20 Burst results for "Civis"

Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

The Bio Report

06:16 min | 11 months ago

Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

"Lou thanks for joining us. It's great to be here. We're GONNA talk about Regenerative Medicine Third DA- positive and your efforts to improve the ability of bones to heal. I'd like to start with your own journey and how you became involved in the field of regenerative medicine. A West Point graduate. Masters in Chemical Engineering in a PhD in biological engineering from MIT. You've also got twenty years of active military service and earned both a combat action badge and a Bronze Star medal. How did you come to West Point? When did your interest in science begin? Were A. it's an interesting trajectory. One would necessarily recommend to others perceive career in science, but It's been quite a right unless but the. Interest really started the early school. In I always knew I wanted to devote my life to science, but about round the time that I was graduating high school light. I got an niche to prove myself physically maybe militarily, so I I decided to go to West Point. Actually provided a very good foundation for my Further studies later on in science had the bigger and and kind of engineering focus, West Point, being engineering school originally, and still is, so. It provided a good backdrop for me to continue my studies after. After finishing a West Point. Military service included time in Iraq. How much of your time was an active military zone? Right so after finishing west point. Miami actually was lucky enough to receive a hertz, Foundation Fellowship, this foundation that that pays for regular school in the in the sciences. And that allowed me to remain on active duty, but to pursue graduate school, and then after that. Two years than I was reassigned to units were traditionally tactical. Army units, and that included time both US industry said in Iraq so I a deployed with the First Cavalry Division to Iraq as an intelligence officer and. That tour was a little over a year, but that period of time between the masters in the was about a five year period of time. What was your experience in Iraq? So. It was actually in Iraq that that I think this idea crystallized in my mind. You know what it is that I. WanNa do in science. A lot of people come in. To a scientific field and maybe have a question about what direction to take so many options, but. What I saw there and what I almost nearly experienced myself several times. You know these injuries that lead to lifelong. Disability. Several if he was serving with head injuries. For example to the limbs lower limbs. I'M GONNA. Get back to the states. Medical scientists able to save their lives, but some of them suffered amputation, and the now have lifelong disability, and all that was due to the fact that there really wasn't anything out there to regenerate tissues, so that that ideas what motivated when I got back from Iraq to to go back to mit again under the leadership to the the focus on this idea, precise tissue regeneration. How much contact had you had with with people who who became amputee? Well after I got back, I did have a lot more interactions with folks in the region near the Walter Reed. Military Medical Hospital. Just others that had served with who who had suffered injuries so. It was a period of time in two, thousand, five, six, seven, eight. Where you know, there were really a surgeon so more and more people that had served with people that they knew. Were suffering injury. So you know it's a close knit community end up. Seeing many of them again. You returned to mit to earn a PhD in biological engineering. What was the work you did there? How did it connect? Sure so when I went back, the army gives you three years basically to do a PhD so I knew I had to hit the ground running. And and have a plan for what to do and MIT's department of biological engineering was very. Welcoming and said you don't pick the professor that you want to work with also a worked with Linda, Griffith, who is really Tinier in the field of regenerative? Medicine Tissue Engineering. Actually! She was a post doc in the Bob Langer's lap. Developed the ear on the back of the mass back in the ninety S. So you know real rich tradition of tissue engineering there it was on her group that I was able to focus on this idea for good delivery of proteins to induce the body to regenerate tissue. was well understood why these? Soldiers. Who would come home would. have their lives save, but then end up losing limbs. That's a great question. It's something that maybe doesn't get a lot of attention so if you injure limb. Normally. That injury affects bone. Can AFFEC-, nerves and vessels, if any one of those tissues doesn't heal properly. Then you end up with a limb? That isn't usable. Actually becomes a burden to you and the medical guidance is that what's recommended? Amputation, which is a? This is amazing to me that you would. Basically discard limp because one of the wires is not the NACCHIO correct Civis, so to me I wanted to. Address a problem on a very detailed level this Aitken we regenerate? Let's say bone so now. You can save a bit if if the problem is that the bonus inhale. So. It's a piece wise approach to try to salvage alums. What are bone void fillers? And how are they used

Iraq West Point MIT Regenerative Medicine Third Army Tissue Engineering LOU Military Medical Hospital Bob Langer Aitken Foundation Fellowship Walter Reed Miami United States First Cavalry Division Officer
The Care and Feeding of Data Scientists

