33 Burst results for "Clearview"

"clearview" Discussed on Daily Tech Headlines

Daily Tech Headlines

02:58 min | 3 weeks ago

"clearview" Discussed on Daily Tech Headlines

"These games can be downloaded individually and played for no additional charge with your Netflix login. Starting Wednesday November 3rd, you'll also be able to launch the games from a new games tab in the main Netflix app. Netflix says iOS is on the way. The director general for the digital currency institute of the people's bank of China mooching Chun said 140 million people opened wallets for China's new digital yuan as of October and used for transactions totaling around ¥62 billion. That's about 9.7 billion U.S. dollars. The digital yuan is currently accepted by roughly 1.5 million merchants. The currency is still being used in pilot trials with no official launch data announced. The office of the Australian information commissioner ordered clearview AI to destroy all images and facial templates belonging to individuals living in Australia. The order came after a joint investigation with the UK's information commissioner's office, found clearview's database breached citizens privacy. However you intends to appeal the decision. Meta is shutting down Facebook's facial recognition system, even if you've opted in, photos of you will no longer be automatically identified. Facebook will delete more than a billion people's facial recognition templates. Alt texts will need to be manually programmed to identify people in photos. Meta says it will continue to research and develop the use of facial recognition for identity verification and preventing fraud and impersonation. The operators of the black matter ransomware organization announced it shut down operations, setting increased pressure from authorities. The group published a notice of the shutdown on its ransomware as a service portal on October 1st 2021, saying it's infrastructure would be shut down within 48 hours. Google news will return to Spain early next year after the country updated its copyright laws to allow Google to negotiate fees with individual publishers. Google news previously shut down in the country in 2014. DoorDash introduced a new in app security toolkit for delivery workers called safe dash, door dash partnered with ADT to let workers call an agent when they feel unsafe or alert the agent to call 9-1-1 for them. This is initially rolling out to New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Detroit, San Francisco, and Los Angeles, with plans for availability across the U.S. by the end of the year. The U.S. cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency or cisa published a catalog of software vulnerabilities known to be exploited in the wild, issuing a binding operational directive requiring federal agencies to patch these within specified deadlines. The catalog currently includes 306 vulnerabilities across vendors with updating back to 2010. Activision Blizzard beat endless earnings estimate in Q three earning 72 cents per share on revenue of $1.88 billion. An investor presentation, the company said it will delay the release of both Diablo four and Overwatch two to give teams more time for production. No specific release dates were announced with Activision Blizzard sang back in February that neither game would come out in 2021. The latest version of Firefox for iOS.

Netflix digital currency institute of mooching Chun clearview AI clearview Facebook Google U.S. China Meta U.S. cybersecurity and infrast Australia UK ADT Spain cisa Detroit Philadelphia
A Diagnostics Company Moves to Developing Precision Cancer Therapies

The Bio Report

02:22 min | 7 months ago

A Diagnostics Company Moves to Developing Precision Cancer Therapies

"Osama. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me danny. We're going to talk about four bio therapeutics. Its strategic shift from diagnostics to therapy dixon. Our seeking to build a pipeline of targeted therapies. Perhaps we can start with a little history though. Four was known as novellus deacs until this year. What was the name. Change meant to signal once again. Thanks for having me so let me let me maybe go back a little bit in time to come back to the present As you mentioned. Four prior to a few months ago was novellas novellas diagnostics company based out of jerusalem israel companies. About nine years old. It did start out as a diagnostic company The foundational product here was a functional genomics platform that helped physicians providers and pharma companies. Identify the right drugs for the right patients by looking at very specific molecular profiling by patient Over the years as the company was evolving in that diagnostic business model I think a combination of prior management and the board realized that there was a there was quite a bit of opportunity to think about diagnostics internally and develop diagnostics on their own because we were identifying unaddressed. Patient populations and matching them to therapies That were either being developed or already in the marketplace and so at believe early two thousand nineteen the board and the management team decided to pivot from a diagnostic business vital to therapeutics business model and leveraging the platform started to identify across a number of validated cancer targets unaddressed. Patient populations where there's a high unmet need and where the company could really help bring beneficial therapies to market under this scope in early twenty twenty the company in licenses its product from lexicon. It's a next generation. Be rafted addresses class one and class two mutations And within that again using the platform we have begged clearview into creative trial designs. That target high unmet need populations. These are commercially viable populations

Novellus Osama Dixon Danny Pharma Jerusalem Israel Cancer
"clearview" Discussed on Celebrate Community Church

Celebrate Community Church

05:59 min | 9 months ago

"clearview" Discussed on Celebrate Community Church

"Have that in common both highest fans. He'll probably like jerk me off the stage here and he's second another thing we have in common. We both think we looked pretty good for at least that's what we tell ourselves. Every morning differences. I used just for men. But that's all right and then the one thing we really do have in common is we share a love for the old testament. Like we both geek out over the old testament. It's so relevant. You can't understand anything without understanding where you've been and the old testament is about the journey of god's people i think the old tests tests make gives us the best picture of our lives and i love teaching old testament. I love preaching out of two or three favourite tax. I'm gonna do today. And and we're starting new series right. It's called something like the hidden war on this coffee mug which is super cool. I take this with me guy. Red bull on their watch out he he. He really says like if you don't preach still two o'clock you never come back anyway. Well let's pray. God were were so excited to be here. I love these people. I don't know most of them. But i love him and i know that's because the love that you have for them and you do that. Scott i mean it's just amazing to me when you gods people and i've interacted with so many this weekend last two years..

Scott two o'clock two both today second one last two years both highest fans three favourite tax this weekend God
Clearview AI's face database violates privacy, lawsuit claims

KILF Morning New Podcast

01:59 min | 9 months ago

Clearview AI's face database violates privacy, lawsuit claims

"There are greater concerns. And i have been Naive about this and this. This really opened my eyes. According to the lawsuit clearview has provided thousands of governments government agencies and private entities access routes. I said governments plural. Not not just the united states federal government or state government. We're talking about governments around. The world came. Clearview has provided thousands of government government agencies and private entities access to its database which they can use to identify people with dissident views monitor their associations and track their speech. Big brothers here folks. Nineteen eighty-four george orwell and all that big brother is here except that they're not making a hard and fast rules in terms of where you can go and who you can talk to and what you can see and say yet. Lawsuits had clearview scrapes dozens of internet sites. This'll get your attention. Right like facebook and twitter and google and then mo. What does that mean scraping the site. Well they gather facial pictures. It involves the use of computer programs to automatically scan and copy data which according to the lawsuit is analyzed by clearview ai to identify individual biometrics such as ice shape and size that's put into a face print database that clients can use to identify people and You know we've just to appoint and you say well. Okay so they can you know if they're looking for a criminal somebody who's wanted for heinous crimes. They can catch them before they can escape from the airport. Because we've got all these cameras that can identify these people and that's good but it also means you can't just disappear if you want to. You can't and you may say well. Why would i want to do that. I don't know but just a little. Bit creepy

United States Federal Governme Clearview George Orwell Clearview Ai Facebook Twitter Google
Clearview AI's face database violates privacy, lawsuit claims

New Jersey First News With Eric Scott

00:32 sec | 9 months ago

Clearview AI's face database violates privacy, lawsuit claims

"Liberties activists are suing a company that provides facial recognition services to law enforcement agencies and private companies around the world, contending that the company called ClearView Ai Illegally stockpiled data on three billion people without their knowledge or their permission. Lawsuit claims the New York based company has built the most dangerous facial recognition database in the nation by scraping and analyzing images from Facebook, Twitter and other social media ClearView Has its activities are totally legal. A

Clearview Ai Illegally Lawsuit New York Facebook Clearview Twitter
Facial Recognition in Law Enforcement

Malicious Life

04:58 min | 10 months ago

Facial Recognition in Law Enforcement

"One month before the new york times published. The story of robert williamson. Police officers killed. George floyd we all remember the weeks that followed the protests that broke up around. The country garnered tension around the world. It was so engrossing watching those scenes of civil strife that an otherwise remarkable part of the story went almost entirely on the radar in fifteen cities is the department of homeland. Security deployed planes helicopters and drums to watch over the protesters. The aircraft hovered over protesters in new york philadelphia. Detroit feeding customs and border patrol man centers which streamed the intel to police forces and national guard on the ground in minneapolis and the a secret rc. Twenty-six be reconnaissance. Blaine worked with ops on the ground streaming video feeds to an fbi command center in another instance in the top spending in the ficials ordered helicopters to provide quote persistent presence to disperse crowds. He helicopters flew so low to the ground that the sheer downward pressure from their rotor. Blades ripped the signs off of billions. And of course since protesters running this was something out of science fiction full on military intelligence operation on. Us land in later reporting military and government officials insisted that none of the aircraft deployed on protesters were equipped with fisher recognition capabilities in most cases. The aircraft were so high up that facial recognition would be moot. You can't make out face from a blip from nineteen thousand feet but even if some planes flew close enough to capture individual faces be problematic according to the new york times at least two hundred and seventy hours of protests footage was captured by the aircraft and uploaded to big pipe. Dhs network which can be accessed by other law enforcement agencies around the country for future investigations. Video in big pipe can be stored for up to five years. One potential concern then. Is that if a plane recorded. Good enough video. It wouldn't need real time fisher. Recognition on board an agency like the fbi could access that footage weeks or months later to identify individual protesters. It's entirely possible that this hasn't and won't happen but around the country police have already utilized facial recognition to identify and in some cases arrest individual. Blm protesters the extent of it is unknown. Police have no obligation to report on the run. Your face through a machine or concerns me is there's currently no limits at all none at all and so they can also use it to take a look at everybody who is in a peaceful protest of some sort And then take down their names and Hassle him or arrest them or give them trouble in one way or another or simply file them in a database as person of interest. None of which we want to have happen to us. This is ted claypool a lawyer and an author on legal issues surrounding privacy. And a here's one example of what ted means by no limits. Batanes out you can be arrested and not even know that facial recognition played partnered one. Protester less summer oriana albor knows was arrested for throwing rocks at police line. That's definitely a crime but no point in her processing. Did miami police mentioned in documentation to her lawyer or in any other capacity that the used clearview to identify her as the rock thrower. It took an independent investigation by nbc. News to uncover that information and it's important for mission right maybe arena was guilty but he next arena could be a robert williams.

Robert Williamson George Floyd Department Of Homeland Detroit Feeding Customs And Bo The New York Times FBI Fisher Blaine Minneapolis Intel Philadelphia New York Ted Claypool BLM Batanes Oriana Albor United States TED Miami
New report on Apple’s VR headset: 8K in each eye, potential $3,000 price tag

Daily Tech News Show

04:16 min | 10 months ago

New report on Apple’s VR headset: 8K in each eye, potential $3,000 price tag

"Myanmar's new military government ordered that local telecoms temporarily blocked facebook owned services in the country from midnight on february third through february seventh claiming that the platform was contributing to instability the digital rights nonprofit access now estimates that there are twenty two million facebook users in the country. A new report by canada's privacy commission found clear view is facial recognition database to be illegal mass surveillance and said sent a letter of intention to the company telling it to cease sevices in the country and delete canadian faces. Clearview has not operated in canada since july due to the investigation and says it will allow canadians to opt out of the database. But we'll challenge the determination in court analyst. Ming she quos on a bit of a roll this week. The latest from quo is word of another lend supplier for the main next gen. Iphone perhaps called the iphone thirteen. That's expected next year and it's camera. Quo says that sunny optical successfully passed apple's approvals process for ipad lenses and are likely to be approved to make the main camera lens for the iphone. Thirteen lineup currently logon eugene. Guang and can cut. Sue supply lenses to lg innotech for incorporation into the camera module so sunny optical would be yet an additional supplier for that lends parlor co founder. John mattes announced. He's been fired. Ceo by the company's board In a statement. Matt said quote. I've met constant resistance to my product. Vision my strong belief in free speech and my view of how the parlor site should be managed. He supposedly proposed expanding automated. Content moderation on the platform as well as a full ban on accounts tied to designated domestic terror organizations the blockchain based service network or b. s. n. backed by the chinese government access an operating system for blockchain program development china's state information center and affiliate to china's top economic reform planner credit card processor union. Pay telecom trying to mobile and beijing based startup called red date. Or all involved in supporting both consortium and public blockchain's this week. Bsn announced it will roll a permission. Diversion of cosmos. Cosmo's that's a network comprised of many independent blockchain's and calls itself the internet of blockchain's so just you'd have no concerns and just jumping on an open block chain from from china winter no tom sawyer. Red flags there. I mean the state information center is part of the deal. I don't know what you'd be worried now all right. Let's talk a little more about that. A little more about the information given some some details on apple's alleged upcoming mixed reality headset sources have more details including a rendering this time of what they say is apple's vr headset. A lot of the details are similar to what we heard from mark gurman of bloomberg earlier last month It's expected to use fabric. Mesh run on an apple design chip cost a lot. Although we've got a number as much as three thousand dollars the headset may have more than a dozen cameras for hand. Tracking lied are sensors for room. Mapping and a are affects dual eight k displays and i tracking to save battery life. The information sources says apple would use aided rendering. that's when you only render in full resolution. What your eyes are looking at everything. In the periphery can be a little lower sources. Say apple has not finalized input control but the options. They're considering are a combination of hand tracking i tracking a dial on the headset or something. They call a thimble like accessory. Oh boy well the thing that jumped out to me. I because we have talked about this before. This rumor has been swirling. I mean really for years but it seems to be more of a reality than ever. Is that three thousand dollar price points now again. It's a rumor and yes. Apple tends to make things that are similar to other products that are more expensive and then says but it's apple so you know we can do that sort of thing. Three thousand dollars. Oh my goodness Compare that to oculus to for three hundred dollars. That's a crazy price point. I don't know how the company could get away with such a thing.

