35 Burst results for "Cleo"

"cleo" Discussed on Hack

Hack

06:01 min | 8 months ago

"cleo" Discussed on Hack

"That i had. While russell agrees social media is a factor. He doesn't think tick talks. The only coals of behavior like michaela's the vast majority of the young girls young women have had some previous vulnerability and most of them have a history of anxiety or depression. Some of them have. Adhd some of them have. Which is russell says. These takes our response to these vulnerabilities combined with. Yeah the stress of the pandemic michaela's been doing a lot better. Since she began seeing psychologist. She hasn't take in more than a year but she knows that. That isn't everyone's journey and just works for you. Don't worry what anyone else thinks about you because you are going to to research strong's pack on triple j mango bali reporting the text me. Have you developed cheeks off to watching teak talks you into the threat space on talk. Oh four three nine seven five seven triple five text me. Let's go to professor kamenda such dave now. He's an expert threats and neuro psychiatry at you. Us w thanks so much for joining us. What is going on in the brian he talks can potentially turn into a tick. I think we are looking at possibly Social genyk dominant confer mass social genetic phenomenon which has describing the fosters about Be used to in the oftentimes used to talk about mass hysteria in some ways and they were a description in two thousand eleven. In fact in new york there was report but cluster of dick's occurring a school. A lot of girls in that school seventy developed takes and it is supposed to be a kind of a social genetic gore site psychosocial genyk kind of phenomenon and now of course Vinod at that community was usually. It was a close knit community at that time. And of course that community has expanded through social media to be rather international. and i think Yeah i i agree that the professor russell deal that often these girls are vulnerable in the sense of being anxious being under stress and i think the pandemic is probably contributed to that in terms of the isolation they also have major influencers on on social media on talk or youtube etcetera. They identify it. To some and often it is that vulnerability plus the influence of a dominant person or a kind of a flood of information that leads to these symptoms. Why is it. Why is it that you know if you are in a vulnerable state if you if you might have anxiety or depression which a lot of these young women had previously that seeing any influence can have that effect where your behavior changes to that extent because obviously a lot of us watch content over social media. But we're not necessarily speaking up those behaviors right absolutely absolutely. We don't truthful answer is we don't fully understand but i think one thing that we really should appreciate that often manifestation of anxiety and distress takes accent. Acceptable form socially acceptable for many ways. Because it in some cultures wearing anxiety in somatic symptoms like pain and sometimes non epileptic seizures occur in those settings out. So it's it's an expression of anxiety that is socially acceptable that's one aspect to it. The other thing is that there is a certain element of mimic mimicking of behavior that occurs in people and in fact our brains are tuned to mimic other people in certain situations. I mean we do that. Normally in in life fair you know that person one person yawns in a room that other people tend to yawn also so this kind of biz an inbuilt mechanism of mimicking that occurs and been attribute it to Mirror neurons in the brain other such mechanisms in the brain that causes mimicking and that can be kind of exacerbated in certain situations and of course once symptoms develop the to take a life of their own are Sort of a certain actually gains that bush might get in terms of these symptoms. They will be attention or the dependency that fosters on these symptoms and also identification with your group. That is kind of seen as being supportive to the. They tend to kind of perpetuate as a consequence of that. Yeah right so obviously like developing things based on who around professor. We only have about thirty seconds. Left short talk should change anything about its algorithm. The way that it's recommends these videos to people absolutely absolutely. I think they tend to sample children. Who watch these videos that tend to get more and more because delegated some kind of perpetuates the so they'll be flooded silicon videos. In fact a break from a social media for two time is often necessary to try to deal with this kind of. But i think also ah consultational. Definitive diagnosis is often needed before. This can happen so a consultation may be necessary. If there's some such a symptom develops but certainly break from social media for fear. Time is definitely recommend. Hack on triple j. That was professor him. Inda sach dev and he's an expert into reds and neuro. Psychiatry at eunice. W thanks for joining us on this episode of hack. Catch you next time..

michaela russell genyk depression epileptic seizures bali gore dave brian dick new york youtube Us bush Inda sach dev eunice
"cleo" Discussed on Hack

Hack

02:15 min | 8 months ago

"cleo" Discussed on Hack

"Like blood.

"cleo" Discussed on Hack

Hack

08:35 min | 8 months ago

"cleo" Discussed on Hack

"By this case. Hacks thankful to the media. You've kept the story running and everyone and that's really important entrepreneur. This is hack. i'm avenue dies. We're talking about cleo. Smith who was found this morning after going missing for eighteen days and police told the media this afternoon that yet. Ten thousand coils made in that time about the case. They've said that is a crazy amount of interest in cleo's disappearance so why are australians obsessed with stories like this every group chat. I'm in has been going off with theories on these case today. John safran is a writer. He's a dog omega. He actually used to host a show on triple j. That's not really related to what we're talking about. But he's ridden a true crime book code motoring mississippi's got into true crime communities. Thanks for coming on the show. Welcome back to triple j gay. How you good so. Obviously this much interest in this clear. Smith case texans going off but people who've been talking about it today. Why are we so obsessed. Well i think when you talk about true crime more. Broadly like to get to Touch danger and with and particularly if like other aspects of your life on that dangerous. So they'd be that aspect i mean. I don't want to be like super cynical because obviously the police of said it's like great that People got involved in this. And we're kind of interested in listen. Might all the phone calls. So it's like this early a bad thing but they they they does seem to be that aspect and also it's just again. I'm talking particularly about this case. But this more. Broadly like this like crime is just a great framework for like discussing broader issues. Like if you think about how how boring it is if an academic is talking about this that or some political presence. You'll get out this little that as soon it's like a crime involved he suddenly get to like talk about all these issues Like whatever they like issues about cloth issues about racism issues about community issues about family. You just get to talk about all these things that are just people wanna talk about him and should talk about and and you get to talk about it through this kind of interesting framework. Do you think he's an australian thing. Like a uniquely australian thing these sort of obsession with true crime on a broad scale. Well i don't know if it's uniquely starring but i was really surprised as i went to america years ago and i went to a bookshop bookshop and i was looking for the true crime section because all of those when i was in mississippi riding my crime. I thought look at some book. And i didn't have. They didn't have the specific true crime section. They just had like no it was amongst nonfiction and three that i learned. 'cause they'll say talking to people at penguin or whatever like these real kind of obsession about true crime is really emphasized in australia. Well like there is something like like the fact that the equal first place biggest section of bookshop. He's gonna be true. Crime that's true in all countries. So god lord noise i mean we'll need like a historian and a psychologist to get to the bottom of that has anything to do with full being convict for something. I don't know why. Adrian texted ozzy coaches compassion. We'll say we survive because we have an inbuilt need to care for our young no-show. How true that is but you know could be a theory obviously an interesting pot of every slee these clear smith case but putting that aside every be case the media and countries get consumed with these that online forum. Stott trying to crack them right. Why is that such a phenomenon. I think there's a bit of again like it's obviously great when people have real leads and they're getting them to law enforcement so that's really cool or whatever but i mean there is another aspect to it where i don't know people just excitable and i i think about how in the boston there was a bombing at the boston marathon. Not long ago. And that was one of the first sort of register. Investigations like everyone was like drawing like like looking at all the photos and zooming on in and and getting the you know the google maps out and and sort of an ever. Suddenly everyone was a forensic investigator and everyone was wrong there. You know what. I mean like so it. It is easy to sort of get over excited and think you like cracking the case. When like maybe you know maybe in the same way as doctors are better at things in amateurs on the internet Maybe forensic investigators that are these things on the internet. Then yeah they're the of okay. Our responsibility where. I noticed how like even articles written about the boston marathon. It's being cracked open on the case. Or whatever like that and it's all unread it. This is the future of crime investigation. You know open source da da da and then it turned out. Everyone was real unread. It like you never heard about it again. Like those those people like. Yeah maybe maybe like e can't really solve through reddish yet so we have to be in a sec but do you know any crimes have actually been cracked online. I'm sure i'm sure in some sort of roundabout way. I don't know how directly whatever even i mean. Even as well as writing my book. I might be about half a dozen or something like true crime things off to that feature stories and all of those came to me because like people were able to contact me Over just direct message me and stuff like that so it definitely in the sort of in a broader sense like yeah online is kind of amazing. Totally john safran. Thanks so much for chatting to us. Thank you bye-bye bye. John safran is a yeah dolkar make harada and he's yet into the true crime. Space doctor say rise in teen girls experiencing tick like behavior candy linked to tick talk just right doctors around the world have noticed a strange trend during the pandemic tain goals developing random uncontrollable jerky movements and verbal outbursts. That cooled ticks. They don't usually call goes medical. Experts was super confused. About what was happening and i realized it was one thing in common. They all use tc talk cool me. Have you been getting ticks off to going on. Talk you into threats to talk one three hundred archer five three six magna bali's been looking into what's going on because it is a bit more complicated than that explanation. It's like a random afternoon in july. Las t it's cold and fourteen year old michaela colby is sitting in jeanine history class. She's learning about the holocaust. It's a pretty hectic topic and she starts to get upset and then suddenly a my brain just snapped and i started trying to chew iron finger. Her hands going blue and she can't go because her jaws locked that go next to me saw angie. She was yelling at the teacher and the whole clauses kinda stopped looking at me and my teacher comes over and she was trying to like pull my finger out mathis sticking her finger in my mouth. Try and get it up eventually. She's taken to the school office and someone finally wrenches her hand free using vaccine command. It was also like i felt extremely bad. This wasn't the first all the loss. Time michaela's takes would disrupt her life like this. The ticks started out of the blue in january loss g. Sometimes michaela would hit a cell for others. She just chuck things that were in a hand. All the times should say these random woods like pola ben would just straight up start swearing because icon actually control. My body's doing so. It was very very scary because there was absolutely no hinson anything that was going to happen. Her mum takes it to the emergency department. But no one can figure out what's happening to these. Ticks went on for months. It was very frequent. It was ten minutes. Michaela tells me it was a pretty terrifying time. She'd be having today. These.

john safran mississippi Smith boston ozzy Stott Adrian da da da magna bali america australia smith michaela colby harada sec google jeanine michaela Las mathis
"cleo" Discussed on Hack

