7 Burst results for "Clean Up The Lake"

"clean lake" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

27:27 min | 9 months ago

"clean lake" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Vast greenhouses, containing the wares of some 200 companies in the gardening game. There are also 33 national pavilions where countless artists architects and curators have made spaces and exhibitions that riff on this year's theme. Growing green cities to get my bearings and understand more, I shaded from the spring sun under a sculpture of two figures in corten steel, and it was in the shade of that enormous pair of steel buttocks formed from laser cut bees that I caught up with Frank cornelison, commercial director of Florida 2022 to find out more. Florian is all about horticulture it's all about nature, the theme, this edition is growing green cities and we're all about how do we make our cities greener, healthier and nicer to live in. And to do that, we need these. We need pollinators. So we are standing in the shade of our homage to bees and this is actually a parent and a child made entirely out of hand cut and steel bees. It's about 20 meters tall, that gives our listeners a perspective on exactly the amount of shade that we have here. And as I look around, I can see a bit of permanent architecture, a huge flower adorned building, I can see a beautiful water, places to sit, tulip bulbs, and a cable car for the uninitiated, what is Florida and what might people expect when they come through the door. So we are a world horticultural expo. That means that we are a world expo with a really, really strong focus on plants. So we've got everything here from fruit and veg all the way through. The flowers and we have 33 international countries and 210 national Dutch companies presenting their solutions for that growing green cities theme. So you can find anything here from, as you mentioned, a cable car, which is a really, really fun way of viewing the expo site from above. You can find international pavilions where you can learn about different cultures, but also different approaches to horticulture and we have traditional shell gardens here as well. You're very relaxed, but this is actually quite a stressful day. I imagine in the round because it's the opening day and this kind of goes on for 6 months. How do you go about organizing something like that that I suppose grows and accommodates the crowds and changes a little bit as it goes through, but also there is worth visiting for all of that time. So we have had a lot of time to plan this event. We've actually had the most time ever to organize a floor out because this edition has been in the making for 11 years. Just to give you an idea of 11 years of planning, we've master plan the site. We've actually put in all the infrastructure. You can see here all the bridges are brand new. We have permanent buildings here, and then we have a whole events team that are planning, visit the flows, planning all the arts and culture, which is an extremely extensive program, and we have all of our countries have spent years designing all of these pavilions. And I think in total, there's been more than 10,000 people have worked in designing this expo and bringing it to life. And last up, mainly because I can, and because it's the first day because you've seen everything and I haven't. Can you just pull out one or two highlights or things that surprised you or things that look different on the rendering to how they do in real life and that you think have been great successes? And you think that people should come and see? So one of the things that I really enjoy is the German pavilion. Now that is one of the bigger ones, so it's definitely not hidden, but it is exceptional because it is an interactive exhibit. So if you do want to get active, if you want to have some fun, I had a very fierce competition with a few children. Just the other day because you need to earn credits to make the city greener and they can get quite competitive. So that's absolutely a lot of fun. The greenhouse, that's about 10,000 m² of glass house to explore, absolute must visit right there. And one of the things that I hope a lot of visitors will experience is a little bit tucked away. That's what agro forestry area. So that's right in the corner of utopia island. And that's where we have an amazing group of volunteers trialing new ways of Agra forestry. So that is planting crops and intermingling them with different species and with some decorative horticulture as well to really get that soil enrichment going. And that's a really, really nice corner and those people are absolutely amazing as well. So if you do go to agroforestry area, just talk to one of the volunteers. And they can explain you everything in great detail. And they make their own schnapps. They might let you sample some of that as well. As I explored the national pavilions, my impressions were, well, mixed. Many of the exhibits I'm looking at you Italy were left unfinished and throughout the site there were heaped high rolls of unlaid turf and the clatter of hammers. The finishing touches were still being added days after the first green fingered guests arrived and began to wander through the show. One impeccably finished affair, however, was the UAE pavilion, an open courtyard riffing on the nation's traditional mid century shabby houses that's shabby with an eye, by the way. It's here that I caught up with the organizers to find out their take on what a desert nation can add to the debate about cities, one that's hotting up fast and why they decided to bring a saltwater garden to this year's exhibition. Hello, my name is Angela megali. I am a member of the UAE pavilion participating at Florida expo 2022. My name is Maya garo. I work for studio called tell art, which is based in the Netherlands. We've been collaborating with Angeles foundation SHF for a number of years, and we're really thrilled to be here. When we heard about the theme growing green cities, we really asked ourselves, what does that mean for the UAE? Obviously, when you think about the UAE you might think of desert. But we also have quite a bit of sea around us. And so this place called the ecotone, which is the place where C means land, many of our major cities are actually located on the. And so we brought together an amazing creative team. We had a local architecture firm named pragma. I am an executive director of the slama bin tandan foundation, so many of our creatives from the foundation got together. And really asked, how can the UAE express this theme? We were really drawn to the ecotone that is actually indeed how we are greening our cities. We have mangrove forests that grow in the sea. We have Meadows of sea grass underneath the sea, and many other salts to tolerant plants that grow in the ecotone. And so that really is how the idea came. And we really wanted to make a presentation that was very credible and authentic at the same time. And it was tell art's job to bring a lot of that thinking into a physical space and to make the whole thing work. And as I crunch around on the sand like substance on the floor and pass through, I feel like you've done a very good job of that. But how did that come together? Tell me a little bit about the stages that we can see as we move through the hosh. So we started actually at the beginning, Angela asked us to speak to a lot of the different leaders in the UAE, scientists, people who are pushing the boundaries of ag tech because of course there's a food security angle to fill the handle that we wanted to focus on the UAE imports a lot of its food is really actively trying to look at ways that it can grow food locally. And so we had these wonderful conversations and minister of food security who's not a minister of climate change and the environment, the minister of culture, and the head of the EAD, the environmental agency of Abu Dhabi, just giving us a picture of what is the thinking here, what's possible, what does the future look like? What are the big challenges? And a big spark for us was this one sentence where when we look at greening our cities, we also have to look at greening RC because that is part of the environment. We have to look at the plants that thrive here and work with them. And I think that's really true to the spirit of the UAE, the landscape is extremely challenging. It's high salinity, extreme temperatures, and very saline soil. So those three conditions make it very difficult to grow anything. And yet in these challenging conditions, you have these plants, these halophilic plants, so these are plants that are salt tolerant to salt loving, thrive. So what are these superpowers that these plants have? What can they tell us? What clues can they give us to solving some of the problems that we face collectively in the future? And one of the big inspirations really here is that the UAE can serve as the lab for the future because its environment is what the world could look like at 2100 if we don't take action. And it's a story that's told in three parts, so this is a plant show. So it has a garden and that's your first point of entry. You enter into a garden that looks very different to the others in Florida. It has sand and it has pools of water. And then when you look closely, these pools contain plants, but it's not an abundant floral garden, lots of colors. The palette is muted. It's an emirati minimalism palette so these very soft colors of the sand and of the sea and the landscape. And in this garden, we tell a story actually. So it's a diagram almost of a closed loop biocell in agriculture system. The UAE obviously has an issue with water scarcity and they need to desalinate seawater in order to produce waterfront plants and for people to consume. And so we represent that in the garden. We have a salt flat. We have a desert. We have water pump which shows this fresh water coming out that you can actually drink. And then the brine from that desalination process is used to feed these pools of fish, tilapia, which produce protein for the MRT diet, which fish is a very important source of protein for emiratis traditionally, but then that waste water from the fish is used to basically water the quinoa and the Salle cornea, the grown nearby. And then that water is purified by a small mangrove forest and sent out to sea again in a pristine state. So it's this beautiful loop where we use nature itself to create an elegant machine to produce food and an environmentally sustainable way that also protects the environment. And then you step inside, there's an ecotone wall that explains the condition of this landscape and then you step inside into a halophytic gallery, which shows these four hero plants as Sally cornea, the mangroves, the seagrass beds that are abundant in the UAE and the Arabian gulf, and microalgae, which is the unsung hero because it's invisible to the naked eye. And yet it basically produces a huge proportion 20% of marine oxygen that is needed by all of the marine life to survive and to thrive, but also produces the air that we breathe. So we actually very directly depend on these plants for our own survival. And we really wanted to give them a place we represent them as beautiful glass sculptures created by an Amsterdam based glass studio. And we wanted to show them as joules because that's how Emirates think of anything that can grow in this environment. It's a precious thing to be celebrated and treasured. And then in the final room, there is a purely immersive space which celebrates the seagrass bed. So it's really an invitation to enter their world. It's not animated. It's actually a live game environment. So as you approach the seagrass bed, it responds to you in waves that you welcomes you in and there's a beautiful scent of marine scent. So there's an educational aspect to the exhibition, but really we just want people to feel welcome and to understand the UAE in a new way, hopefully. And I'm ruining your narrative, but going back to the beginning, I thought there was a nice nod to the fact that we're in the Netherlands that you mentioned the kind of the water spout at the beginning, which is taken to denote the desalination of the kind of salt flat bit next to it. How is that a nod to Dutch in this? And how important is it that these things are rooted in where we are as well as where the ideas are coming from? It's funny because when you look at the lateral landscape of the UAE, it's the exact opposite of what we have here in the Netherlands where there's an overabundance of water and rain. In fact, the problem here is controlling the water because there's too much of it. And both cultures are very collaborative around water. So here it's all about the polar system and dikes and controlling and in the UAE. It's about sharing the water. So the water feature that you saw is actually a celebration also of the falaj, which is an ancient irrigation system where water was channeled from the mountains into the communities, and it was showed equitably among all of the families in the community so that they could grow their crops. And so water is treated as something precious. You can see it falls into this rock face with a small pool and then it's channeled through this delicate ribbon of a channel and you can collect it at the end. So the idea is it may be abundant here, but in the UAE as precious as gold, and we treat it with reverence. And Angela, I'll come back to you now. How important is it to move beyond kind of cliches? Because I suppose because I'm lazy and callow, if I were to think of the UAE and think of greening cities, I'd look to the oasis maybe as an aspiring place or think about how to make things work in an arid environment, but this has turned the idea on its head a little bit, hasn't it taken elements of the past 50 years of urbanization, but also looked beyond that cliche a little bit. Was that part of the brief? Well, I will say that one of the things that we're so passionate about in