18 Burst results for "Claire Denis"

"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

03:11 min | 3 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

"It's just, I'm going crazy, and once again, this is my 5th pick. Uh huh. You guys had the opportunity, but I guess you don't respond to beauty and heartbreak. And world centered around women. So that's fine. Here it is for me. Recently. Yeah. Recently, voted nursery on the site. This is unfair, but I loved this movie. Was it too low on that list? Oh my God. Coming up next. Oh my God. So that's my drama. Coming up next was portrait of a lady on fire. Are we sure that isn't the pod we should be making? I feel like the pod, the green tea pod, the green cinema. All teases. But it's like all high art films though. No better than get out, coming up next. Coming up next is Claire Denis actually doing our best work. Stars at news coming up next. Yeah. Okay. You don't have a green ET's do. No, I let you guys do this and then I laugh at it. Velvet buzzsaw, the film might crawler wishes it was? Maybe coming up next. First, subway fresh day caught live. Knives out, more like ten toes down, Ryan Johnson, a big struggle phase coming up next. But we really let it let it rip. We let it all hang out. I think I could have done really well in sports talk radio. Just like really, really, really overstated opinions about things that don't matter. I'm incredible at that. It's what you do every day. I know what sports, though. Yeah. You know what the problem would be? Guys on the phone with you. But are you talking about? I love the callers. No, can you imagine if somebody fucking called you a shoddy? Steve Cohen's gotta spend some money. I'm gonna fucking end it right now and you would just be like, now I'm sad. No, I would be like, no, I'm so strive down to the studio and sit with me. Come sit in my lap. You would get fired 'cause you'd be like, just send it then, fine. Yeah, you'd be like, what you should definitely end up, I'm gonna end it too. I want to quit my sport seems like every 13 days, so it would be hard for me to have that job. Are you back on the next? No, I think that would make it easier for you to have that job. You're supposed to be outraged. I want to quit. I'm well suited to it 'cause I'm raised by it. I am back in on the Knicks because they have won 5 games in a row and Julius Randle decided it's 2020 again. And I don't really know what to make of that. But it's been exciting to watch. I really, truly hated Julius Randle for the last 12 months. And so now I've had to cope with him being an excellent basketball player. It's very strange, very strange team. But yeah, they're currently a playoff team, which is just amazing to me. Okay, it's December. It's a fair point. I don't have a comeback. They're the Knicks. So I won't be defending them. In my upper. And I have to ask a question to the chairman of the board. Chairman chair people of the board. Oh, I thought you were going to say to a moment of the board and just talk to me. The chair lady on fire of the board. How we haven't done a lot of genre manipulation recently. We've been very honest and we're like, you know, I know. But I think that at a certain point, things open up, you know?

Claire Denis Julius Randle Ryan Johnson Steve Cohen Knicks basketball
"claire denis" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:48 min | 4 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"News now with our regular monocle 24 contributor Karen chrysanth. Thanks as ever for joining us, Karen, sight and sounds greatest films of all time. What's on this list? Yeah, well, every ten years I can sound magazine since 1952 has also a handful of experts critics and other people to list the top ten films that they think for the coming decade. This year I was included, which is nice. They've doubled it to almost 1700 people, so we get folded in there. And this year, the topper of the entire list, quite prestigious, is chantelle Ackerman, her Jeanne de mang film from 1975. She's Belgian filmmaker. She made it when she was 25, has beaten Albert Hitchcock Orson Welles. Ozu, one car wash, Stanley Kubrick, and 7 is Claire Denis. So we do have another woman in there as well. So in terms of choosing the films, there's no time limit, then it's not just the list comes out every ten years, but the film can be from any era. Yeah, there can be, you can choose silent movies if you like as well. The thing about what the greatest is. I mean, this, of course, is extremely subjective. And I have a tendency to think about what's my favorite and what would I tell people that I would think they would enjoy seeing. I think what was expected here because a lot of film critics have died every retired. And there's a new generation coming up with a different view about films. And so this was actually mooted to be as Jason wood, the BFI executive director of public programming said, it's a compelling list, but also it shakes a fist at the established order. And this was pretty much expected. So what are the general themes in terms of the changes that you've seen since the last list? Oh, gosh, there's just so many to say. I mean, in 2012, there was only one black film. And now there are 7. And other films have been pushed on with two silent films. It made the top two. And films that have been knocked out have been stroheim's greed, Agrippa's intolerance ocean and bunuel, which is always been one of the magnificent ambersons. And it's just many, many, many films that have been pushed out, which is quite shocking. Now, as you say, you were actually one of the voters on this, so what are your, say, top three? I know you're going to ask me, well, without going into the big list, I have to say that my list is more like the director's list. I mean, I did put 2001 in space Odyssey first. Because it's just, I love watching it. And I think that most people would enjoy watching it. Big screen are small. So I think that's the kind of argument I put in some new films from 2022. Nope and triangle of sadness. So it is quite interesting. It's just as an agenda I just wanted to say that the new editor of site and sound Mike Williams is going to be on the stack this week. So it's going to be very interesting to hear what they're doing with the magazine and how they're shipping it up for a new generation of film mothers. Absolutely. How does this like this matter? Do they influence the viewing public? Do you think? Right and sound is a bit niche. I have to say, and I think that the editor is probably trying to make it more popular, something like Total Film, which so many people read our empire. It's influential into fire as it's recognizing a lack of diversity, I suppose. And recognizing that there are great filmmakers that we don't even know about or aren't seen as much of. And I have to say, add a Roberts with his more my friendship so bad. He has been, he has been heralding chantel Ackerman for a long, long time. She's now passed away, but he is very influential in getting this film to the top. I want to look at the unlikely named cocaine bear. As I understand it, it's about a bear that takes cocaine. Indeed, well, he didn't mean to. It's kind of an accident. This is based on a true story. This is directed by Elizabeth Banks. We've been picking out some really great material. It's been based on a real life story of a 175 pound black bear who ingested a duffel bag of abandoned cocaine in northern Georgia in 1985. Now, that sounds like a great soil out the poor bear died a terrible death. But in Elizabeth Banks, fictional version, he goes on a killing spree. It is not a real bear. You will see that it really is not a real bear. This Israeli autos last film. And we also have Scott seiss who was a tic tac phenomenon over lockdown, really, really funny comedian. It's great to see him performing in this. But it's the trailer that you really caught everybody's attention. On social media, I think it's just what people need. They need something ridiculous a little bit forbidden. And just silly. And if you see the trailer, even if you hate yourself, it's quite it's quite funny. And this is a set again in Georgia's chattahoochee oconee national forest and when they found the bear in real life, there is nothing left but bones in a big hide that the investigator. Oh, dear. Right. Cocaine bear, that's one to certainly mark in some way. Karen, thank you very much indeed, that was the film critic Karen Krause and this is the globalist on monocle 24.

