19 Burst results for "Claire Mitchell"

"claire mitchell" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:37 min | Last week

"claire mitchell" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"They're excluded from public life. So they're either not allowed to go to universities or participate in protest or even go to work or college or whatever. That's when one fund. In terms of policies, if you consider the kind of agenda that the transitional government reform agenda sorry, that the transitional government pushed. And it's two years in government. The kind of economic reforms that so removal of subsidies. And the replacement with an attempt of a universal income program has just meant that a lot of women felt with the cracks. Yeah, economically. And politically, I'm sure and socially, as you've been describing at rajah mcauley, thank you very much for putting us more in the picture, a Sudanese democracy, activist and editor at African arguments and to will Ross there, the BBC's Africa editor. I have to say more messages coming in, not least just after our discussion is also around coming back to things closer to home about long COVID. I wanted to read this out from Julia who says, I'm pleased to hear long COVID being discussed. I've been stuck in a long COVID Groundhog Day for over a year, I barely leave the house, and I've lost the person I was with. I had an active, busy, happy life. It's a hidden pandemic. That's how she describes it in very sobering terms. Indeed. And so many messages also coming in about the way that we live and the design of the world that we live in. But just let me bring you this before our time together is nearly over this morning. Almost 300 years after the witchcraft act was repealed, a bill has been brought forward in the Scottish parliament to pardon those convicted. This comes after a two year campaign to clear the names of nearly 4000 people mainly women who were accused of witchcraft of whom well over half were executed. Zoe went to dot see who cofounded the campaign and co host the witches of Scotland, podcast and Marion Gibson, a Professor of renaissance and magical literatures at the university of Exeter and author of the book witchcraft, the basics join me now. Zoe, let me come to you first about what the witchcraft act was. And what you're asking for the Scottish government to do now, good morning. Hello, thanks so much for having me on. It's a real pleasure to be here. We started the campaign because we feel this was a terrible miscarriage of justice basically of human rights. And my cool campaigner and the founder of the campaign, Claire Mitchell is a QC. So that's her life's work for professor is often about miscarriages of justice..

rajah mcauley Ross BBC Marion Gibson Julia Zoe Africa Scottish parliament university of Exeter Scotland Scottish government Claire Mitchell
"claire mitchell" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A lot of big economies say, like America or European economies depend a lot on consumption by their own by their own people. To keep the economy going. New Zealand seems to be much more of an export or rented economy. Does that has that made thie recession worse or better for for New Zealand were the numbers across a quarter to encompassed? The aggressive, locked down stage of the entire New Zealand population to control covert 19 and we saw the domestic camped at the domestic consumption numbers plummet but actually exports on his shrunk by percent in that time, and I think a lot of that has to do With the fact that a lot of New Zealand's major exports are food and primary produce based the sort of things that countries need to keep using. Whether there's a recession or not so expert set this house up fear we well, it's been the domestic side like so many other countries were, the pain is really being fell. How do you think this is going? These thes figures are going to help or hinder the government because you've got an election coming up again soon, I think. Fortunately for the government since the Greece of lockdowns ended, we've seen a very record rebound of the domestic economy. The government is also continuing to renew its job support and about small business support programs. We've seen their We're expecting the economy there to bounce back from this overtopping four by 11% in queues free As the domestic economy gets backto work on DH export demand remains strong from the primary export side as well. So all in all, I believe the governments Pretty well sit for this election in October, given the track record so far. Mother was Jeffrey. Have you seen your analyst that Amanda dot com, talking about the New Zealand recession? Thank you very much to you. And you would Now here's a question almost 300 years on well, thousands of women who are touching convicted of witchcraft, then bundle of hiss taken Scotland here in the UK finally could justice Well of us. What our next guest the lawyer, Claire Mitchell QC, which means Camp Queen's counsel or a very senior lawyer. Indeed, here in the UK wants to get on. She joins us now from Edinburgh. Good to have your Newsday and a very good morning to you. First of all this takes me back to the crucible in 1953 play by Arthur Miller set in Salem, Massachusetts, where people were basically being accused off which craft and many of them had nothing to do with it. What kind of justice and wonder would you want to see? Good morning. What kind of justice I want to see is a recognition that thousands off people the vast majority of off them being women, where accused between the 16th and eating century in Scotland off witchcraft. On dim. I've set up a campaign called witches of scott dot com to to get them a pardon for those that were convicted of witchcraft. An apology for those who were accused of witchcraft. But for whatever reason, were never convicted on also a national monument in order to recognize the great miscarriage of justice done to these people. A lot of these things we're talking about happened between 50 and 63 on 17 36 and the women were killed. In what Has been called The Satanic Panic, which was begun by James to sixth. I wonder what more can you tell us about the injustices of the feast on their place in history? Well, you're right. The yem the pita time which this and capture lease is from the Witchcraft Act came into being between 15 63 on 17 36. At drooling rap idiot of time. King James. The sixth returned from Denmark with his new wife. He believed that his clip had been cursed. The strip in the Reebok had been cursed on Spain Time and Denmark where people were talking off things like witches. Which craft on DH, which trials When he came back to Scotland. He became obsessed with the idea of which Taft and believed it was very much a living part of society. And there were witches at you were casting spells and doing bad in Scotland. So he provided agree legitimacy right from the very top ofthe society that these things were view on, which is Lift him on this right? Why you campaigning now? It's stuff that happened A long time ago. Some people say Are you getting any support for it? It'll? Yes. I have delighted to see I'm getting a huge amount of support. I understand people looking at the modern dean since a long time ago, but really in terms of history. 300 years ago as the blink of an eye. There is only three reasons why I decided to bring this forward festival. I think justice is important at any time. So if there's been a miscarriage of justice, I think it should be put put, right. Secondly, that is alack ofthe female visibility and public species. I think recently the Black lives matter. Campaign shows how important as two people the Estes proper, recorded on third and perhaps most importantly, that of places in the world where witchcraft is still being used as a two ofthe persecution, and it's important That would stand up and see that natural in 10 seconds. Do you think that you will achieve what you're looking for? I have setting out to achieve on the practice that I want on DH with the support. I have already appears a huge amount of people that he with me really good to talk to you. Thank you for spending some time with this Clam QC.