Blockchain Privacy Commission Apple Parlor Co John Mattes Facebook Chinese Government State Information Center Canada Clearview Myanmar China Guang Ming Mark Gurman LG BSN Tom Sawyer Cosmo Matt
"clearview" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:39 min | 10 months ago

"clearview" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"I'm tom merritt and from studio redwood. I'm sarah lane from oakland california. I'm justin robert young on the show's producer. Roger chan we were just talking about little yachties new movie. It's going to be about. No that was on good day internet. If you'd like to get that conversation become a member at patriotair dot com slash s. Let's start with a few tech things you should know how myanmar's new military government ordered that local telecoms temporarily blocked facebook owned services in the country from midnight on february third through february seventh claiming that the platform was contributing to instability the digital rights nonprofit access now estimates that there are twenty two million facebook users in the country. A new report by canada's privacy commission found clear view is facial recognition database to be illegal mass surveillance and said sent a letter of intention to the company telling it to cease sevices in the country and delete canadian faces. Clearview has not operated in canada since july due to the investigation and says it will allow canadians to opt out of the database. But we'll challenge the determination in court analyst. Ming she quos on a bit of a roll this week. The latest from quo is word of another lend supplier for the main next gen. Iphone perhaps called the iphone thirteen. That's expected next year and it's camera. Quo says that sunny optical successfully passed apple's approvals process for ipad lenses and are likely to be approved to make the main camera lens for the iphone. Thirteen lineup currently logon eugene. Guang and can cut. Sue supply lenses to lg innotech for incorporation into the camera module so sunny optical would be yet an additional supplier for that lends parlor co founder. John mattes announced. He's been fired. Ceo by the company's board In a statement. Matt said quote. I've met constant resistance to my product. Vision my strong belief in free speech and my view of how the parlor site should be managed. He supposedly proposed expanding automated. Content moderation on the platform as well as a full ban on accounts tied to designated domestic terror organizations the blockchain based service network or b. s. n. backed by the chinese government access an operating system for blockchain program development china's state information center and affiliate to china's top economic reform planner credit card processor union. Pay telecom trying to mobile and beijing based startup called red date. Or all involved in supporting both consortium and public blockchain's this week. Bsn announced it will roll a permission. Diversion of cosmos. Cosmo's that's a network comprised of many independent blockchain's and calls itself the internet of blockchain's so just you'd have no concerns and just jumping on an open block chain from from china winter no tom sawyer. Red flags there. I mean the state information center is part of the deal. I don't know what you'd be worried now all right. Let's talk a little more about that. A little more about the information given some some details on apple's alleged upcoming mixed reality headset sources have more details including a rendering this time of what they say is apple's vr. Headset lot of the details are similar to what we heard from mark gurman of bloomberg earlier last month It's expected to use fabric. Mesh run on an apple design chip cost a lot. Although we've got a number as much as three thousand dollars the headset may have more than a dozen cameras for hand. Tracking lied are sensors for room. Mapping and a are affects dual eight k displays and.

Matt Roger chan John mattes tom merritt twenty two million justin robert young next year Clearview facebook iphone february seventh apple february third three thousand dollars ipad Iphone oakland california july this week eight k
Clearview AI’s Facial Recognition App Called Illegal in Canada

Daily Tech News Show

00:25 sec | 10 months ago

Clearview AI’s Facial Recognition App Called Illegal in Canada

"New report by canada's privacy commission found clear view is facial recognition database to be illegal mass surveillance and said sent a letter of intention to the company telling it to cease sevices in the country and delete canadian faces. Clearview has not operated in canada since july due to the investigation and says it will allow canadians to opt out of the database. But we'll challenge the determination in court

Privacy Commission Canada Clearview
Should Law Enforcement Use Facial Recognition

Malicious Life

05:00 min | 10 months ago

Should Law Enforcement Use Facial Recognition

"Facial. Recognition wasn't always ankle tattoo. Good as with many of these technologies it was a stair step process. Ted claypool is a lawyer and an author on legally shoes surrounding privacy and a through the audits facial recognition listed. It wasn't great Until about two thousand and fifteen. It wasn't something that that would really be usable whereas the fbi of course has a as long had a biometric database of fingerprints for example But their face sprint database. Really wasn't Great until recently and then the clearview database which takes all of the social media pictures into account as really multiplied the abilities to use this kind of database before clearview. Police departments around florida relied on a program called faces. The facial analysis comparison and examination system based on an algorithm developed by the french company idea. It works by cross-referencing database of medians mugshots driver's licenses as well as digital photographs taken by police officers but faces just. Isn't that great. According to the new york times. Florida officers query system as much as four thousand six hundred times month at its peak but only a small fraction yielded anything resembling results. It took four years for the system to aid in an actual arrest and according to the new york times in its twenty years of only around. Two thousand successful arrests have been causally tied to faces. That number doesn't include questionable cases or accurate identifications which didn't lead to arrests and it's worth noting that took a wild for faces to spread statewide but still do thousand rests is not a lot for a place as big as florida. It's even less impressive when you consider just how expensive software is faces was built off a three point. Five million dollar government grant in the year two thousand and by two thousand. Fourteen ended up eating fourteen million in taxpayer dollars. So that's fourteen million dollars divided by two thousand arrests Let's see drag the one and yep seven thousand dollars pair arrest. Maybe a reasonable awry on a bank robber but not your standard. Heather riles if you're a defender fighting to protect your organization from cyber attackers. You must be successful ending attacks every single time. They only need to be successful. Wants cyber reason rivers the attackers advantage. Our future ready attack platform gives defenders the wisdom to uncover understand and piece together multiple threats and the precision focused to inside attacks instantly cyberrays ends cyberattacks from in quotes to everywhere so this podcast episode. Probably couldn't have existed ten or even five years ago. We could have envisioned future where police uses facial recognition. But it just wasn't practical enough at the time in the past few years that's changed. According to tests from nist the national institute of standards and technology the best facial recognition algorithms have improved from around eight percent failure rates in two thousand and ten to around point three percent by two thousand eighteen. These numbers are highly dependent on the kinds of images. You feed these algorithmic but still ninety nine point seven percent. Accuracy is quite good and that's three whole years ago thus we end up with clearview ai which can identify faces at angles or even with partial coverings sunglasses and face masks or it wouldn't need to identify a face because it can identify attached to instead it's a very powerful tool that in the hands of law enforcement today is having a real effect which brings up the question now that police can use facial recognition to catch criminals should they.

Ted Claypool The New York Times Heather Riles Florida FBI Sprint National Institute Of Standard
"clearview" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

03:21 min | 11 months ago

"clearview" Discussed on Malicious Life

"You'll see. Where could i find your face now other than well. That's a good question. Probably everywhere you'll see now is a security engineer of two decades and one of the founders of cyber reason definitely can find it on on facebook you can find it on the lincoln <hes>. On several newspapers <hes>. Online publications <hes>. Physical publications probably to your see isn't a public figure. But he's been around the block enough that if you manage to spell his name right on google you'll find plenty of pictures of his face some of you out. There are in the same predicament. Some of you you to your career or because you're proficient with some of media will have many more pictures online then you'll see does but even for cybersecurity audience. I can't imagine many of you out there. Having no pictures out on the web these days it requires diligence and effort to be that private. Is it possible that i might find your image in places where you don't yet realise it. Is i be surprised. Is it possible that you listener have images unveiled in it. You're not aware of you might not realize what's out there in the database of the gym. You used to go to or the office building. You used to work at or on your old. My space account the day make nelson. Our senior producer ran his and my face through a face. Search engine to test it out. I found shoot around twenty something with this kind of poise haircut. An earring and then there was one shot which was labeled adult content. Which i can only assume was because you're old sideburns. Were so dang sexy. Yeah that was my asimov period but hey it's nice to know that i have an alternative career in the adult industry in case this podcast thing never gets the graham. I don't know ron. There's a reason they put you on radio instead of tv <hes>. Not for later fire. Make the fact that there are pictures of me. I don't remember in places. I didn't expect doesn't surprise me much and that's important for us story today. This episode is about a problem that arises when we have too many faces in too many places because like any data. Your face isn't something to be carelessly tossed around. There's value to it a market for it when i tell people about family sounds the audio documentaries. We create for families who wished to preserve an important piece of family history. A lot of them. Ask me if those family histories really interesting to listen to after all we're talking about our parents and grandparents not some famous movie stars or scientists

Mark zuckerberg san francisco six million sixteen march sixteen apps Two thousand two years first two years iphone september two thousand four stars one august two decades google facebook july today
Clearview AI

Malicious Life

03:21 min | 11 months ago

Clearview AI

"You'll see. Where could i find your face now other than well. That's a good question. Probably everywhere you'll see now is a security engineer of two decades and one of the founders of cyber reason definitely can find it on on facebook you can find it on the lincoln On several newspapers Online publications Physical publications probably to your see isn't a public figure. But he's been around the block enough that if you manage to spell his name right on google you'll find plenty of pictures of his face some of you out. There are in the same predicament. Some of you you to your career or because you're proficient with some of media will have many more pictures online then you'll see does but even for cybersecurity audience. I can't imagine many of you out there. Having no pictures out on the web these days it requires diligence and effort to be that private. Is it possible that i might find your image in places where you don't yet realise it. Is i be surprised. Is it possible that you listener have images unveiled in it. You're not aware of you might not realize what's out there in the database of the gym. You used to go to or the office building. You used to work at or on your old. My space account the day make nelson. Our senior producer ran his and my face through a face. Search engine to test it out. I found shoot around twenty something with this kind of poise haircut. An earring and then there was one shot which was labeled adult content. Which i can only assume was because you're old sideburns. Were so dang sexy. Yeah that was my asimov period but hey it's nice to know that i have an alternative career in the adult industry in case this podcast thing never gets the graham. I don't know ron. There's a reason they put you on radio instead of tv Not for later fire. Make the fact that there are pictures of me. I don't remember in places. I didn't expect doesn't surprise me much and that's important for us story today. This episode is about a problem that arises when we have too many faces in too many places because like any data. Your face isn't something to be carelessly tossed around. There's value to it a market for it when i tell people about family sounds the audio documentaries. We create for families who wished to preserve an important piece of family history. A lot of them. Ask me if those family histories really interesting to listen to after all we're talking about our parents and grandparents not some famous movie stars or scientists

Facebook Google Nelson Graham RON
The facial-recognition app Clearview sees a spike in use after Capitol attack.

Cyber Security Headlines

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

The facial-recognition app Clearview sees a spike in use after Capitol attack.

"Facial recognition app clearview sees a spike in use after capital attack. The ceo of clearview on dat reported a twenty six percent increase in searches over. Its usual weekday volume. This is significant because unlike traditional facial recognition tools used by law enforcement that use databases containing government provided photos like driver's licenses and mugshots clearview relies instead on a database of more than three billion photos collected from social media networks and other public websites. The searches are being done largely by local police departments who are answering requests for assistance from the fbi. The usa facial recognition technologies remains contentious in many countries including the us.

Clearview DAT FBI United States
The Year's Best Stories on Security Now

Security Now

05:26 min | 1 year ago

The Year's Best Stories on Security Now

"Hello everybody is. I don't know how. Steve does this mustache thing. We're giving steve the week off You know he he takes no time off. The man works his butt off not only with with his with his products. Spin right and and all the research and stuff. He does for his website. Grc dot com. But he spends you know hours putting together the security now show every week and the funny thing is about steve. He never wants to take a day off. He never wants to miss a show so i've tied him up and put them in a closet so he can't be here today because the guy needs a week off and we're gonna take some of the best moments from the year. Twenty twenty starting with the story of and this was a bad one clearview and their face recognition technology. So last week we talked about the clearview a i company who were doing the facial recognition and bragging the web for three billion face sprints and made them available to six hundred police department so they could identify people within seconds since then clearview has increased their collection of cease and desist. Letters are just not exactly what they are hoping to be collecting from major. Us social media players. The first one they they received was from twitter a couple of weeks ago when twitter told clearview to stop collecting its data and to delete whatever it had. In addition facebook has similarly demanded the clearview stop scraping photos because the that action violates facebook's policies and now google and youtube are also both telling clearview to stop violating their policies against data scraping. Clearview take on. This is defiance. The ceo hone thanh fat was interviewed last wednesday morning this morning. News show He's told to trust him. He said the technology is only to be used by law enforcement and only to identify potential criminals. Tom fat claims that the results which which is not encouraging our ninety nine point six percent accurate. I guess though you wouldn't wanna miss. I want a false positive. Miss identify you as a bad guy. So i guess accuracy is is a better thing and he also claimed that it's his right to collect public photos to feed into his facial recognition archive. He said. there's also a first amendment right to public information so the way we have built our system is to only take publicly available information and index it that way and we by the way there was a recent supreme court decision having to do or was it supreme court but maybe ninth circuit court having to do with scraping of linked in which they ruled. Yup you can't stop scraping if it's public information. Y'all can't stop it. In fact i have that i mentioned that here So we know from last week when we talked about this the that in illinois at least with their bitta. The biometric information privacy act You know it's illegal there And youtube statement read quote. Youtube terms of service explicitly forbid collecting data. That can be used to identify a person. Clearview has publicly admitted to doing exactly that and in response we sent them a cease and desist letter as facebook Facebook said last tuesday that it has demanded that clearview stop scraping photos because the action violates its policies. Facebook said we have serious concerns that clear views practices which is a with sorry serious concerns with clear views practices which is why we've requested information as part of our ongoing review. How they respond. We'll determine the next steps. We take which i'm sure. Facebook attended sort of sound ominous And taunt that defended clearview as being a google like search engine. He said google can pull information from all different websites. If it's public and it can be inside sorry. Excuse me if it's public and it could be inside. Google search engine. It can be an hours as well. Google disagreed saying that clearview isn't at all like their search engine. Google said there's a big difference between what we do and the way your shanghai ing everyone's face images without their consent. Most websites want to be included in google search and we give webmasters control over what information from their site is included in our search results

Clearview Facebook Steve Tom Fat Youtube Twitter Ninth Circuit Court Google Supreme Court United States Illinois Shanghai
ACLU Asks Durkan to Ban Use of Facial Recognition Software

News, Traffic and Weather

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

ACLU Asks Durkan to Ban Use of Facial Recognition Software

"L U claims Seattle Police are using face facial recognition technology and they wanted to stop comes Kelly Blier report. Did you see how you have? Washington sent Mayor Jenny Durkin's office a letter today to ban Seattle Police from using face recognition technology developed by ClearView Ai. The organization says they found out the information through a public records request. Jennifer Lee's with the A. C L U of Washington. The record indicated one police officer, But it's not clear how widespread this used. Maybe the mayor's office claims. The SPD has no licenses or agreement with ClearView Ai and does not use them. Seattle Council ordinance requires any use of this technology to be approved and it has not been given the OK the A C L U was demanding the City Council look into the matter.