Karen chrysanth chantelle Ackerman Jeanne de mang Albert Hitchcock Jason wood public programming stroheim Claire Denis Ozu Stanley Kubrick Orson Welles BFI Karen Agrippa chantel Ackerman Mike Williams Elizabeth Banks Scott seiss Roberts
"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:15 min | 4 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

"We are fully on the same page in that respect. This year, as you mentioned singing in The Rain comes back into the top ten at number ten, man with a movie camera still here at number 9, mulholland drive a number 8, as we said, Claire Denis at number 7. Which is pretty amazing too. A handful of female filmmakers on this top ten. Number 6, 2001 is back. Number 5, as we said in the mood for love. Number four Tokyo story, number three citizen K number two vertigo, and at number one, Jean del mon, the Chantal akerman film, which is this amazing portrait of a woman who is working as a sex worker and also a housewife and is this long, long film, which has become, I think, in the last 20 years or so, like a huge object of affection and fascination in a huge influence on a lot of, especially European filmmakers, but also American filmmakers as well. So pretty radical shift in the top ten. It seems like they held about 6, four new entries, some classic reentries, some kind of like I mean, both and in the mood for love and mulholland drive makes this like a startlingly contemporary list. Not to mention as you go through the top 100, there are a lot of newer films that are installed. The film that seems to be the most immediately, I don't want to say controversial, but noted is that portrait of a lady on fire is in the top 30. Right. Which is high placement for a very recent film. The way that you noted that to me is I think the right way to contextualize it, which is someone observed, oh, now I feel bad for portrait of a lady on fire because it is ranked above all of these other fantastic films that of the world will get really mad about like, oh my God. Like 8 and a half, you know, whatever. It's literally 8 and a half and then portrait of a lady on fire. 8 and a half was in the top ten left. I understand that. And a portrait of a lady on fire is one of my favorite films of the certainly the last ten years. So I'm thrilled to see it in there. But it's the quirks of the list. I was about to ask you a lot about the process behind this list. I think we should probably say that for Monday. Let's get deeper into that. Yeah.

mulholland Jean del mon Chantal akerman Claire Denis Tokyo
"claire denis" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

01:54 min | 5 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"Why don't they exist and how one of the things we loved about movies was they root you in this specific place in this era. Like even we did cruising for the rewatchables and it's like we were in late 70s. Do you need packing district in New York? This is what it's like in this part of town and this world and this culture and we are now going to enter that and why hasn't movies about the last four years? I'm going to come out that have done that. I'm going to tell you about a movie that maybe neither of you will like and maybe most people listening to this won't like, but it just came out. It's not about like in the movies, so I'm it came out about a month ago, it's now streaming on who it's called stars at noon. It's an adaptation. It's Margaret qualley and Joe alwyn, who is a good actor who is Taylor Swift's boyfriend. Who's not bad. And he's a good actor. It's an adaptation of Dennis Johnson novel, which is set in the early 1980s in Nicaragua during the revolution, but the Claire Denis the director of the movie, updated the film to be set in the present day. And it's one of the only movies I've ever seen, kind of regardless of how you feel about the film that is honest about what the pandemic was like, which is to say that a lot of people in the movie are wearing masks around their necks and not on their face. And it was the first time I'd really seen a movie where I was like, oh, people don't even really care about wearing masks. And we're going to be honest about that. I have to wear the mask to get in through the door and the fast food restaurant, but once I get in there, I'm taking it off, and people won't tell me any different. And it was a very specific small choice in a movie that isn't really about the pandemic. It's just set during the pandemic. That felt similar to the things we talked about when we talked about blowout, where it's just like every little detail matters. So representing what life is like in this universe of creation matters. Of the present. And those modern movies, I feel like are operating in some sort of like surreality like what you're describing where you're in New York. I have no idea. Or we're in some alternate universe or we're in a comic book world or whatever. Did

Margaret qualley Joe alwyn Dennis Johnson Claire Denis Taylor Swift Nicaragua New York
"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:10 min | 5 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

"And there's kind of elusiveness to this story and it's meaning as there is in many Dennis Johnson books and also in many Claire Denis films. Clergy has updated the story to have a take place somewhere in Central America. I can't recall if she shifts it to Panama or I can't recall. But it's set during the pandemic. To me, it's one of the only realistic portrayals of what the pandemic was like, obviously, it was not in that country during that time. But I thought it was interesting that the amount of times where people just have their masks off, but they're around their ears. That's not something we've seen in any movie because they're trying to be careful about moralizing about mask wearing. It's a very slow, slightly confusing, deeply elliptical movie about people who are lost, like a young woman played by Margaret qualley who plays the journalist who is just desperate and a little crazy and driven mad by her circumstances and needs to get out of this country and just can not. She can't get an assignment. She can't get her, you know, she can't get her passport back from the revolutionaries. It's like I'm very confusing story. This film just hit me on a deep level watching it. I was really, really fascinated by the search for any kind of meaning, any kind of connection in a desperate time. Obviously that's like a big metaphor to swing at, but I thought it was great. You look absolutely baffled by me right now. I was just thinking about the Zoom call scene that Margaret qualley does with John C Reilly as incredible. I understand we're not searching for realism in this film or, you know, but that was that's just not how assigning editors work or talking to each other. It's very funny. Riley improv that whole sequence. Really funny. He's hilarious. There's also Benny safdie appears later in the film in a similarly kind of like menacing and creepy but also very effective turn as a significant figure in the story as all I'll say. Denise doesn't really make very many films in English. High life was her first and she has an interesting facility with it. You know, like it really felt very much like a Claire Denis movie to me because a lot of her movies that have this kind of like elliptical and emotionally intense but also distant quality where you're sort of like, what is the story of this movie? I don't really know what these characters are striving for trying to do, but by the time you get to the end of it, you're like, everything is hopeless, you know. That is how I often feel coming out of her movies. I like this one a lot. It's on Hulu now. It just came to Hulu's play just a couple of weeks in small city movie theaters.

Margaret qualley Claire Denis Dennis Johnson Central America John C Reilly Panama Benny safdie Riley Denise Hulu
"claire denis" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

03:02 min | 5 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on Popcast

"Example of a song that probably could have gone either in the reputation era or in the lover era in the reputation era as just part of a big tent ambitious experimentation and the lover era of like, hey, we're throwing ten different things at the wall and most of them are pretty good because we thought through each of the individual ten things. Glitched to me of these 7 songs is the best. Four of these songs literally should never have been released. They're actively damaging to the Taylor Swift. But that goes for most bonus checks. I think we're holding Taylor bonus tracks to a higher standard than most because we actually listened to them. Bonus tracks are bad. Bonus checks are fan service and streaming boosts. I agree, but I just don't think it's important. It's not the album. Bonus tracks are never good. However, I think the bonus tracks on her rerecordings have been at least on the red rerecording. The Taylor's version of red, we need to kind of unpack this too, just how incredibly prolific she's been in the past few years. You know, we haven't talked much about the rerecordings, but I think they fit into this record both in the backwards glancing nature of the project, but also in how she's just like completely saturated the market and is still hitting all these milestones and streaming wise and stuff. And I definitely think the bonus tracks are mostly streaming filler a la too long Drake album to go back to her imagined collaborator, but she's just now completely emptying the vaults and putting everything out there. I find it a little fatiguing as a fan. To go through all these songs, I think I was appreciative that the record was only 13 songs long, and then we got this dump of the rest of them. And I think, you know, again, I think she's just in this mode of both looking back at her past, but also throwing everything out there, even the rough drafts. And I just super serving the fans. Yeah, but I want things to be a little more labored over. I agree with the idea that this record feels rushed. It doesn't feel like there was another pass given to some of these writings. There's a rough draft feel to a lot of it. Dark lane demos. One thing she mentioned behind the scenes at about the creation that's interesting is and that I had forgotten about it is that she said they made a lot of it while their partners were starring in a movie together. Have you guys seen the trailer for the Joe alwyn Margaret qualley film? Shout out Claire Denis. Yeah, shout out Claire Denis, although maybe a rare misstep for the queen. Based on that trailer. But I think that that's an interesting, it's an interesting framing for this project when you think of your romantic partners making something together and you feeling almost like you have to do something while they're busy together as a compliment to. I don't know. It's a very strange dynamic and it'll make for an interesting page and a half in the Taylor Swift bio in 25 years. Wow. Wait, I wanted to mention something about glitch.