the UAE is really sharing untold stories. The UAE is only 50 years old. And in that 50 years, you have seen kind of meteoric progress. A lot of times when people think about the UA, especially those who have never traveled to the UAE, it's easy to be drawn to things like the tall buildings, the rapid modernization. But there is so much more and one of the things that the UAE I know really cherishes is the opportunity at international platforms like expo or like the Venice Biennale. To really share maybe the unseen or the untold stories of the UAE and so for us, this is just the excess so excited. This lattice faced wall that you find around the garden here is very reminiscent of the architecture in the UAE. It is very common for homes to have gardens in front of the homes and to have this lattice wall around the garden. But we really wanted to take fluoride's challenge to really think about sustainability and everything that we do, including how we build the pavilion. So this particular wall is actually constructed out of 3D printed thermoplastic pellets that is actually recycled plastic, and so our walls are made out of recycled plastic at the pavilion. The interior of the pavilion is made out of timber and then clad in this 3D printed recycled plastic, and then when we are done, we can shred this recycled plastic and make it into something else. And so it is completely reusable wall. And tell arts take on technology is also circular and the idea that you can reuse things. Well, yes, indoors in the halophytic gallery, we reused equipment that we had used in the pavilion in Dubai. So the scent machine was brought over the projectors were brought over, so it's basically trying to have the smallest footprint possible in everything that we do indoors and outdoors at the pavilion. While some national pavilions offered a cerebral take on the future of cities or self sufficiency, others felt, well, a little less neatly conceived. Japan and Qatar both occupy striking spaces. The former is an attached cottage and the latter in a mock pigeon tower structure. If you don't know what that is, it's something with which qataris would once have exchanged bird brought messages. Despite the striking structures, both felt a little confused about who the whole show was for, and what the target audience might find interesting. As I wandered through, I felt the same. Is Florida for flower lovers, wholesale seed buyers, or a clever way to snare architects urbanists and landscape gardeners into seeking fresh ideas. To this moment, I'm still not sure. One pavilion that caught my eye for its simplicity and good humor, however, was that of the host cities themselves Al Mira and Amsterdam, the design of the open top space filled with illustrations by local practice costs, its theme was the voice of urban nature, showcasing the natural world and how people can rub along with it in the urban environment, and I caught up with its founding partner, Hermann cosman, to find out more. Of course, you have cities and you have parks, you have nature, but more and more at an idea that we have to change our relation that nature is not just something else. I mean that human beings are nature that the inhabitants has to be more connected to nature also designers or busy with the city. So that was directly a question. How to present this other relation and then we came up with a sort of interviewing people and also experts to see the city not as a city and nature, but to the sea, everything as nature. So that you could say that the city has not, for example, Amsterdam, 800,000 inhabitants, but you can also say we have trillions of inhabitants. If you count also all the animals, all the plants, all the bacteria, everything which is connected to our life and that was the beginning of our story, how to do this. This voice of urban nature was already the beginning of a concept how to bring in different perspective different voices of nature into the pavilion. I do really identify with that point that how you count the inhabitants of a city depends a little bit on who you're counting and as you walk into that pavilion as I did last week. The first thing that you feel is the kind of crunch of shells underneath your feet, I suppose picked because of the life in the waterways of both the canals of Amsterdam, but also the seaside of cities on the coast. Tell us a little bit about the pavilion because there was an amazing and good I think you serve illustration and maybe a little bit of humor in there as well. Now the python itself that was really nice to make it completely bio based and so it's a wooden structure. It's a sort of pergola structure so there's a part where the roof on it and then you walk into an outdoor space with a structure of wood and all these wood it reused wood. It's collected from all over different places. And it is filled with a special facade because it's made from lime amp, which is growing in our mirror. And chalk, and they put it together and made this facade out of it. That was one layer. You could say that the story that you make and that you build with bio based. So directly from nature, then we had a second story which the landscape, or our 5 different types of gardens in, so we made one garden which is with all plans, food related, plants which are all related to bio based, plants which are just for your health. We made also garden on the roof, which is a sort of you could say, garden you can't reach as a visitor, but it's especially for the animals, which touches the topic of rights of animals. And then we made an introduction with an animation, and then billboards, we call them. We did it with a very nice and famous illustrator. You know, Amsterdam, which are beautiful and yeah, you could say a little bit funny, cartoon like images, which are related to these different gardens, so that wasn't layer, and as last layer is a layer of voices of all different people from our mirror inhabitants of omega and Amsterdam. We're dealing with this topic, so from people who are building bio based still cook or try to cook with healthy ingredients from nearby by discussion and trying to design all these levels. We try to make something which is a little bit imbalanced. When you think about these projects, how do you stop and think about the experience of the visitor and I guess getting them to halt in their tracks and kind of take notice when there's so much other visual stimulation, do you design that differently from something else? Say a retail experience or any other kind of experience. What are some of the keys that you've learned in your long history and experience and good fortune of being successful exhibition designers? What are some of the ground rules that we can take with us? I mean, we are storytellers in a way. And you can write a book. You can make a film. You can make a theater piece. But you can also make an exhibition out of it. And what's nice about our part of storytelling is that you walk through this story and so this time and space, connection, maybe you can compare it with landscape design or architecture, but then with storage, that's what we are doing now for 25 years and always trying to layer these stories, but this moving part is important. So you're not sitting in chair, it's not one direction, the visitors are also you could say that a lot of knowledge with them and they're all different. But by walking, you experience different ingredients of the story and you do it with different senses. Instead of a book in which you do it with text, of course, or a film which is quite flat and you do it with sound and images, but we can do it also with touching and interesting is that you we never know how fast people walk, so you can stop, you can walk back. I mean, we have a lot of elements to play with. We are quite aware of and that's what we try to bring in. Having got over some of the strangeness of the fair itself, a company selling seeds here and nation selling itself there and yes, a mechanical marionette doll symbolizing something at the entrance. I took time to retire to a quiet garden on the aptly named green island to collect my thoughts. Florida will close this autumn and the entire site will then be developed into a proper suburb to the city of almira, aptly named hortus Latin for garden. Much of what is here now will need to be dismantled to make way for new houses and a rethought version of a garden suburb that fell to the master planner Vinnie mass of mvr DV. I spoke to him about his roller coaster role in the project. 12 years ago, I was supervisor of almeida in charge of doubling of the city. So the let it grow from around 50,000 to 200,000 people as part of an ambition in the Netherlands to build 1 million new homes and periods should take a big role in that. We designed the structural plan for 5 new garden cities as almeida is composed currently already out of four garden cities each of say 20,000 units and we combine that with the new infrastructure metro line that connects Amsterdam with our Utrecht. We developed at that moment, also like the different themes or approaches of this garden cities. So there is one example that will be built in the sea is called Al nira island. And that's a real clean Lake completely. And repair hydrologically at all operations. So that's the new garden is basically the water garden city. The next one is a dike city where the whole concept of resilience is a developed and that will have 20,000 units that deal with aspect of making banks or non banks through the water on land issue. The third one is the Florida is actually the center of the almeida do enlarge it and to stretch it around the Lake and turn it into a compulsory center for not only shopping but also for university and for housing earth one is on the east side and that is called on your host world combined with agriculture. Everybody has to participate in urban farming way than the last say garden city is here to repair over the existing months. So when doing these four, that will stimulate movement within the city to be able to move to definitely the new places that leave behind, therefore, potential emptiness, especially for renting housing, but you can have a system than to innovate the stock with that and turn it also in a green direction. The furry art, we took on board ten years ago, the idea to solicit for the floriana, knowing that it would give perspective on the article sector. So that we would show all the species in, say, scientific order from aid is that we can not use tuberculosis because it's only temporary, so for the events. So we use the word hardest Latin name for garden that facilitates automobiles planned library in its widest sense. I wanted to ask you Vinny while I have you how important was it to plan a lot of the planting, the diversity, the arboretum, as you say, and how important is it to leave nature a little room to grow? I'm interested also in the development of the site, will everything be prescribed on how the housing and the units look or is there a little bit of space for, I suppose, what makes cities a little bit magic as well that serendipity or that choice later on, how did you build that into the master plan? To make 5 garden cities allows you to have 5 different interpretations on the evolutionary aspect of nature. And engagement and involvement of nature in it. You can not do everything on one side. So in this case, the choice to make the library is systematic way and to develop knowledge on that sort of every species although it is a specific choice is like I'm not designing a classical ecology, then you have species that belong to each other. If I put roses next to a rod on dendrons in the R section, they have nothing to do with each other. But I do it on purpose visual that you can see that every species what it has to do to get an ecological niche. That's what this selection of plants is doing. So if I have a number and I have to add tarf in it, I have to have another kind of maintenance. I have to show it or if I've roses, then I need to collaborate with alien with onions in order to get rid of certain kind of the insects that would come into the soil. From a hierarchical perspective, I try to investigate what a plant needs. That's a choice. The idea is that every species would continue in and over the houses. So the facades, if you are in the birds zone that the walls and the structure would be made out of wood and that the birch would grow over it, that even the toilets would be made by birch wood so that there is a consistency between arboretum and the houses. That was the idea behind it. And how it could inspire. And anticipate also on life with human beings and with products of human beings in this case, the houses. So what are some of the lessons from the world's largest horticultural expo in the Netherlands might some of the conversations held here about greening or growing our cities and leaving a little room for nature, or perhaps cherishing the scant resources we have continue to flourish beyond the fair itself. I for one hope so and that some of the seeds planted at Florida 2022 might find fertile ground to grow. In almira and beyond. And that brings us to the end of this week's episode of the urbanist. You can get your weekly fix of urbanism and built environment news by subscribing to our podcast. You can also find us on Spotify Apple podcasts and of course at Monaco dot com and don't forget to buy monocle magazine. Every month we cover key urbanist topics and if you're a subscriber, you'll never miss out. Oh, and of course, there's also our 5 minute bite sized audio show tall stories. New episodes are out every Monday. Today's show was produced and edited by carlotta rebello and David Stevens, and our thanks also to Josh for his fine reporting today too. And this week, well, here's GJ with flowers. Thank you for listening city lovers. We throw it all away let's talk about it 'cause I can't do without you love means so much to me can't you see right here I'll always be.