Seattle Police Kelly Blier Jenny Durkin Washington Jennifer Lee AI Seattle Seattle Council City Council
"clearview" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"clearview" Discussed on KOMO

"Our top stories now from the coma. 24 7 News Center. Good afternoon. I'm Rick fan sites with ELISA Jaffe, a dire update from the State Health Department details from Como's Jeff Pooja. Even though delivery of a covert vaccine is only weeks away. The numbers are startling. 19 hospitalizations are rapidly increasing and that our deaths are increasing as well. State health officer Dr Cathi Lo Fi says the number of hospitalized covert patients in the state It is now more than twice what it was during the peak last spring, and they still haven't seen the results of Thanksgiving gatherings, she says. All of this could lead to further lockdowns over Christmas. Jeff Pooja look come on. News. The A. C l U says Seattle police is used are using face recognition technology and they want that to stop almost Kelly Blier Report A C L U of Washington sent Mayor Jenny Jerkins office a letter today to ban Seattle police from using face recognition technology developed by ClearView Ai. The organization says they found out the information through a public records request. Jennifer Lee's with the A. C L U of Washington Record indicated one police officer, but it's not clear Panel widespread this you may be the mayor's office claims. The SPD has no licenses or agreement with ClearView Ai and does not use them. A Seattle Council ordinance requires any use of this technology to be approved and it has not been given the OK. The A C L U was demanding the City Council look into the matter. Kelly Blier Coma News. Several police agencies are investigating an explosion heard by neighbors in Snohomish County last night commas to Romero as the latest. The 80 F FBI, State Patrol and the county Sheriff's office are all investigating after explosives were found in a home in the Silver Lake area of Mill Creek Tuesday night. Courtney O'Keefe with the Snohomish County Sheriff's Office. For the past several weeks, there have been complaints of fireworks and rockets being shot nearby in the area, she says a 19 year old hobbyist was identified but not arrested. However, she says charges will be referred to the prosecutor's office. The explosives were taken to a county facility and Cathcart and intentionally detonated Causing nearby residents to question on Twitter about what was going on. C. Romero come on news. Well, for the first time since March of 2019 of 737 Max filled with passengers took to the air and come most Charlie Harder tells us about the demonstration Flight. Today was a 45 minute flight from Dallas to Tulsa, symbolic start to an important public relations effort. Rebuilding trust in the jet after the two crashes left hundreds dead. Pilots can be heard here performing the preflight inspection Now you can control that side. I control this side. Reuters reports of flight was filled with American Airlines leaders and members of the media. The first regularly scheduled flight of the plane is later this month. Charlie Harder, Come on news. Come on his time. 3 34 come on Traffic every 10 minutes on the force from the Dubin Law Group Traffic Center. What do you see? Marina? Well, we have some slow down south down I five coming into her and threw Renton because the left lane is blocked on south found four or five of the Maple Valley Highway exit. That's exit number four in Renton. So the stop and go traffic from Sunset Boulevard on South found 405. And Tequila's south Down I five just north of Inter urban the H O V. Lane is blocks. That's why we're seeing stop and go Traffic from the Boeing Access Road South and I five approaching 5 20 earlier collision cleared, We did have AH, stall in the back of it. It looks like it's still there, South Bound I five at 85th. Road is open now in rented on Highway 169 between four or five in South East fifth. We are going to see some traffic there, but a car had hit a pole in that area. Also on Whidbey Island Highway 5 to 5 completely blocked both directions at Double Bluff Road, You're next. Come on Traffic at 3 44. Let's talk about the future sound weather outlook. Nice is it's been all week. And here is Kristen Clarke, keeping an eye on a very localized wind event for the central Southern Cascade foothills. We're.

Seattle Jeff Pooja Charlie Harder Kelly Blier C. Romero ELISA Jaffe officer ClearView Ai Snohomish County Sheriff's Off Snohomish County Renton Courtney O'Keefe Dubin Law Group Traffic Center Washington State Health Department News Center Mayor Jenny Jerkins Dr Cathi Lo Fi Whidbey Island SPD
Why Police Could Still Be Using Facial Recognition, Despite Big Exits

WSJ Tech News Briefing

09:15 min | 1 year ago

Why Police Could Still Be Using Facial Recognition, Despite Big Exits

"We've seen. The biggest company is making changes in response to protest over the killing of George Floyd. They've announced massive donations to racial justice. Initiatives held town halls in their own companies and introduce new diversity and inclusion policies among those commitments Microsoft Amazon. IBM and others have said they're no longer selling facial recognition technology to law enforcement, and they've called on Congress to institute national regulations to govern its use. But I reporter. Jerry Council says that might not spell. The end of police use official recognition tech, and he joins us now to explain jared thanks so much for being with us. Forever Man. All right, let's from the beginning. How does law enforcement use facial recognition technology right now? Why is it so controversial so I'll start with the second part I this. This technology has been around for years, and it's not just us by law enforcement. It's used in airports and retail establishments stadiums on and so forth, but the reason it's so controversial is there's really two reasons one has to do with the accuracy of these systems you know these systems for the most part have a tougher time identifying darker skinned people and women than they do. white males. Males essentially the other reason has to do with privacy. Even if these systems are ninety nine point nine percent accurate, some people were concerned that they're being used to survey them and to uncover information about them. That otherwise may not have been known so those are those are the two reasons why this technology is so controversial I'd say in recent years a lot of law enforcement agencies have turned to this technology to help with investigations, so if someone commits a robbery or crime in public somewhere in there are cameras that got footage of the perpetrator, then they. They would use the technology to essentially take an image of person and compared with the database of suspects that they have to essentially fight crime. Right and we've obviously had that going on for a long time. We have cameras that pick people up. And then they go through databases of potential suspects people that have committed crimes in the past, and they try to match those faces. How is this technology different from that kind of eyewitness matching in the lineup? Yeah, yeah, yeah, so technology allows it that process to happen a lot quicker so if you are. are able to get a again. An image of someone you can just run it through a database of of suspects and get results in minutes. The other aspect about the technology is that it's also being used to not just search databases, but the really the entire Internet there's a there's a company out there called clearview that sees itself as a as a search engine for faces, so if the police were using this technology upload of face of it could be a suspect, or it could even be a witness to a crime, they can essentially find. Find out who that person is based on social media, posed and other upload, so that's new and different about it, the the risk of the technology and again this is one of the main reasons. It's come under such criticism in recent years is that let's say a law. Enforcement agencies is using it, and they are trying to figure out the suspect Hula suspect is a in a robbery or some other crime. They use technology and IT pulls up potential matches for that suspect if it's not accurate if it's not if it doesn't do well at making those. Those matches for for faces that are that are darker, skinned or for women. There's a chance that police go after the wrong person, and it even goes beyond that it's not just the police agencies that use it, but there are stadiums I'd use it, you know. Retailers say we don't want this person who has been accused of shoplifting before to come back into our stores. You know if these technologies send an alert that says hey, you know, look out for this person. He or she is on our watch list and ends up being a wrong person you. You know that could that could cause a lot of headache in a lot of you know undue harm for whoever the whoever that person is. Each spoke about clear view and the work that they do. We've now seeing big companies that are are household names. Amazon Microsoft IBM come out and say that they are not going to allow police forces to Hughes facial recognition technology anymore at least for a moratorium at least for a time your reporting seems indicate that might make a big difference in terms of police use of facial recognition technology. Why is that? That yeah, yeah, the big players from Amazon. Microsoft of IBM they all announced that they're pulling back from the market. The only thing about it is is that they're big names in the facial recognition market, but they're not the biggest players per se and the market is made up of other companies including a whole range of startups that focus on this technology, so with the big tech players pulling back. There are still going to be other providers out there. That are selling this technology to police departments. They have no plans to pullback. They see this as. Their bread and butter. If you will you know despite some of the concerns around the technology, they feel that their technology. Does a lot of good. They say that it helps with investigations to find suspects quicker than otherwise might be possible. They also say that their technology is is used to help. Find Missing exploited children. A lot of them do want regulations, but they don't see any reason. Pull back right now because they feel that their services are are essential, and that there is still a market for it, so Microsoft an Amazon are calling on Congress to develop clear national laws about who can use facial recognition technology and how they're using it. Is there any kind of legislation already in the pipeline? So at the federal level, not so much. Last week the House of Representatives introduced a police reform bill that provides or at least touches on a lot of aspects of policing the country, but there was a mentioned in there about facial recognition, and essentially said federal law enforcement officers think you know FBI, and so on and so forth they had. They're not allowed to use facial recognition software on body camera footage without. Without a judge's warrant again that bill was not all about facial recognition. It was just a small part of it, but that's all. That's taking place at the federal level, and there are initiatives around the country and states and municipalities. Some them have sought to ban or put a moratorium on the technology by police agencies. At least for the time being, there have been other. Bills including one in Washington. That seek to regulate the use of the technology, so there's there's really kind of efforts happening across the country in various fashions, but at the at the federal level there hasn't been anything there and just add to that I think that actually was was part of the reason why a lot of these these large companies from Microsoft and Amazon why they why they took A. A step back. They saw the recent police reform bill and say hey, y'all congress. If you're looking at doing something, we're going to wait for you to address the whole issue. You know instead back until then as we wait for legislation on facial recognition software specifically, we're also hearing calls to defend the police. Is that something that could have an impact on this market? Oh Yeah for sure. Yeah, we we. We are seeing a lot of those calls which again just to be clear about not eliminating police departments. At least that's not what everyone wants. It's more so diverting resources and funds away from policing in changing how it operates as those calls and increase obviously in the wake of the George Floyd protests. A lot of police departments may be forced to look at what they're spending their money on, and some of the most controversial elements of what they're spending. Their money on could be the first to go, so you know. I spoke to a fellow at the Berkman Klein Center at Harvard, and she mentioned that these protests are really putting a lot of public pressure on police departments, and some of them, not all of them, but some of them may say this is just not worth it right now, you know. Know where we're going to wait and step back until there are rules of the road for how to use this technology so again. This is by no means to say that police are still going to be interested in it. They're there still are a lot of them are still using it a lot of facial recognition companies still have business in the US. But some believe that that that these calls the defunding police could change that calculation. Our reporter jared. Council thanks so much for joining us right, thank you.

Microsoft Amazon George Floyd IBM Reporter Congress Jared Robbery Jerry Council Berkman Klein Center At Harvar United States Official Washington Shoplifting FBI
Police can track protesters even after the demonstrations end

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:00 min | 1 year ago

Police can track protesters even after the demonstrations end

"What surveillance tools police departments across the country are using to identify protesters or Lueders in the past week, but we know there are a lot of them from widespread camera. Technology drones to license plate readers, not to mention the facial recognition tool known as clearview AI, which has been used by dozens, if not hundreds of law enforcement agencies. Civil rights activists say these tools can be used to track protests in some cases to keep the peace, but they can also be used to find organizers and even arrest protesters after the fact and there aren't a lot of rules about how they get used Siwa. Hussein is a lawyer for the electronic frontier. Foundation law enforcement has access to things like CICI TV networks gunshot detection. Stingrays more commonly known as cell site. Simulators face recognition possible aerial surveillance, oftentimes law enforcement also has the ability to access private networks like ring to law enforcement agencies. Many times are acquiring these technologies without sort of any sort of public process where the public may not even be aware that they're using it, and because courts haven't necessarily caught up to the. The use of these various technologies, oftentimes, the constitutional protections aren't put in place either. We've heard a lot of reporting about clearview specifically. How much to your knowledge is that in use now? We're talking about face recognition. We know that it is proliferating across the country that there are many law enforcement agencies that already have the in us and we know that. The whole clearview Stan scandal came to light that some law enforcement agencies decided to stop their partnership, but others haven't. clearview is the subject of active litigation. Some law enforcement agencies continue to partner with them in the context of protest. How are these tools used sort of before during and after so in the moment there are technologies being used things like cell site simulators as well that can then identify where the locations of these of these devices are individuals who? Who posted on facebook or twitter were identified after the fact. Baltimore is one of the most prevalent examples that we have seen where we actually know that that law enforcement uses tool called Gio Fida which looked at public feeds for social media to try to identify people's locations during the Twenty fifteen protests in Baltimore to protest the death of Freddie Gray and many people were arrested on on completely unrelated charges because they were in the vicinity of the protests Sort of mass surveillance in that form, is incredibly problematic, but also knowing that. When we're talking about face recognition, they can always look at the footage of the fact and connect you through. You know the readers that they have the face recognition. I think that it's really important for people to know that we're not just talking about in the moment, but also after the fact that this technology can possibly be used by law enforcement. Sira?