Hack

06:09 min | 8 months ago

"cleo" Discussed on Hack

"That and the w. police have just released. This footage of clear being rescued eats of brady doc. Seines this a lot of wind happening this trays. That and then you can say yeah a police officer lifting her up and walking out with her in another office officer talking to her. And and yeah i. It's it's crazy stuff to say that that she was rescued in found. Let's get into this associate. Professor terry goldsworthy used to be a police detective. Now he's a criminologist thanks so much for coming on the show before we got on hack police said no one in the public actually soul clear even though they was a cool for information that it was actually police work. That got them to her. What would go into an investigation like these police. The challenge for place with a investigational at the starting office. What's missy pressed. Essentially so the first thing i have to decide very quickly has a criminal event. Occurred is missing personal. Has she been abducted. So i think i think the fact that three week three hygiene we saw a million dollar reward. Being issued is very unusual. Si- very quickly. I think they can clues. This was a criminal event and treated as such and the resources they put into it requires substantial and the fact by resources putting signs early have probably led to this conclusion saying today. How often do you police end up. Finding a missing child took my missing. Children are found But behind that is that my child abductions have board members of the family so i mean to stranger. Abduction is quite unique event and You know we have seen cases. I say with children. Doctrine remind for the captors for years on end. So you know i. I quite unique. They're not going to happen. That often but They do captain happen. Occasionally nicole's for example then you walk 'em case way you had that terrible dot com and dies mine solf years ten years of his case yeah and they will obviously so many assumptions about who these in the late up to today. Putting these cases side does that sort of room. A meal actually influence detectives at all. No not really. I mean handy compton. Investigation will look at the hierarchy or hierarchy of suspects and that includes those people who are closest and had the opportunity and of course that would include the parents The first thing there's this guy moved to verify what the parents are doing what their actions were etcetera and much excluding them. You can move on very quickly to not at least consider or make sure. The pants went suspects We'll do mice be negligent in his top investigation. So you know you look at those closest munshi says that they had i roll. Then you move out and you know you look at people and geographical area you look at people have a history of Peps charles six fences and things like that site place to methodically. Move through These top of issues. I mean you could imagine the uproar with We went four two three nine weeks. Dan track and not wanted above. Do interview the parents and let it turned up in some scenario at it. I wear the offenders. Cold competence. I i mean i must move through these things and what people need to realize we learnt here. Listen lindy chamberlain that once someone's excluded they're excluded and these talk and things like facial movements tron. Draw conclusions from that really. Have night tom at all. Yeah and in this place conference that happened before the show today. The police really thanked the community and said that people really got involved. They had more than ten thousand tip-offs. How do what sort of changes what people get invested in terms of cases like this here i think is three main issues looked to concept of evil and we want to be coaxial and there's talkback said people focus on the medial look at this really three facets that will get detention the media one is if the is senseless fuck. We can't make a rational Examination towards someone did it. The next one is if they unique side got some strange circumstances in the last condition is the innocence of the victims. In this case it was unique in summer. Gods and it was a little side. The innocence young child in four years. Old which i think linda to the media attention The media is a tool and this tool used by the place And in this case. I used to quite well. They kicked it in the media. Kept a court count and idea at the early release. The reward was designed to do that in all of those things. Put pressure on an offender. Who's the with the child. They can't move anywhere that go. Be careful what. I do cy and it just adds pressure to them terry. Obviously it's hard to say exactly what will happen in the next few days but in terms of how clear is being supported and so on. What do you expect will happen now in terms of obviously you court case place. I charges could be light soon. Where do you say this going. You think they're to be trying to fill in the tom long morning. Back to nineteen days. Ago when cleo taken they'll be looking to see if there's any other offenders involved domain become squid is. Tom was it a single offender. And it'll be a collection of evidence. I mean the job is really just started for the place. It's not like the tv where they go off to a barren have drinks. I'm sure they'll have a few celebrates drinks but ultimately mice evidence gathering appetite price. They'll be forensically examining the house. The young girls clothing declining the etcetera Then i'll be doing electronic forensics so he's fines and computers things like that. So there's a lot of work to be done terry. Goldsworthy from bongino. Vesey thanks so much for coming on hack. Terry used to be a police detective. Now he's a criminologist and yet a lot of people. Getting in touch about this shown from bendigo a crowd this morning. When i heard the news about clear and i'm tearing up again now. Just amazing news. Yeah let's get into why so. Many people have been fascinated.

terry goldsworthy mine solf munshi Peps charles Dan track lindy chamberlain missy compton nicole tom linda terry cleo bongino Vesey Tom Goldsworthy Terry bendigo
"cleo" Discussed on Chats With Cats Podcast

Chats With Cats Podcast

03:29 min | 8 months ago

"cleo" Discussed on Chats With Cats Podcast

"When we're a happy valley house you might remember. They saw would've told you. I was driving a jeep wrangler and always absolutely fucking hooting up the hill going on the inside line where it goes to add to lock two lines turn onto seeking road or whatever it is and it's three and whatever was on the inside line up the inside you are madman and just go on bang and before i even would have gone to eighty ks to got the who was already gone. Like one hundred ten. What blob bernheim. And then all of a sudden plots in the background. A fuck you ha- thanks. Dc's law salah since he. This is a six month job. i'm gone anyway. Get a drive up a little bit pulled over where it was. Saif god comes. He's on my apologies for x. Amount of hundred maters before put milan. He's like she sped up. And you're doing these spate and i was like Yup and then yossif. If there's an excuse or you know what. I said all lucon understand. It's not an excuse but You know we just moved into this house and my parents told me that i've left the actually monitoring went thomas..

bernheim salah Saif Dc milan thomas
Interview With Carlacia Grant of 'Outer Banks'

Black Girl Nerds

02:21 min | 11 months ago

Interview With Carlacia Grant of 'Outer Banks'

"It is so great to meet you. My name is stacey and i write for black girl nerds and i have watched a feel episodes of outer banks and then kind of pulled away for a while and so my nieces and nephews are huge huge fans and so they're always talking about it and so i was like i know a little bit about it so this opportunity came up. I was like okay. Well let's let's see what this is about Especially knowing that season two is going to take place in the bahamas. We found in barbados but nj heated to look like bahamas. Well yeah what can first of all tell us a little bit about you and kind of how you got into acting and then how you stumbled upon this role. I started acting Will i knew. I wanted to actor when i was thirteen. Did a play. And i don't know. I just fell in love with the whole process of this is what i wanna do for the rest of my life. Just you know just kept pursuing it through the years in with getting outer banks I just got. I got edition. And i didn't wash yet like i remember seeing the show that my cuba never got around to watching it. But it said films in barbados. Looks like i'm emily an island girl at heart man. I never been to barbados yet. So i was like. Oh my gosh. I have to get this like i really wanna go to barbados And then i tape the audition. I sent the tape in. I didn't hear anything back. And i just kept seeing like re releasing the role like now to say day. I didn't i didn't even get a callback. Nothing and then like my manager call. And she's like. I'm still looking for that girl like they're still casting that that cleo role in like that show. He talked about the barbados shop. And i was like Shall i love the show like at this point. I already finished it in house Wanna be in the show She was like are listed. Send it again. Let's just on the tape again in literally just sent the exact same tape again Chemistry and russell and history.

Barbados Bahamas Stacey NJ Cuba Russell
Ethics: Is It OK To Break A Rule?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Ethics: Is It OK To Break A Rule?

"Today. We're going to tackle an ethical question if you're a long-time listener of this show. You may have heard me. Ask you for your thoughts on this question before. Hi my name is finn for. I'm from seattle washington and my age is time that it might question is is located to do something you told not to do and then never tell anybody. We've talked about ethics in some of our other episodes like the one about how we treat animals differently depending on where we're from and how we're raised basically ethics is how you behave based on what you believe is right and wrong. You might hear fins question and think of course. You shouldn't break a rule and do something you're not supposed to. It is not okay to do something that you're not supposed to do. It's not okay to break rule when you break and don't tell anybody it's not good no because it would be bad. No that will be no because it's usually just mean to get in trouble because you're gonna big trouble. I okay that no because we knew it again trouble now because it's not good if you get into a no because you're sort of lying and not doing what people asked you to that was gabby gabrielle. Juniper elliott corwin prudence and cleo. They all told us. They think it's not okay to do something you're not supposed to and then not tell anyone but we also heard from some of you who think well maybe sometimes it is. Okay it depends on what it is like if you're told to stay in the house but something happens and you have to leave that slyke a different thing. It's not okay to not tell anybody but it you if you do have to like leave or do something that your parents are semi tells you not to do. Then you should do to should tell

Gabby Gabrielle Seattle Juniper Elliott Corwin Washington Cleo Slyke
New Washington DC 911 Dispatchers to Get 10 Times the Geographical Training

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

New Washington DC 911 Dispatchers to Get 10 Times the Geographical Training

"Director of the Office of Unified Communications, Cleo Subito, mandated that new 911 recruits will get 160 hours of geographical training instead of the previous 16. Adding that current call takers will be getting refresher classes on the waterways and hiking trails most popular during warm weather. Getting the call receiver's off of the floor for a lot of training at once is difficult, logistically in order for us to be able to keep answering the phone, so I can 911 colors help really going giving us your entire address. When we asked, and we're always gonna verify it, but it would save some time if we get the whole thing at 11 of

Office Of Unified Communicatio Cleo Subito
Sentinel's Sinatraa Accused of Sexual Abuse by Ex-Girlfriend

Esports Minute

02:41 min | 1 year ago

Sentinel's Sinatraa Accused of Sexual Abuse by Ex-Girlfriend

"What a sad day in Esports, once again after being able to celebrate the women in Esports on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday have been a stark reminder of how far we still need to be go. First off before I get into this episode a trigger warning. This minute is going to contain details that include sexual abuse gaslighting harassment and rape on my dreams and the Esports minute from a sports network. So you've seen the allegation by now. I can imagine J one better known as Sinatra has been accused of sexual abuse with plenty of proof by Cleo his ex-girlfriend Thora is the former MVP of the OverWatch league has been playing ballarin for the central since retiring from the uw-l. The allegations are long and I'll link down below they are difficult to read but it is extremely important to do so in the Google Doc Cleo details how Sinatra coerced her into sex made her feel guilty for not wanting to have sex and progress past the point where she was saying no to confirm You having sex with her that's rape. We should call it what it is. There's audio of them having sex where you can hear that situation play out. Clearly. The write-up is nine pages long including screenshots of many different conversations. I want to read a section at the end that I think is especially important quote if this isn't proof enough, I'm not sure anything will ever be to get you to understand the hurt those done to me by this man. It's not his word against mine. It's his word against multiple points of proof and an audio of his voice not allowing me to say no to having sex and quote. She's right and while many people have spoken out about how horrible this is other voices have chosen once again to ignore a victim. The fron is one of the high-profile ones eating out quote e girls can be scary as a twitch streamer. They will try to debate or photoshop evidence to fuck you. I'm not saying she is one, but she could be and quote I really Dubose. Giving his horrible message a platform but I think it's important as it reconfirms what Cleo said at the end of her message. She knew some people wouldn't believe her even with the evidence. I hope a community we see these types of people for who they are and shut them off as this won't be the last time this happens victims shouldn't need nine-page Google Docs detailing their trauma complete with audio recordings and screenshots of multiple conversations for people to believe them. And when that happens that people's first reaction is somehow to blame Photoshop just shows how damning it is and how far people will go to not believe someone in this