Linear Digressions

07:47 min | 1 year ago

The Care and Feeding of Data Scientists

"Talking about data signs management. This is something we've been China about for a while leading wrote and a Riley report together on this very topic a few months ago and and thought it would be worthwhile to get in and talking through. So that's what we're doing today talking about once. You have a data science team in place. How do you keep those learning? How do you keep them growing? How do you think about moving along in their careers? All that good stuff. So you're listening to the year diversions in our last couple of episodes which listen to strongly recommend that you go back and pick goes up by a little bit of recap here so we talked a little bit about getting into data science and the different types of data scientists. How you assemble a team and why it's so important to get the right blood in your team once you have? The team assembled or you. How kind of critical mass us most of your time? These days is not your managerial time by not beyond hiring. But it's instead on growing your not making sure that they're learning and they're sticking around. They're happy hair progressing in their careers. You say yes yes yes sorry you can't you can't you can't hear me now so and this was something that we it's your three chapters to talk about if I recall correctly because it's really important and it's a for me this the the stuff. That's not always obvious because sometimes if you're a good manager you're working super hard and but people don't see the things that you're you know fighting for the process of the you're putting in place two two happy I don't know maybe maybe it's a little bit cynical but sometimes given the only time you hear about is when people are unhappy with their happy sounds about right. Yeah I I think that's just as of nature of the beast so but when we were together we together for a couple of years. I remember even when I started at that job. There was a lot of. There's a lot of stuff that was in place when I write the action that you were part of starting some of this certainly part of of continuing the things that have been started before your time of that created a really nice learning environment and so I think that now upon on reflection I realized how important that was for me as a younger data scientist as a way of learning and and stay happy so if as you can get a little bit of detail about what was the you put in place out of things April so yeah it's funny. I actually don't know that I can take credit for having put in place a lot of the good things that we had But I can't take credit for stealing them and putting them in place in my current company actually But there's actually I think one of my favorite topics at least one of my favorite topics from the book and the way the way we talk about it in the book is kind of this idea of like foam. Oh like fear of missing out that like data scientists really have this feeling that like if they're not using cool new techniques learning things that they're like falling behind and just again anecdotally like I think a Lotta people quit jobs or go from company to company because they feel like they're getting stagnant or they're not learning anything anything or doing anything interesting at their company so some of these things that we had in place to help combat that that feeling that people can have so. What kinds of things are we talking about so we're big fans of of just a simple idea of having a journal Club where folks get together? Read a paper of blog posts. It's like something like that. Maybe they've ideally they've read the paper of the blog post but that's not necessarily mandatory and get together and discuss it Someone who has like selected the paper could maybe give the short presentation but really you can just do it over lunch and spend an hour talking about a paper blog post like learning something new dirty secret. You never read the paper. I know what I was GONNA say. Everyone has been very often but every once in a while I'll realized that Journal Club is on a topic that I wanted to do on podcast anyway and then I'll make sure gotta check. Oh all your listeners. Know the secret purchase but and we have like A. I think we find that a great way for people to keep learning stuff but it's also a good opportunity for the company because a lot of interested engineers or analytics people. Oh Com people who are a little bit Interested in getting into the field and it's just a good rates like socialized data science. Like around your your company One thing we've done a few times he's like when we forgot to select paper is to have like a cold. Like Davis is movie night where we will find a talk from an interesting conference. Like Pie de puts video video online a lot of conferences. But there'd be online and we'll just like sit for the hour and like watch talk a conference talk together and I think people often accumulate these lists of things they wanNA watch and they don't have the time for it and that's just another way to get people like watching something Learning something so journal Club thing. That were a big fan of the second one I think is like some sort of dedicated halftime and I definitely did not start this at our previous job and I definitely didn't even come up with the best iteration that I think that we've landed John so I've never three companies that have done halftime we've and seeing many flavors like one flavors like that we at a previous company was like half of every he Friday. You got to do whatever you wanted. Essentially another one has been like what is like a full day full day once a month. I think that's where we're doing a full day once a week at some point either way like that in those like short increments I find. They often don't work very well for two reasons. One people don't aren't able to at the time Apart like it was just half a day every week like you just get pulled in a meeting. So you'd get normal work like you can't actually. You can't actually do it even if it's like a day every other very hard at at the time aside so then we've tried whole team accolades and spending two days like working on something a team. We did cagle competition as a team wants. It's an and that has been fun has advantages but I think the the downside of that is that people can't work on the particular thing that they're interested or they want to learn about. Yeah Yeah So. That's a problem so I think both what we did at Civis and what we do now. Here is the idea of of individual hack weeks. And how often you do them depends is on your company. And what you what you can do. We do them quarterly. But you can. You can even do them once or twice a year but the idea is basically that each person gets to spend a dedicated week on like a hack project and because it's a whole week retire them to treat it like it's a vacation and plan for it like way out in advance and you know people can take a week advocation and get out of meetings and projects so do the same thing with this hack week actually set time aside a week as long enough to make meaningful progress on projects. It's like to actually get end to end on a prototype or try a new software package or open source somethin- and then the last bit is like some kind of bit of accountability to make sure people are actually doing something so Having a slight plan in place ahead of time that people can look at and then doing a presentation to the rest of the team at the end is super important so We do it on Friday as well help like a forty five minute presentation where the person that was on Hack Week. We'll walk the rest the team through what what they've done and so the rest of the team also gets to learn something new and cool but then that person realizes actually have to do something. Because I'm going to get off in embarrassments off. I have nothing to show for my

China Riley Civis Scientist Journal Club Davis Cagle John Forty Five Minute Two Days
"civis" Discussed on Shareable

Shareable

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on Shareable

"And when I kept in touch wasn't following him up menu in rinsing that he was on my nurturing sacred in on my Email list. And then something triggered it was ready to buy and. Guess who we we started to from someone who had kept in touch with him and giving him value of the many many years and the mighties and the Nour's maybes a noise to die. But you don't know what's going to happen in their law in the he dies sixty days ninety days when they ready to buy and they you'll pipeline a future business. I love that an in. It's nice. It's refreshing to hear that because you hear so much of the sales advice that really plies that pressure. And it's like, you know, you wanna jettison people from your Email list, if they're not taking action, and there's there's a whole movement around like this, very no nonsense. You know, you're either enter your out type of mentality. It's really nice actually here the alternate side of that so moving from that. Okay. So now, we've were assuming we've been through the first six steps of the process, we've identified who the audience has had the right messages for them with give him the right type of media brought him in as lead nurtured them. And then we got to the point where friction listen, we're able to move in. Customer. We move into that experience where we're trying to deliver an amazing customer experience. Talks me a little bit about that. Because it doesn't seem like that would be something that would typically fall under a quote unquote, marketing plan that typically falls into the customer experience bucket of things why why do you think that this is part and parcel of the marketing program, that's such an awesome question in a lot of people think that marketing ends off to the silence might right? So we've got we've got the customer's money we've given them the Civis product that's marketing, either with rights I and the answer to that is not wrong very wrong because you've just done the mice difficult and the most expensive part of the price is, and this is where the real money is my this is way. Converting customer who's spending some money with you to converting customer who spending with you, either volume will frequency or whatever this is where the real money is made. Because a lot of people are on the hunt. They they they think very transactional. Rot of delivered the service give me the money. That's it, and that's very much not. So the first concept to really understand is the concept of the unequal Dala. So he's what I made so adult from a customer who's a net promoter someone who's arriving fan. Someone who loves what you do. Someone who refers new business is not equal to a dollar from someone who is kind of a pain in the backside. I pay light. They always complain all of the sort of things though, adult from h of those clients, even though you Bank manager will tell you that the same. They not the same side, we need to be working with optimal customers and. The reason I say that is because we want to generate a tribe of writing fans tribe of raving fans is very different to people who had just transactional and satisfied with what you've done because try try but writing fans Maine's they going to refund you business to you. They going to buy you'll future products and services, they're going to buy from you more frequently they going to.