New Zealand Scotland King James DH America UK drooling Claire Mitchell QC Arthur Miller Reebok analyst Massachusetts Denmark Jeffrey Amanda dot Greece Salem Edinburgh lockdowns Taft
"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"Yeah Hey right then then we go. Wow Yeah there we go. We are live would. Admission not was was not absolute mission boys and girls if you success finally. I can't believe if you are joining us on linked in thank you and welcome because we've been trying to get this going for the last fifteen minutes. How hard was now for the past fifteen minutes so we just said maybe maybe if you have a right laugh because it's been twitter assumes will remain on earth is going on with all this stuff but here we are we are live. Thank thank goodness and welcome. Welcome Welcome Ex World. Live the rundown where we do. Run through all of the news. That's happened and all of the town of talking points in the voice and conversational industry and of digested and packaging open helped translate into. Why does for you working in the industry? Who's thinking about compensation and your voice kind of strategy? I'm your host Ken Sims. I'm joined as always by dosing coats. Dustin out you don't alright. Alright how are you? Yes very well and super excited to welcome our new special guest co for the month of May for the ruined down Clem Mitchell. Well thank you so much for having me great to be here no worries it is a pleasure so if anyone who has listened to the podcast anyone who's familiar with the podcast you've heard class speak on the show in February. The episode was so fantastic and class insights so interesting that why not make this whole thing. A thing I'm bringing Clara along to help share a little bit more of those insights with with you living more often so thank you clever for joining. Us absolutely joining us. Join us for those. That didn't see the episode by February in the show notes. If you listen to poke us will stick it down there and you can. You can check that out to your heart's content on demand as they say not live oil but We kind of give an inch until the people that have about who you are what you do sure. Claire Mitchell Product Design and innovation consultant mostly focused on emerging technologies new user interfaces. Most recently came from agency world working with brands to help them expand their communication with their audience and prior to that was in the IOT stays designing software platforms for industrial iot applications cool so on with the show where we have a lot of those. Yeah we got a lot of news going on Malta. Choose from By doing start. Let's start with maybe one. That's a little light but also I think also timely as well the news coming out from a voice spot I believe is what was about voice. Control elevators I dunno of after the technical challenges. We want to try and play video clip right now. We want to go straight and we try. Why don't we kind of Have a bit of an overview. What story is and in the meantime? I'll try and save on fire. This this clip. Yeah so the company PECO voice Has unveiled a new voice controlled elevator an intercom system. And so the idea here is that you can the seventy elevators say to the fifth floor or call apartments three G. A reason why this might be interesting is leaving voice. Leave the home and go into the building. I know can you and I have spoken on this show about before about entering retail for example Something that we're definitely saying right now and we're seeing voice now in the buildings as well and this might be also timely also as we all have become Germaphobe for for valid reasons. Here and elevators are are a carrier germ. You're pushing the answer. You're touching things and same for speaker phones and things like that as well. So this shows at voices is moving into that as well If anyone hasn't seen this it's a a BBC. If I recall correctly and Kane you you might have to explain this a little bit especially for the American listeners because we do have a groundskeeper. Willie's so that's our our our frame of reference for the Scottish accent my understanding in the UK. This is Jackson is known as the want. That's the most.

PECO voice Germaphobe IOT Clem Mitchell twitter Ken Sims Claire Mitchell Dustin Clara Kane Willie Jackson consultant Malta UK
Keri Roberts - Takeaways from 100+ Voice Technology Podcast Interviews