Overwatch League Ballarin Sinatra Cleo Thora UW Google Dubose
From Australia to Canada, how Indigenous people are coping with isolation one year into the pandemic

Unreserved

04:27 min | 1 year ago

From Australia to Canada, how Indigenous people are coping with isolation one year into the pandemic

"It has been almost a year since the covid. Nineteen outbreak was declared a pandemic. it's an anniversary. I'm sure many of us are not too happy to celebrate. This year has been a real challenge in the pandemic has fundamentally changed our lives but many folks have found ways to not let isolation get the best of them. I know so many people out there all around the north. Were ready to support you. I think a good storyteller reminds you that all storms pass. We've been here before but we can help to route at resilience and make them more aware of how strong young folks are this week. Unreserved how indigenous people are turning to digital communities storytelling and culture feel connected to squash those isolation blues cleo denny writer richard van camp has essentially been on a one book a year pace for two decades his latest called gathered share some secrets to great storytelling and it includes seven stories. Elders from his community have shared with him. Richard is here with us now to talk about his new book and how storytelling can help fight and banished loneliness especially during this pandemic. he joins me now from edmonton. Welcome back to the show. Richard musi cho- feeling sal. My see my friends thank you. So let's party. yes let's party. So can you tell us about your latest book gather. Oh thank you. Must he chose so. Gather really an exploration of my journey as a storyteller. For those of you. Who don't know my name. Is richard van camp. I m c show denny. I was born and raised in fort. Smith northwest territories treaty. Eight country goes born in nineteen. Seventy one and i was raised in a town. It was. It's the maty capital of the northwest territories if it's paradise schwartzman throws territories officially quadri-lingual so bush cre- dna a french and english spoken at any given time. And when i graduated from high school i ran. I went from hero to zero. Because i had no idea what i wanted to do. No idea at all. I wanted to be a break dancer. I wanted to be a minjah. i was nineteen. I had a mullet. Some pinch hickeys. And i actually had a real existential crisis. I had a midlife crisis at nineteen. Cause i was like what am i gonna do. Who am i supposed to be. And i saw that. They were looking for drivers for the handy bus. They were looking for volunteers. And when i saw that on the green screen in fort smith northwest actors. The bango channel. I realized that that was what i was going to do. I was going to volunteer. I'll start driving the elders around. Because i was a really good canadian. Really good treaty indian. I was a really good person. I was a former. But i was a really poor ki- chou denny. I didn't know anything about our language. I knew a little bit of butter culture through our mother. But you know i was so busy having fun growing up by what i realized when i showed up to begin my apprenticeship as a handy bus driver in fort smith northwest territories to the matriarchs to the lighthouses to the mama. Bear's portsmouth arthritis territories. And i'm talking about irene centers. Dora toronto seraphine evans. Emilia gate tricks. I'm talking about the sweethearts of our community. They could see right away. That i was a really hollow indigenous person culturally and that i was searching and they took me under their wings and it was bingo runs. Hospital runs medical runs. It was trips to cancers in the northern store and trips to the landslide to watch the pelicans return it was through those driving shuttling and careering the royalty of our community wherever they wanted to be that they started sharing their stories with me so gather is really about what i learned. The smartest thing. I ever did belan was i realized a few months into apprenticeship as the handy bus driver. Fort smith risk territories. No one was recording our elders. Nobody because the mistake we make as we think everybody is going to be here forever. And so i remember explicitly having this. Oh my god. If i don't record our elders and get these stories downs. I think we're going to. We're not gonna have this opportunity my message with gatherings. Don't wait to record your heroes. Honor them now.

Richard Van Camp Cleo Denny Richard Musi Cho Quadri Fort Smith Chou Denny Schwartzman Edmonton Denny Dora Toronto Seraphine Evans Richard Fort Smith Bush Belan Arthritis Cancers
Could more women-led tech companies make the internet less awful?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:09 min | 1 year ago

Could more women-led tech companies make the internet less awful?

"The dating app. Fumbles wiped right on. Its ipo last week. Making it ceo whitney wolfe heard the youngest female ceo take a public. Not only that. But eight of the company's eleven board members also identify as women and that has more than just symbolic power bumble has styled itself as a women first dating app. The platform encourages them to send the first message. It also moderates the photos that are on profiles and the ones sent through direct messages so users won't get any revealing content. They didn't ask for sarah. Kunst is the managing director of cleo capital and she advised about on its venture capital arm. I asked her if all that translates into more women on the app then men. No you know it's funny. They're more men. Because it turns out that when you empower women and when you give people dignity and equity in the relationships that it helps everybody. It's not just women. And how much of that do you think is because of the type of content moderation. It does not allowing photos of shirtless men are worse. I think that's a huge part of it right when you think. Oh maybe maybe. I'll go meet the love of my life today on a dating app and instead you see something that you really did not want to see. It's disappointing and and it makes you less excited to do it and so bumble hs done a ton of work in making sure that you know people are who they say. They are with things like photo verification to that. They're not doing creepy mean rude things and if they do than than the the companies taking a really firm stance that it's really kind of one strike and you're out with everything from people who want to body shame to people who are sending lewd images that's not okay and certainly the legislation that they've been able to work on and push through in the state of texas to make sending a picture that exposes yourself illegal. It makes so much sense. Those are the kinds of things that are so obvious. In retrospect but but nobody in the dating app world and the online dating world had taken that stand yet. And i think it's pretty clear from the market debut. There's a lot of success in helping people. Just treat each other better given that success. Do you think you'll see more companies kind of taking that same path of moderation. I mean i think this is happening right. I really kinda everywhere right now in our world online when you look at everything from twitter's tussles with the last president to the facebook review board. They're starting to be this understanding that you can't be the wild west right you build roads in the real world but then you put up speed limit. I think we're seeing that happen. A lot. Right now in the digital world and i think companies like bumble. That had the vision that had the real kind of character to stand up and say. This isn't okay. we're not doing it. I think that really really matters. And so that. I think is something that we're going to see more of less of and it certainly hasn't escaped my notice that it seems like women led companies in particular are really leaning that way. Now this good news for bumble comes on the heels of what looks like bad news. For other women lead tech companies with so many facets of life the pandemic seems to have exacerbated inequities including with venture funding the share venture capital dollars for companies founded by women declined last year to point three percent according to crunch base. So what happened. And what do you think needs to happen at change. That i mean the good news is it is a frustrating problem with very simple solution. The solution is now fund more women and fund more more women. Because you either fundamentally believe that somehow men are just so much naturally better at running companies and raising money that they take ninety percent plus of all venture funding. Or you think that there is some inequity and there's a problem to be solved there and you know the reason to solve. It isn't the the social mission. It's because if you are leaving that much money on the table by not funding women. Then you're not gonna make as much money as you should and you know it is your job as a investor as a venture capital investor to make money and so by only looking at a sliver of the population. You know that's a lot of money you're not making and that's not good. So that's the solution. Why is it a problem. I mean the reason for this problem is always the same. The reasons never change. it's always. it's always sexism. It's always biased. It's always you know the concept of hama awfully of sane. Every human is generally drawn to people who remind them of themselves. And when you don't have enough diversity on the investing side of the table. You're very unlikely to see that diversity take place on the founder side you know. Bumble obviously had a really successful. Ipo do you think that will make a difference. You know in all of the stuff that you're talking about you know the success of stumbles ipo. And and being the youngest woman take a company. Public reminds me of this excessive katrina lake in such fix a few years back. And it's it is certainly helping to move that needle right if if you can't be what you can't see shortly after fumbles. Ipo came to marquette allison from from the ceo of our modern help. You know a company. That recently became a a unicorn. You have said openly that that she looks at that is is a real inspiration to think about you. Know how do we. How do we get an even younger woman to show her company next now. They're looking at that. I think that that deeply matter is built on the founder side and on the investor side. Because when you start to see that it becomes a lot easier of the next time a woman walks in your office building a company that you might not one hundred percent understand because it's not fixing a personal pain point for you and say well i mean if there's been all this success in the market and this person seems interesting incredible. Why wouldn't they be next. And so i think it's incredibly incredibly important.

Whitney Wolfe Cleo Capital Kunst Sarah Texas Twitter Facebook Katrina Lake Marquette Allison Bumble
Audit of Washington DC 911 set to begin amid search for new director

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Audit of Washington DC 911 set to begin amid search for new director

"DC's 911 system gets more than a million calls every year. Most are handled properly somewhere. Not now, W t. O P has learned new details about the upcoming audit of DCs Office of Unified Communications comes in a letter from DC Sordid there. Kathy Patterson it tell us Cleo Soup Edo, the new interim director of DC's 911. That the audit will begin two weeks from today. On February 15th. The audit will look at the effectiveness of DC 91 one's operations against national standards, see how it's training, stacks up and review the agency's internal investigations of past incidents. The audit is expected to take seven months and a final report on D. C s 911 system will be made public by the office of the Order. Iturbe