UAE UAE pavilion Florida Amsterdam Frank cornelison the Netherlands German pavilion utopia island Angela megali Maya garo Angeles foundation slama bin tandan foundation Sally cornea Angela Florian pragma halophytic gallery EAD
"clean lake" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

21:50 min | 9 months ago

"clean lake" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Of that enormous pair of steel buttocks formed from laser cut bees that I caught up with Frank cornelison, commercial director of Florida 2022 to find out more. Florian is all about horticulture it's all about nature, the theme, this edition is growing green cities and we're all about how do we make our cities greener, healthier and nicer to live in. And to do that, we need these. We need pollinators. So we are standing in the shade of our homage to bees and this is actually a parent and a child made entirely out of hand cut and steel bees. It's about 20 meters tall, that gives our listeners a perspective on exactly the amount of shade that we have here. And as I look around, I can see a bit of permanent architecture, a huge flower adorned building, I can see a beautiful water, places to sit, tulip bulbs, and a cable car for the uninitiated, what is Florida and what might people expect when they come through the door. So we are a world horticultural expo. That means that we are a world expo with a really, really strong focus on plants. So we've got everything here from fruit and veg all the way through. The flowers and we have 33 international countries and 210 national Dutch companies presenting their solutions for that growing green cities theme. So you can find anything here from, as you mentioned, a cable car, which is a really, really fun way of viewing the expo site from above. You can find international pavilions where you can learn about different cultures, but also different approaches to horticulture and we have traditional shell gardens here as well. You're very relaxed, but this is actually quite a stressful day. I imagine in the round because it's the opening day and this kind of goes on for 6 months. How do you go about organizing something like that that I suppose grows and accommodates the crowds and changes a little bit as it goes through, but also there is worth visiting for all of that time. So we have had a lot of time to plan this event. We've actually had the most time ever to organize a floor out because this edition has been in the making for 11 years. Just to give you an idea of 11 years of planning, we've master plan the site. We've actually put in all the infrastructure. You can see here all the bridges are brand new. We have permanent buildings here, and then we have a whole events team that are planning, visit the flows, planning all the arts and culture, which is an extremely extensive program, and we have all of our countries have spent years designing all of these pavilions. And I think in total, there's been more than 10,000 people have worked in designing this expo and bringing it to life. And last up, mainly because I can, and because it's the first day because you've seen everything and I haven't. Can you just pull out one or two highlights or things that surprised you or things that look different on the rendering to how they do in real life and that you think have been great successes? And you think that people should come and see? So one of the things that I really enjoy is the German pavilion. Now that is one of the bigger ones, so it's definitely not hidden, but it is exceptional because it is an interactive exhibit. So if you do want to get active, if you want to have some fun, I had a very fierce competition with a few children. Just the other day because you need to earn credits to make the city greener and they can get quite competitive. So that's absolutely a lot of fun. The greenhouse, that's about 10,000 m² of glass house to explore, absolute must visit right there. And one of the things that I hope a lot of visitors will experience is a little bit tucked away. That's what agro forestry area. So that's right in the corner of utopia island. And that's where we have an amazing group of volunteers trialing new ways of Agra forestry. So that is planting crops and intermingling them with different species and with some decorative horticulture as well to really get that soil enrichment going. And that's a really, really nice corner and those people are absolutely amazing as well. So if you do go to agroforestry area, just talk to one of the volunteers. And they can explain you everything in great detail. And they make their own schnapps. They might let you sample some of that as well. As I explored the national pavilions, my impressions were, well, mixed. Many of the exhibits I'm looking at you Italy were left unfinished and throughout the site there were heaped high rolls of unlaid turf and the clatter of hammers. The finishing touches were still being added days after the first green fingered guests arrived and began to wander through the show. One impeccably finished affair, however, was the UAE pavilion, an open courtyard riffing on the nation's traditional mid century shabby houses that's shabby with an eye, by the way. It's here that I caught up with the organizers to find out their take on what a desert nation can add to the debate about cities, one that's hotting up fast and why they decided to bring a saltwater garden to this year's exhibition. Hello, my name is Angela megali. I am a member of the UAE pavilion participating at Florida expo 2022. My name is Maya garo. I work for studio called tell art, which is based in the Netherlands. We've been collaborating with Angeles foundation SHF for a number of years, and we're really thrilled to be here. When we heard about the theme growing green cities, we really asked ourselves, what does that mean for the UAE? Obviously, when you think about the UAE you might think of desert. But we also have quite a bit of sea around us. And so this place called the ecotone, which is the place where C means land, many of our major cities are actually located on the. And so we brought together an amazing creative team. We had a local architecture firm named pragma. I am an executive director of the slama bin tandan foundation, so many of our creatives from the foundation got together. And really asked, how can the UAE express this theme? We were really drawn to the ecotone that is actually indeed how we are greening our cities. We have mangrove forests that grow in the sea. We have Meadows of sea grass underneath the sea, and many other salts to tolerant plants that grow in the ecotone. And so that really is how the idea came. And we really wanted to make a presentation that was very credible and authentic at the same time. And it was tell art's job to bring a lot of that thinking into a physical space and to make the whole thing work. And as I crunch around on the sand like substance on the floor and pass through, I feel like you've done a very good job of that. But how did that come together? Tell me a little bit about the stages that we can see as we move through the hosh. So we started actually at the beginning, Angela asked us to speak to a lot of the different leaders in the UAE, scientists, people who are pushing the boundaries of ag tech because of course there's a food security angle to fill the handle that we wanted to focus on the UAE imports a lot of its food is really actively trying to look at ways that it can grow food locally. And so we had these wonderful conversations and minister of food security who's not a minister of climate change and the environment, the minister of culture, and the head of the EAD, the environmental agency of Abu Dhabi, just giving us a picture of what is the thinking here, what's possible, what does the future look like? What are the big challenges? And a big spark for us was this one sentence where when we look at greening our cities, we also have to look at greening RC because that is part of the environment. We have to look at the plants that thrive here and work with them. And I think that's really true to the spirit of the UAE, the landscape is extremely challenging. It's high salinity, extreme temperatures, and very saline soil. So those three conditions make it very difficult to grow anything. And yet in these challenging conditions, you have these plants, these halophilic plants, so these are plants that are salt tolerant to salt loving, thrive. So what are these superpowers that these plants have? What can they tell us? What clues can they give us to solving some of the problems that we face collectively in the future? And one of the big inspirations really here is that the UAE can serve as the lab for the future because its environment is what the world could look like at 2100 if we don't take action. And it's a story that's told in three parts, so this is a plant show. So it has a garden and that's your first point of entry. You enter into a garden that looks very different to the others in Florida. It has sand and it has pools of water. And then when you look closely, these pools contain plants, but it's not an abundant floral garden, lots of colors. The palette is muted. It's an emirati minimalism palette so these very soft colors of the sand and of the sea and the landscape. And in this garden, we tell a story actually. So it's a diagram almost of a closed loop biocell in agriculture system. The UAE obviously has an issue with water scarcity and they need to desalinate seawater in order to produce waterfront plants and for people to consume. And so we represent that in the garden. We have a salt flat. We have a desert. We have water pump which shows this fresh water coming out that you can actually drink. And then the brine from that desalination process is used to feed these pools of fish, tilapia, which produce protein for the MRT diet, which fish is a very important source of protein for emiratis traditionally, but then that waste water from the fish is used to basically water the quinoa and the Salle cornea, the grown nearby. And then that water is purified by a small mangrove forest and sent out to sea again in a pristine state. So it's this beautiful loop where we use nature itself to create an elegant machine to produce food and an environmentally sustainable way that also protects the environment. And then you step inside, there's an ecotone wall that explains the condition of this landscape and then you step inside into a halophytic gallery, which shows these four hero plants as Sally cornea, the mangroves, the seagrass beds that are abundant in the UAE and the Arabian gulf, and microalgae, which is the unsung hero because it's invisible to the naked eye. And yet it basically produces a huge proportion 20% of marine oxygen that is needed by all of the marine life to survive and to thrive, but also produces the air that we breathe. So we actually very directly depend on these plants for our own survival. And we really wanted to give them a place we represent them as beautiful glass sculptures created by an Amsterdam based glass studio. And we wanted to show them as joules because that's how Emirates think of anything that can grow in this environment. It's a precious thing to be celebrated and treasured. And then in the final room, there is a purely immersive space which celebrates the seagrass bed. So it's really an invitation to enter their world. It's not animated. It's actually a live game environment. So as you approach the seagrass bed, it responds to you in waves that you welcomes you in and there's a beautiful scent of marine scent. So there's an educational