20 Burst results for "Clarisa Ward"

"clarissa ward" Discussed on The Current

The Current

03:39 min | Last month

"clarissa ward" Discussed on The Current

"I think it is, and I think that's a problem and this is something that I really try to address in the book because it's still a taboo among people who do this kind of work I can count on well, one finger the amount of times I've had like a real frank conversation with a colleague about the toll that is takes emotionally about ways in which I have struggled and that shouldn't be the case. We should be able to talk about this, and if we're not able to talk about, it should at least be understood that anyone doing this work and I don't care how tough you are. The check is gonNA come okay and you're going to have to pay it that needs to be part of the conversation in a very open non taboo ways so that we get rid of the stigma attached to struggling with covering these types of stories. What happened when you came home from covering you're with us when when you would come home from covering those types of stories. Well, in the movies, right you see that someone sees a child die in the war and then they feel sad and that they have nightmares and they can't sleep and their sad and actually what happened in my situation was I would see a child die I would be shocked by it but not necessarily really. It in that moment, I would leave the war zone. Feel completely detached from my life completely detached from the people who I love my friends and my family I would feel irritable sort of like a caged animal pacing back and forth in my living room trying to work ways out to get back to Syria at that time and only in certain moments later did I fully understand I think one them was when I won two Emmy Awards and spent the whole night hysterically crying because. I had forgotten to thank an editor and I was like, okay, there's something wrong. Something isn't right here. I'm not able to experience joy right now I'm not able to access that emotionally at all I'm not able to hug my husband now really without sort of bristling and feeling like. Like. You know. That's not normal. That's not healthy, and maybe this is all related to win. You did see that child die and that's okay but we need to be talking about this. I need to be talking to therapists about this. I need to be doing yoga and he'd have spiritual practice whatever it is that works for you. You write that you started to pray who what does that give you. I for me prayer is like incredibly Cathartic A, but be what a relief to sort of let go of the idea that we can control. That, we can control the narrative that we can control who lives and who dies and when you sort of surrender that to the universe and embrace the fact that you have no agency in it you know beyond being sensible and taking precautions and all the rest of it. It's a really freeing moment. It allows you to really make peace with the limits, the limitations on your abilities to to change things and and and that helps with acceptance and acceptance frankly, if you want to do this job and you, WanNa do the full marathon and really go the distance. You have to be able to accept that you're not always.

Emmy Awards WanNa Syria editor
"clarissa ward" Discussed on The Current

The Current

03:08 min | Last month

"clarissa ward" Discussed on The Current

"But also to bring the stories of America with me to the field and in the process hopefully to try to improve. Understanding of each other humanizing each other. I mean, keep in mind Matt I was twenty two. Very, realistic and full of Hubris which. You realize that you were a communicator kind of in those moments. Yes I'd always loved telling stories and fundamentally that's what actors and actresses do and I understood. Now that I've felt that skill could be put to better use or more important use in in this function as a communicator between different worlds. There is a very rapid kind of. Ascent of your career you talked about being in Moscow either an intern there you end up. On the overnight desk at Fox News. In two, thousand and five you end up covering the Iraq war what was going through your mind when you arrived in Baghdad Writing in Baghdad for the first time having never set foot in a conflict zone in my life was one of the most thrilling and petrifying moments that I've ever experienced petrifying because you realize this is real. You're in a war zone but thrilling because you have no real frame of reference for it other than the movies and so everything is so novel and exciting that feeling of the hot blast of errors, the plane door opens the sound of the. Security guys radios back and forth as you make the journey on the airport road to the bureau, watching your colleagues do their live shots traveling around the country with the US military in the back of striker's Humvees I. Mean this was all such a intense learning experience and you feel like your brain is going to explode you're just taking in new. Information, every moment and and that is dizzying it's very exciting Then of course, you have your first kind of real brush. With death in my case when our compound was under attack by multiple suicide bombers. And you realize that it's not a game that it's not exciting and glamorous that it's real it's hell it's war. It's death and and that's a real moment of reckoning and any young war correspondents live. What is that? You write about this and you talk about experiencing in your words naked, pure the acid of fear. What does that fear feel like? It's a very strange feeling because it's utterly unemotional I had always thought that when you are a real situation where you think you might die that you'd be sort of crying or the thinking that you want your your parents or your loved ones or your children whatever it might be an actually you go into an almost Zombie frame of mind where you're just trying..