Taylor Taylor Swift Claire Denis Drake Joe alwyn Margaret qualley
"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:47 min | 6 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

"I think by conjuring the names of Claire Denis and a pitch upon, you do something interesting, which is that you put him in a class with largely foreign, I guess, sort of art house, true artist filmmakers. And lynch is for sure that he is for sure in that tradition, and I'm sure he inspired both of those filmmakers in ways. But he's also a mainstream American filmmaker. He is a person who is he is a legitimately famous person who has made movies that have been watched and rewatched and picked over time and again that are a part of the canon. He's a person who's been nominated for three Academy Awards. He's not this oblique standoffish, you know, outsider. He is in an odd way, a part of the fabric of American movies, and that is highly unlikely when you really dig into his work. But it also makes sense because he's working in a tradition as well. It is unlikely and I mean, we don't want to be too discursive and jump around, but I'll throw something out for you because you're a guy who likes ideas. And I try never to have takes on this show. I'm like, if I ever have takes, I need to arrest myself, but Chris Chris is going to take. I don't have takes, but here's a semi take for you, which is that his fame, the true fame you are talking about, is more of a byproduct about what he did to television the first time than anything else, right? I think blue velvet makes you seriously famous as a filmmaker. Sure. But I think Twin Peaks makes you seriously famous in a moment when everyone's watching the same things on prime time, where it's limited options and all of a sudden there's a bunch of eyeballs on one television show and that television show in the form of Twin Peaks is just so strange. That's where I think his fame metastasizes into something else. And he becomes the go to adjective for that, which is not mainstream. In American movie making. I don't know how that sits with you because we were both there for that, but we were young when Twin Peaks was on, but that's how I remember him becoming really famous.

Claire Denis Chris Chris lynch Academy Awards Twin Peaks
"claire denis" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

04:27 min | 8 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Situation is, you could make it good. This is a job to you. No. Right now, nothing is a joking. Make one little mistake. Eventually, cracks a beer. I'm not believing it. I was 20 years old. And to be fair, hardy is great. I mean, this, this acting challenge of essentially carrying the entire movie, he can do it. He does carry one through it, even if not much else, is working for you, but this is so funny, I've got my tears here in my list, my rank list, and I'm crossing out your picks as we go. In my two out of four star tier, all bunched up together, I have three picks. While we're young, spring breakers lock all the row there, so yes, you should enjoy those at your film festival. Well, we're actually in a similar position, Josh, in that you have, I'd say at least half your choices are probably in the 15 to 25, a 24 range for me. So we have some crossover at the top. And I like all of the movies. Well, I'm not a big fan of the witch, but every other film on your list, I gave a positive review to. There's just so many good a 24 films to choose from that you can have them much lower. That's what we should have. I mean, really the reason we're doing this is the incredible run that have had over these ten years. When you take this list as a whole and you can see my three and a half out of four stars tier is just gigantic. It's packed packed with titles. So a huge, huge, impressive output for them. Those are our favorite a 24 films and that does conclude our a 24 movie draft looking back on ten years of their releases Josh. Do you have any others you would like to honorably mention ones that just missed the cut? Maybe you're even a little bit surprised about as you were coming into the draft. You thought maybe they'd have a shot and you found them just on the outside. I mean, I could mention I'm looking at my rankings here and the ones you grab that I would have grabbed. We've sort of covered but ex Machina moonlight first cow Uncut Gems. And yeah, under the skin was pretty high for me. Neither of us took high life. The Claire Denis, Robert Pattinson, sci-fi, existential drama. I thought about it a couple of times as we were talking here. I mentioned I do like eggers the lighthouse. Ari aster, I would have gone with hereditary if I was going to choose one of his. How about the tragedy of Macbeth? I had forgotten that was an a 24 film, but I'm quite high on that. And then real quick, a couple others here. The last black man in San Francisco, lamb, I do like Alex Garland's men as well. And the rover. Oh, I thought about the rover Adam. I wish you would pick the rover. Securing me the victory, Josh, in this little escapade. Less black man in San Francisco, a golden brick winner here on the show was definitely one I thought a lot about the movie with green in the title. I referenced earlier. I would have gone with green room from Jeremy sonie, ahead of The Green Knight, a movie. I also like quite a bit. I think another unconventional horror film and that it's not even remotely scary, but has elements of a horror film that would be David Lowry's a ghost story. The movie, I believe we were both big fans of and the other movie I will say here that I did strongly consider for my top ten. That you never see getting much love when it comes to a 24 appreciations. And if I watched it again, who knows, I might find that I had a different reaction to it. I have a feeling I would just love it even more. It's a most violent year. Jessica Chastain and Oscar Isaac as a married couple in that film JC chandor, the director who also did margin call. I'm an outlier, or this film is an outlier, as I said when it comes to people praising a 24 films and I'm not sure why that's the case. Have you seen it? No, I missed that one. So not on my rankings, unfortunately. Once again, those are our favorite a 24 films we would love to hear your picks or any other

Josh Ari aster hardy Claire Denis Jeremy sonie eggers Alex Garland Robert Pattinson San Francisco David Lowry Macbeth Oscar Isaac JC chandor Jessica Chastain
"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:52 min | 9 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

"This is the big picture a conversation show about the thing. Last month marked the 40th anniversary of John Carpenter's sci-fi horror masterpiece, a film that has endured and grown over the past four decades. Into one of the signature cult classics in American movies, it has been reconsidered reanalyzed and ultimately hailed as a chilling and unexpired vision of terror. It's a gory, disquieting, expertly constructed piece of work, and one of my favorite movies ever, so it was quite a thrill to talk to Carpenter on the show today. He is a genuine hero of mine and a real no bullshit customer. Our conversation holds true to that form. But before we welcome Carpenter, I want to set the table for this movie by talking to someone who might love the thing even more than me. It's Chris Ryan, see our hello. Hello, Sean. Thank you again for having me open up for one of the great directors of all time. I feel like this is one of my favorite bits that you do. Where it's like, Claire Denis, but first CR on horror from this year. Well, I think you're a solid opening act. You are the Jerry Lee Lewis to Carpenter's Elvis Presley today. And obviously I had to speak with you. As a movie we talked about a lot over the years, but we've never potted about. No. And we've never earned our keep by discussing this movie on Mike. What do you think of when you think of the thing? I think of a perfect movie. And I think of a movie that gets more and more perfect if that's possible. I guess perfection is the arrival of somewhere, but it grows in my estimation as the years go on for a number of reasons partially because of maybe the quality of movies like this now. And some of the mistakes that they make that thing kind of I wish they would have learned certain lessons from the thing, which we can talk about. And I think also because of the sort of four quadrant depth of the movie, the way it sounds the way it looks, the way it feels, the way it was written, you know, like everything about it, you can kind of let your eye look like wander when you're watching the thing. You can get into different aspects of it. You can just listen to the more cone soundtrack you can just notice all the funny little character ticks that aren't belabored, but are really, really awesome. It's a great ensemble movie, obviously. And sometimes you can just kick back and watch Kirk Kirk Russell with a sombrero in sunglasses, be a badass, which is one of my favorite things to do with these movies. Yeah, let's hit the table for it a little bit by just describing what this movie is. If you're listening to this episode and you haven't seen the thing. I would say just check it out, you know? Just fire up iTunes, you know? It's currently available via AMC on Amazon Prime. If you have an AMC subscription or anything like that, yeah. This is John Carpenter's 8th movie. It's not his 8th feature film. He did make a couple of TV movies, but this is you can see him fully realizing his powers and it's his first movie that is neither a TV movie nor an independent production. It's a studio movie made with Universal Pictures. And you can tell, you can tell that he's having some fun.