Dcs Office Of Unified Communic Kathy Patterson Cleo Soup Edo Office Of The Order Iturbe
"cleo" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"cleo" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Devastating pass rusher Cleo Mac. Standing on the side down sidelines. When that's what he gets paid $141 million to do his rush the passer. Do you think I'm kidding? Get the get the movies or get the films of the playback and take a look at the whole game and you just go to second half. What is Cleo Mac doing when it's third and long standing on the sidelines? That's where your past rushes. We'll forget about what he's on the sidelines. What's he doing when he's on the field? Something's not right. Well, the chipping on him and every once in a while they got the back road morning. I noticed that I couldn't believe it. What is this guy doing? What you standing on its 13 long You should be in there. I know I got it. And it's Bela Nickels and Barkevious Mingo whether to best pass rushers we had on the field, and even Quinn actually made a couple of plays on the interception that Bela Nichols God, he actually made a move and beat the right tackle and got a little pressure, forcing Stafford to throw that errant ball where Nichols was able to intercept it, But pressure It's something we have to have for this team to function Mark before you go next large one say this real quickly. You take Quinn, who's been missing in action all you're basically and Cleo Mac. Horrible your last year. It's a really if here this year. We listen when signed a contract for $70 million Clio Mac signed a contract for $141 million Now. What is that? Basically Get about $211 Million Good math 22 people. One can't even get close to the quarterback and we got the other one standing on the sidelines. Let me repeat that again. $211 million For four and five year contracts. One you can find on the field and the other one standing on the sidelines. You think I'm kidding? Take a look at it Well, and let's be clear. It's not CA Will Max fault and or Robert Quinn's fault that they handed him the money. That's one of the reasons or one or two of the reasons why Ryan Pace is most likely going to be out of here at the end of the year. The main one, of course, is he got the quarterback run multiple multiple times. What about Glennon? The quarterback? Guaranteed 19 million guy was here a year. That's right. Multiple multiple times, Nick Foles. And, of course, the Big one. That's why he's going to get fired. But hey, can you hear is my point. Those two guys, I'm talking about a paid to rush the passer, their edge rushers. It was money and don't quit. Christ basic. He's the guy might as well be walking up now on Rush Street. 312981 72 100 happen will be brought to you by Chevy Dr Chicago dot com and Ham Pose Truck. The Chevy Silverado Drive. What Hand drives Mike Hawthorn Woods. Thank you for being patient. Welcome to WGN. Go ahead. No accountability, no raft. When they had played. He had George Alice. You know, he knew darn well if, um Didn't play. Wow, George houses it would be all over. Hey, Mike, When Dan played Mike, that would be all over Mike. Okay? He was all over you before the game was over with. I know I was a little kid watching you at Soldier Field or a worldly field and then Dyke Stadium when I was eight years old, and then I met your Vagina Country club after your Playing days was I was a caddy. You sure you weren't 18, but now we don't because of free agency. There's no accountability who's pace accountable to hold on Arjun Way. God, I don't wanna bury the leader you. You saw Obi play at Dice Stadium when? In Illinois jersey. Is that true, Mike? I hear that right that wish when they worked moving from worldly field, Okay, Stadium defense, they were didn't have the soldier field deal. I want to hear what my uncle I you know it was from Gale Sayers was playing and I assume that was playing back then. But I grew up the way I was in my thirties who are late twenties when Dan played and I read all the books about the bear's back then and Yeah, just the one put up with this. No, he wouldn't trust me here. You don't hear Nandi. After that. Nobody's pissed that they lost. Nobody's up. You know, I That's why nothing's going to change until we get a buck ticker in there like that. Show us or somebody. I agree with you, Mike. Hi, Mike. I'll tell you what I like what you're saying. And you know what? Here's your 0.0 B $211 million for two people. To be correct to play the game. Now going into this arrangement, there has to be a commitment on both sides were gonna pay you and you're going to give us a level of play. Well, Guess what if you hired a kid to mow your grass, and it looks like Holy hell are you going to keep paying him? Are you gonna have some kind of? You know, strong words, Tonto come to an understanding and again, you know, naked comes out with that fake, You know, diatribe last week against the deep defense and you know what I know He was winking at the guy's going I've got to get on somebody. It's too late. The game happened Sunday at 2 30. We needed pressure on the quarterback and our best player on the team is on the sidelines, standing there looking like a dupe. Well, Stafford is going down the field like he's Bart Starr. I'll tell you what, Maggie The horses are out of the barn that cows are out in the past year. The dogs running wild, pal, your days are numbered. The cats are on the couch. Oh, my God! The fish jumped out of the okay. I don't know what's happening. I got Let's get to these calls. We'll get killed. Coming on back your hang in there, guys. We've got a segment that sponsored by Marquis coming up here, Which is always fun to look at what you're saying. I live it happened. Oh, be essential questions coming.

Mike Hawthorn Woods Cleo Mac Robert Quinn Soldier Field Stafford Bela Nichols Dan Nick Foles George Alice Chevy WGN Gale Sayers Ryan Pace Arjun Way Silverado Clio Bela Nickels Glennon Illinois jersey Marquis
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 1 year ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
Remote Learning is Testing Parents. Can Family Benefits Firms Help?

Business Wars Daily

03:25 min | 1 year ago

Remote Learning is Testing Parents. Can Family Benefits Firms Help?

"From wondering I'm David Brown and this is business words daily on this Thursday. September. Third Back to school has a whole new meaning this year and it's an understatement to say it's not a good one as schools reopened partially or fully online parents are understandably worried about their kids educations, and in many cases their help the new situation also reveals the extent to which employers have relied on public education to ensure parents can. Work with school buildings closed. It's become a frustrating often impossible three ring circus for parents who need to supervise their kids, online classes and meet their own work deadlines. In April family benefits company CLEO surveyed two, hundred, fifty of its members, all working parents of young children. The response is startled Cleo CEO Sarah Jane Sogeti she told Fast Company it was even more sobering than we had thought one in five were considering leaving the. Workforce due to the impossibility of working and parenting simultaneously with little or no help as the company noted in a press release working parents and their children are not all right. The potential brain drain of twenty percent of working parents mostly mothers quitting their jobs is a huge problem for employers and that's inspiring some to help fill the dramatic COVID nineteen gap in support for working parents. For example, Cleo launched the invest in parents. Pledge, which brings signatories, large companies like salesforce zoom and Oetzi together to dream up better ways to support stressed employees Sogeti told fast company that most companies were already adding some benefits like offering flexible hours in extending remote work until schools reopened properly, it's a patchwork with most companies coming up with their own offense, scattershot offerings and policies, and it's generally not easy for large companies to manage broad menus of benefits on their own. Here's where the pandemic is spurring entrepreneurial thinking cleo unrivaled rival benefits company fringe among others are creating family benefits in the same way the traditional firms offer for instance, mental health assistance, and adoption subsidies. Personalized Menus of benefits are particularly pertinent

Fast Company Cleo Sarah Jane Sogeti David Brown Salesforce Covid CEO
After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

The Bio Report

04:55 min | 2 years ago

After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

"Joining US pleasure beer. We're GONNA talk about far next. It's unique approach to drug discovery and its efforts to develop a therapy for the rare degenerative nerve condition shark Marie Tooth Syndrome. A let's start with the company's platform technology though and its efforts to discover what it terms, his cleo therapies what's meant by the term cleo therapy. Therapy. Comes from the idea of field tropic meaning that that there are often multiple pathways for any drug to follow. In fact that most drugs don't act on a single target but rather act on multiple targets. So for example, we all know that you know aspirin can treat a headache, but it also can. You know prevent clotting by. Platelets from forming clusters that. Eight including so. Many many approved medicine have multiple pathways, and the concept here for us is that diseases are not. Just single genetic kits that that that does exist. But often I'm diseases are the result of an imbalance between multiple pathways and insofar as multiple drugs acting on multiple pathways can correct that that's been the goal of far next our work we call it also polly pharmacology. This is a data intense platform uses a I. How exactly does it work and what's the range of data that draws upon? Well it starts with essential genetic data or G wash data. and. What we aim to do is look at a specific disease and look at the genetic lesions if you will within that disease and then all the pathways that are affected. When there is a genetic lesion liken charcoal, Mary Tooth, and then by looking at all those pathways, we can figure out which drugs or which molecules might interact with those pathways in start to put them together in combinations insofar as the combinations provide. A novel and non obvious exciting results that are true synergies. Synergies meaning that the result is greater than the sum of of each response and we do that with a lot of data. It's a lot of data inputs in a lot of a inputs and a lot of experience in pharmacology by our experts. Working at for next on our teams in. So with a multitude of approaches knowing that the output are combination medicines as opposed to single medicines, we've been able to achieve I think some some remarkable results. The company is focused on using this platform as a way of repurposing combinations of existing therapies. What's the case for doing this from a time cost speed on view? We in the past have I'm combined existing medicines although I would say going forward in the future we'll probably. Use a novel molecules are new chemical entities, so-called ease as the combinations of new medicines. It does afford when you're using existing medicines and much more efficient process however, simply because these medicines are already safe and well tolerated in so you can put them into clinical trials right away in advanced trials and get towards the FDA, an approval usually much faster than starting with a lot of the toxicology work that you have to do. With new new molecule. So it has been for us an inefficient process generally should be inefficient process, but most importantly, it should bring new medicines to patients and caregivers that they haven't seen before. You're focused on neurological conditions. This is an area where there's been great frustration. diseases have been somewhat intractable I. Think of what's happened in the area of cancer in terms of the use of combination therapies is that part of the rationale here that combination therapies are what's going to be needed to address diseases like Alzheimer's on Ls? Right in in diseases like Alzheimer's for example, you know there may be one or two or three. Causative factors but ultimately, it causes a significant imbalance in the brain and rather than addressing the first domino, which is still a huge debate in many companies in among many scientists, we often think maybe by making combination medicines, you can address a lot of the more downstream. Activities. That have resulted in the balancing that could be readjusted. So so as we can make a better new equilibrium with that new equilibrium, hopefully modified disease as we've done. Well. Let's talk about.