Baghdad Matt I America Fox News Iraq intern US Moscow
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

04:15 min | 2 months ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"The the armor that surrounds you and the things that you wear to to protect yourself and you go into a space, which is usually a shed space. If you do it in the city like Copenhagen, it's because the city cared enough to clean up the water around you and what we're doing is just kind of. Trying to bring people back to that sense of wonder, there's quite central to Monaco. In every issue of the magazine, we're looking for positive case studies looking for people that make interventions that that make our cities better and as you said before I began to ramble this can be as simple as planting out your balcony. It looks nice from the inside is rewarding. It looks nice from the outside and it it kind of gives this hopeful edge to a city of no one looked after balcony entire city would look different and therein lies I think a metaphor. And finally, Josh. We have the new issue out as well. This coming week, which again talks about similar similar kind of topics that book touches, how to design a better world. That's the main theme of Disease Right. Yeah. That's right. I mean, you know this is this is a print industry show so it'll be no surprise to listeners that. The magazine World has been affected broadly negatively by the pandemic. But one interesting thing you know for every lost sale of an issue because people aren't in airports a lot of people by monocle and other magazines of course, being a for every. Shot shuttered newsstand. We've noticed a real engagement from our readers. We've never had so many letters. We've never had so many emails. We've never had so many people writing in who don't have a point of view who would just saying thank you. We appreciate that and I think the how to design a better world takes up the mantle of what we've been doing for the past few issues which is trying to give people something hopeful to look forward to something tangible to have faith in because there are so many. Reasons not to be hopeful at the moment and I think the idea of designing a better world. Also, you know you don't have to be sitting behind a Mahogany desk in New York with the billions of pounds in the bank you can be at home and it can be about planting tree outside Your House that can be your simple urban intervention can be putting a bench outside your shop where people can sit. It can be about thinking carefully about the way that you get to work is sustainable safe interesting way. Any that would to level an accusation of elitism against Monaco I'd say that the ultimate luxury from Rita's is probably debility to cycle to work. There is just something in Baltimore and personal about it. That is interesting and all of the people that we feature in the magazine you know they do talk about serious issues. There's a section on how to fix the the US protecting Estonia we have a section. About retail and the shops that managed to keep on selling we we've done of things you know in in a climate that's unfortunately warming. We look at desert architecture and what we can learn from it how perhaps using a natural breeze rather than a a heavy air conditioning unit could be just a small subtle intervention that you make in your house that contributes in some small way to a better world. That was Josh there, and you can preorder the Monaco Book of gentle leaving on our website and our new issue will be out this week..

Monaco Josh Copenhagen Rita New York US Baltimore Estonia
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

05:01 min | 2 months ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"And finally, in the show, it's an exciting week ahead from Monaco, we have a new book out the Monaco Book of living a guy to slowing down enjoy more and being happy, and we also have a new issue out our CTOBER. With a focus on how to design a better world and who better to preview those titles. Then our deputy editor Josh Vanit we've done many books before and we've always focused on things that were the the real wheelhouse of what Monica was interested in. So that might be building better home for yourself. The kind of place where you really feel like you can relax where you can shut the door and be away from the world. You know we've talked about what a good life isn't about quality of life, but the funny thing is that this book does Feel rather relevant to now you know and appeared where people have thought long and hard about the importance and value of the health of that community. We've actually been touching on these topics for a very long time. So the idea of doing an entire book about gentle living was very much an idea that started before the pandemic did in February and expo a kind of photo lead feature in the regular issue of Feb issue of the magazine and it just it gave you these little bits of wisdom. You know how can you get a better night's sleep how? Can You I don't know take a bit of time feel self and the broader context was something I. Think you'll listeners and perhaps you and me think about quite a long, which is the ribbit of a divided moment in history rid a bit of a finger wagging shout he bitter recrimination movement where people very quick to blame each other to turn to twitter to say that things have never been worse and I think we all have that within us some wouldn't blame anyone that thinks that this book is just a more gentle invocation to is supposed to. Be, a bit nicer to ourselves nothing wrong with that be a bit nicer to each other I think nothing wrong with that either I'm probably to be a bit nicer to the planet and our surroundings as well. So you got these ideas you know then all entirely our ideas.