Nour Civis Maine Dala ninety days sixty days
"civis" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

Twitter Civis sivvy Adelphi assault Doug Amos Dennis Hoffa hughes Adrian forbe
How Civis Analytics Is Building a Data-Driven World

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

05:55 min | 2 years ago

How Civis Analytics Is Building a Data-Driven World

"civis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"No. So Satan, we're told does is work the human beings, you and me and everybody else gets under a skins makes us do things often without us ever knowing that. That's what's happening. Which brings us to this tiny news story that we noticed few months back, maybe describing the work of Satan. Maybe just the actions of human beings and happened in article Russian, scientists Sergei Civis ski and a colleague of his welder, Bella Gustav, what part of a team that was stationed there for years working together and small remote station, but only two Russian TV channels and some sort of exercise room and vibrate. One of them, the scientists really liked reading and the two men got into an application of her books that ended up in the news, and it was also unusual this altercation that we wondered what actually happened like how does something like this go down. And we were unable to find any interviews that they done to return to a novelist. Gerry steinberg? He's rushing, by the way to imagine for us. How this played out? Here's what he wrote. Dear diary, the boys from the hunting have brought in a catch of a dozen emperor penguins and tomorrow, I will make my famous penguin stake in horseradish reduction. Do you know how hard it is reduce a horse radish diary? It is very hard one. The boy said to me gay I live for your emperor penguins steak, and we drank two hundred grams together to celebrate the successful hunt afterwards, I showed him my penguin knife. He said it will take months for the penguins to and then I will make my steak and the boys from the hunt will love me here at the Russian base. There is not much to do internet.

Gerry steinberg Bella Gustav Sergei Civis two hundred grams
"civis" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"You know, you guys look like you probably within these statistics. But is there anybody actually in the room who doesn't use online banking, like don't be shy? If the some crazy reason why you don't like we'd like you to put your hand up now. And nobody did. Okay. So. How about like actually paying bills online? Is there? Anybody who doesn't pay bills online. Well, that's what about shopping online. Anybody doing shopping online? Anybody's still go into a shop like, yeah. Okay. Just just a clarification. Then people did like I'll be interested Laura's, a Mike you're gonna regret putting your hand up right now lady right there who's trying to viciously guy contact with me right now. But like Madam, why do you not go? Why do you not do it online? What do you to show you right there? Yeah. I do pulse. So I also use. Full some race. And it's nice athletes. Looking the malts? It's much easier to call the steel. Yeah. I think I think the difference. What we've seen there is between citizens people are very happy to do Civis online to pay bills that banking out when it's actually a nice experience that you want you want to go into shop you want to touch something. You wanna make sure that it's actually bright view. Then that's very different different set of tools that you need really like posting literally everything Amazon now like literally everything by Amazon, you should see our office. It's carnage Friday resulted in MS deluge. So everyone is is taking the lives that businesses shopping payments online. We've started to see some innovation hit..

Amazon Civis Mike MS Laura
"civis" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on Pod Save America

