything from facials, gloves, takeaway food containers, and even bubble wrap for online shopping has gone up and with that demand is severely set back the effort to recycle this happening is big oil companies are investing hundreds of billions of dollars to create new plastic and companies that have made pledges to use more recyclable materials are even in a tough spot as new plastics are far cheaper than using recycled plastic for more on how the pandemic has accelerated the trend of creating more and not less plastic trash. We'll speak to Joe Brock special correspondent at Reuters. Before the pandemic, we had a plastic crisis and I think that there is an awareness about that. It's killing marine life. It's it's leaking toxins into drinking water in some of the world's poorest countries. Then the pandemic hits and we have this flood of new plastic containers from three takeaway. Bubble wrap because more people ordering in as they were stuck in lockdowns as well as the the lifesaving PPA, the mosques and the gowns and the bodybags, which is understandable but also you have this double whammy. Plastic recyclers are suffering like every other industry under an economic meltdown and they are unable to recycle the plastic and the price of oil from which plastic is made drops dramatically, and that means that new plastic becomes very cheap and we cyclist cannot compete with that new plastic. So you've got this sous Nami new plastic arriving on the scene we site closed. Struggling, and so this dynamic can only lead to more plastic waste. I. Think that's a very important thing that a lot of people don't realize or they forget right away as that plastic really comes from fossil fuels, oils and and petrochemicals, and as you were mentioning, you know to make new plastics these single use plastics. It's so much cheaper now than using recyclables. Companies that have pledged to use more recyclable materials in their packaging and whatnot, but they just can't keep up you know new plastics just cheaper for their business models and all of this can become a driver of climate change. Correct and I think this is something which has been overlooked toll misunderstood during the climate change debate not only plastic made from fossil fuels oil derived products and gas issues. A growing area for struggling oil and gas companies. People are driving more electric cars than moving to cleaner fuel. These oil and gas giants need to use up this oversupply of shale gas. In the US they've got dwindling opportunities to use this one area they put into is making new plastic for the developing world where there's a rising middle class in parts of Asia and Africa. The problem comes that these are the places who are feeling the plastics crisis the worst. So as oil and gas company suspending about four hundred, billion dollars to increase production of plastics to use up cheap oil and gas. These countries have no way of processing dot plastic. So with already a waste crisis, more supply coming online no way to deal with it what do you think's going to happen? And the oil and gas industry are planning to spend about four hundred, billion dollars over the next five years on new plans to make the raw materials or these new plastics virgin plastics as they're called through Reuters surveyed twelve of the largest oil and chemical firms around the world to see what they're doing about this waste. Really they're just spending a fraction of the money that they're making on sales to devote to working on waste. So you've got campaign groups on you know some politicians in some government sank the oil and gas industry we KINDA. Coat. We need to reduce plastic production and what the oil and gas industry saying his. Don't worry we've got this covered we've got a solution we are investing in recycling infrastructure. We are helping poor countries to deal with their waste, and that's where I'll story really came from. We wanted to check that claim on what we found was the pledges made by the oil and gas industry are fraction of best spending on increasing plastic production, and they will have minimal impact on reducing plastic waste. So I think that that's a key point I understand because as the oil and gas companies tell you that they are fixing plastic waste crisis. It's important to interrogate those figures and I think that's what we've thoughtfully achieve with the story. I wanted to talk a little bit more of the effects of the pandemic. As we said in the beginning, you know face masks gowns, the P.. P. That we need to protect ourselves. That's also a big thing that's going to be feeling a lot of the waste you mentioned in your article China US twelve times more face masks than they did in earlier months in the United States, they generated entire years worth of medical wastes in two months at the height of the pandemic. So this is a lot of stuff that we're going to be seeing. The effects are going to be with us for some time. Yeah I think that's right I. think that's where it's worth separating the issue here. I don't think anyone is saying that plastic is not an incredible material with multiple uses and that it helped industrial organizations to make planes lighter may cause lights I think the issue here is single use plastic on the fear is this pandemic will exacerbate that trend of single use plastic. So although people might need mosques a need gowns and these are essentials if companies were to take this opportunity to increase the use of plastic single use plastic, then it's GonNa add to the waste problem and that's something we've seen with oil and gas lobbies who since the pandemic is hit. Written to lawmakers in the US to say that single use plastic is safer than other materials. Now, scientists have found that that's not the case. So you have to question whether the plus the pandemic is being used by certain vested interest companies that they want to capitalize on this to increase their profits. I think when a lot of people think about plastic waste and the huge problem, they definitely think about our oceans plastics make up about eighty percent of the marine debris and we've seen the big problems. We've seen the Great Pacific Garbage Patch you know which is just a bunch of plastic and netting and things like that. So I think a lot of people are really focused on that when they hear about plastic problem, but I mean it's really ranges all over the place. Yeah absolutely, and I think this is a problem which affects everyone. It affects humanity and I think that you see you see it in the oceans and certainly in parts of Southeast Asia, which is considered one of the biggest toy destinations in the world of Pristine Beaches Turquoise Asians you've got these waterways completely clogged with plastic fishing communities devastated where they live to be a risk as you mentioned, each plastics in the Pacific and elsewhere, but it's not just in the ocean it's clogging up rivers. It's affecting communities where they rely on food supplies where plastic waste is. So you know this is an issue that impacts everybody and should be an issue which everyone wants to help fix. We talked a little bit about the efforts from the oil and gas companies to limit plastic waste. But one thing that I did not know I found very interesting that the world's top three plastic polluters for two years running now are Coca Cola Nestle and Pepsi Pepsico. Obviously, they have a lot of plastic packaging. Their bottles are made the bottles that hold the soda in are made from plastic, and they're constantly setting goals to use more recyclable plastic in their products and not meeting those standards and it goes back to what we were saying at the beginning it's just cheaper to use new plastic than it is to use recycled stuff. Coke and Pepsi and Nestle and the other big consumer goods coming committees giving up a a consistent message they wanna fix this problem they want to use more recycled products but when it comes to meeting those targets that consistently Mitch the Knicks over decades and then they set new talk. Now, what they're saying is we don't get the recycled material. Now they cannot get the recycled material at the right price it cheaper to buy new plastics. Now, how you're GONNA get movies like material will you need a very advanced recycling system and that's what we're highlighting in this story the investment in that respect infrastructure is simply not there the oil and gas industries Coke Pepsi, they say they're investing in it, but then investing a fraction of what they're spending on advertising on new production. And this is a competitive industry when you go into the store and you look at the bottle of coke bottle of Pepsi bottle of another brand, the price of the packaging is significant in not product and you don't want your product to be increasing because you're using more recycled plastic. So the proof in the pudding we've seen that they've made these promises before and they've missed them. So I think we need to keep checking and keep saying they're gonNA meet those promises in the feature.

United States Reuters Lockdowns Joe Brock PPA Nami Southeast Asia Pepsi Knicks Asia Coca Cola Nestle Nestle China
How Trump And Biden Differ On Energy Policy