Monaco Book of living Monica Monaco twitter deputy editor Josh Vanit
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

04:49 min | 2 months ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"Exciting. News in Italy on the fifteenth of September the country who have a brand new newspaper the money published by Swiss Thailand cartilage divinity. The paper will be a welcome addition to the country's our editor in chief. Tyler Birla spoke to the Benedetti about the new media venture on our show the chiefs he was a highlight of that conversation and what we can expect from the paper. I want to maybe start with you maybe pulling out your graphic design and editorial tools for us. It's difficult to do, of course on radio, but you're going to have to do it. What type of newspaper will greet people over the coming weeks. Of course, there must be a lot of work being done already on front pages, etc. What are we to think of are? We to think of something completely new are we to think of something which may be has the sober feeling of the Frankfurter Allgemeine No, or maybe picking up the noise circuits item does it feel a little bit ill folio what's in your mind and what can you conjure up for our listeners when we think about seeing this front cover for the first time at the color? You mentioned. Which is a nice publication, but the US acted to very select. Group of people. So we are not in that game, we want to be a newspaper which has to be. If, you want to be objectively informed. On politics economy having a struggle of investigative journalist. and. A newspaper. We stakes into gate account to gain economy. But we have filed away from the Fargo. Idea, we again is directed to an elite. And on the contrary, we are not looking reality digit third. Initiative. That means that our starting point and our success is going to depend. subsciber of our digital edition. We decided I decided that just the site without having. A baby boom edition would have been difficult to emerge as the lead. The alleging of information because the mentality is still. That the paper. Evaluating Bolt the paper. So. We just starting. On opposite way as tradition newspaper has done. For reasons shouted linked to that editors started older with printing edition and then added to that big addition a digital version of a website we up of she didn't exactly in the opposite way our success is going to depend on how many digits subscriber we are going to have not how many big up your we are going to Model on that point of view is completely. that. He's no other publications that I know we have started digitally with the paper residence instead of the opposite. Many would ask the question and goes back to your starting point. That's you're launching as a digital first product with a print component. Why bother with the print wouldn't that be lots of people sitting around or traditional management meeting saying listen Mr De Benedetti why are we bothering to cut down trees? Why are we bothering to have a press going what does this do for us as a brand? Why do we need paper now? Personally I know the answer I think it's great but I'm wondering how do you defend this to people when they say well, look just find be on an iphone beyond someone Samsung beyond someone's laptop..

Mr De Benedetti editor in chief Tyler Birla US Swiss Thailand Italy Fargo Samsung
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

04:05 min | 2 months ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"One war ends another begins famines breakout, and you have to have sort of agility and flexibility to be able to dart from one story to the next to shift gears really pretty quickly, and I'd say that's one of the most challenging aspects of the job. And this year must have been quite challenging as well. We've coronavirus because even when you have to report such A. Like a war story in Syria or something else I mean there's a whole other challenges involved as well now, right? Yeah how do you cover a war against an invisible enemy from your living room and I use the word war and obviously it's not a violent conflict but nonetheless, you're seeing the world galvanized by this pandemic hundreds of thousands of people's lives being claimed economies being destroyed, and so I, don't think it's hyperbole to to call it a war but were so limited in how we can tell this story as journalists and an even when you are able to get into hospitals, for example, or travel to other countries where the outbreak has been particularly fierce. You're also limited in terms of trying to humanize the story by the fact that people are wearing masks they're wearing PP protective equipment, and so for me one of the biggest challenges is, how do you convey the heartbreak of story? How do you convey the loss of this story and and that is very, very difficult. Clarissa I wanted to see a film called on phones. Have you ever thought about it I mean does it need to be a family can be a lovely series as well? I mean you now, of course, I've thought about it in the sense of I do think it would lend itself well, particularly to sort of series in the vein of Netflix's or whatever because there's so many different places and so many stories and so many rich lessons about the world and exciting adventures and and I think there's heartbreak and I think there's moments of humor as well. If I'm allowed to sort of shamelessly tout I on book like that. But listen I wrote this as a love letter to journalism I wrote it said that my sons would have sense when they're older of of some of the things I've experienced and what I've learned along the way and I wrote it really also so that people would see the stories behind the stories because. So often as journalist these small human interactions and acts of kindness and highs and lows and tears and laughter, they don't make it onto the evening news but that's what shapes the way we see a conflict that's the way. We learn about people in the world and it was so wonderful for me to have an outlet to finally share those things. Completely agree what you said because you do humanize stories because I think sometimes people when they don't know let's say you know when you talk about Syria it's almost like if it's another planet, you know it's like I it's such an author that people sometimes don't realize. Do you know what I mean..