aspect to the exhibition, but really we just want people to feel welcome and to understand the UAE in a new way, hopefully. And I'm ruining your narrative, but going back to the beginning, I thought there was a nice nod to the fact that we're in the Netherlands that you mentioned the kind of the water spout at the beginning, which is taken to denote the desalination of the kind of salt flat bit next to it. How is that a nod to Dutch in this? And how important is it that these things are rooted in where we are as well as where the ideas are coming from? It's funny because when you look at the lateral landscape of the UAE, it's the exact opposite of what we have here in the Netherlands where there's an overabundance of water and rain. In fact, the problem here is controlling the water because there's too much of it. And both cultures are very collaborative around water. So here it's all about the polar system and dikes and controlling and in the UAE. It's about sharing the water. So the water feature that you saw is actually a celebration also of the falaj, which is an ancient irrigation system where water was channeled from the mountains into the communities, and it was showed equitably among all of the families in the community so that they could grow their crops. And so water is treated as something precious. You can see it falls into this rock face with a small pool and then it's channeled through this delicate ribbon of a channel and you can collect it at the end. So the idea is it may be abundant here, but in the UAE as precious as gold, and we treat it with reverence. And Angela, I'll come back to you now. How important is it to move beyond kind of cliches? Because I suppose because I'm lazy and callow, if I were to think of the UAE and think of greening cities, I'd look to the oasis maybe as an aspiring place or think about how to make things work in an arid environment, but this has turned the idea on its head a little bit, hasn't it taken elements of the past 50 years of urbanization, but also looked beyond that cliche a little bit. Was that part of the brief? Well, I will say that one of the things that we're so passionate about in the UAE is really sharing untold stories. The UAE is only 50 years old. And in that 50 years, you have seen kind of meteoric progress. A lot of times when people think about the UA, especially those who have never traveled to the UAE, it's easy to be drawn to things like the tall buildings, the rapid modernization. But there is so much more and one of the things that the UAE I know really cherishes is the opportunity at international platforms like expo or like the Venice Biennale. To really share maybe the unseen or the untold stories of the UAE and so for us, this is just the excess so excited. This lattice faced wall that you find around the garden here is very reminiscent of the architecture in the UAE. It is very common for homes to have gardens in front of the homes and to have this lattice wall around the garden. But we really wanted to take fluoride's challenge to really think about sustainability and everything that we do, including how we build the pavilion. So this particular wall is actually constructed out of 3D printed thermoplastic pellets that is actually recycled plastic, and so our walls are made out of recycled plastic at the pavilion. The interior of the pavilion is made out of timber and then clad in this 3D printed recycled plastic, and then when we are done, we can shred this recycled plastic and make it into something else. And so it is completely reusable wall. And tell arts take on technology is also circular and the idea that you can reuse things. Well, yes, indoors in the halophytic gallery, we reused equipment that we had used in the pavilion in Dubai. So the scent machine was brought over the projectors were brought over, so it's basically trying to have the smallest footprint possible in everything that we do indoors and outdoors at the pavilion. While some national pavilions offered a cerebral take on the future of cities or self sufficiency, others felt, well, a little less neatly conceived. Japan and Qatar both occupy striking spaces. The former is an attached cottage and the latter in a mock pigeon tower structure. If you don't know what that is, it's something with which qataris would once have exchanged bird brought messages. Despite the striking structures, both felt a little confused about who the whole show was for, and what the target audience might find interesting. As I wandered through, I felt the same. Is Florida for flower lovers, wholesale seed buyers, or a clever way to snare architects urbanists and landscape gardeners into seeking fresh ideas. To this moment, I'm still not sure. One pavilion that caught my eye for its simplicity and good humor, however, was that of the host cities themselves Al Mira and Amsterdam, the design of the open top space filled with illustrations by local practice costs, its theme was the voice of urban nature, showcasing the natural world and how people can rub along with it in the urban environment, and I caught up with its founding partner, Hermann cosman, to find out more. Of course, you have cities and you have parks, you have nature, but more and more at an idea that we have to change our relation that nature is not just something else. I mean that human beings are nature that the inhabitants has to be more connected to nature also designers or busy with the city. So that was directly a question. How to present this other relation and then we came up with a sort of interviewing people and also experts to see the city not as a city and nature, but to the sea, everything as nature. So that you could say that the city has not, for example, Amsterdam, 800,000 inhabitants, but you can also say we have trillions of inhabitants. If you count also all the animals, all the plants, all the bacteria, everything which is connected to our life and that was the beginning of our story, how to do this. This voice of urban nature was already the beginning of a concept how to bring in different perspective different voices of nature into the pavilion. I do really identify with that point that how you count the inhabitants of a city depends a little bit on who you're counting and as you walk into that pavilion as I did last week. The first thing that you feel is the kind of crunch of shells underneath your feet, I suppose picked because of the life in the waterways of both the canals of Amsterdam, but also the seaside of cities on the coast. Tell us a little bit about the pavilion because there was an amazing and good I think you serve illustration and maybe a little bit of humor in there as well. Now the python itself that was really nice to make it completely bio based and so it's a wooden structure. It's a sort of pergola structure so there's a part where the roof on it and then you walk into an outdoor space with a structure of wood and all these wood it reused wood. It's collected from all over different places. And it is filled with a special facade because it's made from lime amp, which is growing in our mirror. And chalk, and they put it together and made this facade out of it. That was one layer. You could say that the story that you make and that you build with bio based. So directly from nature, then we had a second story which the landscape, or our 5 different types of gardens in, so we made one garden which is with all plans, food related, plants which are all related to bio based, plants which are just for your health. We made also garden on the roof, which is a sort of you could say, garden you can't reach as a visitor, but it's especially for the animals, which touches the topic of rights of animals. And then we made an introduction with an animation, and then billboards, we call them. We did it with a very nice and famous illustrator. You know, Amsterdam, which are beautiful and yeah, you could say a little bit funny, cartoon like images, which are related to these different gardens, so that wasn't layer, and as last layer is a layer of voices of all different people from our mirror inhabitants of omega and Amsterdam. We're dealing with this topic, so from people who are building bio based still cook or try to cook with healthy ingredients from nearby by discussion and trying to design all these levels. We try to make something which is a little bit imbalanced. When you think about these projects, how do you stop and think about the experience of the visitor and I guess getting them to halt in their tracks and kind of take notice when there's so much other visual stimulation, do you design that differently from something else? Say a retail experience or any other kind of experience. What are some of the keys that you've learned in your long history and experience and good fortune of being successful exhibition designers? What are some of the ground rules that we can take with us? I mean, we are storytellers in a way. And you can write a book. You can make a film. You can make a theater piece. But you can also make an exhibition out of it. And what's nice about our part of storytelling is that you walk through this story and so this time and space, connection, maybe you can compare it with landscape design or architecture, but then with storage, that's what we are doing now for 25 years and always trying to layer these stories, but this moving part is important. So you're not sitting in chair, it's not one direction, the visitors are also you could say that a lot of knowledge with them and they're all different. But by walking, you experience different ingredients of the story and you do it with different senses. Instead of a book in which you do it with text, of course, or a film which is quite flat and you do it with sound and images, but we can do it also with touching and interesting is that you we never know how fast people walk, so you can stop, you can walk back. I mean, we have a lot of elements to play with. We are quite aware of and that's what we try to bring in. Having got over some of the strangeness of the fair itself, a company selling seeds here and nation selling itself there and yes, a mechanical marionette doll symbolizing something at the entrance. I took time to retire to a quiet garden on the aptly named green island to collect my thoughts. Florida will close this autumn and the entire site will then be developed into a proper suburb to the city of almira, aptly named hortus Latin for garden. Much of what is here now will need to be dismantled to make way for new houses and a rethought version of a garden suburb that fell to the master planner Vinnie mass of mvr DV. I spoke to him about his roller coaster role in the project. 12 years ago, I was supervisor of almeida in charge of doubling of the city. So the let it grow from around 50,000 to 200,000 people as part of an ambition in the Netherlands to build 1 million new homes and periods should take a big role in that. We designed the structural plan for 5 new garden cities as almeida is composed currently already out of four garden cities each of say 20,000 units and we combine that with the new infrastructure metro line that connects Amsterdam with our Utrecht. We developed at that moment, also like the different themes or approaches of this garden cities. So there is one example that will be built in the sea is called Al nira island. And that's a real clean Lake completely. And repair hydrologically at all operations. So that's the new garden is basically the water garden city. The next one is a dike city where the whole concept of resilience is a developed and that will have 20,000 units that deal with.