Environment: NPR

06:48 min | 6 d ago

How Trump And Biden Differ On Energy Policy

"We are now just over a week away from election day although we know millions of people have already voted. But in these final few weeks, we've been focusing on some of the policy differences between President Donald Trump and former vice president Joe Biden differences that might not be so easy to discern when they're buried in the middle of campaign rhetoric or debate jobs. Right now, we're going to focus on one revealing moment during last Thursday's presidential debate when the two candidates talked about energy specifically, how should the US get and use power in the future have a transition from their own minister yes? Oh. It is a big statement because I would stop why would you do that because the oil industry pollutes significantly here so let's dig into that a bit more what other two candidates competing visions for us energy policy going forward and what are the implications per workers and the environment to help us sort this out. We've called Dino Grandoni he reports on all this for the Washington Post with us now Dino Grandoni. Thank you so much for talking with us your. Thank you for having me on. So let me just start if we can with that clip that we just played there is a divide and how these to view the future of. US Energy. So when it comes to oil, where does each one stand? Yes. So the two candidates have laid out starkly different visions for what they would like to do with the oil industry and how they would like to transition away from fossil fuels or whether or not. They would want to even do that You saw a Democratic candidate Biden pledge to move away from oil in favor of renewable energy and predicted that that kind of move will generate millions of jobs president trump by contrast says that doing that would be costly and hurt the economy and in particular would hurt the oil producing states where both men are competing for votes. Well. You've recently written that president trump has very recently tried to rebrand himself as an environmentalist which would seem like a difficult sell when his administration has rolled back countless environmental regulations over the past four years and he continues to push for oil coal and gas. So what's his pitch? Yeah, and this is a man who has spent much of his life trying to rebrand himself during various business ventures. So He Over the past year has changed his position and a few different things he has promised to fund restoration of the Great Lakes when in the past White House had proposed cutting money to do that similar story with the everglades in Florida and He is endorsed this idea planting a trillion trees around the world in order to suck carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. President trump is going to have a hard time convincing the public that he is a more environmentally friendly candidate than Joe Biden, release candidate who cares more GONNA do more to solve climate change. His administration has spent the past four years rolling back literally dozens of anti-pollution another environmental rules and that kind of reputations probably baked into the public. At this point president trump has attacked for vice president Joe Biden for what trump a radical climate plant and we do have to say this has been described as by far. The most aggressive climate and energy platform that this country has ever seen from a major party candidate. So could you just just as briefly as you can describe what are some of the key elements? So what Joe Biden wants to do is eliminate US contributions to climate change by the middle of the century and on the way they're doing. So he wants to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector in particular power plants by twenty, thirty five, both of those are very aggressive timelines and like you're saying more. Aggressive than anything any other major party candidate has ever put forward. It's in fact more aggressive in some ways than what Bernie Sanders was saying back in two thousand sixteen. So let me ask you this though how does Biden respond to the argument? That's would cost this have tremendous adverse economic impact especially in states that are necessary to for him to win I, mean, how does he respond to that cost the loss of just thousands upon thousands of jobs? Well, he says that his climate plan is also a jobs. Plan that transitioning away from fossil fuels will create millions of jobs in itself to have to install solar panels, built wind turbines. But then also all all the different sort of retrofits that his plan calls for to homes and businesses to make buildings more energy efficient. He really thinks of this as an economic plan in addition to being a plan to stop climate change or headed off at least. Well, we knew though that president trump in contrast president trump has always kind of focused on that economic impact of. This country is kind of reliance on fossil fuels and back in two thousand sixteen many people may remember he promised to reopen coal mines and to bring back coal mining jobs has that happened no that has not happened and we've seen trump talk less and less about coal in the first two state of the Union addresses. He gave he talked a lot about clean call and saving jobs but he dropped those references in the last two state of the Union addresses and we've seen coal fired power plants continue. To Shudder and call nine continue to close down during his presidency not because of any government policy. Really. But experts say it's because of economic pressure Kohl's just gotten to expensive relative to natural gas and renewable 's and what about oil I. The idea that a move away from fossil fuels from reliance on fossil fuels is increasingly popular with the public. I mean, the polls make that clear but apart from that are the economics driving oil to face a similar fate, a colleague of yours reported last month, for example. That British Petroleum VP has come out publicly and said it is shrinking it's oil and gas business and investing in wind and solar. So are sort of economic imperatives or whatever public policy imperatives regardless of what president trump sort of perspective on this are they driving in that direction anyway. So during the pandemic at least in the short term, the oil industry has been hit particularly hard as people driving fly less. There's a lot less demand for oil and that has caused a lot of oil companies to have to. Lay off people and even have to declare bankruptcy in this country that said, there are some experts who do think that oil is going to go the way of coal right now, electric vehicles. There aren't that many being used relative to the entire auto market in the United States, but there's this expectation that adoption of electric vehicles is going to pick up and that's going to really eat into the petroleum business because most of the petroleum in this country is used towards transportation field towards the gas tank in your car. That is Dino Grandoni. He is an energy and environmental policy report with the Washington. Post Dina Grandoni thank you so much for talking to us. Thank you for having me

President Donald Trump Joe Biden President Trump Vice President United States Dino Grandoni Washington Post Dina Grandoni Bernie Sanders Great Lakes
Joe Biden calls climate change the ‘number one issue facing humanity’

Pod Save America

01:34 min | 6 d ago

Joe Biden calls climate change the ‘number one issue facing humanity’

"The debate Trump seemed to think he had a kind of got you a moment there at the end when you talked about transitioning away from oil and fossil fuels even though ending subject for those Industries very popular, and he really wishes you'd say you'd ban fracking even though you haven't but the same time you've set these ambitious climate goals as part of your plan and a lot of polling shows that climate change is the number one issue among young people particularly among young people deciding whether or not to vote. What is your message to those young people who are passionate about this issue, but skeptical that they can count on you or really long politician to actually deliver and take this issue with the urgency. It demands the number one issue facing Humanity. And it's a number one issue for me and all the way back in the eighties. I'm the first person ever ever to lay out the need for a deal with global warming and off and PolitiFact said check it out. It was a game-changer and but it's just the way in which this campaign had been run for the beginning about me in the primaries that it just never got traction. Look climate change is the existential threat to humanity the existential threat to humanity unchecked it is going to actually bake this plan is not this is not hyperbole. It's real and we have a moral obligation. There's not many things down and I work together a long time don't hear me often invoke a moral obligation. We have a moral obligation. Not just the young people we have moral obligation to

Donald Trump
'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

All Things Considered

02:21 min | Last week

'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

"Firefighters in Colorado are battling explosive wildfires at a time of year when things are normally quieter as NPR's Lauren summer reports, climate change is extending the fire season across the West. Mike Morgan is using the word unprecedented a lot this year, and that's after a 30 year career in fire. Fighting this year has just been unbelievable. We're just seeing fire girl just like we've never seen before. Morgan is director of the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control, the largest and now second largest fires recorded in state history are still burning. Normally in October. Cool, wet weather is tamping down the fire season. Most of our folks are usually trying to use up their vacation time to go hunting right now, and they're all out fighting fires. When Morgan started his career fires in Colorado's high elevation forest didn't spread much. The warming climate has helped change that. Unfortunately, none of this seems like a surprise. Jonah Pots of glue is a climate scientists at the University of California, Merced said. He says most of the West is in a drought right now, and hotter temperatures make it worse by drying out the vegetation even more. That's really sort of extending the fire season out and allowing fires to burn longer in places they don't typically burn this time of the year. It's sort of testing out what we sort of traditionally have thought of it in terms of fire season. Wildfires are also happening in places where they're not. Not comin like the damp forests of the Pacific Northwest. Erica Fleischman is a professor at Oregon State University. So historically, they've burned roughly every couple of 100 years. It takes really extreme conditions for those for us to burn because they are so wet this year conditions have been extreme. But even in years with a normal amount of precipitation, climate change can still extend the fire season. More rain falls instead of snow, which means a smaller snowpack that melts sooner, providing less run off through the spring and summer. All of that means that the same amount of water is not available to plants or soils for as long so that exacerbates the drought. And all of that is projected. Tio. Unfortunately, continue happening. Climate continues to change. Fleischman says The lesson is that communities need to prepare by clearing, flammable brush, improving houses and preparing evacuation plans. Because wildfires will keep

Jonah Pots Mike Morgan Erica Fleischman Colorado Colorado Division Of Fire Prev Lauren Summer Pacific Northwest NPR Oregon State University Merced University Of California Director Professor
Biden and Trump spar in final election debate.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

03:07 min | Last week

Biden and Trump spar in final election debate.

"Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, renewed his attacks on Donald Trump's handling of the corona virus pandemic at last night's final debate seeking to bolster his lead in opinion polls with just twelve days to go until the November third election the televised encounter from Nashville. Tennessee. Represented one of the Republican trump's last remaining opportunities to reshape a campaign dominated by a pandemic the disc- killed more than two hundred, twenty, one thousand people in the United States and devastated the. Anyone who's responsible for that many deaths should not remain president of the United States of America Biden said. Trump was far more restrained than at the first debate when he aggressively talked over Biden, defended his approach to the outbreak and claims the worst the pandemic was in the past showing no emotion or regret for the mounting death toll we're rounding the corner said trump who has played down the virus from months it's going away he said falsely. Opinion polls show most Americans disapprove of the president's response to the virus. Several US states including the election swing state of Ohio reported record day increases. In covid, nineteen infections on Thursday evidence. The pandemic is accelerating though trump trails former vice president biden significantly in national polls the contest is much tighter in some battleground states where the election will likely be decided. Trump was pressed on why Americans? Should support him if they're concerned about his comments on racial issues such as black lives matter I am the least racist person in this room trump insisted biden responded by saying trump was one of the most racist presidents we've had modern history. He pause fuel on every single racist fire Biden said noting trump started his two thousand sixteen campaign by attacking Mexicans as rapists. This guy is a dog. Whistle. About as big as a foghorn. Biden said Biden made a character based pitch for his candidacy saying he was anxious to see the results of the presidential election. The character of this country is on the ballot are character is on the ballot. Biden said relatively few voters have yet to make up their minds and trump's window to influence. The outcome may be closing a record forty seven. Million Americans have already cast ballots eclipsing total early voting from two thousand, sixteen election in the final minutes of the debate when the candidates were finally asked what they would do to address the climate crisis trump offered an alternate reality in his world fossil fuels clean and renewable power is problematic. His administration has cleaned up the Aaron water despite rolling back protections. Biden, presented a climate plan a sober. Of where humanity stands cooling climate change an existential threat that we will pass a point of no return for within eight years.

America Biden Donald Trump United States President Trump Tennessee Nashville Vice President Ohio
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

06:41 min | 4 months ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"The future, and also we not this APP that some of the staff is still saying that that got mets Martin. Work is my work and. Responsibility, so we have to work a lot with that idea. Do because it is A. And I think it happens with many would many topics I mean there's an expert of that topic. And why? Why do I have to border to start looking for information, understand the on to be very clear that that our role is a supportive role and now real clements modernisation eat is not made by a single person that knows everything and do the whole job. It is more like about be linked up these a along the whole staff. They will be able to manage tool to respond for climate change risk in their daily work because I'm not. The one who is doing they must important conservation work in India office so we. We are now like about how to deal with those are. and. We have come up with some strategies to that in that situation where someone says oh well, this is your role and responsibility and. You get Kinda dig, and maybe to a specific example with someone. Yes, I think this has to has to not with the about race. We mentioned at the beginning I mean. When you start like talk with people in terms that like make realized the Platinum smart approach is not very sophisticated that do not do not need to have a PhD. The made to read like fifteen papers. You don't need to I mean it's more like a thing of attitude than taking the right approach because this is a very. They had like no I'm not. I never meant to be as expert as you will. Because I have not invest seniors on knowing on these issues and I think the first thing to say is that is easy. Easy it's an easy thing and you are perfecting able to go that within within two months within six months. You have to do a lot of effort, but it is not like a rocket science fixing so democrats are wrong. Interpretation of we're expecting them to do at one important. Stay Up. We are working with marina and I think is very variable for a valuable for me to having heard in the in team. Is that I? Am very familiar with the concepts and with topics and for me. It's like come on. Why don't you understand? On Madonna told me now is not that easy. Perhaps we got. We have to find this way or this way and for me. I mean I do not consider myself. I'm expert. Look I'm not knowledgeable about the topic so for me now at this point is difficult to see why they don't get the. So Madina is helping a lot with that and to try to make things even simpler I mean if we want to be leaders in conservation, windy into red cadmus changes about leadership as annexation and. Technical staff were very good team. We have the. So Sean. We just heard from WWF offices on what they have done since the workshop in Nairobi. What do you mean takeaways from what we heard? Well first of all after listening to these four women. I am incredibly honored to have the opportunity to work with them and I'm really proud of what they're doing. Saving Nature is never been easy and climate changes making it that much more difficult. We've heard some of the challenges. They're facing and getting some of their colleagues on board, but they're not giving up shifting the paradigm of how we approach conservation is an enormous task and what's happening in some of the offices. Really gives me hope that WWF is moving in the right direction. So are there any common themes that emerged from these discussions that make you want to make some revisions to the process WWF is developing. Sure the one obstacle everyone ran into was using the red flag. Words words like preserve protect conserve as a way to identify where work is at the greatest risk to climate change, and we really wanted this to be a fairly simple exercises, a way to get people to question the viability of their conservation goals, and to rethink how they might make their goals more open ended inflexible, but a lot of people seem to think this was just a rather pointless exercise in semantics, so we're going to have to make some changes there to make sure that people understand why we're doing all this in the first place. But there's a mother takeaways as well I. Think we learned just how crucial support is from leadership without some kind of mandate from the top? This work is really hard to sustain, and we also heard the importance of not doing this alone. Almost all of our offices have just one single adaptation officer to try to get everyone else on board and I think one of the reasons why Mexico's been so successful is because they have a partnership, Nell and Madonna are working together and supporting each other and learning from one another. Another I think that's really important. And finally we heard from many of our staff. How much they appreciated the approach. WWF Mexico is taking. They didn't do long planning workshops. They didn't use a lot of heavy science upfront. They just had simple one our conversations with their colleagues to talk about what they're already seeing in their work, and how climate changes are affecting it so putting the conservation experts in the driver's seat and empowering them to use the knowledge already have a really powerful way to get. People started down this path. That's great. This whole process has been great I. It's been an honor for me to be part of it, but what's next, so we're going to take all this learning and I'm currently writing some guidance for our office to us, and we're going to keep learning from each other as we move forward. We're going to have regular calls like you heard from Melissa and our. Our colleagues earlier and we're going to have regular. CHECK INS to strengthen community of practice, and finally we really need to focus on what's happening with the national adaptation plans pending on how countries helped there. People adapt climate change. Naps can come yet another threat to conservation and by working with governments in the adaptation planning process. We're really hoping to create new opportunities for nature. Okay Sean so the journey of this podcast is almost over so any last final thoughts. While, the journey of the podcast is almost over, but the adaptation journey never ends I really hope your listeners whether they're working in conservation like music or an urban planning or some company, or really in any field enjoyed this episode and taken away some ideas that can use their own work and I really hope they'll share their experiences with you and your audience the only way we're going to adapt as you get out there and try stuff learn from our successes and mistakes.

WWF Sean Madonna mets Mexico clements India Martin Madina Melissa Nairobi officer Nell
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:13 min | 4 months ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"These elephants. Going to kill them, so you typically find that at the end of the day, the impacts of climate change that Uganda is facing will undo some of our conservation efforts. My name is cal. Don't cheat widening and I am currently the senior many John Climate Change Program in WWF South Africa. What are the changes in climate and weather in south? Africa that people are most concerned about 'em in South Africa. We are mostly concerned about the recent drought that has hit most of our Tell C. which is Cape Town. It took Queenie. Queenie, as when s parts of the Eastern Cape province, we even heard about that here. United States that Capetown was. There was even a potential date where you guys were going to run out of water and when you're dealing with a situation where humans aren't even to have access to water. How does that make your job more challenging when you're focuses on wildlife? Allah job is was made more challenging from the basic thick that I'm within the Arianne Capetown. saw a lot of people running out of water and the. Heavy set up various points web. People can come with. KITSON continues to collect water so from them. Basic human leads side as that. Something that is very real and serious and experiencing it through our stuff turnout way you would have a lot of people struggling with what especially those that are coming from townships. What townships! Mainly people that way you'll find a lot of black communities in that, and you'll find that they will have challenges coming to work because they didn't have water to really prepare themselves infra intact. Emily's so that is actually me. Norwick, quite difficult, but at the same time we also. Playing a role in terms of wicked close with this city to come up with measures to help this see to cope with the. Ambition that Kennedy experiencing 'em resulting from water shortages. Alright those fantastic I hope everyone learned what WWF. Offices around the world are going through what the varies climate change impacts that they're dealing with so Shaun. What's next so next? We're off to Nairobi Kenya to listen in on a three day workshop that we held in April you've learned about the climate change impact, some of our offices are facing and what we were. Were doing it. That workshop is to look to see if our offices are actually addressing those threats in their conservation strategies, and your listeners will find out what we learned there, and how we're developing a process to move forward and help offices really get a handle on how they're going to manage these threats going forward. Okay adapters pack your bags. We're going to Kanye I am here with John Martin the World.