Lueders AI Hussein Cici Tv Sira Baltimore Facebook Gio Fida Stan Partner Twitter Freddie Gray
"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"An insurance company or an algorithm could start to pick up on certain medical conditions that are manifesting your face in in very miniscule ways as a human being, and even a human doctor wouldn't sense. The computer picks us up before you know anything's wrong sort of like the way targets algorithms figured out that poor girl was pregnant before her. Her family knew so. Here's the question. Would the insurance company legally be required to notify you of this possible health condition say like there's clearly something happening, maybe if they have video to in your behavior that is indicative of an early onset terminal condition. Would they be legally required to tell you that? They knew you had a? Let's say eighty percent chance of dying in the next. Next two years and give you the assistance you need right now. That's a note is a big no chief. They don't have to do a damn thing for you what they can do with absolutely no repercussions is say hey. This person's probably GONNA be dead in two years, and it's GonNa. Be Expensive to get them to year two, so let's just drop them. Let's just drop. There's no law that there's no like ethical legal requirement for them to tell you what they know and that's that's. Mind Boggling that is reprehensible, that is like I. Need I need to get my good, not abridge the source to come up with all the different words for how bad and disturbing that is. Ben I would love it when you do that because I always learn a new word. Did you guys ever just that lay the mood. Did you guys ever hear that old joke? About the abridged Thesaurus, it's like avid. An abridged thesaurus not only is a terrible. It's terrible. I didn't write that, but you, but you can. The good news is right now. Depending on where you live, you can opt out of clearview. Oh my gosh, but. Even the way you opt out, isn't it? It's such a burden. It's such a burdensome bras as you can't just click a box in an email. Right you, all you have to do is send a headshot. We all have those and and an image of your government issued Id. And this only applies also to residents of California or the EU. For whatever reason, sorry rest of the world right because of privacy because of privacy laws that exist there. Yep We should also point out a going back to this accuracy thing. There are serious questions about how accurate clearview is in general so buzzfeed. According to marketing literature, they found from clearview. says that the company the company Tout's the ability to find a match out of one million faces, Ninety eight point six percent of the time, but when clearview did finally start talking to the New York Times, they said the tool produces a match up to seventy five percent of the time, and we don't know how many of those are quote, unquote true matches, so there's some contradictory information coming out which can make people feel uncomfortable obviously. And that's that's where we leave today. The battle lines are firming up on one side. You have clearview. It's investors, its clients and what I would call. The techno optimists. On the other side, you have privacy advocates. You have tech giants like Microsoft Ibm you even have the pope. The pope cable against facial recognition, and he summed it up pretty nicely. He said quote this symmetry by which a select few know everything about us, while we know nothing about them. Dole's critical thought and the conscious exercise of freedom imagine applying that to a priest who here's can confessions from everyone every week? When when they go and tell their dirty secrets, the priests is then the one. WHO everybody knows nothing. About But he knows everything about them. Just putting it out there especially and also, this thing is targeting child-sex-abuse. Abusers. Just also leaving that they're. One of the thing for anyone listening along and thinking. Good thing I made my profile on insert social media here private years ago. Sorry, homey anything public at point is pretty much in the system. Even if you later made it private, so check your my space in that CNN business interview as you said Ben. They test out the software on the producer who has a private instagram account and images from that account show up in the search, and it is because it was public at one point. And that's where we leave off today. What do you think fellow conspiracy realist? Do the benefits outweigh the potential consequences of this do the consequences outweigh? The potential benefits Let us know you can find us on facebook. You can find us on instagram. You can find us on twitter. We always like to recommend our facebook community page. Here's where it gets crazy. Now you can jump on there. You can talk about this episode or any other. In the past. You can post some Dank means. Let's say some conspiracy means or facial recognition stuff Maybe you've had. Access to this before to? And you. WanNa talk to us about it. Don't do that on facebook. Don't do that, but if you do want to tell us about that, you can call our number. We are one eight two three three S. T. D. W. I k.. You can leave a message there. Tell us about it. Let us know if you don't want to be identified. If you don't want us to know or talk about anything on air, it just just let us know. Give us the information We'd love to hear from you and I want to add to this to say that I finally. Despite my strange phobia regarding phones, I started diving Matt. You're doing massive amazing work there as I've started listening to these calls as well. Thank you so much to everyone who calls in I. It's inspiring I. Don't know about you, I. Don't know about you guys, but it. It makes me feel like what we're doing is worthwhile. That makes sense Oh definitely definitely I had you know. Hopefully you're going to. If you could get past the Phobia Ben. Hopefully you can call a few people because you can use that APP and you should be good to go Actually. Speaking to to you know you know who you are if if we've talked on the phone It means a great deal has been as saying just to know that we're not just talking in a darkened room. And that you guys, you guys care about us as much as we care about you, so this is a great relationship. Let's keep doing it. Well, said Matt, while said. And we'll be following up with some of those messages in the future, so keep them coming. One last thing if you say, Look Ben's right phones, terrifying, weird but also social media. You.

clearview facebook Matt Ben California EU Microsoft CNN twitter instagram New York Times Dole producer Tout clearview.
"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"So it's like watching a real life progression of you aging and the let's say that an insurance company or an algorithm could start to pick up on certain medical conditions that are manifesting your face in in very miniscule ways as a human being and even a human doctor wouldn't sense. The computer picks us up before you know anything's wrong. Sort of like the way targets algorithms figured out. That poor girl was pregnant before her her family knew. So here's the question. Would the insurance company legally be required to notify you of this possible health condition? Say like there's clearly something happening. Maybe if they have video to in your behavior that is indicative of An EARLY ONSET TERMINAL CONDITION. Would they be legally required to tell you that they knew you had a? Let's say eighty percent chance of dying in the next two years and give you the assistance. You need right now. That's a note is a big no chief. They don't have to do a damn thing for you. What they can do with absolutely no repercussions is say. Hey this person probably GONNA be dead in two years and it's GonNa be expensive to get them to year too so let's just drop them. Let's just drop. There's no law that there's no like ethical legal requirement for them to tell you what they know. And that's that's mind boggling that is reprehensible that is like. I need I need to get my good. Not Abridge the source to come up with all the different words for how bad and disturbing that is. Ben. I love it when you do that because I always learn a new word. Did you guys ever just that lay the mood. Did you guys ever hear that? Old Joke about the abridged thesaurus avid abridged source. Not only. Is it terrible? It's terrible I didn't write that but you but you can. The good news is right now. Depending on where you live you can opt out of clearview. Oh my gosh but even the way you opt out isn't it? It's such a burden. It's such a burdensome bras as you can't just click a box in an email right you all you have. To Send A headshot we all have those and and An image of your government issued. Id and this only applies also to residents of California or the EU. For whatever reason sorry the rest of the world right because of privacy because of privacy laws that exist there. Yup We should also point out a going back to this accuracy thing. There are serious questions. About how accurate. Clearview is in general so buzzfeed. According to marketing literature they found from clearview Says that the company the Company. Tout's the ability to find a match out of one million faces ninety eight point six percent of the time but when clearview did finally start talking to the New York Times they said the tool produces a match up to seventy five percent of the time. And we don't know how many of those are quote unquote true matches. So there's some contradictory information coming out which can make people feel uncomfortable. Obviously and that's that's where we leave today. The battle lines are firming up. On one side you have clearview. It's investors its clients and what I would call the techno optimists on the other side. You have privacy advocates. You have tech giants like Microsoft. Ibm You even have the pope. The pope cable against facial recognition and he summed it up pretty nicely he said quote this symmetry by which a select few know everything about us while we know nothing about them. Dole's critical thought and the conscious exercise of freedom. Imagine applying that to a priest. Who here's can confessions from everyone Every week when when they go in tell their dirty secrets. The priests is then the one who everybody knows nothing about But he knows everything about them. Just putting it out there. Especially and also this thing is targeting child-sex-abuse in abusers just also leaving that they're one of the thing for anyone listening along and thinking good thing. I made my profile on insert social media here private years ago. Sorry homey anything. Public at point is pretty much in the system. Even if you later made it private so check your my space in that. Cnn business interview as you said Ben. They test out the software on the producer who has a private instagram account and images from that account show up in the search and it is because it was public at one point. And that's where we leave off today. What do you think fellow conspiracy realist? Do the benefits outweigh the potential consequences of this do? The consequences outweigh the potential benefits Let us know you can find us on facebook? You can find us on instagram. You can find us on twitter. We always like to recommend our facebook community page. Here's where it gets crazy now. You can jump on there. You can talk about this episode or any other in the past you can post some. Dank means let's say some conspiracy means or facial recognition stuff Maybe you've had access to this before to and you WanNa talk to us about it. Don't do that on facebook. Don't do that but if you do want to tell us about that you can call our number. We are one eight two three three S. T. D. W. I t. k. You can leave a message there. Tell us about it. Let us know if you don't want to be identified if you don't want us to know Or TALK ABOUT ANYTHING ON AIR IT. Just just let us know. Give us the information We'd love to hear from you and I want to add to this to say that I finally despite my Strange Phobia regarding phones. I started diving. Matt you're doing massive amazing work there as I've started listening to these calls as well. Thank you so much to everyone who calls in I. It's inspiring and I don't know about you. I don't know about you guys but it it makes me feel like what we're doing is worthwhile. That makes sense. Oh definitely definitely I had you know. Hopefully you're going to if you could get past the Phobia Ben. Hopefully you can Call people because you can use that APP and you should be good to go Actually speaking to to you know You know who you are if if we've talked on the phone It means a great deal has been as saying just to know that we're not just talking in a darkened room and that you guys you guys care about us as much as we care about you so this is a great relationship. Let's keep doing it. Well said Matt while Said and we'll be following up with some of those messages in the future so keep them coming one last thing if you say look Benz right phones terrifying weird But also social media. You.

clearview facebook Matt California EU Ibm Microsoft Cnn twitter New York Times instagram Dole Tout producer S. T. D. W.
"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

08:37 min | 1 year ago

"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"He wanted to find out about this Guy I. Imagine you know whether you're a millionaire or a popper? You? Of course you want to know who your kids dating. You want to know about them, but it's crazy that this guy was able to to use any he out all the stuff that we just mentioned like where the guy lives what his job is. You know his known connections is social media and stuff. This example is a little weird. Though because I imagine being a billionaire, you could just hire a person to. Their dime to doing that desire a Pi. This is a this is a really important thing about this that I. Maybe we mentioned, but we didn't get into it. The reason why he was able to find all that stuff about. person the way I've seen the software work. It's not like you identify this person that it gives you a giant. Read out of all of this person's information you. You identify that that person's face then all of the other publicly publicly available in the Internet faces show up. and. You can click on it and it takes you to the website where that face is where that image is located, so that means you're then directly connected to their social media to anywhere that that photo has been posted, and then through those other websites you can gather all that other information. At least that's the way it was demonstrated in that CNN business interview in a couple of other places. That's the way it works for. For now, but we know that that you I could easily be upgraded to maybe pull the to scrape that information if it's publicly available right I, mean think about how many things are we've talked about before. How easy it is to find a phone number how easy it is to find not just your address, but the last few addresses you lived at over the years this this we also mentioned. People don't trust clearview A. Little bit of stereotyping, but they don't trust it. Because one of the investors, Peter. The'll is also big in facebook. So. facebook. FACEBOOK is good at a lot of things and users. Privacy is never been one. That is not a bug. That's a feature from their food, and this is just dovetail on all of that In that interview Danica Sullivan does a search of his face and it's the official profile picture on the website. Where he works with the CNN business site and When it scrolled when they scroll all the way down, there was an image of him because he's in his. Thirties late thirties or something to that I? Don't know how old he is, but he's a person about our age been all and I. They all the way down, and there's an image of him from a local newspaper where he was in Ireland fry when he was sixteen years old in a group of teenagers, holding up a sign, and you can just see his face, and he looks absolutely different. I mean you. I would not have been able to tell that that was him, but he recognized the photo and he knew it was him. and. This is the kind of thing where you know this is. Not An allegation part. This is just me wondering in ruminating. I'm wondering how they connected that up. HOW THIS FACE RECOGNITION SOFTWARE! Inserted that picture of him. where he looked so different, and the founder says well, you know the they're still parts of your face, the geometry of it that remained the same over the years. Even if you put on weight, even if you're wearing glasses, even if you're covering your face. I get that argument. But. To me. It makes me wonder if there is some kind of added like spoke Yo search. That's going on within the system where you're looking at this. Just another company that you can search social media any social media accounts that somebody has using email or a phone, number or name. And it makes me wonder if they're connecting things up there as an extra layer of league name like prioritizing image by. Other information. Yeah, I mean. It makes me wonder if that's happening I guess not but I. They I would say he didn't sufficiently. The founder didn't sufficiently explain how that image got in there and the interviewer is clearly a little, weirded out and disturbed by it. Is I mean you know in the United States, presumably you. You know you might be identified using this technology, but doesn't mean you're immediately going to be convicted of something without some kind of physical evidence without a trial, but in other countries. We're stuff like that isn't as much of a thing. It could be used to identify social dissidents, or like people that are speaking out against the Taliban government and flag them, and throw them in the Gulag or whatever you know without ever. Batting an eye and that is sort of the crux of the problem with this software is it depends on the notion of people that use it being good actors and Ben and being good stewards of this power that they have, and as we know power corrupts, and we've got a lot of governments that are kind of corrupt and. Out To shut down any kind of Criticism of what they do, and this would be a great way to identify those people and round them up. And put them away. And it's it's. It's dangerous for that reason you know you could, you could detain people and could cut around some of their legal protections. What this counted at in a court of law as definitive identification, then you would say well. We don't need to figure out. If you're the person right, it could get so dangerous so quickly. There's another point we have to add you know. This sounds like some kind of Skynet big brother stuff. It can also be used inaccurately. It is far from perfect there's. One thing that I I've been talking a lot about with some people online about. Facial recognition has inherent racial bias that I wish more people talked about for non white people for persons of Color. A this stuff lags in accuracy, not just clearview, but in general facial recognition is known for this, and this means that you could be arrested due to a computer error because the software decided that you look like a guy who never met lives in St. you've never been to who committed a crime that occurred while you were not alive, and it could happen. It could happen here into continue with that. We mentioned you know the people that were known to be using the software, the organizations and two of them. Are, three of them wishes point these these out department of Justice us, immigration and Customs Enforcement. Let's leave it to those two, so take the problems. You're talking about Ben. That are inherent to this system. Apply that then to let's say immigrations and custom looking for people who are in the United States illegally and imagining that you're attempting to round everyone up. The implications of the software would be Extremely effective I would say or completely ineffective because they're they're. Detaining rounding up people incorrectly because of the problems with the software. Will think about this to. The problems with the software, so they compound on the state level, but they compound on the private level to, and this is one that I think for the immediate future is is at least as dangerous as the Orwellian stuff. We're talking about right now, so that data when it's mind right, just like your data on any other social media, it can be sold to third parties, insurance companies, financial institutions, and so on this goes way past ads with the phrase. I, know I'm kind of church effecting here, but the freeze I think of is a longitudinal profile of your face and your behavior over time, so it's like watching a real life progression of you aging and the let's say that..