Future Ear Radio

09:31 min | 2 years ago

Keri Roberts - Takeaways from 100+ Voice Technology Podcast Interviews

"So we're joined here today by Kerrie Roberts Caritas a little bit about who you are and what you do thank you dave. I'm so excited to be here so I like to say that I am a brand. I'm a marketer and I'm a community builder So I work for myself and a company called Brandon connection and one of my main clients is voice summit so I help them with their podcasting strategy as well as lead their marketing for their big event. That'll be in October. That's awesome so I've gotten to know Carey. She actually brought me on the inside voice. Podcast that's Sort of like where. Our relationship started and I just think that it's so cool. Because outside of this podcast that she does she has her own podcast. And then I know that she's the host of another podcast. So podcasting is sort of in her life blood and I think that I've learned a lot personally from her. Just the way that she goes about it in post production in the way. That she disseminates podcast. She doesn't really like thoughtful in a meaningful way. And I think that it's incredibly It's a it's a really good way. I think to to build a network and help to connect that network. I know that's kind of a big theme for you and so I'm curious like You know I wanted to bring you on to talk about your experience on the inside voice. Podcast go through some of the different episodes that you've done in the different guests that you've had but like as you've gotten immersed into this world with like so many of us kind of have In you've done it as like being this conduit of Understanding like who people are different. Facets you've actually probably gotten a really wide education you know into the whole voice landscapes on curious like from this first year or so that you've really started to get involved into the space would have been some of your like macro takeaways You know in in things that you've learned since doing this. Yeah well again. Thank you for the kind words I appreciate it. I've been personally podcasting for a little over five years. And I took over the inside voice podcast and leading their strategy and hosting and kind of running it as their form of content marketing and one of the things that Pete Erickson the owner of waste summit that he and I share. Is this love for connection and community and to really showcase the diverse community that we have in voice technology and when I say diverse that means not only male female Or whatever gender you identify as Lgbtq Q Different races different backgrounds but also different elements within voice. So you know it's not just developers or CEO's it's linguists. It's audio engineers. It's voice artists It's startups it's conversational designers. And so my job is to really make sure that we're hitting the gamut as best as possible And I think we're doing that. I think we're doing that. Not only in the podcast that the events that we host And so for me. I personally love hearing what people are passionate about. What makes them great for every episode? I really tried to highlight them as a person first and foremost And then the work that they do within voice and so. I think you know one of the things that I've noticed kind of overdoing that podcast for the last year or so Is that you know first of all. There's so many people involved in voice and that it's important for us to learn the different things that they're doing And so within that also comes the importance of inclusivity with invoice. You know talking to people and saying okay election. Google tend to be a female voice when not everybody wants to hear that or identifies with that or feels comfortable with that You know when you're creating conversations are you including people in how they speak within their culture within their language translation is not always direct word for word. It's also the vernacular and how do we interact with people Are you including people who have disabilities? Who HAVE SPEECH IMPEDIMENTS? You know that I think really thinking about voice in a broader term And really the big question is how do we include the whole world and make them feel leg? They matter and that they can interact with voice. on a global scale. And that's that's not an easy answer but it's great to see that people are doing their due diligence to work on that and I think that's probably the biggest takeaway from the voice standpoint When we're looking at the other side from the consumer standpoint The challenge there is security and this is something I think people have heard about for a long time Of course people talk about well You know your mobile phones already have enough information on you. Are you worrying about Voice But you know there is concern when you're asking people to use their voice for passwords You know how easy is it for somebody to hack into something to take your important information? Your data your privacy and there is a very high level of concern from a consumer standpoint of. How are the big companies doing this? How are Amazon Google and Samsung Keeping the data protected but also every single person. That's doing voice if you are a startup or you own an agency or you're doing it on your own you know how are you proving to your clients and consumers that you're keeping their data and their information safe and it won't get hacked into. Yeah you've touched on a lot of different things there. I think first and foremost it's it's really cool that Because that is something that I've noticed about your podcast is. It's really really diverse and it's just like you said it's not necessarily like just the people but it's also their backgrounds in their interest. Because I think that one of the biggest takeaways that I had when I went to these different shows like I went to the Alexa conference which is now project voice and then I went to voice. Summit Was just a wide variety of different people. Like kind of coming into the space for different things just like you said like people with a linguist background developers designers. So I think it's so cool that it is like this melting pot and I think that the most insightful I think findings that people have come across. Have been when you have like this. Crossover like you have. People that are applying everything that they know in the linguistics world. And then you have the conversational designers that are coming in and when they're all starting to fuse their knowledge together. I think that's where some of the most interesting thing has come about. And you know going off of the point that you made around security and privacy. I think it's really important that this is something. That is a really centric to the whole conversation. Right now I think it's top of mind that a lot of people are realizing that like I think a lot of the people that are attending. These kind of conferences are They share the same sentiments. You know they are concerned about Where's the state of going? What is this data going to be used for? Are we comfortable with sharing the level of this data like I still go back to a the first Alexa conference that I went to where Brian Rahmani was speaking? And my big thing that I kept coming back to like. He kept saying that will need to have these like really deep relationships with voice assistance in order for them to be more impactful So therefore they're going to need a like a deeper level contextual understanding about the user but I feel like that's that runs counter to trust and security so like I'm only going to be able to. I'm only going to be comfortable with sharing the sensitive information that would make my voice assistant In even better assistant if I if I trust all of that so I totally agree with you that I think those are really critical pieces like as the formative period of time while technologies being built so I wanted to Because you've done so many podcasts. In you've brought on so many awesome guests. I thought that what would be kind of fun to do. While you're on here is to go through some of the different episodes that you've done In just go guest by guest in just have you share like either a key takeaway something you learned from that person or just something that you really enjoyed about that person in the conversation are you. Of course I would love to do that. Okay so I know that you shared today on on linked in or twitter. I saw it somewhere about the media people and so. I've had a chance to meet Claire Mitchell and Patrick. So let's start with Patrick. I know that you've done an episode with him. Patrick Gibbons GimMe something from that episode. Yeah I think you know I just WANNA say Intermedia. A lot of people got into voice because of Gary Chalk myself included the sub. Where I I heard about it. And there's so much hype about Gary and he's an amazing person but I think we really want to that. The people on his team are equally as amazing an equally as passionate And Patrick Really he's excited about stuff on the go here bowls a lot of the space that your in specifically And he also Kinda came from an artistic background and I love that he is willing to kind of reach out and say. Hey if you guys have questions like let's collaborate. Let's interact and so it's not just about okay. We're Bainer media and we're going to do our own thing it's like. We WANNA work with everybody and so I love that he kind of mixes his artistic background his ability to connect with others and then his personal passion within boys about how. It's going to be so much more on the go how we're going to be using curable and what that's going to look like

Patrick Gibbons Alexa Google Kerrie Roberts Gary Chalk Brandon Connection Carey CEO Pete Erickson Bainer Twitter Samsung Brian Rahmani Amazon Claire Mitchell
"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"That was Claire. Mitchell of Vin- media. Thank you Claire Joining those. That was a really good conversation. Not Situational design side of things. I'm really interested in because I do know from speaking to another few people. Not It's actually pretty difficult to create a to develop stuff. He's a situation on design but the principles absolutely sound allowing a user to get to any part of the skill any part of the application any functionality or features from wherever they are I any point in time makes total sense. I do think that tree based structures are still relevant for certain parts for example when you get into a purchase funnel you probably want to guide us through that rather than let them say anything. They won't Hav that saw the tree structures poverty work well for certain commands but the principle of our user to say anything at anytime to access various bits of functionality depending on what their needs are makes absolute sense. And I'm glad so glad there's somebody else shares the same passion as I do for. Sound design are still really do thing. I'm going to keep buying on the drum for sound design because I do think it's one of the most only utilized yet one of the most important parts of any voice. Application is sound design because it's an audio medium. It's audio I and there is so much they even achieve with doing. Sound sound design. So thank you for the job as well and some great examples of some skills The US good sound design as well which you should totally check out so that was an absolute pleasure. Thank you as always undoes always low ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for listening until next time. See you later..

Claire Mitchell Vin US
"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"Very theoretical and philosophical. Look at at sound pretty awesome. Sounds right up my stras. I'll pulling found out. Put the link in the show on his check it out and then finally one thing. That's always interesting to hear is. What do you want to see and regards the voice? People who listening who can build things based on situational design. Would you lights See what would you like to use on voice in the next year? I think I'd just really like to see some really interesting experimentation We have sort of. There's sort of some parallels west of the early days of Web design and things are a little bit clunky and now there's some really really incredible From web three jazz. All this really really interesting robust immersive experiences. That you can have an. I think we need to push what's possible on our voice forms a little bit more on and that just requires getting acquainted with it which we're sort of in the stages of doing now and now. I think it's time for more experimentation with pushing the creativity of these forms as interesting one of the things that I loved being on the Internet is it was really weird like someone just really weird and I love to see some of that. Coming up voice as well. So Claire where can find you? Where can people find vader? Where can people find out? More information about situational design. Yeah best place is linked. Dan is always a good one. So feel free to reach out. And I'm situational design that a lot of great documentation from dams on Alexa team. And you know I'm always happy to chat with as well. Thank you so much for bearing this as religious. Been fantastic awesome. Thanks guys..