WWF South Africa Queenie Cape Town Africa Uganda KITSON Capetown Emily Kenya Eastern Cape Arianne Capetown. Norwick Kanye United States John Martin Kennedy
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:54 min | 9 months ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Does that affect your work? Well I just want to center. That Katrina is a result of climate change and we are continually seeing the impact because over flooding is worst or rains or the extreme weather is worst. I and so I think what we're seeing now in. Our community is heightened stress response to even what does not seem and to be so significant or would not have been so significant in the past but when it rains people think there could be another flood and unfortunately they are increasingly more flood. So there's a part of that that is also very correct there was a list of mental disorders. PTSD associated with climate change. Do It seems like I'm sure you can appreciate mental. Disorders are underfunded. Feel there's maybe an opportunity going four Ford with climate change and making those links that people are really suffering from these issues because of climate change. Absolutely I think why people are suffering is not necessarily just the loss of the physical infrastructure. Usually these disasters become problems because people pull develop medical conditions physical and mental health conditions. And in all the disasters we've studied there is increase in trauma based disorders such as post traumatic stress disorder. Depression use of substances or substance. Use the sorcerer's alcohol being big one and just an increase in aggressive behaviors in particular and children. Children oftentimes don't have the language Wjr to tell you about how they feel so they show you and they show you with bad behavior.

Wjr Katrina PTSD Depression Ford
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

07:55 min | 9 months ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"City eighty can handle that level of water? So in addition to our drainage pumping stations. How are we building large? Scale Rain Gardens and detention basins and other places for that water to Akao. Okay so for Norlin. I'm from Florida. And there's a lot of resilience talk and there's chief resilient officers that a lot of cities are bringing on which I think is an an encouraging sign. But do you feel New Orleans. I when you talk about resilience. It's more about immediate response to natural disaster like hurricanes and such dis- Climate Change Enj- come up a lot in what you do absolutely and I would say that here. In New Orleans or resilience efforts really are rooted in our climate threats. Were thinking in the immediate. What are things we can do? That will help residents for the next storm. But we're also thinking how to our policies and how does our advocacy work as the city. Make sure sure that you know twenty years down the line we are making sure that residents are protected and that the city is able to thrive just as it is now okay in again with cities hiring people like you an encouraging sign but sometimes what's lacking is on the communication side. How is the city communicating to citizens about these issues? You're just out sort of planning for these things but I'm sure a lot of times you're encountering people why you're worried about one hundred years from now sea level rise. How does New Orleans do it? Do you guys Icefield. Is there a communication equivalent of you. That's a really great point and I think a challenge that New Orleans faces a lot of cities do is how do you balance kind one of the immediate concerns that residents have you know and it might be. How am I paying rent? Whereas my next meal coming from it could be something as fundamental as their basic needs with the fact that we need to be getting residents to think long term and we need them to start seeing themselves as coastal stakeholders and seeing them selves? As part of this changing landscape that unfortunately fortunately climate change is influencing one of the things that I think New Orleans does really well. Is that the resilience office chief. Resilience officer works very closely with the mayor's Mayor's Office of community and neighborhood engagement and that neighborhood engagement office has regular meetings with residents has strong relationships and so the resilience office can really be the subject matter experts and practitioners and then partner with the neighborhood engagement office to really translate that into something that's digestible testable. And get residents. Where they already are so we don't want to create new lines of communication? We really want to infuse this in places where residents are already getting their information or they already convene and and where they already are having dialogues. So I talked to different people from different coastal areas and everyone's got a different sea level. Rise number. What does the city of New Orleans kind a plan around? Is it three feet. Is it five. I know we kind of defer back to the IPC. I talked to someone in San Francisco. Just like what we're doing eight feet. What are you guys plan around well? It's tricky in the issues of sea. Level rise in Louisiana are are even harder to predict because we're also built on a natural delta and so the reason we're seeing some of the highest rates of sea level rise in the world is because our land is sinking the natural delta is thinking it's the levels are rising so I don't don't have an exact number for you but I can tell you that the state models kind of coastal land lost and how that could affect Louisiana and they're kind of tiered layers that we're looking at kind there's this average case scenario there's a worst case scenario where we do nothing and kind of how. How are we seeing sea level rise then at two best case scenario if we execute the state's coastal master-plan Sir planning full? What kind of land? Loss leader data do we see. Unfortunately there is no scenario at the state level where we lose Noland. Where we're building land in Louisiana Zhanna looks the exact same as it has forever? There's always going to be some areas that are succumb to sea level. Rise and our goal is really to make sure that we're building back. Land in places that are critical critical for the people and the communities the cultures that exist on the coast. Okay New Orleans is unique in that you probably have a very unusual like an unusually tight relationship with the Army Corps. Do you feel like your office. Communicates a lot with them. Because they're you know they're they're with levees protecting the city but are they integrating grading with your approach to resilience for the city. There's a number of entities that interact to make sure that the levee system is constructed that it's maintained that's operated and that the knowledge college that is being shared by practitioners gets to residents. And I would say that The resilience office in the mayor's office kind of fits in in that communication pathway so the Army Corps is working with local Levee district on all of the technical side of things the construction and the operations and the maintenance and we are in constant communication with the levee protection in system and the local Levee district to make sure that we're translating that to the public that we're able an even moment to say what the status of each piece of the levy system is and make sure that residents feel confident that the levees will perform as we expect they will during any given hurricane season. This might be kind of putting you on the spot. But I think it'd be interesting. You had previous federal experience. It's with the council environmental quality. Now that you're working for the city of New Orleans did you learn anything really interesting or I guess would have informed armed what you were doing at C Q. I think we had a really special window. At the end of the Obama Administration where we were able to really make great strides on creating national resilience resilience policies but we were always very cognizant of the fact that nine times out of ten resilience is GonNa come from local government local municipalities working with communities working with nonprofits in the area when you're at the federal level it's difficult to come up with a policy that can apply to coastal Louisiana that can also apply to drought ridden Colorado or California the effects that climate change things are so diverse and the communities that are impacted our Davis as well that we really do. We're always going to need local governments to be very active on resilience salience and for me. It's been very rewarding to come to a city like New Orleans that's recognized vulnerability recognized the threats that come from climate change and is aggressively pursuing doing policies and programs that protect their community. Can you recommend any resources that your office might have that other. Maybe smaller coastal communities could benefit from absolutely so. I always recommend resilient New Orleans strategy that was released in two thousand fifteen. I think it does a fantastic job of looking across all city systems that really what can be affected elected by our natural environment and buyer kind of economic systems that that we have in place so I would recommend that as a first point of entry into what we're doing here in the city also published ashed a report in April of twenty eighteen called connecting our city and coast and it really looks at what's the role of city like New Orleans in the broader coastal conversation. Then that's happening in Louisiana. How can a city impact natural systems? That are outside our jurisdictional boundaries. How can we make sure that our neighbors in Jefferson Persson parish or Saint Bernard parish? Our plans are also look out for and are built to thrive as well okay. Final Question Nor Orleans is considered a bit of a cultural capital for the United United States for someone visiting New Orleans. What restaurant would you recommend? Oh Gosh that's that's a pitfall question. They're also good and I can't. I don't know if I could pick a favorite favorite. I will say that there are a number. This is kind of my coastal plug. I guess there are a number of restaurants in the city that recycle their shells which I think is a really important thing. Instead of sending us to landfills there's a list on the coalition to restore coastal Louisiana's website. And anyone who comes to New Orleans I think one of the few our passions are great one. Then that's probably what I would go with someone that recycles. They're always your shells and gives you get in Louisiana seafood to hear that yelp you should have a little check that you recycle their shells and you wanNA filter for that all right. Thank you so much excited.