Carpenter John Carpenter Chris Ryan Claire Denis Jerry Lee Lewis Elvis Presley Sean Kirk Kirk Russell Mike AMC Amazon Universal Pictures
"claire denis" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:47 min | 9 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The ban. When did they lift it? Just recently, as the tragic murder of George Floyd and mad Arbery and Breonna Taylor, as the protests subsequently swept the nation, I think that they realized that that policy not only is now is wrong now, but it always was. And it was the wrong policy, and they came out with a pretty strongly worded statement and rescinded it. And did Colin Kaepernick ever get in touch with you after you, Neil? Yes, yes. Yeah, we're in touch with each other, for sure. Megan Rapinoe, thank you so much for talking with us and congratulations again on your engagement and also on the new book. Thank you so much for having me on. Megan Rapinoe speaking to Terry gross in 2020. The Olympic soccer champion and social activist has just been awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor. Coming up, Justin Chang reviews the new French film, both sides of the blade, starring Juliette Binoche and directed by Claire Denis. This is fresh air. In the French melodrama both sides of the blade, Juliet binoche plays a Parisian radio show host whose life is disrupted by the return of a former lover. It's the latest movie from acclaimed filmmaker Claire Denis. The film won her the best director prize at this year's Berlin International Film Festival. It opens in theaters this week. Our film critic Justin Chang has this review. Both sides of the blade might sound at first like a quintessentially French movie, or perhaps even a parody of one. It stars Juliet binoche and van son Landon. Two of France's best known actors. As a couple who have a lot of sex and talk a lot about their emotions. Their scenes together have an erotic intimacy that we associate with French cinema. In part because it's relatively rare in American movies. Then a figure from the past returns and threatens their relationship. Voices are raised, tables are turned, and nothing will ever be the same. That might make both sides of the blade, sound like standard soap opera material. Especially coming from Claire Denis. The director of daringly elliptical art films, like Bo trevi, and high life. But nothing about the movie, which deny and Christine ango, adapted from Mongo's novel, feels trite or predictable. It's a jolt of a movie, full of hot blooded sensuality one moment, but then awfully cool and studied the next. Almost as if it were deconstructing itself as it went along. Which again sounds very French, but never mind. Binoche and Linda give superb performances as Sarah and Jean, who have lived together for about ten years, and still can't keep their hands off each other. They have an apartment in Paris, where they've carved out what looks like a perfect life, amid decidedly imperfect circumstances. Seurat hosts a successful radio talk show. But work is less steady for Jean. Who spent some time in prison for an undisclosed crime. He also has a tough relationship with Marcus. His teenage son from an earlier marriage, who lives with Jean's mother in the suburbs. Then one day, Francois, played by Gregoire Cola, slips back into their lives. He used to be Jean's colleague, and Sarah's lover. It begins innocuously enough. When Francois offers Jean a job at his sports talent agency. But syrah can't hide her anxiety or her excitement at the prospect of seeing Francois again. And when they finally meet, long repressed memories and desires come surging back. Inevitably, Sarah will succumb to those desires, but the movie, set to a haunting score by the English band Tinder sticks, rings enormous tension from the build up. The title of both sides of the blade evokes the age old question of whether a person can love two people at the same time. And Juliet binoche, so good at revealing complex, contradictory emotions shows us a woman torn between a partner she adores and an ex she can't forget. This is the latest collaboration between binoche and Denis. And it'd make a great double bill with their recent RomCom, let the sunshine in, a much funnier story about a woman's emotional indecision. Binoche is well matched here by van salt vandal, whose handsome weathered face suggests a man who's already lost too much, and can't bear the idea of also losing the woman he loves. Jean is quick to pick up on the warning signs and confronts seurat. I've seen a lot of heated arguments in movies. But few have been acted or shot with this much sustained intensity. Denis is a master of form, and she uses extreme close ups and jagged edits. To suggest that something has broken between these two. Possibly for good. But even as she pulls her characters close, Denise sometimes steps back and examines them from a more critical perspective. As a radio host, seurat interviews a lot of writers and artists. Often about racial and political issues that she doesn't engage with much outside work. Jean's son is a black biracial youth, who's struggling to figure out his future. And there's an awkward but moving scene, in which he and his father talk about race and discrimination. On top of all that, this is one of the few movies shot during COVID that acknowledges the reality of the pandemic. As we can see from the characters repeatedly putting on and taking off their face masks. There's something a little ungainly about how Denise balances her character's romantic anguish, with these bigger picture concerns. But that messiness seems to be the point. Even when illicit desires and shrewd and relationships fall apart, real life doesn't just politely recede into the background. Both sides of the blade wants us to see its characters rage. But it never loses sight of the larger world raging outside their windows. It's a different kind of melodrama and a great one. Justin Chang is the film critic for the LA times. He reviewed the new French melodrama both sides of the blade. On Monday's show, a talk about the largest empire in human history, the British Empire. And the impact it had on its 700 million subjects in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and the Pacific. We talk with historian Caroline Elkins about her new book, legacy of

Juliet binoche Megan Rapinoe Justin Chang Claire Denis Jean George Floyd mad Arbery Breonna Taylor Francois Bo trevi Colin Kaepernick Christine ango Binoche Terry gross Presidential Medal of Freedom Sarah Gregoire Cola Landon Mongo Neil
"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:42 min | 9 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on The Big Picture

"I'm Sean fantasy and this is the big picture, a conversation show about gods and goddesses. Later in today's episode, I have a conversation with the European film deity Claire Denis about her career and her new film both sides of the blade. Honestly, I was very intimidated to speak with Claire. I hope you'll stick around for my conversation with her. She is a legend. First, the big movie event of the weekend is Taika Waititi's latest installment in the MCU Norse God, Thor's story. It's love and thunder, joining me to discuss it another all powerful being its Joanna Robinson hi Joe. Oh hi, Sean. What an intro for me. What an expectation to disappoint people. No, I think you'll be wielding mjolnir with the power of a mighty Thor in this conversation. I gotta say, before we begin, terrible news in the world of movies right before we got ready to record this episode, we got word that James Khan passed away. So before we get into Thor, I just want to I just want to talk. I just want to get some feelings off my chest about Jimmy Kahn if you don't mind and of course willing to hear yours as well. Definitely one of my favorite actors of my lifetime who has been a part of some of my favorite films ever made. He passed away at 82 years old this week. I actually just got a chance to see him in person a few months ago. I saw The Godfather on the big screen, the restored version at paramount on the studio lot, which was one of the best film going experiences in my life. And before that film started, Francis Ford Coppola, Italia Shire and James Kahn spoke about their experience on the movie. And Khan, even though he was in a wheelchair, was in great spirits and also could not hear well, and so he didn't really take any questions or follow any of Coppola's lead. He just talked about what he wanted to talk about. And it was delightful. He was charming and funny and a little weird as he always is and a little threatening, but in like a soft way, he's such a unique actor. He really reminded me of the New York tough guys from The Bronx in my family. And so I always felt like a kind of personal affinity watching him and he wasn't just sunny Corleone, though that's the character that he's probably best remembered for. He had a lot of range he was in musicals and comedies and science fiction movies and he always had this bearing of an athlete and it was best known for Brian's song when he was in roller ball and he was a very believable in those movies as professional athletes. He was a big guy. He wasn't like the Dustin Hoffman or Al Pacino diminutive kind of angsty character actor who became movie star. He was a real handsome strapping movie star in the 1970s who had great taste who always worked with great filmmakers Altman and Norman Jewison, Alan bakula. He worked with John Wayne and Howard hawks and El Dorado in the 60s. He worked with Jon Favreau. He worked with what Wes Anderson. He's got a 6 decade career. He directed movies, he made this movie called in haydn play in sight in 1980, which is really, really great. He was in misery, which was just on the rewatchables as Paul Sheldon, who was fantastic, the gambler, freebie and the bean. I mean, he really had an extraordinary career. He's somebody I just was always so happy to see.