Alzheimer Marie Tooth United States Mary Tooth Aspirin FDA Headache
After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

The Bio Report

04:50 min | 2 years ago

After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

"GONNA talk about far next. It's unique approach to drug discovery and its efforts to develop a therapy for the rare degenerative nerve condition shark Marie Tooth Syndrome. A let's start with the company's platform technology though and its efforts to discover what it terms, his cleo therapies what's meant by the term cleo therapy. Therapy. Comes from the idea of field tropic meaning that that there are often multiple pathways for any drug to follow. In fact that most drugs don't act on a single target but rather act on multiple targets. So for example, we all know that you know aspirin can treat a headache, but it also can. You know prevent clotting by. Platelets from forming clusters that. Eight including so. Many many approved medicine have multiple pathways, and the concept here for us is that diseases are not. Just single genetic kits that that that does exist. But often I'm diseases are the result of an imbalance between multiple pathways and insofar as multiple drugs acting on multiple pathways can correct that that's been the goal of far next our work we call it also polly pharmacology. This is a data intense platform uses a I. How exactly does it work and what's the range of data that draws upon? Well it starts with essential genetic data or G wash data. and. What we aim to do is look at a specific disease and look at the genetic lesions if you will within that disease and then all the pathways that are affected. When there is a genetic lesion liken charcoal, Mary Tooth, and then by looking at all those pathways, we can figure out which drugs or which molecules might interact with those pathways in start to put them together in combinations insofar as the combinations provide. A novel and non obvious exciting results that are true synergies. Synergies meaning that the result is greater than the sum of of each response and we do that with a lot of data. It's a lot of data inputs in a lot of a inputs and a lot of experience in pharmacology by our experts. Working at for next on our teams in. So with a multitude of approaches knowing that the output are combination medicines as opposed to single medicines, we've been able to achieve I think some some remarkable results. The company is focused on using this platform as a way of repurposing combinations of existing therapies. What's the case for doing this from a time cost speed on view? We in the past have I'm combined existing medicines although I would say going forward in the future we'll probably. Use a novel molecules are new chemical entities, so-called ease as the combinations of new medicines. It does afford when you're using existing medicines and much more efficient process however, simply because these medicines are already safe and well tolerated in so you can put them into clinical trials right away in advanced trials and get towards the FDA, an approval usually much faster than starting with a lot of the toxicology work that you have to do. With new new molecule. So it has been for us an inefficient process generally should be inefficient process, but most importantly, it should bring new medicines to patients and caregivers that they haven't seen before. You're focused on neurological conditions. This is an area where there's been great frustration. diseases have been somewhat intractable I. Think of what's happened in the area of cancer in terms of the use of combination therapies is that part of the rationale here that combination therapies are what's going to be needed to address diseases like Alzheimer's on Ls? Right in in diseases like Alzheimer's for example, you know there may be one or two or three. Causative factors but ultimately, it causes a significant imbalance in the brain and rather than addressing the first domino, which is still a huge debate in many companies in among many scientists, we often think maybe by making combination medicines, you can address a lot of the more downstream. Activities. That have resulted in the balancing that could be readjusted. So so as we can make a better new equilibrium with that new equilibrium, hopefully modified disease as we've done.

Alzheimer Marie Tooth Mary Tooth Aspirin FDA Headache
Prosecutors Drop Murder Charge Against North Miami Man, Citing ‘Stand Your Ground'

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Prosecutors Drop Murder Charge Against North Miami Man, Citing ‘Stand Your Ground'

"Criminal charges are to be filed against a North Miami man accused of shooting and killing a former lover, according to the Miami Herald. Bernard ST Pierre won't be charged in last month's shooting that killed George Addison ST Pierre told investigators he was standing his ground because Addison, who went by the name Cleo was attacking him with brass knuckles that contain a powerful stun gun. There's surveillance video that supported ST Pierre's claim, so prosecutors won't charge him with manslaughter.

St Pierre Bernard St Pierre Miami Herald Addison Cleo
You may have heard this before: Venture capital investing is not very diverse

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:08 min | 2 years ago

You may have heard this before: Venture capital investing is not very diverse

"Earlier in this week we talked about how the tech industry should either hire more people of color or invest in them higher or wire on that ladder idea. The past few days have seen a few commitments from established venture funds. Softbank, launch. Day One hundred million dollar fund support people of Color Andriessen Horowitz launched at two point. Two Million Dollar Fund to support founders from quote underserved communities with a plan to expand it to fifteen million dollars over time, but if we're being honest here. That's not that much syrup. Kunst is the managing director of CLEO capital. They are real amounts of money, but compared to the size of the industry and the amount of underfunding that has happened. Black founders get less than two percent of all venture capital dollars, despite being fifteen percent of the population and starting companies at disproportionately high rates so that historical imbalance is certainly not going to be solved with you know these cumulative called one hundred fifteen million dollars in commitments that one hundred. Hundred fifteen million humility is already small, and then when you realize that it's not particularly earmarked for black or Hispanic, underrepresented minorities, you have to question how much is actually going to get into the hands of the people who you know have historically been underfunded the most right, and also, if we were talking about structural change, white year, mark money at all exactly and I think you know my fund cleo capital. We don't have a mandate around gender diversity that being said you know. Know, my portfolio is incredibly diverse. We have a lot of black founders. We have a lot of Asian and Indian in Hispanic founders. You know we. We have a lot of gay founders like we've. We just find great people and we invest in them, and they make us a lot of money are two best. Performing companies in the portfolio are founded by women of Color, and the other one is founded by a man of color and his business partner in both are immigrants the exact. Exact things that people are saying. How do we do it? How do we find it? We have to have this carve-out or this sort of remedial training or whatever it is, there are funds like mind that have just been able to do it and we're making a lot of money from doing it i. mean there's research that shows trillions of dollars is being left on the table by not investing in more founders of color like why isn't that economic argument working if nothing else? I mean we see the same thing with gender right I have been on NPR I've been on these shows a lot to talk about gender and race over the years, and we saw a lot of these same things after me to where you know, there's massive economic arguments right? There's only really two schools of thought you either fundamentally believe that only white men are capable of greatness, which is a really thought that I hope you're very quiet about or you're leaving money on the table, and there's not really another. There's not really another option, and and so I think. Think when people realize that, and when people except that, they say oh, I'm leaving money on the table. And by the way the job of venture capital is not to invest in a museum founders.

Cleo Capital Managing Director Andriessen Horowitz Softbank Partner
Coronavirus: The Mask Wars

Science Vs

02:12 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus: The Mask Wars

"Does the science tell us about wearing mosques like should we be putting them on or not back in March? The MESSAGE ABOUT MOSQUES WAS PRETTY CLEO. Healthcare workers needed them for the rest of us. Don't Papa Right now in the United States people should not be walking around with masks here at the CDC. They argue that. Having the average person where an ordinary mass can be counterproductive. The World Health Organization says. Unless you're sick you don't need a mask but just a month later. By April things started to change like here in New York. We were told it's mandatory to web mosques in public. You must wear a mess. The CDC was on the mosque trained to but they will like. Don't win medical mosques. What you should be wearing is a cloth mosque and suddenly it felt like Anthony. Fauci was singing a different tune. Some sort of mask live facial covering I think for the time being should be very regular part of how we prevent the spread of infection these days this such a push behind cloth mosques that even the surgeon general is putting out. Tory rebels on how to whip one up at home. Here's how you can make your own pace covering and a few steps with items you can find around the house. It's that easy. But is it that easy. This flip-flopping advice and confusion has landed us in a place with some people say yes. Mosques are super important forgetting this under control while others are saying forget about it. We don't think they do anything and both sides claimed to have science on this side. So what is going on here? Should we be wearing masks or not a couple of months ago? We published an episode about mosques the Healthcare Workers. But what about the rest of us when it comes to this pandemic? That's a lot of quote the mask the ten this science

CDC United States World Health Organization New York Anthony Fauci
Rosalind J. (Bee) Harris, publisher and art director of the Denver Urban Spectrum newspaper; 2020 Inductee to the Colorado Womens Hall of Fame

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

08:37 min | 2 years ago

Rosalind J. (Bee) Harris, publisher and art director of the Denver Urban Spectrum newspaper; 2020 Inductee to the Colorado Womens Hall of Fame

"Today. I am excited to bring you another twenty twenty inducted into the Colorado Women's hall of fame. Today's guest is Rosalyn. Jay Harris also known as be she is the owner publisher art director of the Denver Urban Spectrum newspaper since one thousand nine hundred eighty seven. She and her contributors have been spreading the news about people of Color and celebrated thirty four years. This year be has received numerous awards over the years including the Martin Luther King Junior Humanitarian Award. The National Council of Negro Woman Trailblazer Award the girl scouts. Two Thousand Women Women of distinction honorary and numerous awards from the Colorado Association of Black Journalists in February twenty twelve. She received the President's Volunteer Service Award. From president. Barack Obama enduring the Denver Urban Spectrums Twenty Fifth Anniversary Celebration. Roselend be Harris was bestowed with an honorary doctorate. A public service from the Denver Institute of Urban Studies Adult College in twenty thirteen. She received the lifetime achievement award from the Colorado Black Chamber of Commerce in February. Two Thousand Fifteen B was recognized as one of the top twenty five most powerful women in Denver by the Colorado Women's Chamber of Commerce. In October she received a lifetime achievement. An excellence award from the Colorado Black Women for political action. And that's not even all of the awards that have been bestowed upon her for a full list. Check the show nuts. Now let's Meet Be Harris a twenty twenty Colorado Women's hall of fame inductee welcomed extraordinary women. Radio be thank you. I look forward to chatting with you this afternoon. I do too. Congratulations on being inducted into the Colorado Women's Hall of Fame Twenty Twenty industrialised. Thank you. It is a great honor. Our wasn't expecting it but I'm so happy about it and look forward to the induction ceremony and much ideas away. It's the day before my birthday. So what a great birthday present that is for me. That's a great birthday present for you. Congratulations that's really good. So you founded the Denver Urban Spectrum newspaper Nineteen eighty-seven tell us about the story and how the seeds were planted for the newspaper. You know it's funny that you would say how the seeds were planted. Because I always start that off when I talked to When I when people ask me that question and I refer to them I refer to it because my from my two partners that helped start the publication thirty four years ago. I was approached by Robert Stewart. Who actually in it? I think he was working in the computer systems and here approached me and said he was looking for I think he's looking for a graphic designer and I've always had a graphic design studio. Were worked in that worked in that field for many years and And I still do I still do as a matter of fact. I'm fortunate that I've been working on the publication in that area. Also as in addition to the publisher but I was doing freelance Moguls business cards stationery menu Annual reports and you know he asked around the community and several people say well he would be harassed anyway we met talked about the publication and I asked him I said well. Can you go and get Working on the business planning come back and see me and he said okay. So I don't know must have been three. Maybe six months went by and then I got another. I got another call from Ron. Still and he's a photo journalist. He's the timeframe and he wanted to start a publications like knock on my head again Publication keeps coming my way and so after I talked with him. I said well Ron. Let's go see Robert and see how business plan is going and called Robert and we met. I called them and actually he just said Oh. I forgot all about that publication. It's like shame on you so anyway we got together. The three of us get together and talk about it and We went out and I went to a printer in and found out that to print publication. It's going to be about eleven hundred in two thousand eleven hundred dollars to print publication small publication twelve pages and so we went out to get about eleven hundred and two dollars worth of advertising temperate. This announced the coverage is to get that first one going and so after that you know Ron still in A. He's Oh God that was too much work for me. So he said he wants to be a photo journalism. I think he went to the Indianapolis Star. So Robert Nigh continued it on but I always say that Robert Plant the seed then run feel came and he kind of water did and I'm I'm out of there so all I can say is the rest is history and then going on for thirty four years. Now that's Awesome. And and what was your drive. What was your. Why did you want to create this? What's interesting because I was a graphic designer My wife was just really kind of support the community. We didn't have Where there were a couple of other publications and you know there's a couple of two round but I think there was a need for the communities of Color and I think our perspective with just a little bit different we We actually Stirred the focus was on women who Latino Women African American Women Asian and native American but That was on women initially the first the first year actually the first year we did a story on. Oh Gosh you know. They were Dell a bad wound. She was a native American community. There was one who I don't even nephews women where they are. Today she was Asian We K- you the OH Gosh okay Florence Hernandez Komo's will also be the story on Cleo Parker Robinson worried cover stories And they were phenomenal. You know phenomenal people that we have the covers on but the first year. We did have a little glitch So well we had a little glitch. And there was a fire we There's a fire in our building and we lost a lot of material some of the original artwork. Kinda change the focus but the other thing too. You know a kind of evolved more to the African American community because the Asian community had you know they they. I'm sure they still do have a lot of publications in Hispanic Community A Lotta publications. Also so they kind of evolved to the African American community over the years. Okay awesome awesome and as you were dimming. So is this something that you dreamed about was something that just happened to unfold for you. I did not dream about it. You know and you're right. It consists is just actually something that unfolded for me. I was a graphic designer and I it just it just came to me. I I went to school in Omaha and I. I was a fine arts. Fine Arts majoring in finance and a minor in journalism. So I always feel that you God has a plan for everyone you know and it. Kinda it was Kinda destiny because I would agree with that. I can tell you that it was something that are meant to step into. And all of the signpost showed up for you to lead you in the right direction exactly and I feel that way with a lot of things people were saying. What are you you know you know when people are talking? I say I've got a I've got a little Assistant and She's she's from Micronesia. And I love her dearly like a granddaughter and she always says whatever plan that God has for me that's where she's going and so that's what I feel also I think there's a reason and a purpose for his plan on everyone's life and I feel like this is my year purpose because I do have a few more things that you know. I WANNA