"You can find information about ballot measures in the candidates on your ballot and make a plan to vote you can figure out exactly when you're gonna vote where you're gonna vote we'll send you personal reminders on your calendars. There is no excuses. No, excuse also are pals at Civis analytics, this is some of the data people that helped Obama win two-term cool nerds cool nerds they've helped us identify twenty house races. And here's the deal with these house races. They are both very close in. They are also cheaper media markets, which means that if you donate to these races, you'll have a bigger bang for your buck, and you can help these Democrats over the finish line. So we put this link out on Friday. It's votes, America dot com slash donate. And we expect it to you know, hopefully, fundraise a couple couple of hundred thousand dollars six hundred thousand dollars were already at right now believe thanks to you guys since since Friday so and a lot of these candidates in these races. Have reached out to us then and they've been overwhelmed by the support some of them said that like they're almost running out of money these checks came in. And that helps them over the finish line these, you know, racist. We can really went. This means the difference between being unable to respond to Paul Ryan's disgusting super Pac ads or you know, getting your message on the air it meets maybe hiring one last organizer to knock doors to get out there and and to get voters to the polls. So it's like the impact is so big with these nations in this late stage. Yeah. So please donate. All right. Let's get to the very sad and enraging news today on Saturday. A gunman used air fifteen to kill eleven Americans who were attending Bris at Pittsburgh. Synagogue, half dozen more people were wounded the Anti-Defamation League called the shooting at the tree of life synagogue, the single deadliest anti-semitic attack in the history of the United States. The man arrested by thirties told swat team officer that quote, he wanted all Jews to die. And he also had nearly two dozen guns. Reg. To his name because that's what we allow here in the United States tummy. What else do we know about what led to the shooter whose name is Robert Bowers to launch this attack at this particular moment, we know that he believed that the Jews quotes are working destroy America by bringing immigrants, and so I believe that that conspiratorial crazy, whatever you wanna call it belief is directly tied to the idea that you're seeing in the mainstream media that there is a caravan of people coming to invade our country full of gang members. Isis like, the president says, and that George Soros who is a billionaire financier who happens to be Jewish who has been demagogued by the Republican party. For decades is paying for that caravan in like secretly slipping in so doesn't require using a slur to be anti-semitism. If you're talking about globalist are controlling the media or politics. Wchs. We know damn well what you're saying. Steve Bannon, you're saying the Jews are in charge. The globalist Jews are running the media or they're bringing their subverting, our democracy, somehow, this is a disgusting anti-semitic slur. We should call it for what it is. And this has been part and parcel of Republican party's messaging in some places for a long time and Trump is just Nain lining this extremes. Yeah. I mean, I don't think we can emphasize the link to the caravan conspiracy enough here last week. It's our last week Matt gaetz Florida congressman the dumbest person on the fucking planet against is a frat paddle come to life. I believe is love it's line. He is at deplorable idiot. But he's dangerous. Well, again, I mean like so many of these people this is not someone who who knows. But like that genuinely believes this is this is like a rich dude who went to college and everything like that he knows better and he just decided to. Cast his lot with the far right and white nationals Donald Trump because he knew it would help his people who know people might be like this guy knows exactly what he's doing. But he's just doing this purely for his own embassy, and you may have heard of him before because he invited a holocaust denier to be his guest at the state of the union. That's right. So that's what a good guy..

Donald Trump United States Republican party America Civis analytics Obama Anti-Defamation League Pittsburgh Robert Bowers Paul Ryan George Soros Steve Bannon officer president Matt gaetz congressman Florida
"civis" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on EconTalk

"You're conus and they are able to exercise fire greater freedom than the head of the institute your cone of can. I think it's Pracha Cup who says, and I quote you need me and I don't need you. He goes on to shout at your colonels generals, they've got a lot to lose, but the man from home you've taken. Everything is no longer in your power. He is free. Again, this is a direct quote from that chapter and by extension. We note that the deputy minister of state security Civis Jonah, as well as the head of the special equipment section of the ministry of state security. Major General row us Kaluka and finally, the chief of operations at the institute, the Colonel of engineers Yakubov. They're going to have to meet with and lie to Stalin's minister of state security general of a coup of in the same way that the zeks have have lied to your of of their progress of. Yeah, yeah. In other words, the extension of Dante's metaphor of hell is very rich in this novel. And in response to your your original observation, I would keep the Stalin chapters because we see that at the very top at the pinnacle of this triangular power relationship Stalin. Obviously he too is a prisoner. And he's also in some what you know. The other metaphor, the came to my mind besides the for circle is is a web, a spider web of evidence trapped in struggling to get free and Stalin. In some senses, the Weaver of the web, he's the spider at the centre, but he's in tangled in it. Also it so many so many ways in the, you know, there's another chapter you could do without in in theory, which is the extraordinarily brilliant chapter where the there's a propaganda lecture, Ron, Stalinist theory. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. And it has no content to the lecture, but of course it it seems grand and important, and we watch as the as the attendees drift off right notes to each other. Just like in a bad school setting and reminded me is a very feels weird, baking this contemporary reference. But it reminded me a lot of the the series called the wire where which is about a Baltimore, David Simon's brilliant creation of the in the first season of the drug war. And you see the the different characters, the drug addicts, the dealers, the police, and the bureaucrats about the police mall in meshed in this system trying to do their jobs, get ahead, make money get promoted, and it's a very symbiotic relationship akin to you. You need me. I don't need you the only other, unfortunately, many of the characters need each other and they find themselves in what is essentially an immoral landscape. There's really no gonna be no easy way to to go forward in line with ones conscience. And in that series, one things that effective about is you don't have to root for after a while. He starts sympathize with the drug dealers just like any other business trying to. But then again, you got people dying from drug overdoses, and then you've got the police doing brutal things, but also trying to do what they think is the right thing..

Stalin Dante Ron Civis Jonah Baltimore David Simon
"civis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"I'm sorry Sheila. She was going for another thought, and I turn my back for a minute because I dropped my pop. Morning. So Mary what who may need vestibular therapy, or what are some of the symptoms? That would say, hey, I I think I need to look into some sort of treatment for this. Feeling of dizziness is the number one reason for physician visits for people over the age of seventy five Manny people have these differences than sations that can be light headedness. It can be a feeling of vertigo, which is just the feeling that things are moving when they're not really it can be a feeling that you can't focus your eyes on things and just a kind of a general sense of being off bounds. Do we know what causes that? There are a number of different causes. Some of them are based in your ear in the vestibular system in your ear. That's where your vestibular as it is in your ear. And that is what has what sets what balances out. Yes. Makes us feel like we're even. That's right. And actually that's part of it's in the ear and part of it. The system is your eyes, and that's the communication between your eyes in your inner ear on what kind of movement is going on in your body. And if there's an. And discount occasion. Between those two simple systems. That is when you get that feeling of dizziness K. Some Mary looks like ninety million Americans will experience dizziness at least once in their lifetime. So that's a lotta people. First of all Civis dealer therapy is something then more people know about this option, if they're feeling dizzy or have verticals symptoms. We always encourage people to check with their doctors first and in order to receive vestibular therapy. They're going to need a prescription from their doctor. But if that is a consistent problem and intermittent problem than yes, something that can be helped. And there are kind of depending on what their problem is with their vestibular system. It may involve just some simple exercises that we teach you that you need to continue that are going to help compensate for that. I think that's what I'm curious about is what they are. What what is the therapy? Look like one cause of vertigo sometimes can be what we call but nine paramedics laxism all positional vertigo. We call it p b p P V, and what that involves is when you have little crystals in your ear that have dislodged and are kind of floating around in that inner ear, and it gives you that feeling of things spanning the good news with that. Is there is a simple procedure where the therapist will gently cradle your head and move it in some different specific directions to actually move that crystal through your ear come out and relieve the symptoms. How about that does it fix it altogether? This is the problem typically after one to two treatments you will be fixed. So.