CNN United States facebook founder Danica Sullivan Peter department of Justice Taliban government Ben Ireland official Customs Enforcement
"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

15:09 min | 1 year ago

"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Yes you're those. Those are perfect ad break. Bill Also be time to get. Get this cat out of out of my recording studio. I heard you had a little our. Yeah yeah well. We're all deal with new coworkers. Right judge do a quick aside. A quick corentin aside headache crisis yesterday. we. I don't know if I mentioned this show that my daughter got a hamster right before quarantine kicked in I had inherited because her mom was allergic to found out Hamsters name Hanako which is like a anime character anyway. We realize yesterday afternoon that Hanako is not in her cage so we had a a hamster search party all up in this house freaking out and I had just these horrible visions of like finding a dead decaying hamster. You know two weeks later in my sock drawer or something so Luckily the little little critter found herself back to where she belonged on her own which was great. Yeah she just popped out and was right there even thought it was a sock and it turns out it was a hamster and it wasn't long. I read all this horror stories about how you can only search late at night and you got to bathe it with peanut butter and all this stuff in it to see this came came right back. There was great. That's fantastic. Yeah at a Gerbil. In my younger days that escaped and lived and died in the walls of a house in my Tried to try to move the oven and appliances to get to it But then We couldn't and my father thought it would be a good lesson in mortality. Hopefully I was hoping to avoid that particular lesson for my kid especially during these trying times when things have been mainly pretty positive for us here at the House. I'm so glad yeah. Thanks guys But no you're right Ben. Tell us a little bit about this security of this APP and the idea of it being tested For you know vulnerabilities right. Yeah this is a very interesting point. So a lot of the reporting that came up about clearview. Ai came before late February of this year in late February clearview APP security was actually tested in the form of a hack on February twenty six. The public learned that the company had been breached their security been compromised. Hackers had stolen clear. View is entire customer list which was coveted and very much secret right. The customer list adding to the troubling facts about this company. The customer list did not jibe with what clearview had said earlier. It spans thousands of government entities and private businesses across the world so the US Department of Justice Immigration and customs but it also includes banks and he does allude to banks in a couple of different interviews the founders also includes macy's and best buy an Interpol and then on the list of you also see credential users at the FBI you know. We said hundreds of police departments. But here's something very interesting. It also includes users in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. These are countries that are not particularly known for their progressive policies or their Their First Amendment Rights The founder by the way says that they're exercising First Amendment right when they scrape all these images. Yeah they're exercising. I right because they're all publicly available in out there. And if the argument that they make generally is that if Google can scrape all the websites and create search terms for all those things and allow you to search that information if you know Youtube has when you upload something to Youtube. It's all publicly available. They can scrape all the information for all the data. And then the other companies intertwined and use that data to help each other find other things. Well Hey why? Can't we do that too? So we're going to however a lot of the scrutiny. That's been happening because of that. That hack that was reported as well as just the tech in general and how these other giant tech companies how their data is being used tech giants like twitter. Google and Youtube same thing have sent cease and desist letters to clearview orders. Saying do not do this anymore. and even like because of this some police departments and other users have just discontinued use of the software and when the founder responds to this kind of thing He says just you know. Our legal team is on it. They're working right now to fight that battle Using the First Amendment as our major argument yet importantly we should note that they said the customer lists was the only thing compromised. So the hackers don't have that three billion-plus and growing image archive. But you're right matt. Legal troubles gather like storm clouds on the horizon. Clearview has said it's complied with things like policies proposed by the ACLU THE ACLU has said that they don't comply a and I think there's there's a case Coming up against clear view in Illinois and it's one of what may be many Legal troubles should be gathering on the horizon and the storm should hit especially when we look at the implications of this technology and before we continue. WanNa be like cartoonish Lee transparent here. We're not saying that clearview or the people in the startup are bad people and we're not saying even that their intentions are bad. We're saying that this technology just like any other technology has inherent implications it. Has It just like fire? It has it has some positive benefits and it has some very dangerous possible consequences. Make how could it be misused? The the first one just off the top here. The first one is one. We talked about a couple of times in this episode. Somebody with access could use it for personal reasons. We did that hypothetical cop who's mad at his ex dating mark mcgillicuddy or whatever but we can go beyond the hypothetical examples. There's a real life example. There's a billionaire clearview investor. Who used the APP to stalk his daughters Newest Bo? He wanted to find out about this guy. I imagine you know whether you're a millionaire or a popper you. Of course you want to know who your kids dating. You want to know about them. But it's crazy that this guy was able to To use any he out all the stuff that we just mentioned like where the Guy Lives. What his job is you know? His known connections is social media and stuff. This example is a little weird though because I imagine being a billionaire you could just hire a person to their dime to doing that desire a Pi. This is this is a really important thing about this that I maybe we mentioned we didn't get into it. The reason why he was able to find all that stuff about this person the way I've seen the software work. It's not like you identify this person that it gives you a giant. Read out of all of this person's information you you identify that that person's face then all of the other publicly publicly available in the Internet faces show up and you can click on it and it takes you to the website where that face is where that image is located. So that means you're then directly connected to their social media to anywhere that that photo has been posted and then through those other websites you can gather all that other information at least that's the way it was demonstrated in that CNN. Business interview in a couple of other places. That's the way it works for now. But we know that that you I could easily be upgraded to maybe pull the to scrape that information. If it's publicly available right. I mean think about how many things are we've talked about before how easy it is to find a phone number. How easy it is to find not just your address but the last few addresses you lived at over the years this this. We also mentioned people. Don't trust clearview. Ai Is a little bit of stereotyping. But they don't trust it because one of the Investors Peter. The'll is also big in facebook so facebook. Facebook is good at a lot of things and users. Privacy is never been one that is not a bug that's a feature from their food and this is just dovetail on all of that In that interview Danica Sullivan does a search of his face. And it's the official profile picture on the website where he works with the CNN business site and when it scrolled when they scroll all the way down there was an image of him. Because he's in his thirties late thirties or something to that. I don't know how old he is. But he's a person about our age abandoned all and I they all the way down and there's an image of him from a local newspaper where he was in Ireland fry when he was sixteen years old in a group of teenagers. Holding UP A SIGN. And you can just see his face and he looks absolutely different. I mean you. I would not have been able to tell that. That was him but he recognized the photo and he knew it was him. And this is the kind of thing where you know. This is not an allegation on my part. This is just me wondering in ruminating. I'm wondering how they connected that up. How this face? Recognition software inserted that picture of him where he looked so different and the founder says. Well you know the they're still parts of your face. The geometry of it that remained the same over the years. Even if you put on weight even if you're wearing glasses even if you're covering your face I get that argument but to me. It makes me wonder if there is some kind of added like spoke. Yo search that's going on within the system where you're looking at this just another company that You can search social media Any social media accounts that somebody has using email or a phone number or name and it makes me wonder if they're connecting things up there as an extra layer of legal name like prioritizing image by other information. Yeah I mean it makes me wonder if that's happening. I guess not but I they. I would say he didn't sufficiently the founder didn't sufficiently explain how that image got in there and the interviewer is clearly a little weirded out in disturbed by well. Another thing too is I mean you know in the United States presumably You you know you might be identified using this technology but doesn't mean you're immediately going to be convicted of something without some kind of physical evidence without a trial but in other countries we're stuff like that isn't as much of a thing. It could be used to identify social dissidents or like people that are speaking out against the totalitarian government and flag them and throw them in the Gulag or whatever you know without ever batting an eye and that is sort of the crux of the problem with this software is it depends on the notion of people that use it being good actors and bent and being good stewards of this power that they have and as we know power corrupts and we've got a lot of governments that are kind of corrupt and out to shut down any kind of Criticism of what they do and this would be a great way to identify those people and round them up and put them away. Yeah and it's IT'S. It's dangerous for that reason. You know you could you could Detain people and could cut around some of their legal protections. Like what if this what this counted at in a court of law as definitive identification? Then you would say well. We don't need to figure out if you're the person right. It could get so dangerous so quickly. There's another point we have to add. You know this sounds like some kind of Skynet. Big Brother Stuff. It can also be used inaccurately. It is far from perfect. There's one thing that I I've been talking a lot about with some people. Online about facial. Recognition has inherent racial bias. That I wish more people talked about for non white people for persons of Color. A this stuff lags in accuracy not just clearview but in general Facial recognition is known for this and this means that you could be arrested due to a computer error because the software decided that you look like a guy who never met lives in St. You've never been to who committed a crime that occurred while you were not alive and it could happen. It could happen here to continue with that. We mentioned you know the people that were known to be using the software the organizations and two of them are three of them wishes. Point these these out department of Justice. Us Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Let's leave it to those two. So take the problems. You're talking about Ben that in our inherent to this system apply that then to let's say immigrations and custom looking for people who are in the United States illegally and imagining that you're attempting to round everyone up. The implications of the software would be Extremely effective I would say or completely ineffective because they're they're detaining rounding up people incorrectly because of the problems with the software will think about this to the problems with the software so they compound on the state level but they compound on the private level to and this is one that I think for the immediate future is is at least as dangerous as the wealthy and stuff. We're talking about right now. So that data when it's mind right just like your data on any other social media. It can be sold to third parties INSURANCE COMPANIES FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS. And so on. This goes way past ads with the phrase. I know I'm kind of church effecting here but the freeze I think of is a longitudinal profile of your face and your behavior over time..

Clearview founder Youtube Google Ai United States CNN facebook Us Immigration and Customs Enf Hanako Bill twitter department of Justice ACLU Saudi Arabia US Department of Justice Immig Illinois
"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

06:39 min | 1 year ago

"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Yes you're those those perfect ad break bill? also be time to get. Get this cat out of out of my recording studio I. Heard you had a little our. Yeah? Yeah well. We're all deal with new coworkers. Right judge, do a quick aside a quick quarantine aside headache crisis yesterday we I don't know if I mentioned this show that my daughter got a hamster right before quarantine kicked in I, had inherited because her mom was allergic to found out hamsters name Hanako, which is like a anime character. Anyway, we realize yesterday afternoon. That Hanako is not in her cage. So we had a a hamster search party all up in this house freaking out, and I had just these horrible visions of like finding a dead decaying hamster. You know two weeks later in my sock drawer or something so Luckily, the little, the little critter found herself back to where she belonged on her own, which was great. Yeah, she just popped out and was right. There even thought it was a sock and it. Turns out. It was a hamster and it wasn't long i. read all this horror stories about how you can only search late at night, and you got to bathe it with peanut butter, and all this stuff in it to see this came came right back. There was great. That's fantastic. Yeah at A. Gerbil in my younger days, that escaped and lived and died in the walls of a house in my Tried to try to move the oven and appliances to get to it but then we couldn't, and my father thought it would be a good lesson in mortality hopefully. I was hoping to avoid that particular lesson for my kid especially during these. Trying times when things have been mainly pretty positive for us here at the House I'm so glad. Yeah, thanks, guys but no, you're right Ben. Tell us a little bit about this security of this APP and the idea of it being tested for you know vulnerabilities right? Yeah, this is a very interesting point so. A lot of the reporting that came up about clearview I came before. Late February of this year in late February. clearview APP security was actually tested. In the form of a hack on February twenty six, the public learned that the company had been breached, their security been compromised. Hackers had stolen. Clear view is entire customer list, which was coveted and very much secret right? The customer list adding to the troubling facts about this company. The customer list did not jibe with what clearview had said earlier it spans thousands of government entities and private businesses across the world, so the US Department of Justice Immigration and customs, but it also includes banks, and he does allude to banks in a couple of different interviews. The founders also includes macy's and best buy an Interpol. And then on the list of you also see credential users at the FBI. You know we said hundreds of police departments, but here's something very interesting. It also includes users in Saudi, Arabia and the United Arab Emirates these are countries that are not particularly known for their progressive policies or their their First Amendment Rights the founder by the way says that they're exercising First Amendment right when they scrape all these images. Yeah, they're exercising I right because they're all publicly available in out there, and if the argument that they make generally is that if Google can scrape all the websites and create search terms for all those things and allow you to search that information if You Know Youtube has when you upload something to YouTube. It's all publicly available. They can scrape all the information for all the data, and then the other companies intertwined and use that data to help each other find other things. We'll hey. Why can't we do that, too? So we're going to however a lot of the scrutiny that's been happening because of that that hack that was reported as well as just the tech in general, and how these other giant tech companies how their data's being used tech giants like twitter, Google and Youtube same thing have sent, cease and desist letters to clearview orders saying do not do this anymore. and even because of this, some police, departments and other users have just discontinued use of the software and when the founder. Responds to this kind of thing He says just you know our legal team is on it. They're working right now to fight that battle using the First Amendment as our major argument yet. Importantly, we should note that. They said the customer lists was the only thing compromised, so the hackers don't have that three billion-plus. And Growing Image Archive, but you're right. Matt legal troubles gather like storm clouds on the horizon. clearview has said it's complied with things like policies proposed by the A. C.. L., U.. The ACLU has said that they don't comply a and I think there's there's a case coming up against clear view in Illinois, and it's one of what may be many Arguably legal troubles should be gathering on the horizon, and the storm should hit especially when we look at the implications of this technology, and before we continue WanNa be like. cartoonish Lee transparent here. We're not saying that clearview or the people. In, the startup are bad people, and we're not saying even that their intentions are bad. We're saying that this technology just like any other technology has inherent implications it has it just like fire it has it has some positive benefits, and it has some very dangerous possible consequences. Make it be misused. The, the first one just off the top here the first one is one. We talked about a couple of times in this episode. Somebody with access could use it for personal reasons. We did that hypothetical COP WHO's? Mad at his ex, dating mark, mcgillicuddy, or whatever but. We can go beyond the hypothetical examples. There's a real life example. There's a billionaire clearview investor who used the APP to stalk his daughters newest Bo..