Syria Clarissa I Netflix
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

05:30 min | 2 months ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"Truly believed that if the world understood how they were being bombed and shot, adding kidnapped and tortured and disappeared that something would change that something would happen to put an end to their suffering and it didn't. Closer in maybe on a personal level is fear of constant on on the job. As an international war correspondent as well or you didn't even think about that when you were there covering. Such events. I am naturally a fearful person which may sound odd to some of your listeners because I think there's this idea, the war correspondent as sort of swashbuckling adrenaline junkie I'm not like that at all. I get incredibly frightened in situations where risks are high or certainly if there's any kind of shelling or bombing or bullets whizzing past me. So yes, fear is fear is a constant and I try to put myself in situations where I'm not going to be directly in harm's way but my passion or my commitment really is. To tell the stories of the civilians who are most often the victims of these conflicts and usually that entails getting much closer to danger than ideally one would like but it sort of comes with the territory. It's interesting Clarissa you've been through A. started. Fox News ABC News CBS CNN you've been through quite a lot of networks in way. So I'm sure they all work in some ways differently I mean did you notice that? Of course? Fox News, I mean you've mentioned as well. I mean even being you know kind of a woman covering such events that you have. You know people care about appearance more than he was a man I believe experienced it. All right. I don't think there's a single woman who works in television who has not experienced the pervasive misogyny that exists in this industry and. In some ways you just sort of. Your toilet to think it's normal because yeah. It really does matter what you look like on television doesn't mean you have to be beautiful per se but you know you can't look..

Clarissa CNN ABC CBS
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

04:14 min | 2 months ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"To be released this coming week but I in the show I had the pleasure to speak with Clarisa warrant CNN's chief international correspondent in her new memoir on all fronts education of a journalist Clarissa tells the behind the scenes from various assignments in Syria Egypt Afghanistan she also discusses being a journalist in this age of extremism. Here's Clarisa with more. Up until while I was in university, I was studying comparative literature and watching. French. New Cinema and I thought I wanted to be an actress. I was passionate always about storytelling and traveling and languages but it was only when nine eleven happened and I think a lot of people across the world felt this way but everything changed and I had an epiphany moment where I realized that I hadn't been engaged enough with what was going on in the world and I needed to better understand how this had happened and I wanted to sort of try to act as a communicator to try to understand what had happened to communicate it. To back in the US and in the West and in the process to try to stop this kind of miscommunication dehumanization that I felt was responsible for this heinous act of violence. Keep in mind I was twenty one, right. So I was full of ideals and more than a little hubris will a and it's so funny. You're twenty I to be on his you're still quite young, but the world has changed so much during this, let's say twenty years you know people were saying we're leaving this new age of extremism as a journalist. Do you few a few that the job of a journalist becoming harder in a way? The job of a journalist has definitely become harder because we never used to be the target. We we the people on the sidelines telling the story. Now we're considered fair game, and whether that's you know terrorist groups like Isis executing..