vertigo Mary Sheila Manny Civis
"civis" Discussed on Tech News Today

Tech News Today

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on Tech News Today

"Just leave your bluetooth on and have your apple watching. Have ads delivered your apple watch. Let south. Thank you so much for joining us. Sean is the IT and national security editor at our seconda. He's a former navy officer systems, administrator and network systems. Integrator is also the pack rat on Twitter. Thanks so much for coming on the packet packet rat. Oh, gosh. Do not. Who is the pack rat? I don't know who that is. The packet. Thank you. The European parliament yesterday voted on a new piece of legislation that has online copyright in its sights, and it's been a little controversial to say the least the copyright directive was approved yesterday in parliament, though. A final vote will not take place until January twenty nineteen. It is expected to pass. Many argue it will significantly change the free flow of ideas in the internet and joining us to share his take on the copyright directive is Danny O'Brien from the electric frontier foundation. Welcome to the show Danny. Hey, good to be. It's great to have you here. So thank you for joining us. So first of all, the has written about this vote, saying, Europe, quote, lost the internet, what, which is a very big statement. What do you mean by that? Exactly. Well, one of the things that the internet is a wave sort of benefited from is that it's kind of a permission list environment. If you wanted to set up a website ability Civis, you didn't have to go in osc someone permission to do that on this really majorly changes that kind of setup. So basically the this, this lots of things in in this in this regulation, some good, some terrible. But the one we've mainly been talking about is thirteen which requires services which have take uploads from uses and then put them online and I, it will require those those services to effectively filter everything full copyright infringements before they go up, but really only the kind of infringements that a a computer algorithm could detect. So that means that was the actual piracy will go through a fine because. They can get round those kind of algorithms, but stuff like fair use, stuff like parodies. Things like remix is stuff that has music playing in the background is I actually have right now. Those would be automatically blocked unless you go in strike a deal with the license holders. And so that means that if he wanted to run one of these services, you'd have to strike deals and for everybody else who might serve you a copyright notice, you'll have to block that content. So the idea is that they will be serving the content creators by doing this. Is there any way in which that is true. So I'm probably I'm gonna give you our point of view, but I point of view is based on like twenty years, having this discussion about copyright rightsholders, ah, very worried about the internet because people copy things on the internet and our nation is well, you can't stop people copying things on the internet. That's what it does. You know, when you cut and paste, that's what happens. And in fact, there are lots of ways in which artists benefit from that. In fact, like the huge explosion in music in remixes in YouTube Coccia. All of that came from technologies that the rights holders tried to ban. So in this situation, what the sort of doing is there was sumptious if they full, the tech company is to create these huge wools. Then the tech companies will. Somehow pay them to take the wolves down because it's autists who are on the side of that will autism to trying to get that content online and it's everybody else on the internet who isn't pod of this ongoing battle who who ends up suffering. Now, there were parts of the proposal that the EU rejected flat out, right?.

apple Danny O'Brien European parliament Sean YouTube electric frontier foundation Europe EU editor Civis officer administrator twenty years
"civis" Discussed on Counting Countries

Counting Countries

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on Counting Countries

"There's nothing there for me. I think you know you live your life cycle when you're when you're. It's a much when I travel I was and I see all the usual things immediately. One will pay, you know. As a top down consumer BMI drinking. But when when we were younger, when we travel, we use the what we should do. We gap at six o'clock every morning. The food city deathly quiet even being before, and we go and see all these wonderful things. I remember me. About five cooking after. Absolutely. Naked could be Donald wonderful things activities sites, and we deserve this beer. Then we And then we. try. I'm actually tragedies getting based locals very now meet your the one for people in clubs and bars. What. The main. Much of traveling getting before a lot of culture on the country. Yeah. I mean, there's a certain logic to that statement of meeting the goals and sharing drink and getting to know them shows during snowball. All of a sudden would have somebody taking out in that call some of the visor on the house with a meal with somebody. I mean, giving out the country, any city will get with the locals on some amazing happens. Mentally set your whole trip ups of for some brilliant. Without, you know. You've had the experience we would have without the meeting, the people when a little bit tipsy was yet. For example, when we on this stupid bops that we sign up for, which we diction of us in Togo, but we don't what he'd has to lives golfing. Ways every everytime we go to a price of member where you're into side, we went out, we We enough enough need need only only. pretty painful and but we will have an completely different trip to the other guys on the buffs who was sitting in that cat. So they usually go to bag. I used to see the sights. We look to them. Renown experience everything and yet before you straighten and that's why we just went on Saturday. Our that turns like a much better option. You mentioned the bull ride in Indonesia where it was an extremely dangerous situation share with me. One of the other most dangerous times you've been on the road. That hasn't been many. Well, pub yoga in America that you more out there. I mean, I would have come into by far and away much time. This is America. You go to the cities and you go down the wrong straight. And and I, we went a little bit too far and. Might yet you go the road bikes America will be succeeded, Civis travel. So you have that America is country of slut the on age because you handle the freedom, hunter, the freedom to anywhere anywhere do anything on the country. People thinking. I. Trump that really state. The American people and American League I, I can just come Trevor zero. Dumbs mess of the disparity to the richer knows ES. Yes..