Alexa Claire Dan
"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"That devices ultimately it's about ambien computing. What form that takes physically I think is as yet to be seen. It might just be that. We always have our headphones on than we can interact with any device sir environment based on our phone in our headphones or it could be you know many other ways that this comes together but it's ambient computing where we can just interact with what we need to add without much with ease. I think it's an interesting question on Australian interesting that you bring up Ambien computing. Because I remember in the early two thousands I promise of it all seems very light base. For some reason. They're all those devices that would light up different colors based on stocks going up or down or or the weather being hotter colder but certainly with the price of computing decreasing in early Internet increasing in five G. Around the corner of actually going to be a game engine nods you the possibility of so many more things being next and then being able to To get information as well it's going to be interesting to see whether it happens or not going to be interesting to say yeah. I wished I had the foresight of seeing our time right now. In retrospect see because I've been actually doing a lot of Reading about some Design and origins of audio recording. And it's so interesting at the time when audio recording technologies were coming about There was a lot of Preservation technology in praise of preservation discussion including embalming which.

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"Kinda like part of. It is almost like the passage of time. Almost I think that's that's beautiful and poetic I. Yeah it makes me want to take a couple of classes and sound theory and changing topics. Are you a pretty unique background? And you've got an interesting vantage point as well to to examine. Think about what's happening in the near future in your mind with voice with conversational one. Should we be expecting or the? Let's say next year. This is a a good times To make our predictions over the next year. Yeah I'll have to double down on down design of mentioned a couple of times before anything or down design and creating more immersive experiences But also thinking about interaction designers and sound designers coming together in one body to to make our experiences more interesting and more enjoyable and then the other area. I don't think this is over the next year over the next five years. I think we might stop speaking about voice applications as specific to voice. Because we'll have all of these different ways of interacting with Our experiences and might be using our voice for multitasking or need to be hands free but will be able to use that same application typing in our phone or using gesture perhaps and so. I think all of these things will start to be considered and we'll have multiple ways of interacting.

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"And still. Do you think it's a requirement fall Companies to have that kind of pedigree or will they need to bring in that kind of pedigree or is this something that you think that people can kind of learn and improve. I think they're probably a couple of ways of going about it. I don't think that every company's going to need to create their own internal audio production company right away. They're probably baby steps. But the the point is really that consideration for audio content and sound design is just something that can be considered upfront and not something that is applied at the end which is sort of how it sometimes can be set up but coming back to a will make better voice experiences moving forward. I think it is just that consideration for sound design. Not only a number of storytelling experiences. But considered audio cues and that can just be a little sound effect and you can look at free libraries of sounds or or sort of low effort ways of introducing some of those pieces but finding a balance between the verbal and non verbal feedback orients the user in whatever the skill is whether it's entertainment or something that's more utilitarian and then the other piece is more contextual flex flexible structures with sort of modular interactions that allow users to drive the conversation rather than conforming to these narrow sets of predefined paths that we sometimes the an accounting for the context of the user. And that's what situational design this trying to get to those interesting study by audio you X. We've had them on the podcast of hot air. On the podcast the district before the study though and he was referencing the concept of audio afterthought or the five is a four is I think he called it And in this study they found that the use off premium sounding aircons that are consistent throughout the skill for example. If you have a sound that is a success noise and then a sound is a failure. Sound having those easily recognizable as part of the same family of sound so to speak con improve the engagement of skills and also it increases the perceived premium kind of quality by experts in the company was the percentage. They've proven that a holistic sounding Suite of aircons does measurably improve the user experience. Yeah absolutely I'm familiar with some of their. Where can I really love the way that they're thinking about this side of things because I think if done right it absolutely can make an impact and from the user's perspective it's almost so subtle that it fits successful it disappears and just conveys this bit of information? That helps you along. The way reminds me a little bit and fucked. I think it was this time last year. I think we had Rebecca Evan Hole on the show she was mobile at the time and then moved to Amazon. Where she's on now and She was talking about a common with a specific part of the conversation. But we ended up at the point of of kind of comparing voice to Other kind of modalities and the kind of age-old say an offer like good design goes noticed so it's like you know all of the hard work that goes into making something really really seamless. It doesn't need to be an obvious. Good conduct designed just needs to work and do his job. Almost WELCOME TO SOUND DESIGN. Fits about it to be like blatantly. Obvious you just want it to be not true sound in the whole thing about a holistic kind of experience totally and you know. I think. One of the challenges for designers. That don't have an answer for this in solving this. But when we designed for visual interfaces we work with the fundamental element of Pixel For video editors maybe they're working with storyboards or working with video directly but it's the frame that sort of the fundamental element and when we're designing for audio first experiences voice user interfaces and we're starting with not an audio unit but a script or something. That's a little bit disconnected. So there's an inherent disconnect I think or a need to apply sound later so I think there's something to be solved there. How can we work at the beginning with audio considerations rather than applying that later? There's this if people haven't checked this out then you should check it out. It's the pocus Dude with Joel. Beckerman of manmade music and one of the things that he said that stuck with me. Evison Kinda Thompson to what? You're saying that which is around. He talks about scoring experiences from moment to moment to moment as in like the passage of time. Every single. Second Matas at as kind of like how are you telling and conveying? Is there a story or an emotion? Or whatever is that you're trying to get across it every single second. It's almost as if like I don't know if whether you agree with this analogy but your analogy looking designers fundamentally working with pixels and video. Gophers fundamentally work with frames. It's almost as if composition design as sound designers when you create voice experiences the fundamental..