Clarisa Clarissa chief international correspond CNN US Syria Afghanistan
UK Coronavirus death toll could be far higher than previously shown

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 8 months ago

UK Coronavirus death toll could be far higher than previously shown

"The true coronavirus death toll in the U. K. is apparently much higher than previous estimates posted by the government correspondent Clarissa ward is in London tonight office for national statistics has come out and said that the daily death toll that the government has been given giving and it's free things is fifty two percent lower than the actual death toll they gave the example up to April third official death toll from the government four thousand ninety three actual death toll six thousand two hundred and thirty five the reason they say is because the government death toll only includes hospitals not people dying in nursing homes or

Clarissa Ward London Official
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:44 min | 8 months ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"What you need there it is only pay for what you need at liberty mutual dot com the corona virus death toll in England is believed to be much higher than is being reported responded Clarissa ward with more that from London the office for national statistics has come out and said that the daily death toll that the government has been given giving and its briefings is fifty two percent lower than the actual death toll they gave the example up to April third official death toll from the government four thousand ninety three actual death toll six thousand two hundred and thirty five the reason they say is because the government death toll only includes hospitals not people dying in nursing homes or residential homes apple says it will release data that could help inform public health authorities and whether people are driving less during lockdown orders to slow the spread of the new coronavirus the data is gathered by apple counting the number of routing request made by apple maps users and then compared to data before the lockdown hi Mike Martz at Fisher investments we do things differently and other money managers don't understand why because our way works great for us but it may not work for your clients that's why Fisher investments as a fiduciary obligated to put clients first is the highest standard for a financial adviser so what do you provide cookie cutter portfolios like the rest of us no cookie cutter portfolios here Fisher investments Taylor's portfolios to meet each client's goals and needs but you do sell investments that are new high commissions right and make commissions when you make trades for clients no Fisher investments doesn't sell any commission investment products and.

England Clarissa ward London apple Mike Martz Fisher investments official fiduciary Fisher investments Taylor
 Iranian tanker to leave Gibraltar soon despite US pressure

Bucket Strategy Investing

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Iranian tanker to leave Gibraltar soon despite US pressure

"Seized oil tanker at the center of a standoff between the UK and Iran is free to set sail despite eleventh hour efforts by the United States to hold its release correspondent Clarissa ward reports in Tehran Iran is promised the ship will not go to Syria Iranians of tonight from the beginning that it was going to Syria but at the same time they said if it was going to Syria it's nobody's business and now what they're saying the Iranians is that lists and we never made any agreement they're not saying where the ship

UK United States Iran Syria Clarissa Ward Tehran
Iranian oil tanker is free, but may be going nowhere fast

Armstrong and Getty

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Iranian oil tanker is free, but may be going nowhere fast

"As seized oil tanker at the center of a standoff between the UK and Iran it's free to set sail and despite eleventh hour efforts by the United States to stop its release correspondent cooler cooler at Clarissa ward reports from run of the country has promised the ship will not go to Syria the Iranians have denied from the beginning that it was going to Syria but at the same time they said if it was going to Syria it's nobody's business and now what they're saying the Iranians is that listen we never made any agreement they're not saying where the ship is

UK United States Syria Iran Clarissa Ward
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"Israel assignment you won't tighten them there are lots of assignments i won't take i actually ironically i have quite a low risk threshold especially the older i get honestly i do not love being shot at or being bombed that syria assignment was very specific and unique i would say in that i felt very strongly about the story and i had put so much work into planning it that i felt pretty good about the uh about the security component but for the most part um i am really more interested in covering the stories of the people who are affected by war than i am in being that brave bad asks who's got bullets whizzing over there had as they're giving the blow by blow of what's happening in the war i care about the civilians that's what moves me that's the component of the story that i feel really strongly needs to be told obviously all the other elements are hugely important too but i do not need to be about us by do not need to prove myself i don't feel that urge any more at all i have i have done it before and i think that risking your life is something that should not be done without a lot of thought and preparation and a kind of sense that you know what you're doing and that it's worth it and and that it's the right story to do it for not every story is the right story to do it for bruce will franck you very much indeed for jordan's here on the big begins view is produced by guy lewis an edited whitehousegov opens i'm chris lewis thank you very much for.