UAE UAE pavilion Florida Frank cornelison German pavilion utopia island Angela megali Maya garo Angeles foundation slama bin tandan foundation the Netherlands Amsterdam Sally cornea Florian Angela pragma Agra EAD
"clean lake" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

21:45 min | 9 months ago

"clean lake" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"I caught up with Frank cornelison, commercial director of Florida 2022 to find out more. Florian is all about horticulture it's all about nature, the theme, this edition is growing green cities and we're all about how do we make our cities greener, healthier and nicer to live in. And to do that, we need these. We need pollinators. So we are standing in the shade of our homage to bees and this is actually a parent and a child made entirely out of hand cut and steel bees. It's about 20 meters tall, that gives our listeners a perspective on exactly the amount of shade that we have here. And as I look around, I can see a bit of permanent architecture, a huge flower adorned building, I can see a beautiful water, places to sit, tulip bulbs, and a cable car for the uninitiated, what is Florida and what might people expect when they come through the door. So we are a world horticultural expo. That means that we are a world expo with a really, really strong focus on plants. So we've got everything here from fruit and veg all the way through. The flowers and we have 33 international countries and 210 national Dutch companies presenting their solutions for that growing green cities theme. So you can find anything here from, as you mentioned, a cable car, which is a really, really fun way of viewing the expo site from above. You can find international pavilions where you can learn about different cultures, but also different approaches to horticulture and we have traditional shell gardens here as well. You're very relaxed, but this is actually quite a stressful day. I imagine in the round because it's the opening day and this kind of goes on for 6 months. How do you go about organizing something like that that I suppose grows and accommodates the crowds and changes a little bit as it goes through, but also there is worth visiting for all of that time. So we have had a lot of time to plan this event. We've actually had the most time ever to organize a floor out because this edition has been in the making for 11 years. Just to give you an idea of 11 years of planning, we've master plan the site. We've actually put in all the infrastructure. You can see here all the bridges are brand new. We have permanent buildings here, and then we have a whole events team that are planning, visit the flows, planning all the arts and culture, which is an extremely extensive program, and we have all of our countries have spent years designing all of these pavilions. And I think in total, there's been more than 10,000 people have worked in designing this expo and bringing it to life. And last up, mainly because I can, and because it's the first day because you've seen everything and I haven't. Can you just pull out one or two highlights or things that surprised you or things that look different on the rendering to how they do in real life and that you think have been great successes? And you think that people should come and see? So one of the things that I really enjoy is the German pavilion. Now that is one of the bigger ones, so it's definitely not hidden, but it is exceptional because it is an interactive exhibit. So if you do want to get active, if you want to have some fun, I had a very fierce competition with a few children. Just the other day because you need to earn credits to make the city greener and they can get quite competitive. So that's absolutely a lot of fun. The greenhouse, that's about 10,000 m² of glass house to explore, absolute must visit right there. And one of the things that I hope a lot of visitors will experience is a little bit tucked away. That's what agro forestry area. So that's right in the corner of utopia island. And that's where we have an amazing group of volunteers trialing new ways of Agra forestry. So that is planting crops and intermingling them with different species and with some decorative horticulture as well to really get that soil enrichment going. And that's a really, really nice corner and those people are absolutely amazing as well. So if you do go to agroforestry area, just talk to one of the volunteers. And they can explain you everything in great detail. And they make their own schnapps. They might let you sample some of that as well. As I explored the national pavilions, my impressions were, well, mixed. Many of the exhibits I'm looking at you Italy were left unfinished and throughout the site there were heaped high rolls of unlaid turf and the clatter of hammers. The finishing touches were still being added days after the first green fingered guests arrived and began to wander through the show. One impeccably finished affair, however, was the UAE pavilion, an open courtyard riffing on the nation's traditional mid century shabby houses that's shabby with an eye, by the way. It's here that I caught up with the organizers to find out their take on what a desert nation can add to the debate about cities, one that's hotting up fast and why they decided to bring a saltwater garden to this year's exhibition. Hello, my name is Angela megali. I am a member of the UAE pavilion participating at Florida expo 2022. My name is Maya garo. I work for studio called tell art, which is based in the Netherlands. We've been collaborating with Angeles foundation SHF for a number of years, and we're really thrilled to be here. When we heard about the theme growing green cities, we really asked ourselves, what does that mean for the UAE? Obviously, when you think about the UAE you might think of desert. But we also have quite a bit of sea around us. And so this place called the ecotone, which is the place where C means land, many of our major cities are actually located on the. And so we brought together an amazing creative team. We had a local architecture firm named pragma. I am an executive director of the slama bin tandan foundation, so many of our creatives from the foundation got together. And really asked, how can the UAE express this theme? We were really drawn to the ecotone that is actually indeed how we are greening our cities. We have mangrove forests that grow in the sea. We have Meadows of sea grass underneath the sea, and many other salts to tolerant plants that grow in the ecotone. And so that really is how the idea came. And we really wanted to make a presentation that was very credible and authentic at the same time. And it was tell art's job to bring a lot of that thinking into a physical space and to make the whole thing work. And as I crunch around on the sand like substance on the floor and pass through, I feel like you've done a very good job of that. But how did that come together? Tell me a little bit about the stages that we can see as we move through the hosh. So we started actually at the beginning, Angela asked us to speak to a lot of the different leaders in the UAE, scientists, people who are pushing the boundaries of ag tech because of course there's a food security angle to fill the handle that we wanted to focus on the UAE imports a lot of its food is really actively trying to look at ways that it can grow food locally. And so we had these wonderful conversations and minister of food security who's not a minister of climate change and the environment, the minister of culture, and the head of the EAD, the environmental agency of Abu Dhabi, just giving us a picture of what is the thinking here, what's possible, what does the future look like? What are the big challenges? And a big spark for us was this one sentence where when we look at greening our cities, we also have to look at greening RC because that is part of the environment. We have to look at the plants that thrive here and work with them. And I think that's really true to the spirit of the UAE, the landscape is extremely challenging. It's high salinity, extreme temperatures, and very saline soil. So those three conditions make it very difficult to grow anything. And yet in these challenging conditions, you have these plants, these halophilic plants, so these are plants that are salt tolerant to salt loving, thrive. So what are these superpowers that these plants have? What can they tell us? What clues can they give us to solving some of the problems that we face collectively in the future? And one of the big inspirations really here is that the UAE can serve as the lab for the future because its environment is what the world could look like at 2100 if we don't take action. And it's a story that's told in three parts, so this is a plant show. So it has a garden and that's your first point of entry. You enter into a garden that looks very different to the others in Florida. It has sand and it has pools of water. And then when you look closely, these pools contain plants, but it's not an abundant floral garden, lots of colors. The palette is muted. It's an emirati minimalism palette so these very soft colors of the sand and of the sea and the landscape. And in this garden, we tell a story actually. So it's a diagram almost of a closed loop biocell in agriculture system. The UAE obviously has an issue with water scarcity and they need to desalinate seawater in order to produce waterfront plants and for people to consume. And so we represent that in the garden. We have a salt flat. We have a desert. We have water pump which shows this fresh water coming out that you can actually drink. And then the brine from that desalination process is used to feed these pools of fish, tilapia, which produce protein for the MRT diet, which fish is a very important source of protein for emiratis traditionally, but then that waste water from the fish is used to basically water the quinoa and the Salle cornea, the grown nearby. And then that water is purified by a small mangrove forest and sent out to sea again in a pristine state. So it's this beautiful loop where we use nature itself to create an elegant machine to produce food and an environmentally sustainable way that also protects the environment. And then you step inside, there's an ecotone wall that explains the condition of this landscape and then you step inside into a halophytic gallery, which shows these four hero plants as Sally cornea, the mangroves, the seagrass beds that are abundant in the UAE and the Arabian gulf, and microalgae, which is the unsung hero because it's invisible to the naked eye. And yet it basically produces a huge proportion 20% of marine oxygen that is needed by all of the marine life to survive and to thrive, but also produces the air that we breathe. So we actually very directly depend on these plants for our own survival. And we really wanted to give them a place we represent them as beautiful glass sculptures created by an Amsterdam based glass studio. And we wanted to show them as joules because that's how Emirates think of anything that can grow in this environment. It's a precious thing to be celebrated and treasured. And then in the final room, there is a purely immersive space which celebrates the seagrass bed. So it's really an invitation to enter their world. It's not animated. It's actually a live game environment. So as you approach the seagrass bed, it responds to you in waves that you welcomes you in and there's a beautiful scent of marine scent. So there's an educational aspect to the exhibition, but really we just