America American League Togo Indonesia Donald Civis Trevor
"civis" Discussed on Synergen Leadership Podcast

Synergen Leadership Podcast

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on Synergen Leadership Podcast

"Will just be able to manage it when it happens, not want be like that. So the Mia, we find out that there were potato changes. I need to be on top of that ninety to make sure that at the fine. Yeah, exactly what those changes may try overnight session providing at peak audience with team to mention that ninety two day lobbying being politically away a student of what's happening in industry and making sure that I can influence is not just possible what's required in the sector and one meets the types it that you just mentioned before. That's huge for us, you know? So we conceit near repent. Capelle what's going to happen or we can actually stop looking at business. ROY Yellen Sanger believes these happens while he's gone to heaven. What does he say to Siri? What does it mean for PayPal, in what types of people do we service in? What's important, Nina Civis that we provide as opposed to wanna take a very latest that you either look up to all that inspired you there. There look civilly and without nine me this painful, it will be the faithful that have actually started from scratch up with very little education. And you wanna be filing during secondary school might have even left school at fifteen or sixteen and didn't even know thank capable off. And this few around off gave a gentleman's nine that had the stools, the fine print. John John is the passed away years ago suddenly. I was reading his story one day north, what you know that was someone that really choke to drain to some way that even with the he recognized the time have be could be. But there are lots about the latest like him side this that that group of ladies that are think through. Julianne along random mushroom intelligence because we've just done something around that that sommes setting national intelligence in tapping to that side of you sunken believing in yourself. Swell, then all go to people like jello, Allama. Brings along pace in how many the spiritual saw this does tops ablaze as well. If you said to me is one, two t kill a person. I, I wouldn't be able to tell you just one person because I actually EMMY spy by lots of various ladies and for various reasons you know. So he could be learning that I have from a career to speak TV groupie learnings that I have in this spiritual world. So people wanna find out more bet. You bet. Siri wish they got onto a website. And any last words unleash IPE fielding teak within t- city is really important. Bay transparent being willing to take on a faith that you know in shape since sizes and Wayne people are also even you advise sole support, and surely he'll people assign and take it on board and citizen and with Cal, what did he said you need to do to Kate moving forward. But the intensity is really important to me an being true to one self, so that important to me and also operatings operating within my values is Charlie totally not will side yet. Well, thank you said much guess for will being of podcast this, hey. Thank you so much. Thank you for the opportunity. I really appreciate it. Let wraps up another episode of the singer. Lee, she poke cost. I trust you found it interesting a couple of things. If you could go online and leave a review of the podcasts that would be great, really help us spreading is podcast happy to connect with me on link dean on pretty easy to find. And if you want to shoot me through an Email, Julian synergy, group dot com dot a youth seeing next on..

ROY Yellen Sanger Nina Civis Charlie Kate John John PayPal Siri Lee EMMY Julianne Cal t- city Julian Wayne ninety two day one day
"civis" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"What is your job? What? What this do not lose track? It's important to decide which lands four. But at this time this cannot be deprioritize canopy. I think sometimes we are scared or to go in kind of defensive position. If we do that to kind of, I'm not concerned with that problem, I think have for my lens for that everything you should focus. Goodness. What have been some of the most difficult things for you to shoot to find the groove with the grew. And I mean the grove is. I know it's, it's a love it in the music. But when I know that it's compare because we have so many precious from outside, we have so many obstacles, production conditions, time, weather conditions, whatever onto the so I know is not the same done interviews. It would be great compete to same. I tried to achieve that kind of do be under same way flanks. That's easy so viable. But I don't mean I mean really in the that you feel everybody is on the same way, it's rare, but if it happens, would scenes who through Sant's. Where has it happened for you? The most. Was there any particular shoot where just like this was a dream and it moved very snoot lighten in Civis Brzeczek it's always some seines events like that example into why driven. It was absolutely clear about a thunderstorm moved from that scene. I dunno if you have in mind, if you'd make sense. Make quotation. The speaks little broader kitchen about that debt was really great scene. For example, you know, it's a masterpiece. Never know if we work to hold fame you. You know it's a masterpiece doing due to that scene. Then indeffinite could happen that disappears or it's there, but not nothing special. I lifted more often than the than the other way that it's really great. She'll be few in good films or respond to saints like that when I'm really happened, I know that will. And then you shaking. For the first screening, things finished. I think it's normal. It's always risky up what we're doing and the there's no guarantee financing. I have to say I was a little amused. When you said you were you guys were intimidated by having Isabel who pair onset just that she was that big star. I didn't think that you would have that reaction sill because you've worked with so many big stars over the years that time. I mean, I know if I say something like that fund American voting is ridiculous because has flown with starts. That's kind of mainstream cinema for us. It was. It was like that was two thousand one infect thought the late to have more internationally known stars was later than Dilan to there's no no reason to be scanned to be afraid because if you are state, Estee are it was even read bitten onto the initial need was fake good relation once you are behind defense, if I can say. So once the shoe, not that Perazzi. Then CC can speak completing normally today, even happy about that to mention problems, but you saying what we want to do survey nice discussions way straight. Completely fooled with substance. You know, not not that superficial lepta that's with with be blowed collective directors Swail of course, or colleagues with over the years. Who have been some of the easiest people for you to have those discussions with be able to collaborate with do no candidate it. I would say, I don't know. This is not the, that's not the Batavia can say. So, no. I don't know. Bro. Stotts for me would see real, of course you not. You can grow your more experience. You are in a band of stare housing, then you'll may be the next floor. But the next Bocek is against hero may be on the next floor. That means there is an exit voted ways and the kind of anybody to run away before your spout. The first day I, I don't know. If you ever ends, maybe not maybe good to conditioner for of for the for our can. Oh, really to have any adrenaline or or abilities scant in good sense or excited, or is on the in on the academic is his estates FIBA? Who can say that I say state freight. Okay. What are you working on these days? For the moment. I have a lot of. Plans for seminars groups. I don't don't shoot for the moment. I'm old enough now to wait for for Greg chick. I don't want we have..