bruce jordan Israel syria chris lewis
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"Or a big part of the reason that isis grew so quickly other than the sort of us military intervention in iraq which is obviously a big component of a backrow baghdadi was in fact largely radicalize while he was in a us prison camp in iraq so that's one part of it but another big part of it and a big component in terms of why we've seen this sort of seeming pluralist relation or spread of the rise of jihadists thought across the globe suddenly infecting many young minds especially here in the west is because they saw that this man was butchering his people with impunity whether he was gassing them whether he was torturing them whether he was shooting them or shelling them are bombing them and that nothing was being done about it and you have groups like isis who are whispering in the ears of young muslim saying he see no one cares about you no one cares of sunni muslims die we're the only people who can defend you we're the only people who will lay down our lives for you and that is an incredibly persuasive narrative for many young muslims so i think it is a huge mistake to assume that president bush arl acid can ever bring any degree of stability to that country in the long term it's too much damage has been done too much blood has been shed and perhaps most importantly what a lot of people forget fifty percent of the country has been displaced.

us iraq president fifty percent
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"And so that precedent was was dangerous ultimately and then we heard from president barack obama repeatedly at the time i said must step down words do matter and it's one thing if you save from the getgo were not getting evolve were never getting involved this is an internal conflict these people have to resolve it themselves it's another thing if you say we're with you this guy has to go and if you're coming on the heels of a of a previous intervention i have no doubt that syria would have looked very different if people had chosen their words more carefully and chosen their actions more carefully i wonder during the siege of aleppo i'm sure you lost most serene friends not pro so um none of those people today you say well okay assad is a time and you know he he has you know there is certainly evidence of what has happened in terms of attacks on civilians in gassing and so on but he's preferable to this ms acv jihadist groups that we hear about in these proxies operate the syria when you hear that is idea the acids actually to bring this wartorn a needs to need its remain how'd you response people when when when you hit on posture well i would say a couple of different things i mean first of all i think that anyone who watches syria very closely would not probably say assad must go immediately tomorrow it's got to happen any kind of transition will need to be done in a sort of to the extent that it can be a methodical deliberate structured and well thought out transition but beyond that i think there's a certain naievety to the idea that well acids the better the devil you now because what people tend to forget is that the whole.

barack obama syria aleppo assad president
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"But the moment was fleeting and of course at the same time what we saw happening was the proliferation of jihadist groups which we were covering for a very early period and it was sort of obvious that that was going to have a incredibly negative impact on the uprising that it was going to leave a very bad taste in the mouths of countries or various parties that were supporting the rebels and that it was ultimately going to be extremely problematic and sure enough we saw that play out as we saw the rise of isis um i think what just had i've never really been able to you know it happens in any war that civilians bear the brunt um this is a sort of time old adage but in syria what civilians have gone through is just so extraordinary and so horrifying and sometimes it does it does sort of confound me that there can be no justice for these people that there can be no ultimately no real silver lining for these people mentioned will the plus choose the came from it's nine to do few now when you see the last six years from harvard played out the will did dropped the ball hit a did not meet the the situation grim oh i think there's no question and i would say not because they didn't intervene but because they gave the strong impression earlier on that they would intervene and you have to remember this was coming right on the heels of libya and whether or not you support what happened in libya it created something of a moral hazard because i can tell you having gone to those early rallies where people were taking to the streets armed with posters and meeting a hail of bullets that half the reason they were willing to do that and that they were willing to march into that hail of bullets was because they believe fundamentally that that would bring about international support in the form of some kind of a knife nofly zone and they believe that not because they were idealistic or or stupid but because they had seen it happen in libya.

syria harvard libya six years
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"So we talked a little bit about about georgia and south such not sets an astonishing seen for what happens in the next few years everything from russian restive influence in eastern europe in estonia or meddling in elections we start to see that become such dominant narrative alltime but then that takes you also to syria's in in two thousand eleven and the new joint cbs of causing income course one for them when you with the stomach rise in in syria how cautious where you about that revolution did you think this is going to go the waved the free syrian army that time did you think this is going to become the deadlock that became in the next couple of years wall sort of reflections them i think potentially i would say they're wise as the uprising continued and galvanize more and more support and more and more platitudes they turned out to be from the international community about asset must go and this must stop i think there were moments early on certainly where it seemed incomprehensible that president assad would be able to remain in power at the same time having spent a lot of time with the rebels particularly in their early incarnations where they really had i mean they didn't even have to weigh radio's they had no training they they had no idea what they were doing i would say i didn't really invest a huge store of confidence in their ability to win a war that they were fighting with you know ak forty seven says i said while they were at that stage let's say before the aerial bombardment began they were still getting hit relentlessly with artillery so i wasn't overly optimistic that the rebels would be able to overthrow but there was a moment i would say in two thousand twelve were there is a big bomb in damascus which killed a lot of very senior assad cronies and all of the sudden the rebels were uh sort of encircling damascus it seemed ended up there with there was a moment there where it seem like oh boy this is actually going to happen.