Sean fantasy Taika Waititi Joanna Robinson James Khan Jimmy Kahn Claire Denis Italia Shire James Kahn Claire Francis Ford Coppola Sean Joe Coppola Khan Corleone Bronx Alan bakula Dustin Hoffman Al Pacino Norman Jewison
"claire denis" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

05:49 min | 11 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Pandemic hangover type thing or what, but I'm, you know, mildly excited about the Thor, love and thunder. So I'd put that at number 5 for me. The Elvis movie from baz luhrmann, I'm still really intrigued by I know you have your skepticism when it comes to lower men. But Elvis, I'm going to see what I'm going to see what we've got there. Could be interesting. Here's a really under the radar one that popped up only to me on in my research. And it's Neptune frost, which is coming to theaters June 3. I'm just going to read this description from IndieWire Jude dry. Again, writing on IndieWire, the experimental afrofuturist musical from multidisciplinary artist Saul Williams and anasa Yemen defies categorization, which is what makes it so exciting and confounding. Part contemporary operetta part anarchist sci-fi saga, the dream like tale follows a gender shifting soothsayer and an off the grid hacker enclave as they Dodge the ravages of a senseless resource war. So after I've recovered from men, hopefully I will be ready for Neptune frost, which just sounds possibly quite dazzling. Crimes of the future, the new cronenberg, that's my second most anticipated, of course, which we've mentioned, I think, comes out in June, and then Jordan Peele's nope is at the top of my list. Can not wait. Okay. Well, you said anything could be great, and I was all in on that bubbly optimism, Josh. I was going to adopt it. It was going to be my whole new mantra. Not your right movies on life. Really? So struck a chord and then you mentioned baz luhrmann's Elvis and does not hold does not hold. No, I know I can't go there. My top 5, well, I've got a top four and we've mentioned all of them. So I don't really have a lot to add. If I was going just strictly in order of the movies I most want to see, at number four, I'd have the Miller, 3000 years of longing. Number three men, the Alex Garland film, we're going to talk about next week. Number two, or no, it's really number one. Okay, fine. I'm going to go nope at number two. And yeah, damn it. I'm going Top Gun: Maverick at number one. I mean, at this point, you kind of have to. Yeah, I have to. My number 5 might either be the cronenberg though. Oh man, we talked about horror earlier, body horror makes me makes me squirm even more of course. So I'll be watching that with my eyes closed. I am, of course, very curious about the new Claire Denis as well talked about that a little was Steve procope last week as it's playing the Chicago critics film festival here coming up. The music box is called both sides of the blade. All I need to hear is that Juliet bonos is in it, but then Vincent London in it as well so good in teton. Last year, but maybe Josh, I would go with a little more populous choice. I am intrigued by the gray man, July 15th theaters, streaming on Netflix on the 22nd. I'm seeing some things about how it's supposed to be like Netflix's big tentpole movie of the year, their most expensive movie to date, which doesn't usually give me much confidence, but it comes to us from the Russo brothers and really why I'm excited is that it's a spy movie, which I'm usually a sucker for. Starring Ryan Gosling. You throw in Chris Evans and their former assassins or they formerly worked together at the CIA and now they're tracking each other sort of a cat and mouse game. I like those performers a lot. Add in on a day armus, Regé-Jean Page, who many may remember from the first season of Bridgerton. I have a feeling I will be plopping myself down on the couch if not in the theater around July 22nd to see the gray man on Netflix. And I suppose I have one other question. I'll stick in the art house here and I'll give you one more question, which is, am I ready for a Peter Strickland comedy? Peter Strickland. The filmmaker behind barbarian sound studio behind the duke of burgundy. There might be some elements in both of those films you would describe as humorous. I don't know what they would be, but if I remember someone could possibly pick out a few interesting scenes and then he's got a new film out called flux Gourmet, this is the description. Set at an institute devoted to culinary and alimentary performance. A collective finds itself embroiled in power struggles, artistic vendettas, and gastrointestinal disorders. So going to be a little bit of a head scratcher, as you would expect from Strickland, seems like it might make you a little bit uncomfortable at times as we talk about stomach problems in those gastrointestinal disorders. And yet it's supposed to be funny, Josh. Summer blockbuster sounds like stereotypical summer blockbuster to me. Apparently so those are our top 5 summer movie questions. We would love to hear your most anticipated summer movies and the questions you have, you can email us feedback at film spotting .NET. Josh, that's our show. If you want to connect with us on Facebook, Twitter and letterbox, you can do so at film spotting and at Larsen on film. In the show archives at film spotting .NET, you can find reviews, interviews and top 5s going back to 2005. You can also vote in the current film spotting poll, which looks ahead to the summer movie season. We're asking what summer movie are you most anticipating? Jordan Peele's nope or nope, something else. Torture show t-shirts or other merch, visit film spotted dot net slash shop, and you can subscribe to our weekly newsletter at film spotting .NET.

baz luhrmann Jordan Peele Peter Strickland Josh Netflix Saul Williams IndieWire Steve procope Juliet bonos Vincent London Alex Garland Yemen Elvis Claire Denis Jean Page teton Ryan Gosling Miller Chris Evans Russo
"claire denis" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

08:40 min | 11 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on Filmspotting