Rebecca Evan Hole aircons Joel Beckerman Evison Amazon
"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"Such an interesting area. Even communicating data we have data visualizations. Not have an audio version of that for certain applications and now the Bloomberg is experimenting with a certification of stocks is going down going up and you can easily imagine how that could be translated into. Sound the mets of our super excited about thinking found through. When is it appropriate to use Sound design to communicate things rather than verbal. So have you. Have you any examples? Have Skills the Using sound well skills with good sound design some of the first that come to mind are Westworld That experience was incredibly. Immersive chompers is also a great one would update their content on a continuous basis with great design and writing every single time and then wait wait quiz which we were fortunate enough to work with. Npr on Has Great writing is highly interactive and Although it's a constrained flow because it's a game there are open ended questions that allow users to feel more engaged and a lot of attention is paid to the sound design and the feedback of correct answers and those kinds of things. It was also just recognized by Amazon. Is One of the top ten skills of twenty nine thousand nine which is really exciting but the common thing about all of these is that they come from brands organizations that are already quite experienced and invested in quality audio and visual production in some cases but I think the success of these experiences can potentially be an indicator for other brands and and other folks that great sound design than investment. In Great. Writing is worthwhile and shouldn't just be considered an afterthought but part of the design process in the beginning the quiz.

mets Bloomberg Npr Amazon
"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"Is there any downsides to situational design challenges challenges are probably not necessarily specific to situational design? Because they probably go from no matter how you're communicating and design. But it's really about what is the best way that I can communicate this design to all stakeholders. I think we've found that. Situational design is very clear way to communicate to our non technical stakeholders because you can actually have a conversation amok conversation in jumped from situation that situation to see if you the comma dated for all the things that a user may ask for an user testing and that sort of thing on the developer side. We've found it's been more robust way of capturing some of those educations that we want to capture some are very used to seeing a tree slow type structure and so familiar already can do more convenient. Sometimes it's interesting. That voice summits was catching up with Paul concentrator. Now along after your presentation about situational design and some developer came up and said okay situation. Zion sounds great. But how do we work it in to flow charts and so it seems like people are definitely married that way representing a voice experiences? Yeah absolutely and I think that it really could fit in a flow chart very heavily. Annotated flow chart caveats boots. Yeah exactly so.

developer Paul
"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"The things that you ordered. And here's the total of your order. And here's a literacy because while we were doing was weird telling them is cited three times because who John around. We didn't necessarily know. Okay how they are that before how they earn it or have not heard that we had to keep track of even heard a tracker or rather view or the total before we have to keep track of that and not tell you again absolutely and that kind of information is accounted for in this way of documenting design and a from a user perspective probably should be although it is quite tedious on the designer and. I'm sure that will But but I think ultimately that's where we want our our conversational assistance to be headed to really know whether we've heard something before or not. I think the purchase flow is a really interesting one. And it's the most fun to design in this manner because it's it really is just about keeping track of. What have they told us? What have they not told us yet to fulfill this request? Would I really like about this as you're describing it as it only seems about showing respect to the user respecting the user because you're saying you're not an Automaton go where you want but also showing a lot of respect you you talked about the tedium that extra work on the designer developer. One of my favorite talk that I've ever or it was an article. Representation of this dog was talking about. How when you're creating something. Your time is or rather. The consumers time is most important so of experience takes off and a million people use it and they have to add three extra seconds of time to get through process as three seconds times. Okay what we're going to take three extra days the dough this situation or designing. It's just.

John developer
"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"I think that there's a ways to go interests I think that's that's one of One of my kind of passions is is in the sound design space. We've spoken about some design in the past. We've like Joel Beckerman Eric Scenes and still flat out and It's interesting going back to the concept of emotion. Do you think when you said it's not quite they at is it. The advancement of sound design practices. That would bring about that. Or is it the advancement all the kind of The Mitch maturing of storytelling on the medium. I think partially might be the investment. That's required often win. Were trying to truth out the the reason for for doing this docile so it's all about creating an MVP and learning from it and getting on the platform. And I think that that's what's happened over. The past year to folks are just trying to get on platform. But there's a an investment that needs to be native order to bring on these sound design talent and Invested in production capabilities. That I think it just comes as less prioritized than now. Basic interactions you. You mentioned a lot of Peo season. I think everyone industry probably seeing the same thing but for Edina specifically is a really these companies coming to you and saying. Hey we wanted to try out boys who want to see what this can our company or is it you going to them and saying hey for your company we have this idea how this new emerging technologies specifically voice can interview junior goals. And we want to give that a try both Harley Marceau the ladder of folks coming in being interested in this new space and trying to understand where they fit within it..

Joel Beckerman Harley Marceau Edina MVP Eric Scenes
"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"Channels as our day right now however I think Over the two year half years that I've been here. There has been some shifting between production and education in both directions so a lot of heavy production in twenty seventeen early twenty eighteen than a bit of more education side of things where people are really trying to understand. What is the state at the space? Where is this heading and now getting into a bunch of production work as well and really interested as well on the issue? You mentioned that part of what you're doing is is storytelling. And one of the things I always said I really WANNA see. Is I wanna feel something through voice whether it's You know heavy emotion or it's it's Excitement or or things like that in storytelling has a big opportunity to do that. So you feel like voice is a channel that can be contrive emotion contrive those types of feelings that you might get from a film or or podcast or radio or things like that absolutely. I don't think we're there quite yet. I mean I think that there are some examples of of things going in that direction but sound design on these channels so.

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on VUX World

"I think he's a good indication about the health of the industry and the people listening to this many people are either in. The industry are trying to break into the industry. So it's always a good kind of like almost like a benchmark to where what's the state of play of things and I was surprise when when we had rain agency on earlier in the in fact it might have even been last year to be honest and we asked how much what proportion of work is spent on voice and they said under percent why we're now voice agency basically Some curious become like then an maybe. It's not something you can answer for the whole of the entire company for your kind of side of things for your for Your Department or Division. What do you think the proportion of voice work? This is the work is do you think for our team. Specifically I would say probably about seventy seventy five percent of our furniture spent on voice The other twenty five. Maybe things like augmented reality or launching a digital experience from a static asset like a piece of packaging Those kinds of things but within that seventy five percent were doing both production work design work and a lot of education and consulting whether it's consulting about the where we voice heading in terms of designing experiences or just stay at the space generally. Yes that's sort of how it breaks down and have you seen that change from the time that you joined to our. You're working on voice more. You're working on voice less or is awesome. That's a good question. I think in our team at our team has always been pretty heavily focused on voice because it is emerging.