New Orleans Louisiana Florida Norlin Orleans Rain Gardens Louisiana Zhanna Akao Office of community Army Corps IPC Noland San Francisco yelp officer United States partner
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"There was one vote needed left. Let's say it's in the senate on it to pass this thing. How'd you feel would you even though this notion that it might increase the size of government it might increase spending and you're gonna say it will but it still will will address the <unk> larger issue of climate change. You still think there's value in actually passing it because of the challenges of passing any legislation. I mean it's it. It's hard to speculate what what legislation's been go through d._c. Or the senate at all. Let's just say it's the green new deal in its current <unk> state by just assume that it is what it is right now and that's the way it's going to go through. I i like to me one vote away <hes> from going through that hypothetically hypothetically. Let's say it's up to. Let's say it's up to the vice president who has the final vote right and so it's fifty fifty vice-president gets the break it is i think i feel it's one of those things where <hes> what's that saying that yeah you bite your nose. Despite your face something like that in other words great we just solve a problem by reducing carbon emissions by fifty percent or sixty percent or whatever it is but now instead of a trillion dollar budget deficit. We have a one point five trillion dollar budget deficit or two trillion dollar budget deficit right soka great now we can we can breathe easier but now we have to increase taxes whatnot to to make this budget work. That's where i would that'd be reluctant with those are two main issues for me anyway the budget and climate right. I'm just sort of putting you on the spot in regards to kind of voting as you know as big legislation in washington washington sometimes if these things fail even closely it can take ten twenty twenty-five years before another attempt at doing such a thing and so so the notion of unless you don't think it's gonna address climate change at all to pass upon this opportunity and it's you know i think whatever climate legislation hopefully it's going to happen sooner. Rather than later conservatives and liberals are not going to be happy with whatever kind of goes through it but what can you live and is a green new deal and its current form something if it meant addressing this huge crisis of climate change and i don't know if you can necessarily answer that now. I think we're headed that way. Where people are gonna have to make a lot of tough decisions. Alonzo up to jen's arguments made on a host of issues not as climate change <unk> creative right. I mean in the thirty seconds that we have. Let's say you you've passed. Ask the green new deal. You have to give something up though right so do you give up entitlements or do you cut military spending in half brace. I mean if you know that's that's what we're supposed to <unk> politicians to compromise on behalf of their constituents so yeah. I mean if there's going to be some kind of a a budget budget cut then sure but if you're going to do in its current form and it's gonna bloat i mean i read statistics. It's going to be anywhere or from ten percent to twenty five percent extra government spending yeah you never know how this kind of manifested themselves but again kind of contrast that with they look project out thirty fifty seventy five years what is the cost of climate change impacts and pretty soon those wars enhanced spending and you know people to use those numbers and so you're you're in south carolina and just related to what we were just talking about. Regarding costs is that has adaptation adapting to climate change become a more important issue issue for the conversations that you're having you know you are in south carolina. You're really just like florida state ground zero i have have you found that. It's come up more for you. It does actually she. I mean i i make the argument very similar to what you just did that. The fact that we're not doing anything is costing us more than if we were to do something so i think it was one.

senate south carolina vice president vice-president florida washington Alonzo jen thirty fifty seventy five year ten twenty twenty-five years five trillion dollar twenty five percent two trillion dollar trillion dollar thirty seconds
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Are you based out of. I'm in mount pleasant south carolina which is basically charleston south carolina okay. There's a lovely area there yeah no flooding here not yet. The season hasn't kicked in right. So what do you do your business man but you have this role with republic e. n. What what does that. Entail is basically put it in simple terms. It's almost like a brand ambassador type thing. Is you know write articles. Try to talk to different elected representatives. I mean for example today. I went and i spoke with lindsey graham's low country director of our republican about our message as or lindsey graham has been echoed right member for quite some time and he's probably the most senior official right now in the republican party that has acknowledged climate change so you're republican at what point did climate change become an important issue for you to be completely honest when al gore was running running for president i i did not believe a man made climate change. It probably started shifting. My viewpoint polly shifted probably by the end the the twenty tents. Oh seven oh eight was when i really started thinking about okay well. How much is human activity. Causing this change having lived most of the twenties the two thousand the two thousands in europe and the middle-east i saw a lot different climates. I went through a lot of different ones and everywhere. I went to say oh. This is unseasonably warm or this hasn't happened in two hundred years or however long records our fire seasons gone longer or it hasn't snowed here. Ear in god knows when you know what i mean so when you have your conversations throughout multiple territories that you have to start thinking that that's very interesting though that process i mean. Do you feel like there was one moment that was the catalyst or or is it just sort of ongoing exposure kind of information that you know what this makes more sense to me. How did that unfold. I think it was the combination of both you know when when again it's when you're sitting there and sitting in london one day and you know it started snowing and ends my brother. Amy lived there for twenty odd years or something said at us. Remember the last time it snowed in london and you take that you couple that with what happened in charleston like i think two years or three years go where it snowed five inches six inches or however much it was and it hadn't snowed that much in thirty years right so you just take little bits and pieces of what you have in you you know. I like to study up on that subject. I don't like just reading one source and being like oh yeah okay this. You know what i mean. Salt lake studying about it and coming to my own conclusions really okay so with republic e. n. It it's an organization that talks about free market solutions to the issue of climate change but when it comes to talking to fellow republicans especially in south carolina what he's been more of your time on. Is it trying to propose solutions or is it just talking about the the basic belief that climate change is even on an issue. That's an interesting question. I kind of evolved on my approach towards that. I it was. Hey you know this as you know. Republican has a great message conservative message. Lemme try to spread the message and get more people to see the value in believing in this thing and i i realize people that don't want to believe in something. Just won't believe it right. I mean it just that simple so i kind of i did have a one sparking image like one and moment where you know we're dinner with a couple of conservatives and that's when i kinda shifted from trying to convince people to just say hey. I don't really really care that you don't believe in is removing onto the solutions part of it and so how do they respond to that kind of blunt change of the conversation. I mean it wasn't actually change in compensation assist individuals kind of said i don't know you've been hoaxed by climate change by liberal media or whatever and you know i simply put down knife and fork and said well. You know it doesn't really matter you're old. You're gonna be dead soon so it doesn't really matter if you believe it or not. It matters if i believe in it matters..

south carolina republican party lindsey graham london mount pleasant brand ambassador official al gore Salt lake europe charleston Amy president director two hundred years thirty years five inches three years
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Things. Were i live on the ballot but you know i think that at the end of the day i want the people in power who <unk> are going to come to the table and make the right decisions a very unfortunate thing happened probably starting around the two thousand early two thousands where the the more so called moderate republicans who are probably identify more with ideologically all got elected and you know the first thing that happened was that they got pry remarried from the far right and in that was sort of a lot of those folks are people would put in the anti climate solutions or the the climate dispute <unk> call them category and some of those folks are in office today but a lot of them lost to democrats and end in this kind of unfortunate thing happened more of a polarization of our political space but also the environmental community who used to work more with these so-called center moderate republicans. They stopped feeling like they needed republicans as much because oh well if hinted edited the democratic candidate one. It's a wash whether it was that person or the moderate republican when it comes to the environment and it's really not right because you we need someone from both sides. There's no you know even when president obama had a supermajority in the senate they were not able to pass climate change legislation and so. I think that he knows very unfortunate thing that's happened. Were we became so focused on the ladder next to somebody whose name visited d. or is it in our and not looking at what they embody and so that's what i try to do when i'm looking at a ballot i pay close attention to climate changing and there's really i can't think of another issue right now that i would put head that when i'm going to the voting but then i have kids in my kids are worried about what their future and what their kids future is going to look like and so. I feel like i have to take that into series consideration italy interesting to see how the parties evolving all of you know especially the republican party of your ten twenty not that long but just some game changer legislation be it some significant carbon tax or cap and trade where the lay of the land around climate change changes radically and then hopefully the republicans new position on climate change will be like well now. We're going to fund you know adapting this way and you know i look forward to that a day. When we have those kind of different discussions you know. I think the green new deals spark that conversation a little bit right. I think that i max thank congresswoman a easy. Okay everyone knows a._o. Saito i really think a._o. C. four putting the green deal on the table because that really deep pushed people on the conservative side to take note and even now a lot of the members of the house <hes> conservative members who never ever talked about climate change when they held the gobbles are now saying okay yeah. There is something that we should be doing here. That's progress and we can sit around and say well l. when they were in charge. They didn't do anything until we're blue in the face but that isn't really going to get us anywhere if they're willing now. Let's exercise that willingness is let's get them to the table and you know republican. We're not about spin throwing a lot of federal dollars at fixing the problem. That's why we think a carbon. Tax is the way to go you. You know we don't want to be the proponents of a conservative green new deal that funds the things that we're interested in right that is the same is going to grow the government the same way that plan would but we do think that conversation about a carbon tax is very relevant and very important at the end of the day will be the policy mechanism that moves forward for my listeners out there. Let's like conservative listeners <unk>. How'd you encourage them to engage on this issue and even engage with republican well they can join our community by going to our website republic e._s._p._n..