Isabel Civis Brzeczek Sant Greg chick Perazzi Dilan Estee
"civis" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"So we advised administrator in all matters related to small businesses, and we try and promote and develop small businesses within our agency. And of course, the federal government. So it really makes sense for us to try and engage with them and understand how they can help NASA chief its mission. So that's something that we feel very strongly about, and we're. I've had great success in that arena. Yeah, it's how how many patents did you say? Half of our Panzer from smashes small businesses. The the country? Yes. See, I'm I'm interested in how small businesses like why? Why is it good to work with small businesses? And is it almost required? Do we have to work with? That's a great question. Yes, we are. We are required to work the small businesses. We do have five socioeconomic gold categories. Vanessa, we had the small business goal. We have the small disadvantaged business goal. We have got the woman owned small business goal hub zone as well as Civis Sabo veteran on small businesses. So NASA has done really well. We are trying to chief our goal of sixteen percent. We have reached out to businesses and not enough traditional areas. So Texas, we have great businesses. We have spent a lot of money here in Texas, but even going across the breadth of the continent. So it's something that we look at an, we think we can be able to to get more small businesses to do, help us achieve our mission. So it does make sense for us to to go ahead and promote that. So that makes sense because we're. Are, you know, as NASA would get funded to to do all these goals, but we can't just can't give all the money to the big guy. Right? You can't just give it to the big contractors and let them you got to kind of spread it out and give equal opportunity to all of these other businesses that may not have the chance of technology and just sort of build it up and you're right, it kind of it kind of goes from there. You build up these small businesses, and then from there they go off and do wonderful, wonderful things that is yes, that actually makes sense. So NASA, if you have a contract with the agency, which has a subcontracting plan, you are required to do business with small businesses. So last fiscal year in f y, seventeen NASA awarded approximately one. Sorry, two point, eight billion dollars directly to small businesses. That's just the agency directly to small businesses on our prime contractors that do quite a bit here, the agency. So the large programs like Orion as-as they awarded another two point, eight billion directly to small businesses. So it was a really great year for. Us here the agency. Wow. Okay. So straight from your program, but then also there are programs here that are not just working directly with the big guys. They're spreading out among the little guys. Right. That's fantastic. Yeah, I'm guessing that's that's part of your vision and mission, right? That's part of your overall goals that that is active, put it at any better myself..

NASA Texas administrator Civis Sabo Vanessa Orion eight billion dollars sixteen percent
"civis" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"civis" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"So we advised administrator in all matters related to small businesses, and we try and promote and develop small businesses within our agency. And of course, the federal government. So it really makes sense for us to try and engage with them and understand how they can help NASA chief its mission. So that's something that we feel very strongly about, and we're. I've had great success in that arena. Yeah, it's how how many patents did you say? Half of our Panzer from smashes small businesses. The the country? Yes. See, I'm I'm interested in how small businesses like why? Why is it good to work with small businesses? And is it almost required? Do we have to work with? That's a great question. Yes, we are. We are required to work the small businesses. We do have five socioeconomic gold categories. Vanessa, we had the small business goal. We have the small disadvantaged business goal. We have got the woman owned small business goal hub zone as well as Civis Sabo veteran on small businesses. So NASA has done really well. We are trying to chief our goal of sixteen percent. We have reached out to businesses and not enough traditional areas. So Texas, we have great businesses. We have spent a lot of money here in Texas, but even going across the breadth of the continent. So it's something that we look at an, we think we can be able to to get more small businesses to do, help us achieve our mission. So it does make sense for us to to go ahead and promote that. So that makes sense because we're. Are, you know, as NASA would get funded to to do all these goals, but we can't just can't give all the money to the big guy. Right? You can't just give it to the big contractors and let them you got to kind of spread it out and give equal opportunity to all of these other businesses that may not have the chance of technology and just sort of build it up and you're right, it kind of it kind of goes from there. You build up these small businesses, and then from there they go off and do wonderful, wonderful things that is yes, that actually makes sense. So NASA, if you have a contract with the agency, which has a subcontracting plan, you are required to do business with small businesses. So last fiscal year in f y, seventeen NASA awarded approximately one. Sorry, two point, eight billion dollars directly to small businesses. That's just the agency directly to small businesses on our prime contractors that do quite a bit here, the agency. So the large programs like Orion as-as they awarded another two point, eight billion directly to small businesses. So it was a really great year for. Us here the agency. Wow. Okay. So straight from your program, but then also there are programs here that are not just working directly with the big guys. They're spreading out among the little guys. Right. That's fantastic. Yeah, I'm guessing that's that's part of your vision and mission, right? That's part of your overall goals that that is active, put it at any better myself..