The Current State of Design & Where It's Headed with Claire Mitchell, VaynerMedia

Inside VOICE

03:05 min | 2 years ago

The Current State of Design & Where It's Headed with Claire Mitchell, VaynerMedia

"I love for you to touch more on the current state of design a little bit more especially with where we're at now and where we're going because as you just said should we all be using voices of work for every situation no similar to other things that we look at. It's really making sure that it's useful. It's usable in the right capacity. So yeah if you could talk more about that current state of design and where you think it's going that would be wonderful. Yeah well I guess taking up on the previous question. I think that there's definitely room for New Paradigm some new metaphors as we get away from screens or spend more time out screens thinking not so much in a file folder structure. We're diving deeper into things things. But at this March either top level or maybe there's another way of thinking about it so that we know how to navigate these systems without using the eight of screen or having to continuously actually be given a verbal menu of options. The other thing I think in terms of the future voice design we offered speak about voice or even conversational design in an isolation from other inputs and outputs we speak about multi-modal as sort of an afterthought sometimes and it's important to consider but I think the distinction distinction of voice designer Rome product Zainur interaction designer. More broadly will eventually disappear. And it's just going to be important for anyone working on a product or digital the experience to understand at a high level at least all of infants at their disposal including voice or gesture or texter image recognition other sensor data and of course on the other side all out that's at their disposal which of course could be audio or verbal response or could be vibration or it could be An audio cue or visual view or text response. There's so many different ways are different tools that we can employ depending on the context of the user. And what's most appropriate yet. I think from a user's perspective. They don't really care what the input as to. What the platform is they just want to use? The one that makes no sense in the moment and in thumb cases using my voice might be ACHIEVE A goal but another scenario that might be the click the buy. I completely agree and I like that. You're bringing into this whole audio the importance of conversational design as an integral part. I've been having some conversation with linguists. Recently there are some of the most creative and fascinating and talented pupil that I've met and they're really talking about the importance of conversational design. Not just developing something because the user wanted really making sure that that interacts with the human in the most effective and efficient way and really includes everybody as well totally and you know. I think that this is another case where we have have inherited certain paradigm conversational design. Where somewhat building on the legacy of IVR's are interactive Voice Response Systems and I've yard were built on a legacy the touchstone options so press one for extra super? Why so I think? In some cases we may still be holding ourselves back because were allowing are designed to be dictated detained by those historical paradigm or thinking about what is the ideal your interaction. And how can we take steps to build towards