founder Youtube Hanako Google FBI US Department of Justice Immig Interpol macy ACLU Saudi Illinois twitter Matt United Arab Emirates Lee Arabia
"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

14:24 min | 1 year ago

"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"There are a ton of problems. We've we've you know we've done some foreshadowing on these but let's let's talk a little bit more about them. I you can categorize these so i. There are not many strong operational restrictions. On how this technology is actually used that means that it can not only be easily misused but there will probably not be repercussions for people at least not legal reprecussions. It's like a point. You made earlier Ben off off Mike. It's like when you used to go into those Tobacco shops and You know you are not allowed to refer to certain smoking apparatus as bonds they are waterpipes exclusively because that absolves the the distributor the retailer of any responsibility if you choose to use them in an illegal manner. It's the same thing it's like saying i. Hey whatever you do with my thing is up to you. I know it's designed exclusively for legal purpose. it's a real sticky situation isn't it because I mean it's it it it it it not only Puts all of the burden on the user? It absolves the creator of any kind of responsibility at all. Or does Abe those? Hey Hey buddy that's tobacco waterpipe right. Okay Yeah Yeah say saying something like that the way the founder did in that interview with CNN where he was just saying you know the thing says just use it. In Way. It's it's we've seen it over and over and over again. There are a couple of good things that he does speak about in that CNN. Business interview and one of the major things you know the top. It's that the software costs around fifty thousand dollars to have a license for you know for Department or something years for two years and so at least there's a buy-in level there that average person if they're getting if they're obtaining legally one of the US and then there are ways to verify if you know an end user is actually if that license is is actually that person they should be using it. That's good In the other thing is if you're a manager within the software of allies licensee of the software you get audits of every time the software has been used which is really nice so at least at least there could be some oversight to it and they could check to see if you are quote using it in a way. They're not supposed to yet. There's an there's an example of that I think they'll come in and play here later. Which is tight. It's pretty weird. It's little it's a little spooky but I WANNA go back to that warning. It's it's literally something it's like that old. Fbi VHS tape warning that we mentioned earlier episode you go onto the homepage. Essentially the APP which you can use on desktop or you can use on your phone and a basically says like. Don't use this in a bad way. And that's it's it's like as effective as those tags on mattresses that say don't remove this tag or or the little note on your box cue tips. That's like hey don't put these in your ear. I know it feels awesome and I know that's what everybody does with it but I don't don't put them in your ear and then like you said no that absolves them warning about seizures at the beginning. When you start up your play station you know what I mean. It's like you get seizures but I'm GonNa roll the dice because I wanna play me some borderlands. Three you know. Now they think about it. We might be a bit of a Glass House situation here my friends because our show literally starts with a warning that says you can turn back now. We'RE NOT. We're not as bad as cue tips you can. You can't turn back now. Let's definitely as as is our Aug. To follow said warnings and not stick cue tips in our ears. But who wants to do that? What are you gonNA use them for? Like putting on showers accurate. The back of your ear q tip for that. Can't you just use a like a tissue? Some people are live wild man. I don't know what to tell you about literally probes feel like they're very clearly designed to shove in your ear and the it does feel great but yeah it can. It's pretty scary. When you pull out some blood just say so yes. I've never done that. Actually I'm going to know gotten blood like gone in for wax out with blood but you know. I'm just fortunate. I want to bring up something. That is possible with the software. And just how it uses it before we jump into the next thing we're GonNa talk about and that's just that when your face ends up on a social media website somewhere if you even if you do not take that picture even if you're in the background of a Selfie that someone took at Bonnaroo let's say or something like that. Your face is still searchable with facial recognition software if it is visible in the background of an image. If you're in a crowd and if anywhere you are anywhere you've been where a photograph has been taken where you are visible Somewhere in the background this thing clearview. I can may very much likely. Has that image within its database. And your face will be recognizable to it. Just lets put that there so it doesn't matter if your social media exactly guys devil's advocate here. Isn't that one of those situations where if you're in public year sort of giving up that right to privacy Or if you go to a bonnaroo. There's usually signed that said when you pass these gates you are subject to being filmed etc. And that's usually for more like documentary purposes of the festival. But I would think it would also apply if you're in public and you're caught on you know one of these millions of little surveillance devices that people carry around with them. Is that fair game? Can you sue overuse of your misuse of your image? I'm I wouldn't have thought so. I'm certainly not arguing about the legality of it. I'm just saying the reality is that. Yeah wherever you go if there is a camera taking a picture whether it C. C. T. CCTV generally wouldn't show up in one of these things unless it was placed into the system at the at the risk of sounding to the don't know too extreme about this maybe to prescient I think the best for people concerned about this. The best way to handle it which is maddening is to is to apply some of the rules that some of the rules that we apply to guns to cameras so you always assume a gun is loaded right. You Never WanNa pointed at you so always assume a camera is recorded. And if you don't want to be without assumption if you don't want to be in the footage or in the photo then don't have it pointed you you guys remember. I was very uncomfortable with pokemon. Go when it came out and it was like no. They're putting their putting these A. R. Blue Q. Things to collect. Because you're filming. You're filming for them and guys really get Ben. Big Brother does not give a like the faintest hint of a about charts or whatever but still. That's the freaks me out you but we did a whole story about the company. Nanotech like how? It had roots in intelligence. Catherine I mean you're not wrong. Bid In their remember that we'd be out hanging out and people would be doing their little capturing their poke Amman's and they'd be on your cell phone or something and you would cover your face and that is paragraph to do and I completely understand where you're coming from because it's like with the whole zoom phenomenon that were obviously we're using it right now. You can turn off the camera as far as you're concerned where it doesn't show it to the group but I guarantee you it's still capturing what's going on and storing it somewhere so you know it's a great technology. It works real well. Which is why it's having this moment right now. But I just would wouldn't trust to implicitly the best technology it's what been when I had a sticker or some tape. Just go poop at all times yet. But that's that's that's still that's that's a low-tech Hack. But you have to do it because this stuff can be weaponized. And there's a guy named Erik Goldman at the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University. I like the way he put it. He said the weaponization possibilities of this are endless. Imagine a rogue law enforcement officer who wants to stalk someone that they wanna hit on later or maybe a foreign government is doing similar to what you describe. No they're digging up secrets about people to blackmail them or throw members of an opposition party in jail. This stuff can happen and you know. Clearview is also notoriously secretive even now. That's the second big issue. It leaves a lot of critics. Ill at ease we. We know some stuff because of some excellent research from early reporters. Let me tell you guys this weird story. So there's a there was a New York. Times journalist who was working on a story about clearview that really brought it to international attention and and while this journalist is working with clear is trying to do. The story clearview isn't really answering. They're like docking attempts to contact via text. Email phone call. And so this reporter knows knows. The law enforcement agencies have clearview access. And so it's reporter asked some contacts in the police department to run his photo through the APP and they do a couple of times so the first approach the first thing he learns about clearview approaching outside forces is not when they come to him. It's when they go to the police that he worked with and they asked the police. Hey are you talking to the media? How Shady is that well. Yeah that is Whoa. They have an explanation right. Oh absolutely and this really quickly. That's the piece that was on the daily because the dailies affiliate do our time. So this was after the fact of this Reporter whose name trying to find Had done all this research and gone through this whole runaround to even get a sit down The reporter eventually found the office and it was like very shady. There weren't that many people there was a skeleton crew and Finally got access to the to the founder but that is all You know described in in great detail on that piece by the daily. I highly recommend checking it out. Yeah Kashmir hill the secret of company that might end privacy as we know it is the is the times article. Yeah I liked what you're saying about. When when when hill finally figured out where the company was originally on linked in they just had like one employee listed it turned out to be a pseudonym. Fake named the founder was using So they're they're aware of the dangers here but but when they did eventually speak to the reporter they had and they had reasonable explanations for both of these things. I the founder said. Look we were avoiding speaking to the media. Not because we're like villains or something it's because we are a tiny startup and a Lotta times when you're a tiny startup you're in. You're in stealth mode right. The and that makes sense. Because the indy as on those things are pretty ironclad. You don't want anyone to scoop you. And then he additionally said here's why we talked to the police about your search terms. We actually monitor all the searches that are done because we want to make sure that they're being used correctly in other words. You know we WANNA make sure nothing like. There's never situation where a police officer is. Jilted is jilted by a romantic partner and then they find out they're ex has a new lover and they're like oh. I'M GONNA find out about this guide. I'm even afraid to make up a name because I to put it out there a marcus mcgillicuddy. That's swinging amiss. Funny thing about that though Ben is like you don't even need technology this robust to dig into somebody that closely removed from. You know a person you really know. They're probably already like posting tagging each other on instagram posts. And you just go and do a couple clicks and you're there but no it's a really good point and that's what set off alarm bells But yeah the way it's described in the in the in the daily piece it was very it. Felt very like okay. They know they're onto something and be they. Don't want to be found and I can see to your point. Been the whole start up mode. They don't WanNa get scoop. They don't want anybody stealing their proprietary info their technology and trying to misuse it. Or you know create a copycat version of it so that doesn't make sense but just the whole thing is a little strange but this APP clearview claims you know is is up to security industry standards in terms of I guess in terms of a hack ability or like firewalls security or you know being not being vulnerable to being infiltrated. But who is actually watching them? Who is actually monitoring them because it it's essentially untested and already being put out into the wild in cases that can have huge effects on people's lives. We'll talk more about that. After a quick word from our sponsor..

Clearview reporter founder CNN Ben officer US Abe Fbi instagram marcus mcgillicuddy Mike Amman Catherine Erik Goldman
"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"The best technology it's what been when I had. A sticker or some tape just go poop. At all times yet, but that's that's. That's still that's. That's a low-tech hack, but you have to do it because this stuff can be weaponized and. There's a guy named Erik Goldman at the High Tech. Law Institute at Santa Clara University. I like the way he put it, he said. The weaponization possibilities of this are endless, imagine a rogue law enforcement officer who wants to stalk someone that they wanna hit on later or maybe a foreign government is doing similar to what you describe. No, they're digging up secrets about people to blackmail them or throw members of an opposition party in jail. This stuff can happen and you know. clearview is also notoriously secretive. Even now that's the second big issue. It leaves a lot of critics ill at ease we we know some stuff because of some excellent research from early reporters. Let me, tell you guys this weird story, so there's a there was a New York Times journalist who was working on a story about clearview that really brought it to international attention. And and while this journalists is working with clear is trying to do the story. clearview isn't really answering. They're like docking attempts to contact via text email phone, call, and so this reporter knows. Knows that a lot of law enforcement agencies have clearview access, and so it's reporter asked some contacts in the police department to run is photo through the APP and they do a couple of times, so the first approach the first thing he learns about clearview, approaching outside forces is not when they come to him. It's when they go to the police that he worked with, and they asked the police. Hey, are you talking to the media? How Shady is that well? Yeah, that is WHOA. They have an explanation right? Oh, absolutely, and this really quickly. That's the piece that was on the daily because the dailies. Dailies affiliate do our time, so this was after the fact of this reporter whose name trying to find had done all this research and gone through this whole runaround to even get a sit down the reporter eventually found the office, and it was like very shady. There weren't that many people there was a skeleton crew and finally got access to the to the founder, but that is all you know described in in great detail on that piece by the daily highly recommend checking it out. Yeah, Kashmir Hill, the secret of company that might end privacy as we know, it is the. Is The Times Article Yeah I liked what you're say about when when when hill finally figured out where the company was. Originally on linked in. They just had like one employee listed. It turned out to be a pseudonym. Fake named the founder was using so they're. They're aware of the dangers here, but. But when they did eventually speak to the reporter they had, and they had reasonable explanations for both of these things I. The founder said Look. We were avoiding speaking to the media, not because we're like super villains or something, it's because we are a tiny startup and a Lotta Times. When you're a tiny startup, you're in. You're in stealth mode right the and And that makes sense because the indy as on those things are pretty ironclad. You don't want anyone to scoop you. And then he additionally said. Here's why we talked to the police. About your search terms. We actually monitor all the searches that are done because we want to make sure that they're being used correctly in other words, you know we WANNA make sure. Nothing like there's never situation where a police officer is jilted is jilted by a romantic partner, and then they find out. They're X has a new lover, and they're like oh I'm GonNa find out about this. Guide I'm even afraid to make up a name because I to put it out there. A. Marcus, Gill cutty that's swinging amiss. Funny thing about that though Ben is like you don't even need technology this robust to dig into somebody that closely removed from you know a person you really know. They're probably already like posting tagging each other on instagram posts, and you just go and do a couple clicks and you're there. But no, it's a really good point, and that's what set off. Alarm Bells Yeah, the way it's described in the in the in the daily piece. It was very. It felt very like okay. They know they're onto something and be they. Don't want to be found and I can see to your point been the whole start up mode. They don't WanNa get scoop. They don't want anybody stealing their proprietary info, their technology and trying to misuse it or you know, create a copycat version of it, so that doesn't make sense, but just the whole thing is a little strange, but this APP clearview claims. Is is up to security industry standards in terms of I guess in terms of A. Hack ability or like firewalls security, or you know being not being vulnerable to being infiltrated, but who is actually watching them? Who is actually monitoring them because I? It's essentially untested and already being put out into the wild in cases that can have huge effects on people's lives. We'll talk more about that after a quick word from our sponsor..