want people to feel welcome and to understand the UAE in a new way, hopefully. And I'm ruining your narrative, but going back to the beginning, I thought there was a nice nod to the fact that we're in the Netherlands that you mentioned the kind of the water spout at the beginning, which is taken to denote the desalination of the kind of salt flat bit next to it. How is that a nod to Dutch in this? And how important is it that these things are rooted in where we are as well as where the ideas are coming from? It's funny because when you look at the lateral landscape of the UAE, it's the exact opposite of what we have here in the Netherlands where there's an overabundance of water and rain. In fact, the problem here is controlling the water because there's too much of it. And both cultures are very collaborative around water. So here it's all about the polar system and dikes and controlling and in the UAE. It's about sharing the water. So the water feature that you saw is actually a celebration also of the falaj, which is an ancient irrigation system where water was channeled from the mountains into the communities, and it was showed equitably among all of the families in the community so that they could grow their crops. And so water is treated as something precious. You can see it falls into this rock face with a small pool and then it's channeled through this delicate ribbon of a channel and you can collect it at the end. So the idea is it may be abundant here, but in the UAE as precious as gold, and we treat it with reverence. And Angela, I'll come back to you now. How important is it to move beyond kind of cliches? Because I suppose because I'm lazy and callow, if I were to think of the UAE and think of greening cities, I'd look to the oasis maybe as an aspiring place or think about how to make things work in an arid environment, but this has turned the idea on its head a little bit, hasn't it taken elements of the past 50 years of urbanization, but also looked beyond that cliche a little bit. Was that part of the brief? Well, I will say that one of the things that we're so passionate about in the UAE is really sharing untold stories. The UAE is only 50 years old. And in that 50 years, you have seen kind of meteoric progress. A lot of times when people think about the UA, especially those who have never traveled to the UAE, it's easy to be drawn to things like the tall buildings, the rapid modernization. But there is so much more and one of the things that the UAE I know really cherishes is the opportunity at international platforms like expo or like the Venice Biennale. To really share maybe the unseen or the untold stories of the UAE and so for us, this is just the excess so excited. This lattice faced wall that you find around the garden here is very reminiscent of the architecture in the UAE. It is very common for homes to have gardens in front of the homes and to have this lattice wall around the garden. But we really wanted to take fluoride's challenge to really think about sustainability and everything that we do, including how we build the pavilion. So this particular wall is actually constructed out of 3D printed thermoplastic pellets that is actually recycled plastic, and so our walls are made out of recycled plastic at the pavilion. The interior of the pavilion is made out of timber and then clad in this 3D printed recycled plastic, and then when we are done, we can shred this recycled plastic and make it into something else. And so it is completely reusable wall. And tell arts take on technology is also circular and the idea that you can reuse things. Well, yes, indoors in the halophytic gallery, we reused equipment that we had used in the pavilion in Dubai. So the scent machine was brought over the projectors were brought over, so it's basically trying to have the smallest footprint possible in everything that we do indoors and outdoors at the pavilion. While some national pavilions offered a cerebral take on the future of cities or self sufficiency, others felt, well, a little less neatly conceived. Japan and Qatar both occupy striking spaces. The former is an attached cottage and the latter in a mock pigeon tower structure. If you don't know what that is, it's something with which qataris would once have exchanged bird brought messages. Despite the striking structures, both felt a little confused about who the whole show was for, and what the target audience might find interesting. As I wandered through, I felt the same. Is Florida for flower lovers, wholesale seed buyers, or a clever way to snare architects urbanists and landscape gardeners into seeking fresh ideas. To this moment, I'm still not sure. One pavilion that caught my eye for its simplicity and good humor, however, was that of the host cities themselves Al Mira and Amsterdam, the design of the open top space filled with illustrations by local practice costs, its theme was the voice of urban nature, showcasing the natural world and how people can rub along with it in the urban environment, and I caught up with its founding partner, Hermann cosman, to find out more. Of course, you have cities and you have parks, you have nature, but more and more at an idea that we have to change our relation that nature is not just something else. I mean that human beings are nature that the inhabitants has to be more connected to nature also designers or busy with the city. So that was directly a question. How to present this other relation and then we came up with a sort of interviewing people and also experts to see the city not as a city and nature, but to the sea, everything as nature. So that you could say that the city has not, for example, Amsterdam, 800,000 inhabitants, but you can also say we have trillions of inhabitants. If you count also all the animals, all the plants, all the bacteria, everything which is connected to our life and that was the beginning of our story, how to do this. This voice of urban nature was already the beginning of a concept how to bring in different perspective different voices of nature into the pavilion. I do really identify with that point that how you count the inhabitants of a city depends a little bit on who you're counting and as you walk into that pavilion as I did last week. The first thing that you feel is the kind of crunch of shells underneath your feet, I suppose picked because of the life in the waterways of both the canals of Amsterdam, but also the seaside of cities on the coast. Tell us a little bit about the pavilion because there was an amazing and good I think you serve illustration and maybe a little bit of humor in there as well. Now the python itself that was really nice to make it completely bio based and so it's a wooden structure. It's a sort of pergola structure so there's a part where the roof on it and then you walk into an outdoor space with a structure of wood and all these wood it reused wood. It's collected from all over different places. And it is filled with a special facade because it's made from lime amp, which is growing in our mirror. And chalk, and they put it together and made this facade out of it. That was one layer. You could say that the story that you make and that you build with bio based. So directly from nature, then we had a second story which the landscape, or our 5 different types of gardens in, so we made one garden which is with all plans, food related, plants which are all related to bio based, plants which are just for your health. We made also garden on the roof, which is a sort of you could say, garden you can't reach as a visitor, but it's especially for the animals, which touches the topic of rights of animals. And then we made an introduction with an animation, and then billboards, we call them. We did it with a very nice and famous illustrator. You know, Amsterdam, which are beautiful and yeah, you could say a little bit funny, cartoon like images, which are related to these different gardens, so that wasn't layer, and as last layer is a layer of voices of all different people from our mirror inhabitants of omega and Amsterdam. We're dealing with this topic, so from people who are building bio based still cook or try to cook with healthy ingredients from nearby by discussion and trying to design all these levels. We try to make something which is a little bit imbalanced. When you think about these projects, how do you stop and think about the experience of the visitor and I guess getting them to halt in their tracks and kind of take notice when there's so much other visual stimulation, do you design that differently from something else? Say a retail experience or any other kind of experience. What are some of the keys that you've learned in your long history and experience and good fortune of being successful exhibition designers? What are some of the ground rules that we can take with us? I mean, we are storytellers in a way. And you can write a book. You can make a film. You can make a theater piece. But you can also make an exhibition out of it. And what's nice about our part of storytelling is that you walk through this story and so this time and space, connection, maybe you can compare it with landscape design or architecture, but then with storage, that's what we are doing now for 25 years and always trying to layer these stories, but this moving part is important. So you're not sitting in chair, it's not one direction, the visitors are also you could say that a lot of knowledge with them and they're all different. But by walking, you experience different ingredients of the story and you do it with different senses. Instead of a book in which you do it with text, of course, or a film which is quite flat and you do it with sound and images, but we can do it also with touching and interesting is that you we never know how fast people walk, so you can stop, you can walk back. I mean, we have a lot of elements to play with. We are quite aware of and that's what we try to bring in. Having got over some of the strangeness of the fair itself, a company selling seeds here and nation selling itself there and yes, a mechanical marionette doll symbolizing something at the entrance. I took time to retire to a quiet garden on the aptly named green island to collect my thoughts. Florida will close this autumn and the entire site will then be developed into a proper suburb to the city of almira, aptly named hortus Latin for garden. Much of what is here now will need to be dismantled to make way for new houses and a rethought version of a garden suburb that fell to the master planner Vinnie mass of mvr DV. I spoke to him about his roller coaster role in the project. 12 years ago, I was supervisor of almeida in charge of doubling of the city. So the let it grow from around 50,000 to 200,000 people as part of an ambition in the Netherlands to build 1 million new homes and periods should take a big role in that. We designed the structural plan for 5 new garden cities as almeida is composed currently already out of four garden cities each of say 20,000 units and we combine that with the new infrastructure metro line that connects Amsterdam with our Utrecht. We developed at that moment, also like the different themes or approaches of this garden cities. So there is one example that will be built in the sea is called Al nira island. And that's a real clean Lake completely. And repair hydrologically at all operations. So that's the new garden is basically the water garden city. The next one is a dike city where the whole concept of resilience is a developed and that will have 20,000 units that deal with.