Zainur
"claire mitchell" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

13:09 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"The release of conversations is incredibly exciting. So we were first in line calling Amazon, like how do we get access? The how do we improve our client experiences? So I think conversations really exciting. I think some of the things that's occurring with Amazon pay. And by once enjoy everywhere, which expands a little bit of the revenue generation is very exciting. And then there's others kind of scattered features like contact permissions EPL, but conversation in any transactional, experiences where we're putting on resource perfect. So how can the voice by listeners keep track of what you're doing on social media? We are skilled creative. Skilled, creative dot com on pretty much every social channel where at skilled creative. We put our opinions we share stories. We think are interesting were absolutely obsessed with the voice space, moving this community forward and building great experiences. So if you wanna see what we're up to check us out, if you want to collaborate with us, please reach out. We're looking for smart people to, to build with Brennan Kaplan. Thanks for joining us, and sharing your thoughts with the audience. Thank you very much, voiced, by listeners still about today. I conference, I'm with Claire Mitchell vein or media. Claire, thank you for joining us today. Hi there. Okay. So Claire you were at the bats in meet up in New York City, and we're doing a retrospective here. So you're on one of the panels, you heard bunch of speakers. Tell me a little bit more about what you said and some of the things you thought were really interesting lines of discussion on the panel. You're on sure. I think that probably the biggest takeaway that I had. Didn't seem like other folks have probably was the sort of period that we're in, in terms of sophistication invoice experiences, and we've seen a mass amount of adoption based on the low cost of smart, speakers, general Clayton. But I think we're now coming to a point where we're having a craving for richer. More high quality experiences that are less linear less defined by a path. So I'm excited to see how folks take that in start enriching the experience for the user. So tell me about that. So in terms of explaining to the audience, what you mean what isn't a voice experience. That is defined by a path versus one that might be richer more versatile sheer. So we often when we. Go into voice experience are presented with a menu of options, typically two to three options and then asked which direction that we'd like to go as users, and that's a really top down way of guiding a user through an experience, which is quite different than the way that we have conversations like the one that we're having between you and I, where we can ask a question we can say a preference without being bound to one or two or three options, and that's the kind of open ended type of experience that we strive for in voice experiences. It's a long ways off to getting to the point that it's as natural as you and I are speaking at the moment, but there are ways to get closer to it. Are there any people out there that you've come across that are doing a pretty good job at this? Well, the folks that Amazon have started spreading a philosophy around situational design cut senior has sort of led the efforts in this, and rather than having sort of decision tree based approach to designing voice experience. It's more about creating modules that a user can plug in out of depending on their context, their preferences, and that's something that's -ticipant by the designer and by proxy, the voice experience. Okay. So Amazon's pushing this, but right now, we don't have a lot of examples of really good conversational interaction, you think. Well, they just presented something remarks, which was a demonstration of this sort of functionality, which was allowing users to. Plan a night out a trip to the movies, a reservation for restaurants which I'm sure a lot of people are familiar with. But it allowed the user to plug in and out of these sort of different domains of expertise, whether it was movies ticket buying our reservations for a restaurant. Without being directed by the voice assistant, and so that's one example, but it's obviously early days. I think a lot of developers designers are really excited after the launch of that to see what they can do. But as far as others that have been published and our lives that we can interact with. I don't think we've seen it quite yet. So there's a huge opportunity, that's probably fair terms of what I've come across. There are people have Asli within the existing model that are doing a better job of it than others. In terms of how natural the interaction is. But they tend to be fairly structured for the most part of what were some other topics that you were happy to hear discussed. Or maybe we're surprised here, discussed in that panel discussion because that was like a forty five fifty minutes scotch in their four of you guys are all really deep into it. He'll what else did out to you? It was it was a really nice discussion in I, I was happy to. Here. The question about opportunities for voice leaving the smart speaker and being integrated into other devices and other environments, and opportunities there because I think a lot of the times when we speak about experiences with voice assistance. We automatically have this image in our mind of the smart speaker. But that's really just the beginning. And I think the default is going to be that we have a layer of information that successful through our environment. Send inanimate objects either through voice, or through vented reality, so thinking beyond smart. Speakers really exciting so is great to hear. Other people talk about that. So devices oftentimes offer significant information around context, so a smart speaker in terms of being far field experience often in the home, not exclusively, but in the earshot of potentially other people could be one on one is opposed to like the near field with the phone or in the car where you have this other activity, which is definitely going on at the same time when you think about that as designer and someone's I'd say new voice, let's say a big global fortune five hundred brand or something like that. They already have a presence in some of these other areas potentially, but maybe not a conversational presence. Do you think about having them start first on an surface like a smart speaker and say, okay, we'll create a presence there in that'll get you involved in the sort of voice, only experience. And then we can poured it across these other device contexts. Or do you at this point sort of step back and say, okay, what are all the things you want to do with voice, and then start to knock off the similarities between the different surfaces? I think at the beginning, we often take a high level holistic view and start to identify the places where voice experience might make sense. But in terms of practical applications, we often do historically have started with of voice experienced that might be specifically designed for smart speaker, and that's also primarily because the smart speaker has been the dominant way that people interact with their voice experiences or mobile phone, but now in the past year. So with the increase in voice assistance being integrated into the automated context, and other environments headphones that cetera. We are starting to think more the practical level on what those experiences are an how to differentiate them from an experience that would be designed for your living room or your kitchen. The Broncos Zun says, okay. We definitely wanna do a smart speaker type of. Solution engagement. For voice, and then they say jeez, we wanna do one other. Let's we want either optimize for the car or the phone, where would you steer them over the near-term that absolutely depends on the brand and the goals of the brand? There might be a use case that works for one brand in the autumn of context that wouldn't for another. So it really depends on the goals, more so than the platform itself or the context, itself, we really think about where an audience is in wherein audiences spending their time and then go from there rather than the reverse. So just in terms of the entire meet up, then we sort of take a step back and sort of think about that. What one thing did you come away from that you either surprised by thought was like an important point that needs more emphasis going forward? I guess it would come back to the first point which is creating better user experiences. We've had our time to get to know the technology and the platforms, I sort of see this latter affect between user comfort, and a platform functionality and developer capabilities, where between those three parties. There's a lot of experimentation about what can be done than how to do it as each of those parties becomes more comfortable with the medium. We're going to see more of quality experiences more complex experiences and more engaging experiences. So I think that was the sort of big takeaway were at this sort of crux in, in the timeline of voice where. We've seen the experimentation in now it's time to define the, the real frameworks yet, does sort of feel like that, doesn't it word junction in, in the space where there's a lot of people who've experimented and the question is, what next one other question for you sort of follow them. Let's talk about vein or for a moment, but a lot of people think about this idea. Oh, will mostly users are mostly using smart. Speakers to listen to music may be the weather timers alarms. But for a lot of these would they would call first party services or second party services on the platform. How do you think that plays in terms of brands coming on the platform? Is that a good thing because you're to have an audience and you're not going to be the dominant player on that platform, dislike, you're not the dominant player on Facebook or one of the other channels, you've used over the last several years, and you're there, when, when they need you or do you think about that is maybe more problematic in that? There's not enough awareness or interest among consumers to try more third party apps. I think there's two things one thing that it shows is that people are interested in utility, so more so than a novelty, you're even entertainment. It's, it's primarily about utility at least now in the phase that were in currently. I think it's on its upon brands to find a place where they can provide value and to figure out what the conversations that they can have are the concretely have within audience before building something just for the sake of it on the other side. It goes back to the point about this ladder affect between people getting comfortable with what's possible platforms. Getting increased functionality developers creating more. Complex experiences. I think that now's the time to experiment and just as win smartphone came about over twelve years ago, people knew that they needed a mobile strategy, but they weren't really sure what that was in a lot of people waited for a long time still. Some people don't are some companies don't have a way to represent their website on a mobile.

Amazon Claire Mitchell New York City Facebook Broncos Brennan Kaplan general Clayton developer forty five fifty minutes twelve years
"claire mitchell" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

14:03 min | 2 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"The conference expects. About five thousand people, it'll probably be more. They're gonna come from around the globe. I'll be speaking a couple of times, maybe three I thank. And there's going to be three hundred others. So there's gonna be a lot of people sharing insights, wisdom, what they've experienced over the last several years. It'd be sharing that with you. I will even be doing three our voice strategy workshop on the twenty second of July. That's the day before the big conference starts. They have some workshops that day, so definitely. Check that out as well. I don't do these types of things often. But if you're working on your voice strategy or need to start at you really come away with some tangible takeaways. So definitely suggest you check that out. Good avoi- some day, I use the discount code voice bought. If you decide to register I hope to see you in New Jersey, and if you are going to be there, make sure you tweet at me at Brechin Sela, and we'll definitely look for him, okay? Time for the interviews today. We have Matt Hartman from beta works filed by Brandon Kaplan from skilled creative those were both recorded onsite prior to the event. Those interview. Are followed by some post event interviews with Claire Mitchell of Intermedia who also spoke there as a key Bahamas. Enzo Hareb amid from resemble AI, who both participated, and we conclude with Alec Leser rescue, who's the organizer of the largest AI meet up in New York City, and the host of the evening's events. So let's get started. First up Matt Hartman from beta works, so Brechin Sela here at the botany I beat up in New York City, and I ran across Matt. Hartman from beta works. Matt, thank you for joining me today. Thank you so much for having me. Okay. So what I thought we would do since most of the voice by community doesn't get to come out to this meet up tonight. I thought I talked to a few the speakers of people here in the voice community and get their taking a couple of things. First thing I want to ask you about is, what are you gonna talk about tonight? So time gonna talk about what we think of beta works as the third wave of voice. So if wave one was literal, ipods, right? That's right. It's called podcasting. Ipods RSS feeds. And wave two was about streaming services in this renaissance podcast. What's wave three? And so we're gonna talk about discovery of new podcast monetization talk about air pod. I technology and what real voice interactions. Those voice utilities and what we think the future is of, of all these products. Okay. So audio technology really are audio content, and the technology to distribute that, that's what your focus has been more so than the voice interactions f- air. I think that. Audio technology. You me and podcasts contents versus smart. Speakers if and distribution and other things like that. Yeah. I think what we've seen is that. The hook that people have gotten gotten people into using these kinds of interactive tools has been more around audio technology, so people get smart speaker, but they listen to podcasts and flash briefings and music on them. They're starting to do some things around weather. But I think we're we've been interested in both but I probably have seen more traction around podcast distribution, and that content side. Right. Okay. So when you think about the different waves that we came through, you talked about the different types of digital audio distribution that we've seen, and you mentioned this focus on discovery as part of a, third wave what's going to change to make audio content. More discoverable? What's a few things? One is data about what's in the audio audio contents that we were talking earlier, about transcription technology, can get better so so discovery from the search perspective. But also what new kinds of. Products will help us find what to listen to. So it might be apps that taking more magazine like approaches that there's that app called Wilson that I've been playing with that's.