obama republican party senate Saito president italy
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"What a journey you're definitely been in that environmental community and senator chafee. I sort of good old days weren't they. He he was a stalwart he was. He did some good work so i look at your facebook page and i see some of the things that you post but occasionally you'll get someone that might say something snarky or they're obviously a climate skeptic that might be ah republicans that kind of find your your facebook page. How how do you guys kind of deal with those voices out there. That really are contradicting the main message that you're doing. I think gets really important to meet people where they are. So one thing that i've learned is that nobody wants to talk to know at all. So if somebody somebody comes to me and in a perfect example i was at a high school reunion recently and i heard a lot of pushback right. Oh the climate's it's been changing since the beginning of time or it's too big. We can't do anything about it and so i am not going to take these people throw them an i._p._c._c. report right. That's not what they want to do but if i sort of figure out what is there concern really <hes> or what did they liked to do so i'm from maine and a lot of people i grew up with our big hunters and anglers and so if you start talking to them. Have you noticed you can't go ice fishing gene. The same length of season is east to be able to or have you noticed that the leaves are changing color at a different year as to you start to notice some of those things and you can start to connect that this is not just a random warm winter or there is a trend that is occurring and and so it always tried to do is just gonna find like we'll have you noticed this. Have you noticed that and not in a condescending her mighty grain away just again trying signed to have a conversation <unk> thought about this and i would say that the biggest pushback is at the u._s. Can't act alone and i agree we cannot but we also have to lead the u._s. Doesn't wait for china. The u._s. doesn't wait for india right one. Have we ever waited for other countries. We get out there. We take take the lead we have the innovation you have that spirit of ingenuity here and then we'll be the ones that make money off it eventually will representative wingless made a point about the us leading i think about world war two and we waited to get into that war and what did that lead to pearl harbor and so a heaved he was making the you you know similarities between climate change and that and i thought that was kind of good actually we don't want to wait until something kind of blows up in our face like that right for sure. This is a question i asked some of the other folks that i have in this episode and we'll see how you want to answer this is that you're an interesting. Republicans sounds like you've been environmental space for a long time and i'm sure you surround yourself with people. Oh that were a lot of liberals a lot of progressive people but you're republican and i we haven't talked about what issues are important to you but i asked the the regime john about about okay so let's look at taxes this look at these other main issues that it means to be a conservative but then when it comes to climate change when it comes to actually voting for someone like how important is the issue of climate change around your ability to vote for candidate necessarily have to tell me he might vote for but that must be tricky for you because you you you're you are a republican but climate change is obviously very important to you but at the end of the day when there's comes a chance to actually passing legislation. How do you deal with those the situations you know. I've never been party line voter so i always try to look at the ballot. Nc who i think is best going to reflect my my interest in my number. One interest is the environment so i live in a very blue state. I actually don't really there aren't a lot of options things..

senator chafee facebook china maine Nc india representative
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"He's now backed so for pelicans one. I recapture the house majority. They're going to have to win back america suburbs and they're naturally they're never going to win them again without a proactive stance on climate change so for that reason alone. I'm <unk> hopeful that we will get some action republicans. If not this election cycle. Perhaps in the next you know the climate change debate in only certain amount of people can qualify for it and it's become just an all democratic kind of thing but it would be nice if they actually may be invited me invite trump of course but you know governor weld is running for the presidency invite him then let a republican at least voice on that seems like a missed opportunity agreed last question and let's say for all my republican listeners out there and they they want climate change to be more of an issue for their party. What would you recommend that they do. What can they do free other republicans lessening the number. One thing you can do do is to make a difference on this is talk about it and talk about it with other republicans where their convictions are on the issue when you when you really dig down two other republicans beliefs on this it's mostly shaped by the rhetoric that they've heard from either leadership or the conservative media and and they're just following the cues if you actually get down to it they might be persuadable and if you believe in climate change in your republican can you should be talking to other republicans about it. The most important thing we can do right now is talking about it. It's the number one issue. I think of our time i think history he is going to judge all of us based on how he reacted in this moment. I don't want the republican party to be the ultimate villain in history whenever it's written on this topic so if you share that have you and you also want us to do something i want us to change our image then go out and talk to other republicans about it. Be vocal challenge them and see if you can persuade some people in myths a mind lines okay john. I'm very encouraged by the work that you're doing and i hope you keep up the good fight and thanks again for coming on. Thank you hit actors in talking with chelsea. Henderson chelsea is the director of editorial content at republic ian chelsea. Welcome to the podcast. I think for having me okay chelsea. So what do you do at republican. So i take all the news that's been generated by anyone in the universe that we call the echo right so someone someone who identifies as being conservative and is pro environment pro climate change action and i make sure that the world knows that these things are are happening is people are doing these things taking steps and i do that a number of ways. I create daily alert that we put on the republican blog that just might so for example. I'm doing right now. On senator romney who was on the radio over the weekend talking about why he thinks climate change is important and why he hopes that it's a manmade problem because then it will be responsive to a manmade solution human-made solution and so i take this information and put it on a daily basis and then at the end of the week i aggregated all into a newsletter that goes out to anyone who wants to subscribe and the whole purpose this is really just to make people aware that there are good people out there who identifies conservative who care about the environment and in particular care about solving coming climate change okay so that's a new one the idea that it's a manmade problem so there must be a manmade solution yeah..

republican party Henderson chelsea ian chelsea senator romney america weld director of editorial content
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Democratic votes but i also think you'd have rebellions on both sides <hes> you'd have on the far right republicans who just don't want any type of tax but on the far left you have democrats say it doesn't go far enough to addressing the injustices of climate change <hes> i actually whenever i published this this article in the national review one of the best moments was when dave roberts vox actually on twitter and said this was a weak solution that you can expect a lot of these types of you know half-measures from the riot coming out and trying to block the path to something stronger he said. I thought that was an interesting reaction. I'm used to normally he getting flak from the right when a rise up on climate change from a republican perspective drawing fire from the last was a new experience. I thought probably a a good sign and that i was doing something right. Hey listen that was david roberts. I've actually had him on the podcast a great conversation but that's david roberts and so that's what he does oh yeah i knew i knew i knew where he was coming from. I didn't mind it at all. I thought it was. I thought it was really interesting but i'm just saying the circles that i run in the climate change circles if the republicans managed to get through the senate a clean carbon tax bill it would be rapturous among most liberals even though might not meet what the green new deal that aspirational part of that legislation. It's just like come on. This is an incredible. I start and i think we want you to do that. We want you to get those senators. There's to to make that and call our bluff and i'm seeing are bluff. Meeting people want some climate change legislation that that'll do for the time being and i think there's please as make it happen well i did but i'm saying make it happen. You're you're talking to republican republican circles and legislators and it's just listen listen get that clean bill and you'd be surprised what who kind of rallies behind it yeah while it'll be. It'll be interesting to see what happened. I thought trump's july eight speech on his on his environmental record. A lot of people saw that as something of an orwellian moment but i actually thought it signalled out a watershed moment for the climate fi in the polls are starting to move on this issue and simple <unk> ellas just not going to be a winning formula in two thousand twenty or ever again. There's an old saying that politicians don't create political will they just respond to it and there is strong political will out there take action on climate and i think republicans are starting to respond to it you see and the formation of the roosevelt conservation caucus morale alexander's new manhattan project francis rooney's carbon tax bill that he's <unk> several carbon tax bills..