UAE UAE pavilion Florida Frank cornelison German pavilion utopia island Angela megali Maya garo Angeles foundation slama bin tandan foundation the Netherlands Amsterdam Sally cornea Florian Angela pragma Agra EAD
"clean lake" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"clean lake" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Examples. Gorgeous Lakeview Lodge. Just 24 9 Prime lakefront lot just 69 9. Here's some highlights paved roads underground utilities with natural gas, high speed Internet Excellent schools. Super Clean Lake. Learn more. Take a property tour at 877 big view dot com. That's 877 big view dot com. That's 877 big view dot com The beautiful homes and properties that ring the shoreline of Lake Toma rarely come up for sale. This convenient location, the great school district and easy access to I 65 45 minutes from Huntsville and Birmingham, making an absolute standout take a virtual tour at 87 central view dot com. Then call 877 Big View. Lake Properties from 24 9 Saturday September 25th on Lake Toma and Coleman collar click 877 big view dot com. I feel swift here for the Flex seal family of products. You know, there's a lot of ways to protect your home. You could dig a move. You could bubble rapid or you could train a pack of wolves to protect it. But the best way is with the flexible family of products. So when you need the patch, bond seal repair and stop leak stressed, Get the flex seal family of products. Available in flex seal products dot com and find retails. So I am trying to eat healthier and I am, But the thing is, I don't like healthy food. I don't like any of it. You've heard of a fact suit, right? I mean, there's got to be when are we getting a skinny suit? Something that will make me look skinny? Because I just want treats all the time. I grew up in a bakery for the love of Pete. The bad news is no skinny suit is coming. You actually have to do the work, blah, blah, blah. That's why I am eating built bars. It satisfies my sweet tooth, but it's a protein bar, but not like you know, that's like eating stuff at the bottom of my chalkboard. Usually this is 100% real chocolate. It's low carb, low sugar. If I'm eating a protein bar is a treat. Come on, You've got to know it's good and I am mint brownie cookies and cream..