europe estonia syria syrian army president assad damascus georgia
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"The six months later i'm feeling suddenly really blue and i don't understand what the problem is because everything's fine and only as you get older and are a little more evolved than have a deeper knowledge of south and just a little more selfaware are you able to say okay all of this stuff actually is interconnected and you don't necessarily always pay the piper right at the time you witness something or experience something it can sometimes be a bit more insidious than that are certain patterns were of will evolve i think the best thing you can do is to be on top of it and be aware of it envy checking in with yourself allott did anyone you know these will season reporters you meets torn did you did anyone and even give you tips how to rule with this hunter you know how to keep yourself on the right track into these and if it sticks in your mind um you know ironically maoists most of the reporters i would have to say when i was starting out in looking to the older generation uh you know a lot of people using a selfmedication let's say a lotta people sir drinking a lot and you know making it work somehow by the one person who gave me some really good advice uh that was a little more wholesome in its nature was christiane amanpour and at the time i was working for cbs news and i was covering syria lot and she was presenting me with the dupont award for some stories i had done in syria and she said to me she syrup pulled me aside and she was like you have got.

christiane amanpour syria cbs dupont six months
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"And i think that was quite hard for me because the only way going back and forth from war zones really works is if you have your home base which is kind of stable so i would go back and forth to baghdad and i already been some tough times with survived a triple suicide carbombing at the palestine hotel in baghdad which was probably my closest experience with death and and really you know his 25 years also i was young and beirut was the place that i went to in between these assignments to have some modicum of normalcy in my life invasion began and then the war began and it was very ugly and quite frightening and all the more personnel to me because it was my home so it was a difficult time at the same time it was e felt like he really wanted to be covering it because you did understand the dynamics in lebanon lebanon is a very complex and convoluted political uh system and and so having the knowledge that i did about beirut it felt somewhat good to be able to put it to use our through were you you mean sort of the very rich mosaic triple baron by actually in some ways you can kind of you you can read some of the briefed big stores of the region in beirut selfkant you tells you those bigger story oh absolutely i mean everything that plays out across the region on a a macro level you can see mimicked on a micro level in bear it because it does have this very unusual a mosaic as you said of all the different ethnic and sectarian groups are all kind of their and one former another with the exception of the kurds so it's a great place to start your career in the middle east in terms of understanding the broader dynamics apply.

palestine hotel baghdad lebanon beirut lebanon 25 years
"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"clarissa ward" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"The siege of aleppo and he said then that you've been covering war for twelve years but have never experienced anything like syria why did you say that what makes this conflict different ethic i mean i think there are a number of components that make syria unique and specifically the siege of aleppo my career really began primarily in iraq in about two thousand five in terms of field work and obviously iraq and afghanistan were very different types of battlefields most of us journalists in order to gain access to these battlefields were embedding with us or british or coalition forces and that provides you or gives you some degree of protection you are staying with a kind of military that is somewhat sophisticated if not very sophisticated so that was one type of experience that i had had the thing that made syria different aside from the fact that of course you weren't embedding with first world soldiers of some of the top armies in the world why is that there was such a disparity between the munitions and sophistication and fighting power of one side being the army of the regime of charlotte assad and then the rebels on the other side who were always somewhat disorganized um there was no clear chain of command they didn't have the same type of weaponry they were often using just light weapons ak forty seven this maybe a few rpgs if they were very lucky some anti tank missiles and it is somewhat surreal to be in a city like aleppo and listen to these barrel bombs falling down out of the sky having no idea where they are going to land and there's a really sort of pits of fear in your stomach that forms when you have no clue as to where the bomb is going to land when you have no idea of which house is going to get hit next it provides a level of of anxiety all warzones or scary obviously but.

aleppo syria iraq charlotte assad afghanistan twelve years