Matt Hartman Brechin Sela New York City New Jersey AI Claire Mitchell Enzo Hareb Brandon Kaplan Alec Leser Wilson twenty second
"claire mitchell" Discussed on Voiciety

Voiciety

06:00 min | 3 years ago

"claire mitchell" Discussed on Voiciety

"Hello everyone. And welcome sued the voice idee podcast in this week. I have Scott Westwater of pragmatic digital Scott. It's great to have you on the show. Thank you so much for having me. Hey scout. So before we get started could you tell a little bit about yourself, maybe your background, and how you got interested in voice. Sure. So by trade, I have been a designer most of my career. So started out in visual design did a lot of advertising work throughout my career, Faust back and forth between digital and more traditional stuff. So I did one of the first websites for Walgreens, I did a lot of the early dot com websites. And so really got interested in digital towards the end of the nineties, which was kind of fun because when I was in college the web was actually starting to become a commercially viable thing. But they're still weren't a lot of classes in it. So I ended up doing a lot of self education to learn as much as I could. And then throughout my career. I've kind of bounce back and forth between more traditional advertising and digital things. And at one point. And I think it's twenty thirteen it was at this crossroads trying to decide. Do I want to continue on the visual design thing or do? I want to try to do something a little bit more strategic and a little bit more user focused right around the time. I was actually introduced to someone who is a user experience professional, and I hadn't worked with one of those folks in about ten years in the practice certainly had changed from the late nineties. So she got me really interested in user experience as a profession and helping you know businesses and also the organization agency organization understand what user needs are and how we can marry those with the business of Jacob's to create something that's useful and usable for audience. So really, you know that from that point on I've been doing user experience. So it's been about five six years of hard core user experience work, and when this voice think. Came up. I really saw it as the next big thing. So as we were talking before we start recording. I am a big Gary van or Chuck fan. And in the fall of twenty seventeen he was doing a lot of talk us, specifically round voice in the opportunity. And when someone like Gary starts to talk, it's probably wise to pay attention at least a little bit of research to see what that looks like. And so I did that research, and I saw the same thing. I saw mobile I saw the same thing that I saw with the web, and you know, this. This is the same pattern repeating itself now for the fourth time in my career. And so I've really focused a lot of my efforts over the past year and a half or so specifically in the voice space, so that we can take a lot of learnings that we had from the web from mobile and mobile apps and start to bring that experience specifically around customer needs to the voice space. So you kind of mentioned Gary there as being one of the primary. Reasons, but also you did some some of your own research as well. I'd be curious to know, if you could maybe name, some those indicators that you saw or are kind speak to some the indicators that you saw when you were looking at voice, obviously, you've seen some high profile people talking about the importance in. And how voice was upcoming in this space. What were some of the indicators on your end that kind of point you to saying, hey, this is something I want to get into this was 2017, correct? Yeah. So it was still like earlier on the consumer side as well. I mean, I don't know what the adoption rate was. But it wasn't nearly as high as it is right now. No, not even close. I think it's you know, I like to look at data from the industry. So just looking at that trending the adoption trends looking how there was year over year growth, I was also really active in web design. When mobile started happening. And so I had written and presented tons of presentations specifically around. Here's why you want to invest in mobile and responsive and all those good things. And so my wife, and I went to a voice Kahn, which is Gary manner, Chuck's voice conference last year. And we saw a presentation by Claire Mitchell who's I don't remember exact title, but she's part of the vein or smart group. And she was talking about a lot of the same things. I talked about during the mobile revolution. So adoption rates and where Custer where businesses investments are. And the opportunities that it presents things like that the next day we actually had a chance to do a tech tour. So there's like twelve of us from the conference that went around and clear is actually one of the people that were taking us to various places in New York City that were experimenting with voice or heavily involved in the voice base. And I actually was I said, hey, that presentation gave was great it. Reminds me of things we were talking about, you know, five six years ago during the mobile revolution. And she's like it's funny to see this whole thing play out again. Right. So, you know, so I had this uncanny ability to see the dots and start to connect the dots. And so as I started doing some research in twenty seventeen and really started getting into what Amazon was doing some of the concept, they had put out and really looking Alec emarketer, and forester and some of these projections the projection seemed outlandish at the time. I mean, you know, they're saying by twenty twenty half of all people will be doing a voice search and in just at that point seem ridiculous. But when big names like that start putting out big predictions like that, and you see enough of those people saying things like that, which seemed completely outlandish. You're like this is something worth paying attention to in. So there's a host of things that I use from research standpoint. So really look at industry trends and understand where we're headed. And

Gary van Scott Westwater Chuck fan Walgreens Jacob Faust New York City Alec emarketer Amazon Claire Mitchell Custer twenty twenty Kahn five six years ten years