reporter founder officer New York Times Erik Goldman High Tech instagram Law Institute hill Ben Santa Clara University A. Marcus partner Gill cutty
"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Of. Faces just specifically faces somewhere north of three billion images, and as we're as we're recording this. That number is likely still growing, so that number is going to be a little bit higher by the time. You get to the end of this episode. Yeah, and it was the gentleman who founded the startup on thought was who I heard interviewed on I believe it was the daily actually so if you want to hear directly from this gentleman's mouth, what he believes, the mission of this technology, and this company is very fascinating in an interview that kind of Goodell's into some of the slippery slope sides of this technology that we're going to get into, but as far as the end user's concerned which in this case would be law enforcement, because currently this is not available to civilians. You take a picture. And it identifies who that person is symbols that. Right by matching it with all of this information that they've collected, and they've collected it not through any really nefarious means. It's all that information that we talked about this already out there. All they've got to do is reach out and grab it. It's a it's a search engine for faces, and it sounds noxious at first I I also If it was the daily I think. I listened to that interview but I I also listen to an excellent interviews at Matt and extended. CNN business a conversation. So if you want to see them vigil like if you want to see the founder using the APP a couple of different times, I think he does it on himself. He does it on the interviewer, and then he does it on one of their producers, and it seems to work on it. It's not. Not a sensationalized thing, either at least the way they're presenting it. Yeah, but we're. We're GONNA. We're GONNA. Maybe talk about a little more Just just. If you do want to look at that video it's an interview with Johnny Sullivan with CNN business and it is. We're going to reference it several times in this episode. Yeah, so like you said. No clearview has taken this from publicly available sources your facebook. Sir, Youtube, your Ven Mos which yes are publicly available I and The federalize and local law enforcement. Admit that they only have a limited knowledge of how the APP actually works mechanically nuts and bolts of it, but they do confirm they've already used it to help solve shoplifting cases, identity theft, cases, credit, Card, fraud, child, abuse, even and even several homicides. This technology goes by the way far beyond anything constructed by silicon, valley giants, or anything officially created or used by the US government. Yeah, in that interview that we just mentioned one mentions that. They. They had this image this video file of child abuse. Incident and the person of interest walks past in the background at one point, and there were only two usable frames of this person's face, and again like imagine the background of a video they were able to take a still from that video of this person's face and identify him through other social media websites where they've got all this data from and. make an arrest on this person like that. That is It's mind blowing that you could do that in. Thank goodness that they were able to do that, but it's the implication of being able to do that. In that one instance, and then applying it across, everything is what makes it feel a little scary because we're critics for the critics. Will Ya for the critics? For the people who are looking at it big picture, so you're you're thinking about just in a law enforcement. application than it's amazing right and it's the best thing ever. But if you apply it to everything. To everyone at all times outside of law enforcement then we will, and this strictly like a technological level, it's fascinating, and and clearly a huge leap forward in this kind of technology because I mean. We've seen these videos. They're talking about these grainy surveillance videos or ATM camera videos I mean it's hard to as a human being, even if you knew that person would be difficult for you to to identify them so this using this algorithm, in Manila, can analyzing and comparing all these different subjects I imagine using points of articulation like on the faces and the structures, or whatever it's able to come back with positive mashes. Really fascinating and they're really. You know pretty innovative use of technology for sure as a nerd speaking exclusively on that level, but you're right. Matt Start to apply on a larger scale. It gets really nineteen eighty-four ish and kind of scary I appreciate that point you'll. It's something that's going to come into play later, and it may surprise. Some of our fellow listeners To learn a little bit more about this technology, and and some of the the other topics that you raise there. I WANNA see this. The their pitch is very law enforcement based on the website They're quick to point out. They've they're quick to claim. I should say that they've helped law enforcement track down hundreds of at-large, criminals. They mentioned the the real. The things that make people very emotional lake, child, abusers, terrorists sex traffickers, but they also say this technology is used to help exonerate the innocent and identify victims. I. It seems that they're. They might be embellishing a little bit in terms of the degree of help. They're providing, but they are providing help. The authorities have used this. It's happening now. They've done so without much public scrutiny, or they were most of two, thousand, nine, hundred, and doing so without much public scrutiny. In early twenty, twenty clearview said more than six hundred different law enforcement agencies started using our APP just in the last year, but they refuse to provide more specifics because they're very protective of their client base, so the Badger is out of the bag metaphorically. This is not a what if scenario this exist. This is in use right now, and that means it can therefore be used on you and every single person you know. Is that a bad thing? Here's the interesting part this technology..

CNN Matt Goodell US facebook Manila founder Johnny Sullivan shoplifting fraud
"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

13:20 min | 1 year ago

"clearview" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"They don't want you to know here in the age of social media right. We're recording this as longtime listeners. Know on a virtual interface. Right we're we're we're mentally and soulful together but not physically together in. That may be the case for some time. However technology is allowing us to feel closer right and the the crazy thing is this stuff is so cheap now. We're talking about the proliferation of cheap imaging technology. You guys remember when not. Everyone could afford a camera editing software and stuff like that I mean hell I remember when not every phone had a camera on or it was like Who's got a digital camera? Go find one you know. Now it's like a non issue you know what if you were gonNA take a video with one of those? It was this little league filed that you'd end up getting even though you had this powerful camera digital camera could use. Your video is so terrible and you just had a nice curated set of pixels that would move in what appeared to look like a face But now we have you know. Now it's it's so affordable to buy these things and on balance that's a good thing but combine that with the massive growth of social media and the massive growth. There's some you people don't talk about is often the massive growth of archival capacity it. This this means if you WANNA be sweet nostalgic about it that are days of cherishing a feud like glamour photographs from your from your local photography studio or few expensive. Polaroid's those days are all gone. Now you can post photos of yourself your friends or strangers and you can post them anywhere you please. There are some laws about it. But they're they're not really good because legislation is always been technologies slower sibling and so those those laws often don't have a lot of teeth to them and with the rise of all this technology and the rise of all these capabilities we also see the rise of technology that is exclusively meant to exploit the vast amount of stuff that we've been making just like live journal Tumbler. Myspace friendster facebook. All you know. It's all that jazz. So what do you guys think? Optimists and pessimists have a different idea of of what this means for the world will yes. On the optimists side. I would just say the number of photographs and captured memories. I have of my son is probably more certainly thousands of times greater than that which exists for me as a child and my growth. My you know my parents and then going back and back and back and back it's just exponentially a larger amount of memories that are captured throughout his life. My son so that's great. That's wonderful we can look back on those you know until the the machines all turn off or we lose electricity those those images will exist for my family and people that care about me and my son but on the flip side of that Matt folks like my mom for example. She doesn't consider those real like like if it's not printed out and it's not in a frame on my mantle than that is not a real memory which is interesting because you to your point about like the machines turning off there's all these companies now that will take your instagram photos and print them out and send you framed copies of them and the proliferation of like insects cameras. And like more analog technology is sort of a response almost a backlash to this over digitisation of like our memories and our collective kind of you know unconscious in a way with all the stuff that's out there it's like there's this sense of. Is it really ours? Once it's out there in the third and I think that's a big part of today's question. Yeah who who owns the art the artist or the audience? It's very old question. But it's one that has continually been relevant and the other question is is it art or is it just data right right there we go. That's a good. That's a good distinction. It's a tough distinction to make optimists are saying this is great. You guys the world's going to be a safer place and think how convenient everything's GonNa be. You'll never lose your favorite photo again. You know and criminals can no longer disappear into a crowd and then pessimists say in a world beyond privacy every person is monitored continually throughout their lives your images logged countless times and all the data from that image and all the other images of you. It's analyzed that spot and sold without your knowledge or your permission a world careening towards Scifi to Stupi precribe pre existing medical conditions advertising so invasive and so- bespoke that. It might as well be reading your mind because it's doing something very close to that but for you get all blade runner minority report. Let's let's start closer to the beginning. There is a revolution happening in the world of facial recognition. Right now and it's name is clear view. A here are the facts. Yeah the first time I heard of clear view I was on a recent Npr piece where the founder was interviewed of so. This is a very relatively new company at least to me but as far as the background is a research tool that is being used by law enforcement specifically in the company. It makes it very clear that this is something. That's designed seclusive. Leave for use by law enforcement In order to identify perpetrators and victims of crimes to little bit pretty exciting. I would say yeah yeah I mean. That's you know we have to be honest. That's that's the high level like log line or pitch from the company on its own website. So we can't blame them for not wanting to get too into the weeds about algorithms. But if we look at how it actually works we can. We can get a high level understanding. It's a start up. It has a massive database of faces just specifically faces somewhere north of three billion images. And as we're as we're recording this that number is likely still growing so that number is going to be a little bit higher by the time you get to the end of this episode. Yeah and it was the the gentleman who founded the startup. Han Thought was who I heard interviewed on. I believe it was the daily actually. So if you want to hear directly from this gentleman's Mouth what he believes. The mission of this technology and this company is very fascinating in interview. That kind of Goodell's into some of the slippery slope sides of this technology that we're going to get into but as far as the end user's concerned Which in this case would be law enforcement because currently this is not available to Civilians. You take a picture and it identifies who that person is symbols that by by matching it with all of this information that they've collected and they've collected it not through any really nefarious means. It's all that information that we talked about this already out there. All they've got to do is reach out and grab it. It's a it's a search engine for faces and it sounds noxious at I I I also If it was the daily I think I listened to that interview But I I also listen to an excellent interviews at Matt and extended. Cnn business a conversation so if you want to see them vigil like if you want to see the founder using the APP a couple of different times. I think he does it on himself. He does it on the interviewer and then he does it on one of their producers and it seems to work on it. It's not a sensationalized thing either. At least the way they're presenting it. Yeah but we're we'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA maybe talk about a little more Just just if you do. Want to look at that video It's an interview with Johnny Sullivan. Cnn Business and it is we're going to reference it several times in this episode. Yeah so like you said No. Clearview has taken this from publicly available sources your facebook's your Youtube your ven mos which yes are publicly available I and the federalize and local law enforcement admit that they only have a limited knowledge of how the APP actually works mechanically nuts and bolts of it but they do confirm. They've already used it to help solve Shoplifting cases identity theft cases credit card fraud child abuse even and even several homicides. This technology goes by the way far beyond anything constructed by Silicon Valley giants or anything officially created or used by the US government. Yeah in that interview that we just mentioned One mentions that they they had this image. This video file of child abuse incident and the person of interest walks past in the background at one point and there were only two usable frames of this person's face and again like imagine the background of a video. They were able to take a still from that video of this person's face and identify him through other social media websites where they've got all this data from and Make an arrest on this person like that. That is It's mind blowing that you could do that in. Thank goodness that they were able to do that. But it's the implication of being able to do that in that one instance and then applying it across everything is what makes it feel a little scary. Because we're critics for the critics. Will Ya for the critics for the people are looking at it big picture. So you're you're thinking about just in a law enforcement Application than it's amazing right and it's the best thing ever but if you apply it to everything to everyone at all times outside of law enforcement then we will and this strictly like a technological level it's fascinating and and clearly a huge leap forward in this kind of technology because I mean we've seen these videos. They're talking about these grainy surveillance videos or ATM camera videos. I mean it's hard to as a human being. Even if you knew that person would be difficult for you to to identify them. So this using this algorithm in Manila can analyzing and comparing all these different subjects I imagine using points of articulation like on the faces and the structures. Or whatever it's able to come back with positive mashes. I think that's really fascinating. And they're really you know Pretty innovative use of technology for sure as a nerd speaking exclusively on that level. But you're right matt. When you start to apply on a larger scale it gets really nineteen eighty-four ish and kind of scary. I appreciate that point. You'll it's something that's going to come into play later. And it may surprise some of our fellow listeners To learn a little bit more about this technology and and some of the The other topics that you raise there. I WANNA see this. Their pitch is very law enforcement based on the website They're quick to point out. They've they're quick to claim. I should say that they've helped law enforcement track down. Hundreds of at-large criminals They mentioned the the real. The things that make people very emotional lake Child ABUSERS TERRORISTS SEX TRAFFICKERS. But they also say this technology is used to help exonerate the innocent and identify victims. I it seems that they're they might be embellishing a little bit in terms of the degree of help. They're providing but they are providing help the authorities have used this. It's happening now. They've done so without much public scrutiny. Or they were most of two thousand nine hundred and doing so. Without much public scrutiny. In early twenty twenty clearview said more than six hundred. Different law enforcement agencies started using our APP just in the last year but they refuse to provide more specifics because they're very protective of their client base so the Badger is out of the bag. Metaphorically this is not a what. If scenario this exist this is in use right now and that means it can therefore be used on you and every single person you know. Is that a bad thing. Here's the interesting part. This technology.

Matt founder Polaroid Myspace instagram Cnn Business US Npr facebook Han Manila Johnny Sullivan Goodell Clearview
Millbury alleges Clearview golf course is open illegally

WBZ Midday News

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Millbury alleges Clearview golf course is open illegally

"Is officially back in the swing in Massachusetts but it comes with a copy off restrictions like social distancing of wearing face masks but did some ever really close at all but telegram reporting speaking to town officials out of Milbury who allege that Clearview Country Club the military has been open for a play during this entire pandemic in defiance of the state's order for all nonessential businesses to close golf was not considered essential now the state's labor standards department has issued a cease and desist order to that club but of course that was prior to the news that all golf clubs are allowed to re open so not sure what the fallout will be for that club for previous violations

Massachusetts Milbury Clearview Country Club Golf
Now With More Women!