"clean lake" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

Capes and Lunatics

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"clean lake" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

"Warriors rob kobe still so much from us. I'm not okay with this. And i've never been less okay with anything but okay. Let's switch topics. I want to get low. Take on this right so that everyone see that whole the whole thing this week about the j.j. Abrams tunnel hussy coats superman. Yes we are getting a black superman no should be. It's not it's just going to be a blackhawk. Kent and i don't know why they're you know the mexican version or someone on there. Like why are you. Bolic's student. Superman just to icon from ouston thousand such a contest on there saying do something about bringing it back in some form soon. The actual the state is last mirrors about certain things separate midnight or they have clearance a lot of stuff. Is leon meet if nothing else do vows on. I mean president superman come on. I mean that costs you that that cost you look good on on milestone returns. It's official. i'm saying maybe not already got static icon. Was there someone else you're looking for. Maybe it's just comics and sure it is got good black. Put no little the. Maybe they don't have movie. Rates are fighting with this debate about things but But i mean okay. What it is is it becomes a different story. And that's that's sort of the problem with it. Let them again it's warriors. Who hopefully they let him shoot right. Not i mean sure but it but you know it become. I what they're doing. It's like they want to set in the nineteen hundreds which is a little weird because awesome. Okay that's i mean they could commit any time in american history especially on you can do it in the nineteen nine hundred and then present as like thirty years old you know however you wanna do it. It's it's it's give them. As far as other people are happy to see what indicators part of like the regular universe you know the regular universe that movie universe. So it's like why don't you just do it and you can have alongside well being another numbers because that's another universe. Howdy how everything's the multi verse now. Maybe just going to be. The joker universe was. That's getting a sequel. They say so who wants to come back. Bill with horner's borders is going through right now. yeah directors. Don't want to deal with it. So i can see that. Honestly you know see vows and get the you know. I get the prompt. Well actually no. Because you saw the superman icon. Iconography could have the superman movie and have it be bells on or have it. Be you know joe zahed for all anyone cares. You could actually create your own story. I want to see the one where superman is just a green bagel. And that's just the natural form crypto bagel who comes to earth agreeing bagel. You say when when they got marlon brando. He didn't actually shown on camera so he said well he actually said green bego. Maybe extra just be a briefcase or green bagel. look like and isn't well clark. Looks you in so obviously Didn't wanna learn projector. The whole time secretly deadpool. Anyway but yeah i mean i not the most impressed by j.j. Abrams work elsie. Were people of color you know. Very bad his. That's why. I think that that's the thing that's why they asked haunts coats. Can you can you oversee this guy. Okay i mean that's the thing to me is like oh how's he coaches reitman. Okay i can see that script in how somebody directed who exactly. That's the that's the other abrams. Good a producer. Let's just be all we'll hopefully. Mr coach will be standing next to him. Be like what. I read really do it though especially and you know it's it's just it's warners. Maybe but he may be making animated. Maybe not maybe make make alive antonin. That's too much pressure. Sometimes that's more expensive nowadays to though that's the only downside you know animation because we don't want to be good animation. So are they making this clark hence still are they afraid little. Pull the trigger. And make someone other than clark kent. They've ruined clark canceled. I don't see why they either though these. Up towel vitriol fight me. Oh the purposely that they they announced this this week i guess on head near cavaliers birthday the ones that the contract you know henry campbell at all. I'll say it was wonderful so don't be a petty is just make speaking not wanna work with them. Yeah well i mean. That's the true. Is that here. Nobody wants to work with people. Were clean lake. Surprised any kind of actors of of like you know famous actors. You know because like you really want to your name like rangel. Both neither other relief in the last two quarters is thomas jerry. We know we're in trouble. Combat effort rather than mortal kombat wonder woman eighty four godzilla. Con- rather do that. No wonder woman eighty four. I like i like i like that. So that was good. That was delivered to circum- i felt that they really gave both of the combatants do showed their strengths and weaknesses and result very well. I really felt that you walked away from that. Feeling satisfied about the monster fights and i hope that's what you're getting with heaven. Watch mortal kombat yet. You know it's one of the video game that you have to keep bor that we've been through video game movies. Evil was the best one that was like can.

j.j. Abrams thomas jerry Kent reitman Both both clark kent american this week nineteen hundreds thirty years old Superman rangel one eighty rob kobe mexican Bolic nineteen nine hundred earth
"clean lake" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"clean lake" Discussed on Spill it, Sister! Reality TV recaps with Ally

"You've always been my number one. Please give me a gold skull. Please make me the house. Vote and by the way i want to go get kyle like. What are you going to come at her. Like so get me to be the house. Vote and in. Throw yourselves in so that i can possibly take kyle skull. How is that going to work. Yeah and she doesn't really fight him on it that much. She's kind of like But it's like you should have been like no like you don't get to vote me and my partner and we already have are. You don't get to rally for that like pick someone else and i'm not gonna like i understand where closed in like i want you to go any get your skull. But i'm not going to back you up to throw me in like she doesn't defend herself. She just so trusting of people and like sees the best in people which i love about her but sometimes it's like girl. Defend yourself well. I admitted disagree here. Because i think that she's taking a page out of the big brother alliance to wear like you. Don't turn down a deal and it's like oh that's what she wanted. Okay because she never released says yes either you know. She's like true listened to him. She hears him. How and in what does she do. She takes it straight to kyle. And she's like. Hey this is what cory wants to. Where if she was really gonna do that. She wouldn't have said anything to kyle shoot a left her partner kind of in the dark about it. Yeah and i mean by her doing that by her telling kyle like. She knew exactly how he was going to respond they. He was going to be pissed that he was going to gun for corey. That he you know. Yeah so i think in that way. She keeps her own hands clean. Lake shouldn't have to start drama by calling corey. No but she kind of. Let's kyle do the work for her. So i could see that and lead mart. Let's say she didn't tell. Kyle the daily challenge could have turned out very differently. Had she not let that fire under his ass berry true very very true if he felt safe right this week. point Yeah so then. We get to elimination activated time. It's very early in the morning. The sun has not risen yet. I noticed that there's already so many people away with these morning people. I do not understand like my eyes open when the sun has risen because that is what the lord intended. Pretty okay like. I'm not trying to be awake in the middle of the night eight. Yeah i'm staying up until the middle of the night and then i'm definitely sleeping in dots. My vibe yeah and like the whole scene of big t being all crazy muick limitation mandating. We're just giving her a dirty look while she's brushing her teeth. I felt that i did my heart. I like somebody get me coffee right now as strong as you can make it so it makes me wonder because you know..

Kyle this week kyle corey Lake eight many people mart
"clean lake" Discussed on When I'm High

When I'm High

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"clean lake" Discussed on When I'm High

"Hello i'll you potheads. We'd freaks cana curious people. I love you all. I'm so grateful that you are turning on this podcast at all. So here we go with no further. Ado here is the rest of ashanti's interview. So we sort of briefly touched on focus. Before i think you mentioned it before but let's let's go into that a little bit deeper. How does your level of focus change when you get high. I feel like i'm a little more honed in on the task of of self diagnose myself with adult. Adhd with me personally with task. I feel like my mind just like bounces all over the place like it's like oh i gotta do that one thing as doing that. One thing something else pops back in my head like shit. I was doing this in to go back to the thing that i was previously doing. A high it's meta that it's like this is the task. You're working on right here like finish this and then move on. It's no like no honey. Do list that. I need to figure out like no. This is what you're working on. Yeah there's no. None of those distractions. So is that one of the reasons why you get high sometimes. Yeah honestly it is. It is a. I've noticed lately. Because i work in the mental health field so like i noticed a lot of times like working in there. Obviously you pick up like you pick up things you earn What i noticed for me is like i get overwhelmed easily by belykh environmental like. There's so if like my house is like if my house is messy. I easily get overwhelmed with that. And it'll stop me from wanting to clean. But i notice that it is that it needs to be cleaned lake. Mining's diety will stop me. But if i'm smoking and i see like okay. Look you probably need to put this load of laundry in the washer. I'm not thinking of anything else. If i'm high it's just all right. Let me put this load of laundry in.

Ado ashanti one One thing one thing