"That I can't resist. I didn't kill my wife. I don't care. I heard a little bit of it there, and you're out. I don't care. We also heard from Andrea weaver. How could it be anything but the fugitive? Nothing beats Harrison Ford trying to outwit Tommy Lee Jones. I saw this movie for the first time when I was very young and never forgot it. I admit that my choice may be influenced by my childhood fear of a one armed man mixed with the nostalgia of my first grown-up movie, but I'm more inclined to believe that it's the exceptional storyline and acting. Either way, doctor Kimball is the best movie doctor doing not so doctor Y things and I challenge anyone, including the U.S. Marshals to disagree. Oh, you don't want that fight. Edwin are not as much as I enjoy the Frankenstein options and the fugitive. Only one of these options is directed by Stanley Kubrick. Concise. I like it. Always a good factor to consider. We heard from Dylan DOM as well. I will come in support of doctor zhivago while it's long and meandering, and I can't remember most of what happens. I wish we still got big movies like this that seem to take a whole week to finish. This was David Lean at the height of his powers, and while this film may have been a bit too excessive, when it hit, it hit hard, including one of the most heartbreaking movie endings ever. And who hasn't had Lara's theme stuck in their head a couple dozen times. Here's Beverly Lieberman, last couple comments here. I decided to go with my heart and my childhood love for swashbucklers. I voted for captain blood because I've always had a space for Errol Flynn. He's a perfect romantic lead, handsome, charming, willing and able to deal with the circumstances and his scenes with Olivia De Havilland are to swoon for. Captain blood really good. Our last comment comes from Brian Friesen. Doctor Hannibal lecter in Silence of the Lambs is another option that came to mind. Although he does perform surgery on a policeman's face at one point in the let's not talk about it. How about we just, we just move on, thanks, Brian. Let's move on to our new deeply flawed film spotting poll. I don't know. Is this one possible for this one to be flawed? I'm sure if anybody could find a way, it's our producer, Sam, and it's on our listeners to point out those flaws. We're looking ahead to our summer movie preview that could come next week, or it might be the following week. We still got some details here to work out with the schedule behind the scenes on film spotting. But while we're working those out, we've got a straightforward film spotting pull. There's only two options. What is your most anticipated film of the summer movie season? Josh, the choices are. Yep, it's nope. Or nope, it's something else. So did everybody listening follow that? I can't see this causing any problems whatsoever. No, any confusion, this will be very easy, simple. We'll have no complaints. Yeah, it's either Jordan Peele's nope. Or nope, it's something else. And if you're not voting for nope, we want to know what is your most anticipated film of the summer, you can write it in the comments. We may feature it here on the show in the coming weeks. I mean, we've got new films from cronenberg, Claire Denis, Terrence Davies. I don't really care about Jurassic World, but how about Top Gun: Maverick? How about it? That's the reason Josh that I can't, I can't vote for no, I'm going off something else. It's maverick. Good luck with that. We also have baz luhrmann's Elvis movie and pass. I don't know how, yeah, I know. You're giving up. Never been a fan, probably. I don't know how this ended up on the list, but apparently there's an Adam Sandler basketball movie called hustle that has went, I mean, talk about whiplash for the Sandler experience. It went from being the potential penalty for the loser in our in-house film spotting prediction poll for film spotty madness to suddenly being an option for a most anticipated movie of the summer. Adventure. I know. And yet it does seem like it might be good enough. It's not going to be the punishment for Mike merrigan this year. Our film swatting madness loser. Who knows? Maybe even he'll get a review on the show. When was the last Sandler movie that got a review on the show other than Uncut Gems? Yeah, that's gotta be it, right? You can vote in that poll now and leave a comment at film spotting dot. Net. So, you want to join the Internet still has all my horror game. We can't be able to responsible for what you become. All you have to do to get started is cave to change. I don't know what to expect. I want to go to the world's fair. I want to go to the world's fair. I want to go to the world's fair. Okay, Josh, busy guy last week, fitting in all the movies. You not only saw the new Doctor Strange. You also caught up with a movie. You want to nominate for the golden brick award. It's called we're all going to the world's fair. The feature debut of filmmaker Jane schonbrunn and it debuted at last year's Sundance currently available to rent on most platforms. In your letter box review, you described it as the nightmare version of Bo Burnham's 8th grade. That movie scared me enough. So I don't know what to make of we're all going to the world's fair. Give us some thoughts. Why is it a golden brick potential contender? Yeah, I mean, that doesn't mean to imply 8th grade was sunny. I think it leaned sunny, though, and this leans disparity. You could almost maybe qualify it as a horror movie, actually. And the similarity to 8th grade is that it basically follows a teenager named Casey played by Anna Cobb, who is very, very good. She's seems very lonely as far as we know, no friends in her life. Her father, who she seems to be, the only person she lives with is an offscreen sort of threatening presence. She is online all the time. So there's a similarity, right? With 8th grade. And at the beginning of the movie, this really engrossing fix shot from the vantage point of her webcam, she joins this online horror game. And the game supposedly instigates these strains transformations in its players, Casey goes on to document this or it's never quite clear, maybe invents what's happening to her in videos that then she makes and uploads on the Internet. So it goes in a little different direction from 8th grade from there and I think for me, it's going to depending on where you are generationally and your relationship with the Internet, it's going to hit you differently. For me, as someone who did not grow up with this sort of stuff, it was this eye opening, but incisive from what I can remember from being that age, really deep dive into adolescent alienation. And then considers how that may be accentuated by the Internet, but this isn't like an Internet fear factor thing, you know? It's almost like people who have a deep need for community and connection now have this tool for seeking it, that can in some ways be good, but in other ways be really destructive and harmful. So that's why it's sort of the horror vision, the nightmare version I should say. But in terms of being a golden brick contender, it's a lot about the filmmaking. And Sean bruns, just their approach to capturing another generational thing is that teenagers are sort of online teenagers. I should say, they're necessarily filmmakers, right? They have to be, they have to be aware of adjusting lighting in their bedrooms, which KC does. And she has these day glow decals that add this psychedelic effect. She puts her laptop at one point on a swivel chair to achieve just the right angle for recording herself while she sleeps. These are all filmmaking choices that she is making as a character, but are also reflected in what shown run is making as a filmmaker. So that sort of stuff fascinated me, I'm very eager to now that I've kind of watched it and had my take. I know it's been out for a little while in theaters and is now on digital, but to follow up with other people and get their impressions on where this goes because there is a lot of ambiguity towards the end of the movie, I'll just say without spoiling anything that Casey does get connected with this mysterious figure named J L B, who that's all I'm going to say..

Andrea weaver Dylan DOM Beverly Lieberman Brian Friesen Josh Jordan Peele Terrence Davies Tommy Lee Jones U.S. Marshals David Lean Harrison Ford Olivia De Havilland Sandler Stanley Kubrick Mike merrigan Errol Flynn Hannibal lecter Kimball Claire Denis Edwin
"claire denis" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

05:36 min | 11 months ago

"claire denis" Discussed on Filmspotting

"She's even better here. There's some really nice supporting work from Leslie Mann and Brad Garrett in this. It's a film about family. It's a film about this very interesting relationship between this mother and daughter in this guy. This still growing up. It's sort of a coming of age story in a lot of ways. It's a beautiful little film. We're very, very excited. We got it to open the festival and that Cooper raif is coming in. So yeah, great, great debut film from him that was golden brick contender here on film spotting shithouse. Yes. I wasn't sure if I was allowed to say shit house. So I guess I can. You're allowed. You're allowed. Give us all the time. Go for it and we can't say what might happen to you. That's all right. One film we always are trying very hard to find some of the best documentaries we can. We have a great one called hold your fire, which I think eventually is going to end up on showtime playing Sunday, may 15th at 7 15. The filmmaker, a guy named Stefan Forbes, is going to be there in attendance. It basically is about the incident that birthed the modern day hostage negotiation practice. Brooklyn in 1973, I believe it's right in the sort of the shadow of Attica. And a lot of the people on both sides of this negotiation are still alive. So they have new interviews with most of the major players in this incident and it's fascinating. And it's a little scary to watch sometimes because this was in the, like I said in the wake of Attica where pretty much every negotiating tactic went wrong, if you saw the documentary Attica that was on showtime last year, it's a perfect companion piece to it. And it's a tense. It's like I didn't really know how this was going to end. I didn't know this story. So it is tense, it is like it is dramatic storytelling at its best in the documentary form. There's another documentary I'm really intrigued by because it's the Doc debut of filmmaker ramin bahrani. Second chance, yes, that's another one from Sundance. That's a terrific terrific film. I dare you to watch the trailer because the first thing that happens in the trailer is a guy in a bulletproof vest shoots himself in the chest. It's a guy named Richard Davis who invented what is essentially the modern day bulletproof vest. So it's about his career and obviously if it was just about a guy who made bulletproof vests, it wouldn't be much of a movie. This guy has a shady as hell story to tell. There's a very fascinating story about this guy who's basically living the American Dream and then sabotages himself as we find out he does has many times in his life. So yeah, but ramin barani, I wasn't, it took me a while to see the connection between this film and many of his other films about the American Dream from a certain angle or the American Dream gone very poorly for some people. It's a terrific movie called second chance. And that's playing Sunday, may 15th at noon. So it would be the first film that day. Claire Denis, another big name who I don't believe will be attending the fest. That would be something. But she has a film playing the fest. Yeah, when we saw it, it was called fire, but now it's called both sides of the blade and it stars her recent favorite actress Juliet bonos, as well as Vincent London, who was just into tan recently and just killed in that movie, and he's also very good here, but that's happening. Actually, that's going to be right after the ramin bahrani film. That'll be Sunday May 15th at 2 p.m.. So that's an excellent double feature. Yeah, that's the afternoon I have circled on my calendar largely for the Denis and I know I'm not in for a comfortable viewing, but I will definitely be challenged and am always open to what she has ready to throw my way. I can recommend one of the films I've seen that's playing the fest. It's one of those films playing on the last day. I think on Thursday, that's good luck to you, Leo grand. Which has really wonderful performance by Emma Thompson that let's just say I think a lot of people will be talking about definitely. And then honestly, it's a two person film. It's basically just the two of its Emma Thompson in this guy named Darrell McCormick. They are wonderful together and I've never seen him before, but he's a male prostitute that she hires. She's a widow. And retired school teacher and she is just trying to figure out what good sex even could be, whether let alone a she can actually experience or not. I honestly think the reaction to this film is going to really depend on what you bring to it. I think it's gonna really just in your relationship to sex. So yeah, and you're right. It's a wonderful film. I can easily see Emma Thompson getting being talked about at the end of the year awards season. So yeah, it's that good and she's tremendous in it. I can honestly say I don't think I've ever seen her the way you see her here. No, that is for sure, unless there's something that I have, I have dramatically overlooked the Chicago critics film festival, runs may 13th through the 19th. It does take place at the music box theater here in Chicago, and you can get more info and tickets at Chicago critics, film festival, dot com. Thank you, Steve, as always,.