Jay Harris Thousand Women Women Of Distin Colorado Latino Women African American RON Denver African American Community President Trump Colorado Black Women Colorado Women's Chamber Of Co Publisher Martin Luther King Junior Huma Denver Urban Spectrum Fame Twenty Twenty Fine Arts Colorado Association Of Black Denver Institute Of Urban Stud Lifetime Achievement Award Colorado Black Chamber Of Comm Robert
Man convicted in 'Fast and Furious' murder of U.S. border agent sentenced to life

Rush Limbaugh

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Man convicted in 'Fast and Furious' murder of U.S. border agent sentenced to life

"Eric cleo oh sorry every honest is handed a life sentence for his conviction for first degree murder and other charges agent Terry's death expose the Obama administration's botched gun walking program known as fast and furious the program was launched at the a TF Phoenix field office which let firearms purchased by straw by yours walk across the border into Mexico without notifying the country two of the weapons were found at the scene were Terry was killed others were found at over one hundred fifty crime scenes in

Eric Cleo First Degree Murder Terry Obama Administration Mexico
Black News Channel launch fulfills lifelong dream of J.C. Watts

In Black America

08:55 min | 2 years ago

Black News Channel launch fulfills lifelong dream of J.C. Watts

"On this week program. The black news channel J. C. Watts Co founder and chairman and Gary Wars Law vice-president of news and programming the black news channel in Black America. Well when you started your broadcast day are watching our broadcast day. We're going to start off with a three hour block off of news from six. AM until nine am. Were then going to have a program live out of Washington. DC It focuses on the politics of the day as seen through the eye congressional Black Caucus And then show is over. We go into another live. Broadcast from. Tallahassee are studio with two young female anchors and that show is going to be called being a woman and it's GonNa highlight issues of the day as it relates to young girls up to the age of women's thirty They're going to talk about issues. That are important to them them in the afternoon and then we go into a series of programs that we call a BNC presents. Those programs will feature documentaries on Michelle Obama. Barack Obama Obama beyond say Riana Little Lane Whitney Houston Michael Jackson. If it's a pop culture person we have a show is going to spotlight that as well as Morgan Freeman. Freemen look at the chilling circuit blues. But we kind of a little bit of everything for everybody in that program. Gerry wardlaw vice president of news and programming. The Black News Channel on January twenty fifth nineteen eighty black entertainment. Television made his debut at the time it will become the most prominent television the network targeting the African American community we now have the African Channel Bounce TV. Aspire TV CLEO TV own NTV one just to name a few on January six twenty twenty. The black news channel began providing all things. African American put together by. A group of entrepreneurs led by former congressman J. C. Watts black news channel will be the nation's only twenty four seven provider of cable news programming programming dedicated company unique perspective of African American communities. BNC will provide an authentic new voice that represents African Americans in mainstream media and foster political economic and social discourse the new channel promises to inform educate and empower nearly fifty million African Americans. Now of living in this country Racelis in Black America spoke with Gary Word Law regarding the network and Tennessee. Little town called South Pittsburg which which is near well not a whole lot. But I grew up in Chattanooga went to school there. I started my career in broadcast there. They'd sixteen fifty years later. I find myself the black news channel. My journey has taken me from Tennessee or the West Coast back to the East Coast New York Washington. DC Seattle adult. I've kind of been all over the place but I'm very happy to be In Tallahassee ready to help launch this black news channel what sparked at initial interest in journalism and communications. When I was a kid working at a restaurant I used to argue with some of the customers about everything thing from religion to politics and man coming off and she's pity office in the navy and he said to me one day is kids? You got a lot of mouth you ought to be on television and of course I laugh because there were no black on television in my hometown. he said I want to go up there and talk to The station manager. I know him to send you. You just give you a job. Well he was Judas word I went to the station. They gave me a job. I started working in the studio and a year and a half later I was on the air the air for some forty years. You remember that I I do I was it was ATV television Chattanooga and my title was floor manager. What what that meant was? I had to manage to clean that floor every night. But he was an auspicious start but nonetheless it spun a career having been in an industry for such a long time. What differences and innovations have you seen so far that has made what you do more efficient in a better? When I first started working in television we shot black black and white reverse negative film They don't even make such a thing thing I don't think anymore so we've gone from the old FEM camera dates to film processors now. Everybody who has a camera is a journalist and so the innovations have been just absolutely phenomenal now in the sand. You a now the vice-president News and program for the Black News Channel. Give us a thumbnail because we're going to go through some of the things that you are anticipating on doing with what channel what channel will look like. Well when you start your broadcast day are watching our broadcast day. We're going to start off with a three hour block of news from six. AM until nine am. We're then going to have a program live out of Washington. DC that focuses on the politics of the day as seen through the eyes of the Congressional Black News of the Congressional Black Right Caucus Rather When that show is over we'd go into another live broadcast and from Tallahassee Studio with two young female anchors and that show is going to be called all being a woman and it's GonNa highlight issues of the day as it relates to young girls up to the age of women's thirty They're going to talk about issues issues. That are important to them in the afternoon. And then we go into a series of programs that we call the DNC presents. Those programs will feature documentaries resigned. Michelle Obama Barack Obama beyond say Riana Little Lane Whitney Houston Michael Jackson. If it's a pop culture person we have a show. Oh there's GonNa spotlight that as well as Morgan Freeman look as a chilling circuit blues. But we kind of a little bit of everything for everybody and that program later in the afternoon we'll have another show. That's primarily focused on females. It's called ladies choice and this show is gonNA spotlight issues. That are important to women. Thirty plus and so that's going to be hosted by our two female anchors one of which happens to be a clinical psychologist. We've then go into a three hour block of prime signed is that will air live from our studios and obviously it'll be in prime on the west coast. We also have programs that featured Dr Corey. Hey Bear as our staff medical person who will be producing programs on health as it relates to the African American audience mark McClellan formerly A. CBS News will a host program for men. And it's called all things men and so he's going to sit back and talk with everybody from ministers to football players so we're GONNA the highlight those issues that are important to fellows and that's just some of the highlights. We're GONNA have Olympic programming. We have a SPEC- sports programming. We have FIBA world basketball. Aw We have star workout. So if it's of interest to the black audience is of interest to us and we intend to put it on as well as spotlighting. The Best of you are the best of the best from the nation's HCC us with a program that's specially designed for our HEC students to be able to show themselves off as did were in programming that we're gonNA produce around their reports as well. How did you all go about deciding what to put on air? I'm quite sure you had a large whiteboard aboard blackboard or whatever kind of board that you all use to come up with this lineup. It really wasn't that complicated. I basically say that for the most part. Yeah I mean I would talk to people that I know One of my favorite Research facilities was called the barbershop and barbershop. And you listen to the brothers and you'll come up with and stuff yes right now. I like to say that the barber shop as a black man. It's country club. I'm doing and be myself and listen and you get some pretty You know you get some pretty good research on what's happening in the black community and You go to the beauty shop you get the same thing so I listened to the people and and tried to put together programming. That people told me I was of interest to them. HEARD THAT MR warlock. What makes you excited about this invention well for the first time and forever We're going to have a network where we are unapologetically. Black The world we're looking at catch US being ourselves and they'll find out that we're more than crime in the streets. We're more than music. We're more than sports and we have brains. We have opinions. We have scientist. We have educators. We have lawyers. We have doctors. We you know we have specialists It's nothing wrong with being a star football player a basketball player. It's nothing wrong with being a musician Russian but the world's GONNA see us in greater scope than just athletics are music

Barack Obama Obama Morgan Freeman DC Tallahassee BNC Chattanooga Congressional Black News Tennessee Washington Black America Whitney Houston West Coast Michael Jackson Football Congressman J. C. Watts Founder And Chairman Michelle Obama Vice-President News
The Power of Showing Up