david roberts dave roberts twitter trump francis rooney senate alexander manhattan
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Let's join our conversation with representative bob inglis unless he adapters today. I have a very exciting upset. I in talking with representative bob english of former u._s. House representative from south carolina carolina and now the executive director republic e. n. Hi bob welcome to the podcast great to be with you. Thanks i was trying to think of all the different questions i want to ask. You know i was thinking can if you went back ten years to do even possibly could have imagined that you'd be in such high demand in this sort of the environmental circles. No it was an unlikely unlikely. Let's say ten years is that point which i was getting tossed out of congress so that point everything was unclear ten years go out will tell you that and that's for that's for sure particularly in my life but it's been a it's not the past i would've chosen but but i'm glad for the past as you know <hes> most you can hope hope for out of your work. Life is that it be about something big enough to be out. That was surely the case in congress you know kids in congress every day days filled with with mission and purpose but my days now are filled with something big enough to be about which is trying to address climate change along with many many any other people that are doing similar work so it's big enough to be about so i'm grateful for the past not the one. I want to chose him. No one attempted to be on but but this is when i was given so i'm glad for it well i. I don't want to lose track and what we're going to jump around to. Some different issues here but what is republic e. n. Wh what's the group all about. We are conservatives. -servative is reaching conservatives on climate change. We believe it's inherently conservative to want to conserve conserve the earth to conserve this ability of its weather systems and the beautiful place to live and where you can restore the purity of the era's. That's what we think is an ethic. Deeply rooted rooted in the minds of many conservatives things have gotten a little bit sideways on climate because many conservatives heard a sort of a regulatory message pige and they're trying to regulate are very breast and they're telling us these scare stories about how the world's going to end twelve years or whatever and so they react again sat and they turn it off so we try to help them turn back on to the incredible opportunities in free enterprise solutions to climate change in the incredible calling because you know this is a an opportunity to light up the world with more energy more mobility more freedom if we just play it right and if america erica would but rise to the occasion and lead the world to solutions so we think there's a a message for the right and the good news is there are many many people on the left that would agree and the result is eventually. We're going to bring america together in lead the world to a solution okay so with your organization. You're really trying to target younger conservatives who care about the issue of climate change. I'm actually the the plan has been talking with price that i'm going to get a few of your younger members and i'm gonna interview them and do some short short interviews and included in as part of this podcast. I'm looking forward to it veering them and kind of hearing from their perspectives but is it really sort of a target demographic for your organization. Well we went all conservatives actually but we do skew young and that's because young people care more about climate perhaps in the plan a little bit on the planet that longer than their grandparents and so so what we find is that young conservatives that are actual conservatives in other words not populist nationalist populist nationalist. We have a hard time reaching not now because <hes> that's the doctrine of grievance picked up. We really don't subscribe to who we believe that there's there tremendous opportunities out there. We don't think think anybody's doing unto us. We're victims in any way we think that wait. We're full citizens. We gotta rise to the occasion. So if you're populist nationalists she probably are very interested in republic dot org but if you're an actual conservative and you're young you particularly want your party to leave leave behind the grumpy old party affect and adopt the grand opportunity party affect.

representative congress bob inglis america bob english bob south carolina executive director carolina ten years twelve years
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Hi everyone. This is america adopts. The climate change podcast dessus. Gonna take climate is america. The indispensable has to wake up and win. It wakes up and enters this fight weight solve it. Welcome back to another exciting episode. I'm doug parsons persons. Your host of america apps that quote that kicked off. This episode was from representative bob inglis. Bob is the executive director of republic e. N. nonprofit organization shen that supports free market approaches addressing climate change. This was a fun episode folks. Okay a little more background. Bob used to be a republican congressman from south carolina. He served eight terms and how seat in a very conservative district. Let's be clear bob is a conservative but he has a fascinating history. Bob famously lost his house house seat in a republican primary partly because he came out in support of addressing climate change a position. His constituents voted out of office for after leaving congress. He started republic e._s._p._n. To give a voice to conservatives who want to take action on climate also in this episode i interviewed three other conservatives who are representatives of the work that republic ian is doing thing in other parts of the country you'll hear their stories and why climate change became an important topic for them and the challenges of working on this issue when most of your party is hostile and even in denial of the threat of climate change these guys are trailblazers and you're gonna love hearing their stories okay before we jump into our conversation with bob..

bob inglis america doug parsons congress south carolina representative congressman executive director
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"There is a certain amount of tension that Nick spur of slower in conversation. And I think you know, it's something that we have talked about in terms of our guests future seasons. How do we lean into a little bit more tension while sustained through to the digitally started out to do in the first place? What's up next? Are you in the middle of a season are I mean are you still thinking about next season? Would you guys have in store for folks? Do you have names of guests in such? We are in the middle of season. We have a couple of more for the season will take a pause and put together next season. But we have a really really powerful episode coming out next actually out this week with Bernadette Demi who's the have the which hidden steering committee, which is the native American tribe that state being very impacted by climate. Already. But is also would essentially be destroyed if they drill in the Arctic national wildlife refuge in that was a very very powerful conversation just hearing from someone who kind of on the frontlines of both fossil Fuel Development and an climate change. It was one of the more moving episodes. I can recall doing I was in tears a couple of times. So really about that. And then we have a one coming up with two folks Colonel Goren Carlos Rodriguez who really talk about really dig into faith in climate change. And then that will have one or two after that for the season. Then move onto the next one one out anything. Well, this this season, the the theme has been all the climate feels in we really have tried to delve into the emotional, psychological spiritual sides of climate change in wooden. We set out to do this is several months ago with the or the green new deal. It was before the young people climate strikes really caught fire around the world and before the release of this new book on inhabitable by David Wallace wells that I think really has gotten a lot of people's filing to an existential crisis of other kind of world that we're leaving behind for our kids. And I think we tapped into something we didn't even fully realize that we were tapping into. But now, I think frankly, people's anxiety panic about planet changes on the front page every day, and that was really what we were trying to do a deep dive into how do you keep doing good work? How do you? How do you will not? Joy, have you persist thrive when you're dealing with this existential crisis every single day. So we have had these really frankly life-changing converstation folks than I hope everyone will listen because they certainly have health in in and I room this very tumultuous last few months Bill books as well question that I want both what I do on my podcast for all my guests at the end desire. Ask them to recommend a guest. They think should come on the podcast in each of. You could take a crack at that. That'd be awesome. So I am just in love with mary-anne Tytler who has written a couple of pieces lately about the both kind of the emotion the emotion. She's very rod emotional in. How she talks about climate teams also writes beautifully in very powerfully about the intersection of race in climate change. I just think she's a really fascinating voice on the issue right now and just a lovely human beings. You know, I. What what you to couple of people who are I think doing heroic in visionary work around economic transition copen Unity's, one of them is Dan Huynh into here in Shepherdstown West Virginia where I live who who's the company called solar holler, which is hiring people from the West Virginia coalfields from those communities in training them. As alert installers in his on a mission to hit solar in West Virginia on par with any other state in the country. Do it with workers from communities that have been left behind by the fall of goal industry on the greater Dennison is another siring young west Virginian, he faced in Huntington has company earn on apple coalfield Development Corporation that is doing similar work around revitalize the economy job trading group, folks in in coal communities. So there are really inspiring..