Attica Cooper raif Stefan Forbes Brad Garrett Leslie Mann ramin bahrani ramin barani Juliet bonos Richard Davis Vincent London Emma Thompson Brooklyn Claire Denis Leo grand Darrell McCormick Denis Chicago Steve
"claire denis" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"claire denis" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Cut fourth, the piano third and yeah, I'm with Sophie. I got bright star at two. Whether it feels like the campion outlier or not, here's our friend Lisa Nelson. She's in navasota, Texas. She says, I just finished my rewatch of the transcendent rights star and I'd forgotten just how lovely a film it is. Slowly and ever so carefully, the movie puts it spell on you until you like Fannie and keats are entirely under its power. You are swept up in its vivid poetry, it's manic mood swings and it's enchanting lyrical beauty. It makes you feel the intensity of first love in the dire heartache of the prospect of losing that love. But in the end, we are left with the sheer magic of those stolen semi private moments between Fannie and keats where they are sharing a knock between rooms or a clever game of red light green light. It is truly my favorite camping film and one of the best romances ever committed to celluloid, take that Josh Lisa didn't say that. Thanks for suggesting the rewatch, Lisa did say, yeah, bright star, I couldn't agree more, though I don't think I could have said it as well as Lisa just did. It's my number two, and if there's an additional half tier, I'm just saying slightly higher, deserving of that number one spot. Power of the dog. Wow. You said she's at the peak of her powers. I think you're right. Wow. I mean, obviously, you know, I don't know why I'm so surprised. I've got ranked number two, but did not think you would go that's a really interesting ranking to go from power the dog to bright star. More power, lovely film. I think that's a perfect word for it more power to those who do love it. I'll just reiterate, especially in the context of this overview, what I think I said when we reviewed it is if I'm feeling comfortable during a camping film, something's not entirely right. And that's just such a comforting movie, not in the context of that film and that experience, nothing wrong with that. But as we're looking at this career as a whole, I just can't rank it quite that high, putting it last does not mean I dislike it. No mischaracterization will I allow here by you or something. I hope all of your English professors back in school have disavowed you. That's what I think Josh. I think that's what you deserve. Okay, we'll see. I'll check in with them. More about the campaign Uber review at film spotting dot net slash campion. You can also learn about our previous overview our inaugural overview devoted to the work of Christopher Nolan. Are we going to continue this in 2022, Josh? Probably. Yeah, I hope it's been rewarding so far. We do have new films from the likes of, Claire Denis, Martin Scorsese, though that would be a long project. Oh my gosh. David Fincher, Terrence malick, Richard linklater among others. I don't have a horse in this race yet. I think we also put out on our website. I think we did throw out maybe Denis Villeneuve, though that was an option really when we were leading up to dune, though he is a filmmaker whose work I'd like to revisit in order, I think, at some point, as I said, don't really have a favorite right now, Josh, don't know if you do, but if our listeners do, or you have a better suggestion, we'd love to hear it. You can send that along with any other thoughts about this show to feedback and film spotting .NET. I mean, I'd love to do scorcese because I want to be a completed, but as you suggested, that would be a lot to take on Claire Denis is probably another one that sounds really appealing, but there might be others. So basically the context is if there is a major filmmaker who has a new release coming out in 2022, preferably probably from June on. So we'd have time to do this. Suggest their name. And we might be able to catch up or revisit their entire filmography leading up to that release. That is the end of our show. If you want to continue the conversation on Facebook, Twitter, or letterboxed, Adam is at film spotting I'm at Larsen on film. Over in the show archives at film spotting .NET. You can find reviews interviews and top 5s going back to 2005. You can also vote in the current film spotting poll. We want to know what is the best film of 2021. To order show t-shirts or other merch visit film spotting .NET slash shop, and you can subscribe to our weekly newsletter. At film spotting .NET slash newsletter. Out in wide release this weekend national champions about a star quarterback who ignites a player strike hours before the biggest game of the year in order to fight for fair compensation. And yes, you can now finally see in theaters. The movie that we saw and recommended on last week's show, Steven Spielberg's west side story..

keats navasota Fannie Josh Lisa Lisa Nelson Lisa Josh Claire Denis Sophie Denis Villeneuve Texas campion Christopher Nolan Terrence malick Richard linklater David Fincher Martin Scorsese Adam Twitter Facebook
"claire denis" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"claire denis" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"A relationship that women's wear daily perhaps a little harshly called one of mutual exploitation. We could also just go win win yanni. That's a little harsh. And this article. Featured a number of top olympic athletes including five time olympian swimmer missy franklin whose photographed in a swimsuit by none other than her sponsors beato with whom she was about to launch her very own line of swimsuits. Now when win and speed is still in arguably the number one choice for olympic swimmers that the most decorated athlete in olympic history. Michael phelps war. Speedo his epic twenty two olympic gold. Cross the two thousand four two thousand eight and twenty twelve games. He has twenty eight metals and total. Well this kind of speaks to the incredible success of the brand which has really been at the forefront of swimwear innovation since day one of the modern olympic games. Because we've talked about speeders contributions to swim wear spanning all the way back to the nineteen twenties when they produce their groundbreaking non wool razorback swimsuit. Which took claire denis to olympic gold in nineteen thirty two and. I just want to point out and point back to that episode that she was almost disqualified from this because her suit showed too much shoulder blade and that is not the last speedo controversy. We will have no so moving into the nineteen fifties up began using nylon and their swimsuits producing nylon alasdair swimsuits. By the nine thousand. Nine hundred seventy s and these really changed the game by making swimwear way more water resistant. There are other fabric. Innovations include introducing the world's first chlorine resistant fabric called endurance. And that was in one thousand nine hundred four. And then their power plus fabric which is apparently fifty percent lighter than traditional swim fabrics so they just keep innovating innovating and then they have this blocked the burn fabrics which is basically a sunscreen protecting wears from ninety percent of the sun's harmful rate. So i think. I definitely need to get my hands on that. Yes then there's also the fast. Skin family of elite speedo swimsuits which company tout's as having been quote recognized by the smithsonian institute for advanced technology and other innovations That speedo sites include quote.