Zen Parenting Radio

08:56 min | 2 years ago

The Power of Showing Up

"Us. Today is Dr Dan Segal. Who wrote a new book coming hanging out January? I don't know we'll get the day. Put it in the show notes but the name of the book is the power of showing how parental presence shapes who are kids become and how their brain gets wired. He co-authored that with Tina Pain Bryson But I I I feel the need to say that we've been doing this podcast for nine in years nine years and we've done over five hundred episodes on every single one. I say this phrase and I'm pretty sure it's yours. It's yours and we stole it and we give them credit. Yes we we give them credit do give but we don't give them credit every single time otherwise it'd be a lot but we have said your name many times The best predictor of child. How's well-being as a parent self understanding? Did that come from you. Yes well I mean it comes from me. Summarizing beautiful research of the field of attachment yes gutters yes. Thank you for that. Because that's become the platform for nine years of podcasts. Is that yes. So it's safe to say that we agree On a lot of parental issues. So that influenced by your work But just to jump right in so obviously the foundation of the book is I For parents to feel say for parents to help their kids feel safe seen sued. And then if you do those things that'll be securely attached. I did actually read the book. And I'm not a fast reader but would you know what I spent rates through this one so that goes to show that this is a book that anybody could read very quickly but I fear of a a good way to start. Is You talk about the introduction or close to it the strange situation research study. And I'm wondering if you can share with our listeners. What that is is and and why you decided to include your book? Sure well I mean the field. In general of Child Development Has Within it. You know the field of attachment research. which is what do we know about how kids are shaped by their experiences? after birth and one of the most important things to know about that is it's you know aspects of your parent You with you as a kid that shapes you so of course. You have your temperament that shaped by genetics on but then you have your experience which is in in the early years especially shaped by your parents. The way the field of science that studies that looks at it is by. I observing how children interact with their parents the first year life so infancy and onward and in the first year we can observe how those patterns of communication are happening and then we do a paradigm the infant strange situation which means you put a twelve month old more or less in a strange situation where there initially separated from their caregiver. And there's a a stranger in the room. been the caregiver comes back. Then they interact and you. Are you know filming all this taping and then Dan you have the stranger and the caregiver go away. So there's no one in the room so it goes on for about three minutes. A the child can tolerate it and parents watch you can tolerate and then Then carry it becomes back again so it's a separation paradigm but what you're finding in the research that's the most useful is the reunion behavior of the child interacting with this particular parent. So is the beautiful thing about this measure from Mary. Ainsworth built on the work. She did John. Colby Elaborated in many ways by her graduate student. Mary main is to send me to sense what you're really measuring as a relationship. You're not measuring something about the child. You're measuring how this child with this parents given their history over in this this case when you're of life manifests in the child's way of dealing with knowledge the separation but especially the reunion and that's why you know in Developing Mind is textbook not now into its third edition. I thought it would be good for graduate students and undergraduates to know about infant strange situation. Ben Ben to build on bat to understand what does it mean to have a secure mental model secure Schema of attachment that manifests insert third baby in the infants. Strange situation that continues onward for the kid and interacting with his friends with his teachers out she will be actually in summer camp and then even tracy elements of it to how we act as parents or his friends or his lovers So there's some really you know. Amazing Longitudinal findings. Of course everyone is open to change. But there are these general patterns that Research suggests Sir. You're how experience shapes nominate the direct way that our brain in a sense of takes in those experiences but then how we adapt adapt to them. Those are the two things direct impacts and adaptation and. That's what Tina Bryson and I my my old student June. WHO's now my colleague and Co Writer? Tina pain bryce tonight do in these books is take the framework of interpersonal neurobiology for presenting the the developing mind and then molded for parents gail that accessible easily to try to put in. You know remember language so you can. Actually you remember when you're in the in the heat of parenting and that's that's what we do so I have a question about 'cause it you're saying it's their experience. And then how they adapt adapt so that could explain why like we have three daughters. They they're going to grow up in this environment. Maybe have similar experiences but the way they adapt up to those experiences may be different so the way that they eventually see the world experienced the world could be unique cracked. They may not all have the same Even if we had a pretty secure attachment the way that they experienced their lives could they could have different outcomes. Correct absolutely well. Here's the thing about it. That's what you're saying is so useful you know. Even if you had identical twins where you know their genes were the thank. Each of us has a way of having energy flow through us. Having the way we turn that into information. That's unique you know and so you might say well. The temperament is likely to be very similar of their genes are identical which is true. There's a big genetic influence on temperament but the way we adapt may be uniquely our own way of basically developing personality in which is temperament of experience. Now the thing that gets complicated is parents can actually actually relate differently to different kids and this is where it gets very subtle and from individual point of view very significant. So so let's say you you have a child who's more outgoing than another child and you yourself or outgoing and you headed image in your mind of wanting child. WHO's outgoing was gonNA be a big? You know soccer player and she's GonNa be star of the musical and you know run for the president or something like that well. Those are your expectations. So you may treat your outgoing child one way but then your child house more inwardly focused. You may get frustrated with an irritated with her because preps you yourself weren't appreciated for you were were. You may have a feeling of being inadequate inside of you. This where self understanding comes and so for the parents who may not have worked through their own issues from their a childhood. They're more likely to have what you call parental presence so someone with presence would say I WANNA see my child exactly Cleo. She is how he is in. This one's more introverted. I know I may be frustrated but I'm going to let that frustration go so so I can see my child sue them keep them safe. Let them feel really good about who. They are rather that they're disappointed me. Because they're not matching my expectation dictation

Tina Pain Bryson Dr Dan Segal Graduate Student Mary Ben Ben Soccer Ainsworth Cleo Colby John Co Writer President Trump
"cleo" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"cleo" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"AJ the curve cleo is DJ damage you might know from the hit show my wife and kids and of course the iconic show Martin we got Tisha Campbell in the studio I know you know when I can get to the vigil but you're saying well now are you happily single I am I am not looking for anybody right now because I think I still want to work on me I get is the first time in twenty two years that I've been and I'm scared I think upscale I have really so you live with these young ally I he gets all the time all the time all the time but you know what I you know what bad thing I mean not for you it's like hello **** but it is that I don't know so I have a girlfriend who's like two been married seventeen years her boys there's you know like in there you know early teens right now and she has no idea who she is without being a wife and a mother what does this journey of self discovery kind of look like for you right now you know what are the things that what are the moments that you have were like yo that's dumb I know that I'm smart that's what I see is that I had to learn a lot in the last couple years and I'm smart and you know you gotta understand I went straight from my mom's house here has another house and they were the old they always took care of the finances and all of that either you had no break in between to go out and just be a young girl on the street he means thought no no okay you know what I mean me too much time between I can't even believe that yeah still yes because me and my friend had a conversation about the responsibility of who I am she said you can't just have consensual nothing because you're gonna play yourself out I was like bass not Hey the end of your life I agree with her when I look at millennials and have conversations with all these people they are more fluid and I'm not even talking about with their sexuality I'm talking about just being able to in my day back in the nineties we will look down upon for just casual thing yeah our own Senshi wow okay so when we come back I want to ask you everyone knows you just co hosted the real but you had an amazing surprise not just for one their guests but for the entire audience I want to ask you about that.

Martin Tisha Campbell twenty two years seventeen years
"cleo" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"cleo" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Frightening indeed out of Cleo, Michigan. The Washington Examiner is rob cruelly has the story. Pete boot. Ed judges brother-in-law is accusing the gay democratic presidential hopeful of hijacking his family's history for political advantage by crafting a bogus backstory of poverty, homelessness and homophobia. Ryan glenn. Thirty four years old. A pastor in small town. Michigan said he was inundated with death threats and hate mail. When stories surfaced this month, claiming he was a bigot who had a falling out with his younger brother Chason when Chason came out of the closet, the reports, were based on a Washington Post article, you really shouldn't look to the Washington Post for any doctor evil owns that. And it's really, it's it looks like a newspaper, but it's not. That's their slogan. Their slogan is it looks like a newspaper. But it's not who would read that paper with a slogan like that. The reports were based on a Washington Post article which described Chason twenty nine how he was forced out of the family home and never reconciled with his two brothers, but rather than rejecting his brother Chason, a would be first gentleman. Glen, man. This is Jason brother, the pastor Glasmann Ryan Glenn Glasmann, who has run the Cleo community church for the past two years said his family has been loving and supportive throughout. On their from a small city and his husband child who grew up with nothing and his parents, kicked him out. It makes perfect political story for the campaign. He said, in an interview with the Washington Examiner at his church in Cleo. Michigan to me. That's very sad. The pastor said if that's all you have to stand on you're not fit to be president of the United States. The great church building stands on the outskirts of Cleo at town of about two.

Washington Post Washington Examiner Cleo Michigan Chason Ryan glenn Glasmann Ryan Glenn Glasmann Pete boot rob Ed United States president Glen Jason Thirty four years two years
"cleo" Discussed on V103

V103

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"cleo" Discussed on V103

"You wanna do download the app today. Get around. It's go time. Chicago weather cloudy with rain, high fifty two that's what's happening. I'm Perry Williams on the Steve Harvey morning show on. Baby. Lesson gonna gets. Pop. No. Cleo. If you go. If you say. Dan? Just. Lucky? Lucky for you. That's. Sure. Rico say the word. May be. Thomas. Brazen parish evidence. Tell me. It..

Perry Williams Steve Harvey Thomas Rico Chicago Dan
"cleo" Discussed on V103

V103

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"cleo" Discussed on V103

"Was on echo just say play one two point seven three iheartradio. Baby. Impacted. It's top of Joe drought. Jammies. Been cleo. If you got to. If you say. Ben cannon. Just. Lucky? That's. Lucky? Sure. Rico as say the word. May be. Static. I promise. Peres evidence. Now, tell me. Ben. Just. Lucky? That's lucky..

Ben cannon Rico Peres Joe
"cleo" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

05:07 min | 3 years ago

"cleo" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

"End But business, plus integration. The mazen. This is proving to be a timely and compelling value proposition to customers is because as companies are faced with increased base business. Do not digital type summation they moved to manage the Arkansas of in the externally consistent partners together with modernizing internal lighting systems is causing a lot of problems. But our customers that they need help from you.

Cleo Blockchain WWW dot IOT degration Houston Connie CIGNA Facebook Sussex writer Neil forty five percent thirty one percent six year
"cleo" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"cleo" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Hey, Shane drinkers. All police headquarters. Shane in the offer this last five seconds after that it gets donated back to the police department, namely me. Good to me. You're not hurt chain just described. You can't you can't we find the body found. Cleo, I figured you would fight us would you'll be an inspect talking about the murder. Cleo Fien was dead shot four times no weapon evidence. We may not be as smart as you seem we call it a murdered body. But are you talking about the one that was stolen from the tool? Like, maybe you're heard worst nice on the department. Don't expect us to know. And I ate, but my brother-in-law's. What about Penelope, which Penelope Cleo system wasn't? She there. What were you doing down there? Anyway. What possible interest? Could you have in the delay see sanctuary for homeless girls, just social work? I feel everyone should speaks a real cute Irishman. You want to keep your license nation. Green could dry up and blow away. He breathing. Hot lies on it. Don't crop leave. I had an idea I can hand this thing off pretty with a ribbon for try real hard. You don't break. My maybe yours too. When I got out of hand fug at rolled in from the ghost gathered up some freshwater lake Porsche train. Then clump down market street is heavy indefinite. Elephants foot all of which.