NASA Texas administrator Civis Sabo Vanessa Orion eight billion dollars sixteen percent
"civis" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"civis" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Hello welcome to another episode the weeds on the box media podcast network i'm matthew yglesias join today by sarah cliff also amount live from new york city we have dylan matthews with us today hi hey we brought tillenon one talk about jobs guarantee which has been a burning up one key twitter for the past week or two we've also got a blockbuster research paper with some some real emotional highs and lows in my great good it's a well it's kind of sad happy it said your cry or laugh it'll be exactly cert but before that i wanna get into the jobs guarantee don't send some great stuff on this and i mean i think an obvious question here is like why do we suddenly have three prominent democratic senators cory booker chris in gillibrand bernie sanders in different ways talking about the idea that the government should guarantee that everybody who who wants to get a job should get a job and part of it i mean i think comes down to politics candidates for office have always talked about jobs jobs are good jobs or popular put some polling was done recently by civis analytics which is a big democratic party data firm ended asked the question of whether you would favor congress passing a law that would put a five percent income tax on everyone who makes over two hundred thousand dollars a year and the money would be used to ensure that the government can give job to everybody who wants one and it pulled really well like fifty to thirty four any pulled really well even though the question was deliberately written a letter people do advocacy polls with the question wording designed to make people say yes this was the opposite like this was done the poll specified that democrats were proposing this it's specified that it would have cost and higher taxes and people still still like the idea and i think you see like a number of fictional presidents have toyed with this idea it's a in dave the every man who becomes president proposes a jobs guarantee and house of cards is jobs guarantee program and i think this is like an idea that sounds really.

matthew yglesias sarah cliff dylan matthews twitter bernie sanders civis analytics congress president new york cory booker gillibrand two hundred thousand dollars five percent
"civis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"civis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The military arsenal the nuclear arsenal he is turning his attention now to interkorean relations one thing i'd like to point out is that in the years as houston groomed to become leader and as he took over as leader in two thousand eleven one thing that he did say that i think is notable is that his father in his grandfather died without having accomplished the signing of a peace treaty to end the korean war he walked into this role knowing that his job was to try to reunify the peninsula or at least a sign of peace treaty with the united states but or south koreans able to imagine a scenario in which kim jong grown is convinced enough of his own country safety insecurity that he is willing to give up nuclear weapons that is precisely what people are skeptical left we have been down this path before the united states and north korea has been negotiating over north korea's nuclear weapons for 25 years and it's only been a trail of broken promises and frankly south korea and north korea have had some its before we had a first historic summit in two thousand eight to cover that here in seoul in two thousand and it was only six years later after that summits and in the middle of this period of warming ties that north create test its first nuclear weapon civis south koreans are a little bit more sceptical irish they bury skeptical this time around but optimistic so here in the states uh as we know donald trump has been sending threatening tweets and stepping of sanctions but today and a tweet about yesterday's meeting from said there's a serious effort being made by all parties concerned then he says may be false hope of the us is ready to go hard in either direction so bombs or peace but it does seem somewhat charitable considering what we've heard from the president what do you think these meetings mean for the us i think this put some pressure on the united states to make sure that they're not sidelined uh is also pressure on boesak and the united states to make sure that is a rift in the alliance noski loves to play a game of dividing conquer a do like to play favorites and that only works to north korea's advantage so if south korea and the united states one of these smart if about it they want to try.

united states north korea south korea seoul donald trump president houston kim jong six years 25 years
"civis" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"civis" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Of a captive a set of clients would really be of benefit for the company because at the end of the day amazon is is bigger better funded and better at the internet well the let's talk a little bit about the funding right because this is not cheap purchase which is probably why cbs shares have been falling and they were really don't have the cash to pay for that said this would be a pretty substantial leveraged by now absolutely would be i mean i definitely have a stock component blood it's unclear how much of that they did they'll able people do it's going to be as significant cash outlay civis doesn't have a ton of cash the idea of more than twenty billion dollars in debt and this deal based on some of the the figures being thrown around could cost sixty five seventy billion dollar there's that that's close to cbs's market cap so it's it's obvious going to be a really big will hit maksim wonder if you could just give us an idea of what your thoughts are about the very business model that says if we can put as many individuals and is many corporations in between you and the service or the no seriously the service or the product that you're buying uh isn't i thought that was going to be done away with because of technology you get rid of all the middlemen you go direct to consumer why can't that happen why can't they do a why they're waiting for amazon to give them the kick i mean it's because of being a middle learn is extraordinarily profitable forget but when you have a you have amazon breathing down your neck i mean we've already been through that in the financial industry you had you know broke a wide swath of brokers now they're advisers because you can't make money on pennies so i mean that's kind of the hope of what people that it it that's amazon's hope if they want to get to this business do you see it as a valuable do you think that trump's going to happen to it the question is whether amazon wants another very complicated loom large in business needed to have sort of unlimited capacity for it it seems so i wouldn't rule it out on the defence in the.

amazon cbs trump sixty five seventy billion dol twenty billion dollars
"civis" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"civis" Discussed on 100 PM

"You're listening to one hundred pm the show where were interviewing one hundred expert product people from startups to enterprise and everything in between to bring you all the actionable advice bringing to succeed in product management today i'm talking to leave johnson's your product manager at civis than a little if you're joining us for the first time be sure to visit our website one hundred product managers dot com the west fastest growing resource for product management topics recommended resources online learn i'm susanne quality product coach startup mentor and host of today's show let's dive right in the say hello johnston you hi i'm wade johnston i work at suicidal would expose senior property what is civis analytics service athletics is software and solutions capri focused on better science so we have to possible business one is any data science software profitle and the other is a solution scripts are dead a science consultants that solve business problems with at data science is at a topic that comes up a law ending a especially now in this everyone wants to medium datadriven datadriven so i wanna diving deeply feel like we're speaking in a little rations that little because even when he said civis analytics i thought that sounds like we're about to go into a tongue twister something let's start out back in your career will will jump to present damn you were at nielsen and tell us of first of all for our audience maybe they don't know what is nielsen.

johnson product manager civis nielsen wade johnston