olympic missy franklin beato Michael phelps olympic gold claire denis olympic games sun smithsonian institute for adva
"claire denis" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"claire denis" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"A podcast roby explored the who what when of why we wear. We are fascists. Orients and your host april kellyanne cassidy zachary so today dress listeners. We continue our exploration into the historical significance of drafts to the summer olympic athlete. Which if we were not clear in the first episode it is the summer not winter olympics. Which are the focus of this series and we are certainly fans of the winter olympics as well but that little dance around. The ice is gonna have to wait until february of next year when the twenty fourth winter olympics opened in beijing so stay tuned for an episode on the evolution of figure skating at tire. Which has a very intimate and surprising connection with fashion. We have been meaning to get to this episode for quite some time. Yes super excited so much. Look forward to including this episode as we will learn today. The fashion industry has played no small role in both the winter and summer olympics over the years while we might be familiar with the partnership between the world of fashion and the olympics. Today for instance ralph. Lauren has of course been the official outfitter of the us olympic and paralympic team since two thousand eight. This was not yet a relationship that had formed at the time of the nineteen twenty eight olympics. Which is where we left off an art last episode so today we pick up four years later at the nineteen thirty two olympics which we pinpoint as really laying the foundation for the symbiotic relationship between this international sporting event and the fashion industry that survives to this very day the games of the tenth summer olympia which were held in los angeles from july thirtieth to august fourteenth nineteen thirty two were notable for many reasons including the introduction of features that remain staples of the olympics. Today for instance the tenth olympiads length of sixteen days is particularly noteworthy here because prior to this the shortest summer games had been seventy nine days law. Which is i said. Last time i would totally watch days of the olympics and also The summer olympics in nineteen thirty two were also the first olympics to feature that tiered. Winner's podium that we all know and love and also the olympic village although the latter at this time was reserved for the male athletes and the women athletes stayed at a very luxurious hotel called chapman park in her oral interview with the la eighty. Four foundation american hurdler. Evelyn hall adams says quote. I was also really honored when i was selected as the friendliest girl in the village. I love this. I do too. I enjoyed changing costumes. Are changing our regular clothes. Sometimes we even changed uniforms back and forth. I changed with one of the german girls. Tilly fleischer. I wore her costume for pictures and she wore mine. I also changed with one of the japanese girls. This was only for pictures because we only had one uniform and couldn't trade them. But i did trade all my own clothes and all the jewelry i had. Which wasn't much and as exemplified by the trading of uniforms staying together. And these close quarters really fostered a sense of camaraderie between athletes were otherwise competitors. This success in the nineteen thirty two olympics was quite an impressive accomplishment considering took place during the great depression which is of course the huge economic downturn that wreaked havoc on the world beginning with the us stock market crash in nineteen twenty nine so despite the global reverberations of the depression thirty seven nations managed to send thirteen hundred plus athletes of which one hundred twenty six four women to compete in la with over one hundred events for comparison. This is just less than half of the athletes in amsterdam games which had preceded it and apparently getting these athletes to america. It was not easy. Some countries like brazil and cuba did not have the money to their athletes to la for their nineteen seventy two olympics so they sent them with goods like coffee beans and sugar hoping that they could trade their way in and apparently this worked for the brazilians but not for the cubans who sadly nine entry into the us because the value of sugar had gone down and not cover their expenses. Heartbreaking of just say heartbreaking so the depression definitely kept some athletes from the competition but the same cannot be apparently said of the spectators because some one hundred thousand people the most people in the audience in olympic history up until this point packed the stadium for the opening ceremony really eager to forget their woes in the midst of the depression and they really wanted to support the international spectacle of all prowess that was about to begin. Oh yeah and each country's athletes came to perform and perform they. Did the japanese swim team. For instance swept all of this swimming events but one there was a japanese swimmer by the name of casula kitamura who became the youngest male ever to win olympic gold. When it just fourteen he took first place in the fifteen hundred meter. Freestyle gold medal wins are also achieved by american swimmer. Helen madison who won gold in the one hundred meter and four hundred meter freestyle events and the four by one hundred freestyle relay and american track and field star. Mildred babe dietrichsen bay was her nickname. Took home the gold in both a javelin throw the high hurdles and then she took home silver in the high jump and it is said that babe dietrichsen would undoubtedly have security even more battles had women not thin limited to participating in only up to three events so mildred is really considered to be one of the greatest all around women athletes in his street. She excelled at not only track and field but also basketball baseball and golf and cass. As you know there. Is this very epic photo of her. At the tenth olympia snapped just a few moments before. She launches the javelin and she is wearing kind of the me to us now. White tank and shorts you know as her uniform and the red and blue. Us insignia on her chest as well as a stripe running across your chest and on the side of her shorts. Yeah so this is the uniform that we've seen many years prior worn by both men and women which honestly had not changed much since the debut of the modern olympics in eighteen ninety six but it is worth noting that at these first games and kind of after those first couple of games the uniform of t shirt and shorts would have been worn by male athletes. Only as women were not even allowed to participate in the eighteen ninety six games but even if they had there is no way in eight women would have been allowed to wear garments that revealed so much of their body. Yes but that would change. As more and more women came to participate in the olympics for women to become winning athletes for their nation they had to have clothing. That helped not hindered their performance. And we've talked about this on the show in the past. But i find it super interesting that it is actually women's stage performers and athletes who set the proverbial stage for all of these innovations in women's clothing that happened beyond the sporting arena. You know and they do this year sometimes. Even decades before clothing such as pants shorts tank tops etc became societally acceptable forms of dress for women and i mean even just one decade prior mildred bear arms and legs would have been downright shocking and perhaps in many ways it still was april because it was also at the nineteen thirty two olympics that this sixteen year old australian swimmer claire denis who actually won the gold medal and the two hundred meter breaststroke get this. She was almost disqualified for showing not quote.

olympics kellyanne cassidy zachary olympic chapman park depression Evelyn hall adams Tilly fleischer roby la Us olympia paralympic beijing casula kitamura Lauren ralph Freestyle gold medal Helen madison
Robert Pattinson, Claire Dini And Denise discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

03:04 min | 4 years ago

Robert Pattinson, Claire Dini And Denise discussed on Filmspotting

"Robert Pattinson again in cleared unease highlife, we chatted with the great Claire Dini earlier in the show talking about her experience working with Robert Pattinson among other topics. I'm curious if anything she said helped you process highlife further or better, Scott. This is a movie you have seen twice is that. Okay. So you've had a couple goes at this film, definitely on one level, very simple film, but a complex film. She is not interested as a filmmaker in spoon. Feeding you anything. There are a lot of different strands and ideas thrown out in this movie. Sometimes they're thoroughly explored sometimes they're not sometimes they're introduced, and you have to do the work to figure out how that may fit into some of the larger themes, and ideas, she's exploring we've mentioned this that it's only her second. Some people say, it's her first English language film. But actually trouble every day is a movie that is largely in English still as she. Touched on. It's not familiar to her. It's not how she normally works and certainly genre. She's not used to working in though, she is working with one of her usual collaborators, not only actually on the music tender sticks. But jump all far Joe who co wrote the film with D as he usually does I bring all that up to ask you sort of where you put this film in Denise larger body of work not worried so much about the ranking. But is this a movie that you consider up there with her best films? I'm not sure about that. I wouldn't necessarily go that far though, it certainly helped see it a second time to clarify my thoughts on a little bit. I think it's one of her more difficult films. Relishes interesting to me that that you have this movie that is surely her largest swing as far as a US audience might be concerned, it has Robert Pattinson than the lead is science fiction, though. She will deny that characterization. Yeah. I don't think we use the word. We did not read another thing. We've would've. That for good reason. But yeah, so it's it's difficult. It's difficult film. It's not necessarily one that I would start with you. If you've never seen the clear Janie movie, I would kind of go with something like Friday night or thirty five shots of rum, which are much simpler love stories, but it has it has all those elements that you expect from her movies, the elliptical use of time the gives you a lot to unpack. I mean, I was not surprised and also kind of grateful that she didn't try to unpack her her own movies. Not really that type. I think she really wants to give audiences a chance to experience it and kind of groove on the associated qualities of the film. So I appreciate that in as far as my own reaction to highlight is concerned. I appreciate it as much for what it isn't than what it is. It's such a defiant film as far as a movie goes about space travel. We are used to movies about space being sterile cold emotionless. And here's. A movie that is that opens with the shot of a garden and then cuts to a shot of a crying, baby.

Robert Pattinson Claire Dini Denise Scott JOE United States Janie