Shepherdstown West Virginia Colonel Goren Carlos Rodriguez Nick spur Dan Huynh West Virginia Bernadette Demi apple coalfield Development Co Arctic David Wallace Huntington Dennison Bill Joy
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Gavin jealous senior marine conservation officer for climate change in rentals for WF Malaysia. What did you think of the workshop? I I thought it was wonderful for myself because I'm trained for climate change assessment. And this workshop provide us dues on the way to make our strategies much more focus on climate change impacts. What did you think of the workshop structure in regards to how it was managed? And what the activists that you did it was really fun. I thought Sean of works that have been to his very detailed, you know, really doing to the nitty gritty of tragedies. But for this particular workshop, it's fund. That's how facilitators actually allow you to. Chiefs of jettison workshop identified very fun way, a set from having a Bill to commend distracted other countries, which you actually learn from other countries also get feedback from them about your particular strategy. So from that particular platform actually enables me to hey, the things that I need to go back and learn about it and also, hey, also lend from other countries. So I like it a lot this particular structure. So you have some interesting stories or information until about turtles and climate change. If if you could elaborate on that. Yes. Shit in Malaysia we we actually home to some of the largest population in southeast Asia. We have the green and the hospital, which is the most common species in that region to one particular story was that actually we can see actually adapting to change example, one of the threats to marine turtles is the erosion of its nesting beaches. So it can be really steeped for them to come. But we thought that if. Erosion happening in the beaches will be less nesting. But it seems that even though it is eroding was still trying to come up and s in that nesting. We finally actually go in Ness in that particular area so apart from humans, we can see some species, I already slowly finan- mechanism away to adapt to commit change. So, but they're successfully nesting they'll nest and they'll lay the eggs in the eggs will hatch. That's all happening. Yes. All happening. Yes. Indeed. So you writing about this republishing that I'm sure there's I'm from Florida, and there's a lot of sea turtles there. I don't know this deficiencies, I not a researcher, but you go to the beach, and you see the the net. And so I haven't heard of anything about that sort of adapting, but I'm not following very closely. But are you is W W F publishing materials because I think that'd be very interesting for a lot of people around the world. We actually have activities monitoring the the beaches in terms of how eroding the beaches are. And then the temperature of the Seine where they actually XL we are currently have working on ground people collecting, those kind of data. So we indeed wanted to publish that to shed it to other areas that hey, this anti grabs can learn from this particular country. Hate actors. We are back from our trip to Kenya. And I'm back here with Sean Martin. And I I just want to give my observations about that workshop, I feel really lucky that I got to go there in person and talk to all these folks in witness what they were doing some takeaways from the workshop for me is that I thought there was a lot of positive energy. I've been to plenty of workshops where people are checking out halfway through the workshop. I think a lot of the W have staff were curious on what was going to happen at this workshop, and I got to interview them at the beginning..

Sean Martin WF Malaysia Gavin southeast Asia Kenya officer Florida researcher
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"The species news out of the need to be very clearly when she's priority that the any may change in some cases, it's going to be the in some species. But if you don't have that clear, you can fly in the what are your strategies gonna be we decided to climate risk for each one example excite and their implications for the target about this climate risks and then wasted tackled. This climate is for for just a casual down with the expert. We didn't while the to think it was a very long planning process. Again, we just ask the your idea the goal, what do you think climate change? And just talk to me about it. So Bizet sample is influence. It was about yesterday. So expert just started describing the events leading having the impacts that has had the butterflies of twenty two thousand trees fell vantage absence Steen, Honey, butterflies, the guy how tourism is impacting the butterflies of is because of climate change there. There's a warmer winter in North America. The butterfly comes down later and then concern of coin sites with the tourists coming in. So stressful moment for them. But because the tourists coming in is already written down there allowed to you can change it. So one of the problems is that they are going at the same time. That's that's a risk for us. So we we ended this vision. They may we said implications for consideration targets. So for example of your conservation targets on the community is a live or their income stays on the tourism on the. Impacts many want to consider is if the reason is coming in anymore. Those communities I'm going to have any or the butterflies really stress because of a weather of thirty storm. You're gonna have your dying with the move. Area..

Bizet North America Steen
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"And when you're trying to change people's approaches, and especially just introducing something new to how we go about doing things. Those statements might need to be in there. So I'm going back to our strategy to look at it with a bit of a different different look to it. Okay. Maybe a little bit more background on that. So your position it's sort of a higher level in WWF. And of course, the difference between these higher level strategies. And then we see on the ground must be really useful for you to come to these kind of workshops to maybe give a little bit more background on what you are trying to do in your position. Okay. Well, the wildlife strategy the wildlife practice strategy is informed by all of these strategies that I'm reading through here at this workshop, and it's really great to see how they're thinking about incorporating climate change issues into their country strategies and those all. Lead up to the to fulfilling the overarching wildlife practice strategy. Okay. I just don't know enough about WBF, even after my relationship with Sean. So there's a wildlife strategy. But is there a sort of a broader adaptation strategy in our those linked up or those two different things or they won in the same. No. There is a non abroad or at patient strategy, but the wildlife practice strategy incorporates aspects of adept tation, I've looked through the conservation strategies. I've read them in some of them are very different. There's themes that are very similar, but as as you dealing with a larger broader strategy are there things that kind of stand out for you positive and negative on some of these guess countrywide strategies mainly positive because a lot of people are thinking about landscape protected area management. That's one of the primary outcomes of the wildlife practice strategy. Which is vital habitats conserved, and certainly with affective management being employed in those protected areas thinking about connective, which brings in issues of climate change insuring that protected areas are connected to allow for new and different migrations. Perhaps so has been positive seeing things like that incorporated into these strategies that I've been reviewing today. I think so I'm gonna challenge from the Mexico office. And the is go out our at of Titian expert as she could be here. So shit needs. So this is our journey huge spikes, not willing. So basically are convinced writers are these four areas, and we had ten outcomes eight nine and seven which is a lot. So the with did as a nation. We have rules in the outcomes for each team in what we did was we sat down on the night. We we. The goal coordinator. Basically, the expert on that theme. We sat down with them. And we did this. So we decided we were going into comments to the goals, and then we went into more detail outcome level, and we ask this questions. So I one was to identify haven't fear conservation or well-being target. These helps prioritize piece of extremists resembling you for your outcome of various species and in the future..

WWF Sean coordinator Mexico
"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"climate change" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Hey, we have forest fires in our country. Tell us what to do. How do we adapt? Our way out of that. That's not what we're going to talk about here. We're gonna talk about you have forest. Fires. So is a long term goal of. Saving that forest even viable with increasing number of forest. Fires. Okay. Does that make more sense? That's exactly why the the person from that was invited. He has problems with drought and says we need to figure out what to do. So you're not gonna figure out what to do here. We're going to tell you do you have the right conservation plan. If you're getting more droughts. Yeah. I think gets tricky. It's like you just giving feedback on good conservation plan making that link to like this is part of that story. That's it's a little bit tricky. Yep. But reviewing your strategies is itself adaptation wouldn't be doing this. If there wasn't climate change, and what we're doing wrong is that we're not considering climate change at the goal setting stage of our strategies, we set our goals based on rigs by diversity outcomes that we want to see, and then we think we're going to adapt our way somehow to achieve those goals and not everything achievable with climate change, you share Dan, a clip from like, you said earlier day Nash came on the podcast about the ability to save everything. And it just seems like as you are describing defining goals at that stage. If we really listened to Dan's advice, you know, we're not doing that with these conservation plans. That's right. I see very few conservation plans to WWF anywhere. That's really embracing the fact. As Dan put it we are in a mass extinction crisis. And we can't save everything. But one of our country offices has strategy that says, no more species extinction and good luck with that. Yeah. So hopefully, that's one thing. We'll correct in. The course of this workshop we understand that you need to be in bishops and aspirational, but I wanna live forever. That's my aspiration. But I know it's not gonna happen. So how can we be realistic and pragmatic as well as ambitious and hopeful? Okay. I'm with Sean Martin here on the first day of the event. Hey, Sean what's going on right now? Well, we are three minutes before starting time. And I'm very happy to see that everyone's on time really excited about today. There seems to be a lot of energy in the room. People are talking and excited to be here are folks here sort of curious what they're up to this week. If you had those conversations at a few of them, I haven't got to talk to everybody yet. But they're definitely people that came that we didn't know we're coming because they were curious of what we're doing. So that's a good sign. Okay. And so what is our morning? It'll look like you're the first ninety minutes or so it was really introductory stuff. We'll do some icebreakers and introduce people to what we're going to achieve in the next three days. And then after our break will be digging into cliques. Okay. Great. Is I I come from they're gonna country office, and they couldn't get the energy climate and extractives program. Jacob the tuna. Walking gonna country office and specifically while called climate walk as climate change money. Okay. So you're here at this meeting. What I'm asking is what are your expectations? This is the first day of the meeting. So you know, what the meeting's about, but what are your own personal expectations? My expectations is that the meeting with help us to kind of draw roadmap on how we work with our countries. For example, name adoption plans out implemented at addition plans and also see how we can follow rate as an organization and taking forward the climate change. And what about you? What are your expectations is to understand clean and really get to know what critical issues that looking and also to kind of what kind of tools are we going to develop together? So that we can able to demand in the different country offices, especially giving that bedding into the formation of. National titian. We are going to start with a quick icebreaker. Everybody. Another..

Dan Sean Martin WWF Jacob Nash ninety minutes three minutes three days