Marketing Over Coffee

07:07 min | 1 year ago

Now With More Women!

"Good Morning. Welcome to marketing over coffee. I'm John Wall today. We've decided to bring a woman on French National Women's month Katie Robert. Thanks for joining us now. With more real women. It's about time you were on the right side of History John. And and so that's part of just before we jumped on it again and International Women's Day is over one hundred years old. I just thought that this was one of those hallmark holidays. That got made up in the seventies so they could make more money but like this is legit yeah so march. Eight is International Women's Day and then the whole month of March is women's History Month. It's similar to other months where they're other ethnicities other cultures. I don't WanNa get too far down the feminist rabbit hole. But it's sort of sad that we still treat the gender of a woman as a whole separate culture or a whole separate identity that needs to be celebrated and needs to be like you need to pay attention because a lot of things happened. I mean women haven't always had the right to vote and a whole host of other things. You could start. Go down and say like we'll right now. Women's reproductive rights are in jeopardy. It's silly these are things that are just basic human rights that women have had to fight twice as hard for so. I'm not gonNA spend the whole episode talking angry speak but I think it's important. Justice Sorta College at Shit that some of these things. Yeah definitely and we've got a couple of topics that we want to run by you and the ideas we've come up with. Chris has always doing you. Ask Answer on marketing analytics stuff which is Great. But we actually have some real in the trenches workplace questions to throw to you and we can get your feedback on them. And hopefully it will figure out who's stepping on a landmine versus. Who's doing the right thing? So we can dig into that one to kick off. The Unilever had a story talking about achieving gender balance in management globally they have thousands of employees worldwide and they actually had reached fifty percent management in the states. But they've now announced that that's the same worldwide that they've done it all over the globe. This is great. News obviously making moves in the right direction from the ground up which I thought was the most important thing to me. But what do you think about how that goes and how they should take advantage of it? What's your overall take? I think it's a great thing for them to be celebrating. Because I don't think that companies realize that this is not a normal thing to see. Obviously there is you know. Companies and industries out there that are more female dominated the male dominated but the majority is still from a management standpoint. And up it's still very male dominated. I've seen this in my own experience. Where when I look across the team of managers it could be ninety percent male. Now that's not to say that male managers are not a good thing but in terms of balancing and getting a more diverse perspective. It's something we talk about in artificial intelligence all the time you need that diversity in order for the approach to be as balanced as possible. That's true of humans that's true of machines and I think that it's such a great move and what I'm hoping is that Unilever really takes advantage of this milestone that they've had an start really like sharing. This is what our culture looks like. This is a peek inside the day to day operations if we're celebrating that we have this balance of management between genders. What does that mean? What's changed really? Does it mean more revenues. Does it mean more employee retention whatever that metric is. I hope that they continue to share it publicly. Yeah that's a great point. It would be good to hear kind of how everything else goes. And of course see what other companies can jump on board to. It just always strikes me. We see so many posting things about well there's not enough C. level executives. But of course if you don't have middle managers you're not going to get the C. level executives otherwise. You're just going to be in this game. Poaching a small group of sea level exacts but by building your own you are actually changing things across the board and just creating better culture for the company from the ground up. I'd love to see people doing things that way. Because it's just it's kind of making change that's ingrained in the organization as opposed to trying to patch and move and buy your way out of problems. I agree I agree. I think that it's definitely going to have an impact on culture. I mean it's tough to say because it almost feels like setting the feminist movement backwards but women are more empathetic. They care more about feelings in terms of what happens in the job place and mail cultures and this is a broad stroke. You can tell me that I'm wrong. It's up just a broad generalization but when you have a predominantly male culture. It's very different from when you have women in the mix you know. It tends to be well. You know what I'm not even GONNA go down that road. I I myself will probably get a lot of trouble if I try to. Make those generalizations of people who tell me. I'm wrong and I WANNA be wrong. I want to know that my assumptions about the way that business still works are changing. Yeah we've seen so many cultures with testosterone overdose. That that's just a mistake. Yeah I'll tell you the worst of the worst. We had an article about clearview. This APP that uses facial recognition. It's now from what I understand. It's only in the hands of law enforcement. You need to be a law enforcement agency to have it but he basically just grab a picture of somebody run it through clearview and comes back with their whole social profile and everything. That's out on the web. You can find out who. Somebody isn't what they do. And they grabbed a picture of one of the investors who had early access to this and was using it. His daughter was on a date and he was checking out the guy and it was just funny because the picture they used to this guy. You know I'm sure you've seen some of these Harvey Weinstein photos that have been going around recently. Yeah I'm looking at the photo now and it's just making me or if you've got the photo it's like our guy like makes. Java the hut look like you know Java could be doing some modeling to put this front on ugly behavior but then the thing that made me laugh was. It's just putting a front on on what's there because like when I got that article I immediately. It was like okay. Well who's the daughter? And within three seconds I had five years of pictures of her and her whole story and everything. That's going on with her. So you know. It's kind of their for everybody. But when you put a wrapper on it and make it as easy as an epic. It's shocking to people. Well I was going to say you know I. It really speaks to that whole privacy issue that we're running into these days like it's privacy on the Internet is. It's not a new issue. It's just a recurring issue and I think that what people are now. Catching onto is the more information. You posed about yourself pictures on social media and that kind of thing like it just. It's there for the taking and it becomes the training. Data set four tools like facial recognition. I'm a little bit of a conspiracy theorist so when it comes to like those facebook challenges of like you know the ten year challenge. You know really what it's doing is it's updating the database to see how your face has changed over the past ten years so that it doesn't have to try to like guests and mockup how you've changed overpass ten years you like. You're doing the work or the database. I understand like the police want to use it but the fact that it started as a secret play thing of the ranch which is what the article title says. It's just kinda gross.

Unilever International Women Clearview French National Women John Wall Katie Robert Facebook Harvey Weinstein Chris Testosterone
"clearview" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"clearview" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Now joined YouTube Twitter and the payment service Venlo in demanding that the facial recognition company Clearview a I'd stop harvesting user images to identify the people in them clear view has drawn scrutiny following investigative reports for The New York Times and buzzfeed detailing its work with law enforcement and its practices of scraping social media for images Tina Cervidae number radio newsradio nine twenty and one oh four seven forty eight senators have pronounced Donald John trump guilty as charged fifty two senators have pronounced him not guilty as charged the Senate a judges that the respondent Donald John trump is not guilty as charged in the first article of impeachment there it is the impeachment saga over as the president is acquitted joining us now is right Rachel Sutherland from fox news so what's next I guess is my question Rachel good morning good morning with the president's going to be at the national prayer breakfast this morning so you may hear some of this first comment them in person on his acquit on both charges and it noon he's going to be get delivering a statement also on his acquittal so we will be hearing from the president today obviously he's going after center Matt Romney on Twitter claiming he's a Democrat secret asset after Ronnie to break up the party that is conduct on abuse of power but acquitted on obstruction of Congress so and there's a lot of the you know evil eyes for for Ronnie this morning but also a lot of support from people who believe that that he did what he thought was right cell do the Democrats let go are they looking for another angle judiciary chair Jerry Nadler has said that he would like to bring in former national security adviser John Bolton for testimony but it's unclear whether the house actually go down that road with the twenty twenty election right here we're already in it but so we're waiting to hear from the house on their next steps that Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer said last night that that if new evidence is found or if the any prices found of wrong doing that they would that the impeachment is around even if he had three months from now okay makes us other than from fox news thank you Rachel thanks it's six forty seven now so we'll see where it goes the impeachment saga at least it's sort of over I guess we can say ninety seven percent of the results are in from Monday's Iowa caucuses they reported up to ninety seven percent this morning following all this technical headaches the issues and reporting problems that led to no results being reported on the very night at the caucuses former mayor Pete booted change senator Bernie Sanders nearly tied now with ninety seven percent of the vote in as new results were released yesterday booted judges lead narrowed to three state delegate equivalents of two thousand ninety eight counted senator Elizabeth Warren was behind them and third former vice president Joe Biden fourth place and senator any club richer was fifth Iowa for the first time this year has also been reporting the total number of votes for each candidate and then the total number of votes after a realignment when people for a candidate who didn't meet a minimum threshold the viability in the first round can go to another candidate it's very confusing in Iowa Sanders is leading the first total vote as well as in the second but with a smaller margin the straggling results have been coming in as the candidates have already moved on there in New Hampshire gonna hold their first in the nation primary on February the eleventh them they'll be a debate among the democratic candidates coming up on Friday coming up tomorrow people in New York City to the streets to protest president trump's senator quill by the way fox is Gerry Baumgarten covered that eight people were arrested during the demonstration on the streets of Manhattan the protesters upset that the Senate the president without hearing from any witnesses.

Venlo Clearview YouTube
"clearview" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"clearview" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Answer they lined up along taking extra steps to clean cars after a passenger with measles road on one of the screens last week L. I. double our president Philip ang says they've identified the trains and stations that the person may have traveled on or walk through and there will be a full wipe down meantime health officials say any potential contamination no longer exists because the virus only lives for two hours either airborne or on surfaces this is the second confirmed case of measles in Nassau County with the first one confirmed earlier this month Lisa G. NBC news radio New York Cooper is filing suit against the city of New York the ride sharing service seeking to avoid a new rule limiting how much time their drivers can spend idle in Manhattan without passengers who were also sought to one do a rule banning the issuance of new licenses to for hire vehicles through August of twenty twenty a spokesman for the Bosnian said it would protect New Yorkers against a company that seeks to put profit first quote on quote in sports action that's over the rents eight one Yankees fall to the blue jays four to three preseason NHL doubles over the Rangers for two islanders beat Detroit in overtime for the three time to check the traffic now inbound on the upper deck of the George Washington three right lanes closed for construction the eighty ninety five express lanes with a left wing closure south bound exit seventy sixty nine for repairs and a crash in western New Jersey on route eighty west bound before exit nineteen around the fun burrows watch for delays traveling on the FDR following an earlier crash north bound by grand street in slow traffic with left wing construction on the Clearview north bound at seventy Third Avenue you now know how not to go whether for tonight partly cloudy lo sixty five degrees Saturday sunshine eighty five and Sunday partly to mostly sunny high of eighty five. Monday sun and clouds.

New York Cooper New York New Jersey Philip ang Nassau County Lisa G. NBC FDR president Yankees Manhattan George Washington Detroit Clearview NHL blue jays islanders Rangers sixty five degrees
Oil Prices Close 15% Higher On Record Trading Day Due To Risk Premium

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:06 min | 2 years ago

Oil Prices Close 15% Higher On Record Trading Day Due To Risk Premium

"Will do oil. I I guess because because both the US benchmark West Texas intermediate it's called and the global indicator known as Brent crude ended the day up just shy of fifteen percent but here's the deal there is plenty of oil on the shelves as it were Saudi. Arabia has got some the US and other countries have their own reserves. There is supply to meet demand demand those higher prices then reflect something that maybe we ought to get used to talk about in global energy markets. Something called the risk premium from Washington marketplace's marketplace's. Scott Tong gets is going to some analysts oil buyers and sellers have been kind of asleep to energy risks in the Middle East in the past month tankers were attacked and pipelines pipelines were struck not much reaction until Saturday strike in Saudi Arabia says Halima Croft at RBC capital markets the market was very complacent place it about the degree of risk in this standoff involving Iran and the US allies and the RIM now. I almost cannot say how serious ethicist Saturday's apparently surgical strike on this essential artery creates one of the biggest disruptions ever to world supply jean-francois says neck at the Atlantic Council Council think tank says the attack warns oil markets that whoever targeted this fortified facility could hit it again the three different rings of defence and Al Qaeda never managed to past the first one I would imagine and that's the big surprises that they would be protected by Patriot missiles and they have not another risk is how long the Saudi facilities stays off line for the next three or four weeks. There's plenty in reserve but for a world that drinks one hundred million barrels of oil every day that cushion could go quickly says Jacques Rousseau at clearview energy partners. You know if this starts to drag into next year the world will have taken down their inventories. He's very substantially if world supply is still short then oil pump prices could double by some estimates and that's the new risk built into the higher price of oil what some call the Gulf premium on Scott Tong for

United States Saudi Arabia Rbc Capital Markets Scott Tong Jacques Rousseau Arabia Atlantic Council Council Halima Croft West Texas Brent Washington Middle East Iran RIM One Hundred Million Barrels
"clearview" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"clearview" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"There because there was no crime. There was no anything the crime was committed by the other side in recent days. The president has urged an investigation into those who initiate the Russia probe officials in Rockland county. New York have reissued an emergency declaration that was blocked by a judge county. Exec. Ed day is making the move because the measles outbreak. There is only gotten worse. Spite our best efforts. This outbreak is not going away. If anything is now celebrating much as we feared thirty three new cases, bringing the total to one eighty four the declaration calls on people who are potentially contagious to stay home. At least some of the students whose parents have been charged in the college admission scandal are also investigation targets legal analyst Rikki claiming on what's ahead for the accused to intend to fight it out in court at some point, they should change their mind. The question is how much aggravation have they caused the government so far as well? As looking at how they have finally come to grips, which taken responsibility statement in prison. Bill Cosby says his insurance company is settling a lawsuit filed by female accuser without his okay? AIG has settled other cases brought by seven other women. Actress Georgia angle has died at seventy she shot to fame in the nineteen seventies with her soft voice and ditzy ways on the Mary Tyler Moore show. Good. She was a five time EMMY nominee Wall Street right now, the Dow is up fifty eight points. This is CBS news. This report brought to you by CBS audio for more news, entertainment sports and lifestyle features. Go to CBS audio dot com forward slash podcast realize this. But not all sick is the same that clearview.

Georgia angle CBS Rockland county Bill Cosby measles New York AIG Mary Tyler Moore president Rikki Russia Ed analyst