Penelope Cleo Shane drinkers Cleo Fien murder five seconds
"cleo" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"cleo" Discussed on KCRW

"Family's maids. Best. Cleo's played by first time actress, Lisa upper ACO, and she herself is up for the best. Actress award the world William troops spoke with a recently had just graduated to become a teacher when you were cast for Roma with the success of the movie, how has your life changed at the La Macarena? No, I just finished. My studies to become a teacher. I haven't actually taught these whole adventures that would accosting calling Lahia co which is where I was born in coop. You think you're going to go back and be a teacher after the all the hoopla over Roma quiets down. Please make Andrea. Said. Name. Well, I love to make another movie I want it to become a teacher because that's a way to reach a lot of people and etiquette them. And now, I have this covered at my making a movie, you can also teach people many things whether Cincinnati just you were doing a photo shoot at the border barrier in Tijuana when you found out that you had received the Oscar nomination, what was your reaction at that moment, none of the etc. In missile dagger. I could not believe it. I simply broke down crying from all the emotion. I was just hoping that the film will be nominated for best picture, and I never expected to see my name included in the best actress category, and in the company of all this amazing actresses, I think, that's why burst into tears. How do you feel now that it's been several weeks since you found out about the nomination? Get. Okay, sigli. What? Saying I think I'm still feeling the same. I don't know. I still can't believe that any of this is even possible and besides being director of Korans autobiographical film and a beautiful movie to to watch Roma. Also touches on a lot of social issues like class and race and ethnicity when you were doing the film, could you see all of the ramifications musket book of we this, Gordon, this were things that I discovered little by little since we didn't have a script and within really know how the story wouldn't fall. So every time we feel my scene. I could sense some of the issues that were being raised. And it was surprising to me. I had read that your mother also worked at a mystic worker. How personal was this role for you? Remastered Parramatta Tampa. Yes, my mother has been a domestic worker for a long time. And that was one of the things that crossed my mind a lot. That would this movie I could honor her as well. How did your mother react to the movie when she finally watched it likes to have? Yeah. When she liked it a lot. If there were parts.

Roma Gordon La Macarena Cleo William troops Family Lisa Tijuana Cincinnati Andrea Lahia co Oscar director Tampa Korans
"cleo" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

04:49 min | 3 years ago

"cleo" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"We gotta repeat about whole argument about why Kato is not betrayed while. He's the betrayer the ultimate betrayer. The man you must not be named the guy that is bad and should be kicked out of the house. We get a whole new cycle of it. Because he said, yes, he said the b word betrayed should not have done that. Oh my goodness. And so now in retaliation Lolo does I team are, you know, what's even worse about Kato? He compared you to miss Cleo. Yes. Done. Oh my goodness. Yes. So Kato so miss Cleo. Is a black woman who wears scarves on her head. And that is why Kato made the comparison. And that is really I mean, this really sets. Hey, Mark off because she feels like he is being racist comparing her to somebody who, you know, they look similar in the sense that they have the same skin tone, and they wear the same head garp. That's where it came from. Yes. And. I think there are very real cases to be made that this was definitely an insensitive remark rod joke, and that Kato should apologize. And that yes, this is this is genuinely. Could could could be considered offensive. I think there's been a lot of debate about it. Whether or not it is. But either way if taymor takes offense to it. Then I think it's something that should be apologized for Kato. Actually does apologize for it. But but taymor does not accept the apology. Tomorrow says that he is a racist sexist pompous misogynist asshole. I don't accept your apology. Yeah. My favorite was pompous out of all of the insults. Got like racist, sexist Astle pop s. How dare she called him pompous? But yeah. And of course, this is another time where there's an argument happening off camera, and I'm just listening while watching Joey groom himself. Yes. And so. The feeds the the people in charge of the cameras and the show do not really like this anymore. They're like this drama has become a little too much. And so they want to avoid showing it I do not expect this to make the show e there were a lot of feed cuts a lot of fees being down. They hit that button. Once twice. I don't even know how many times, but it definitely brought feeds down because this was something that they. Yeah. Just clearly did not want everybody to see. So I don't know what that means. But were definitely not going to see it on the edited show. That's what I do know. Yes. So. It's a very messy situation. It continues to devolve into name calling and apologies and not accepting apologies and yelling and threatening. And just really just puts a puts a nice little bow of terribleness on the whole day. Yeah. I thought we were I thought okay feeds are kind of calming down. We're going to getting back to strategy. And then I don't know the miss Cleo thing happened. And it was I mean it was allowed like I thought Lois yelling loudly. Earlier taymor was very very upset. Like, this is beyond an apology. It's unacceptable for you to speak to me this way. I like pompous. Racist, sexist, atoll, dare KEDO. Insane. It's it's bad. It is it is bad. So that's that's what's going on in the big brother celebrity house. Hey, that's what I'm saying. Pour. A little Ryan was the Hilton make it out before this craziness came down. Another instance of Joey having the right priorities here one he goes and talks to the women to make sure that they know he's still on their side. He's like, you know. In the worst part about it is last night. I was just trying to take a shower, and they were just like, hey, can we just talk? I it was like I just want to shower shower bath man stuff is no joke. And there was another funny. Joey moment yesterday when he takes a felt like seventeen hour, long shower. But it was it was a really long shower, then Dina comes into trying to take a shower the water's cold like Joey used up all the water. No more hot water in the manner. Oh, man..

Kato taymor Cleo Joey Ryan Mark Dina Lois seventeen hour
"cleo" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"cleo" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Miss Cleo's. Lead attorney, MS Cleo. Other side. Who's the other guy says name? Oh, yes. I his whole defense team has psychic John Edwards is going to get miss, Cleo. And he still goes to jail, and they'll be like we did not see that coming. Minutes after the hour. Stephanie Miller show. History of air America lives here. This is w CPT eight twenty Chicago's progressive talk facts matter. Ellen Miller co host about Chicago. And this is w CPT civil rights snapshot on July. Second nineteen fifty one Sylvia Rivera was foreign Ray Rivera in New York City, early self-described and proud drag Queen miserable had a tough childhood by anyone's standards dark skin from Venezuela and Puerto Rican heritage, a wildly dysfunctional, family and acting feminine all contributes a young Sylvia's troubled life, miss Rivera, left home at age eleven she had already been involved in sex work, hustling with her uncle has a queer Latina, Sylvia Rivera fought for the inclusion of transgender people drag queens and homeless queer youth marginalized in an often, violently homophobic society. Sylvia Rivera passed away in.

Sylvia Rivera Miss Cleo Stephanie Miller John Edwards Ellen Miller Chicago attorney New York City Puerto Rican America Venezuela
"cleo" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"cleo" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Tomorrow single break the future. Miss cleo. Snap back on automatic flag. Bam. Nobody. Yup. Real happy. Gimme tap tap. As white minis. Fantasy. Painting. Dump into reindeer. Mike in the front. Super super make nasty. Megan. Call me daddy. She wished she never had me. Backwards. Our? Games. I'm serious. Double dare is. So many. I wanna start Pat. Say no fear. Yeah. Labral cadaver magic mother. Said I needed that. Like skin. I totally she won't get opinion. Semi-naked pitches. I had this. Harney shoe fit our niche. Can't beat it. Join it. Was she black? Yeah. Band-aid? DA don't..

Miss cleo Mike Megan Pat
"cleo" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"cleo" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"That's one of the great blessings of having hair on one's head. You can either work with or work without if you're an actor. I'm speaking. It's it's really changes ones. Look needless to say for share. Well, I want to ask you about what maybe five or six years ago happen that sparked this career renaissance that we're in the middle of witnessing right now. I don't think that's overstating it where you're getting some of the best part you've ever played you're giving some of the best performances you've ever given and people are being more appreciative probably than they've ever been. But it started kind of inauspiciously if I have it correctly because it all goes back to an adult swim stop motion animated show called robot chicken. How does that give way to what we're looking at now been very fortunate in career lately, particularly, but in the last twenty years, I guess voice overs? I got an offer to do this voice over for the adult swim channel to play. This totally wacky. Part and robot chicken jumped at it. I mean, it was funny. Really funny, and I got nominated for an EMMY for. Daytime nighttime early morning Demi or some kind of the day, and I go to this thing award ceremony with my daughter, Cleo, and we sat right behind lily Tomlin who was nominated in the same category for doing voiceover for the National Geographic channel every call on African elephants totally different than the reason there and she won in the category. And I remember going to or in congratulating her and giving her a big hug, and we had a moment just a moment and never cross paths with lily before so clear, and I went on home back to our worlds, and I don't know. I don't even know how long it was after that one night to phone rang. And it was Chris Weitz, and he said sorry for calling lit some late or some weird thing. But my brother's doing this movie with lily Tomlin. Once you read the script, would you read it, of course, I would I send men's grip on I read the script ship and. It was a bet as media role as I've ever seen given the size of it. But just went from ADA Z in my mind. Anyway, this is in what would become grandma and you originally when you getting the script being asked to play a biker with long hair, kind of which I didn't have I don't think I had a mustache. But had very short hair. Went and got together with Paul whites. Chris's brother F Brad read it, and we talked Eddie even called about a wig for the peace, and I but in the getting a mustache made. And then I start reading conscription that the guy a biker I talked to Paul about it. And so what if I could why is this guy biker? This is a lot. But remember mask you working bike? There's a sequence in their room working on a bike and on the page. It was cool might be cool lily at this biker in her past and an Amen. I don't wanna wear a wig for a movie. Anyway, I ended up doing it not wearing a wig and just played this pretty much straightforward dope smoking guy. So that goes eventually to premiere at Sundance, but at a Sundance by which time you've already made another movie, I'll see you in my dreams, which is kind of amazing when people realize it's a from thirty one year old writer director editor I don't know if he'd even made a movie before I don't few few little through bright. So he wants to make a movie about a widower and the guy. She now finds new love with and again, he's thirty one. But he's writing about people at that stage of life, and somehow gets Blythe Danner and Yuda believe in him groups group those very persuasive gunmen. Liberally? So that's an eighteen day shoot where you're playing in this case really like a a gentleman refers leading man was out now leading men rule right nevers through romantically. Guesses better way to put it and Blyth Danner who we had on this podcast at that time. It was just one of our first guest was saying that how much she loved working with you. And and how it could have gone wrong in a way because I mean, she herself had been married for thirty three years. Her husband died cancer years before she'd had no subsequent relationships..

lily Tomlin Chris Weitz Blythe Danner Paul whites Sundance Demi Cleo Eddie F Brad Yuda writer editor director thirty three years thirty one year eighteen day twenty years six years