36 Burst results for "Civil War"

As President-Elect Joe Biden Doubles Down On Calls For Unity, Supporters Have Doubts

All Things Considered

03:55 min | 5 d ago

As President-Elect Joe Biden Doubles Down On Calls For Unity, Supporters Have Doubts

"Calls for unity and healing. But as NPR's Toby a. Smith reports, many of his own supporters are having a hard time letting bygones be bygones. He's been saying it since his first speech as president elect, Biden implored everyone to put away the harsh rhetoric give each other a chance and end what he calls this grim era of demonization in America. So that's a wonderful sentiment. It's probably a really sweet pipe dream. Abby Gold 59 year old Democrat from Arizona thinks it may be generations before the rancor subsides enough for any real rapprochement. We're not gonna have any healing until the public at large words to have a nice cup of shut up before they say whatever is on their minds, hoping to help many around the nation are ramping up trainings for cross the aisle conversations. Julie Bowler is with a group called Braver Angels, which runs red blue workshops that aim for common ground and civil discourse. When you have the experience yourself of feeling a little opening a little less frantic rejection, Then you've learned at least that it is possible for some of that softening toe happen, and it's a humanizing process. Enrollment is way up this fall, but Bowler concedes it may be a self selecting crowd that's open to dialogue. There are plenty who would be hard to convince, including 64 year Old New Yorker, Darwin, Bush. When he sees bridging the gap with die hard trump supporters as a bridge too far. This is not an alternate viewpoint. This is racism, Hate lying demagoguery, sociopath, E. What else can I say? Bad people? Capital B. A. D. I will not sit in table with them. I will not have a conversation with them. Nor what Elizabeth and Tracy Murphy, an interracial couple in Georgia, who say they've been harassed, even spit at by people they believe were fueled by the president's divisive rhetoric. For any fence mending, Tracy Murphy says Trump supporters would have to straight up admit that they made a mistake and apologized. It's their turn to extend the olive branch. They're the ones who messed up everything. It's not my job to fix it. You know, is a funny thing that the person who was the victim always has the end of being the bigger person. But many on the right are just is adamant that they're the ones Odin apology by what they see as radical socialists threatening American values. Virginia Republican Katherine Schoonover says she's all for bipartisan cooperation. But she calls Democratic calls for unity. Disingenuous. I don't know how you go from telling everybody that they're all secret Nazi fascists, bigoted, racist people. And then you're going to say, But now let's come together. It's just ridiculous coming from the Democrats now and especially, she says sin. She believes the claims even though there's no evidence, backing them up that the Democrats stole the election. It's shocking, and I think that if if the Democrats try to ram this down of race throats, you have a real problem. It's exactly why Darryl Dwayne, a 51 year old Biden supporter from Washington, D. C has been echoing Biden's calls for unity and imploring his friends, too. Not dig in their heels. Unfortunately, that's a recipe for civil war. But so far, Dwayne says, he's not made a lot of headway. I've gotten in trouble for it. I've gotten called nasty names for being Kumbaya. Same with 58 year old New York Democrat Vincent Downing, who's with a group of humanists calling for more cross the aisle, empathy and understanding. Even though Trump supporters may dehumanize him. He says he won't stoop to the same level. But Downing says it's challenging as he put it. He also tends to think like any good lefty would When I just think I'm right. Right. Right. Right.

Tracy Murphy Abby Gold Julie Bowler Braver Angels Biden Toby NPR Katherine Schoonover Bowler Smith Arizona Darwin America Donald Trump Bush Elizabeth Darryl Dwayne
Fresh update on "civil war" discussed on Bernie and Sid in the Morning

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:32 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "civil war" discussed on Bernie and Sid in the Morning

"Vermont. Vermin. Oh, look atyou around places stupid too. All right, sweetheart. Here's number three signed in June of 1919 at a palace in Paris. What was the name of the treaty that brought World War 1 to 1 end? Outside. Oh, yes, I've actually been there. Yeah, Look at you, Grace. You're three for three. You're really smart. You know you're asking me what I know No. One. So if I asked you who was the quarterback and Super Bowl one for the Green Bay Packers? Did you know that? A little Lombardi. Oh, hey. Hey, Let me tell you something, sweetheart. That was the coach of closing off the interest parts store. But close enough. Okay, You're three for three. Here's number four. What was the name of the era that followed the American Civil war, during which attempts were made to remedy the inequities of slavery and its political, social and economic legacy. After that, you're on the civil war..

Lombardi Grace Green Bay Packers Paris Vermont.
Claims of election fraud risk Senate race for Georgia Republicans.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:31 min | Last week

Claims of election fraud risk Senate race for Georgia Republicans.

"Of election fraud risk senate race for georgia republicans. Uk's four nations will relax covid restrictions to save christmas and trump scrambling to sell indigenous holy site to mining company. It's wednesday november twenty five life. I'm anthony davis. Donald trump's baseless attacks on the us election maybe endangering republican chances of keeping control of the senate as republican candidates in twin january. Runoffs in georgia tried to drive voters to the polls while amplifying trump's claim that the system is raked the state on tuesday at trump's request began. Tallying it's five million ballots for a third time which officials expect will again confirmed democratic president. Elect joe biden's statewide victory. That has senators. David perdue and kelly low-floor threading the needle on the campaign trail calling themselves the last bastion against democratic priorities without explicitly. Admitting trump lost the november third election the january five runoffs critical for each party while biden narrowly carried the state. Georgia has not elected a democratic senator in two decades losses by both perdue and low floor would deadlock the senate giving vice president-elect kamala harris the tie breaking vote some republican officials say. Trump's repeated attacks on the election is rigged could depress turnout among his core supporters. Many republicans were two points right now where they don't trust the outcome of the system. Gabriel sterling republican official who oversees voting systems. Said on monday as news conference. All we can send. This is going to wind up. Suppressing the votes to a degree absolutely trump's unsupported allegations that election fraud caused his defeat. Have gained no traction in court where he has suffered a string of legal setbacks but he's rhetoric is having an effect a reuters ipsos poll last week found half of republicans believe trump rightfully won the us election even as officials across the country found no evidence of fraud. The party's civil war in georgia could turn off moderate voters who might otherwise be inclined to support the republican incumbents.

Senate David Perdue Kelly Low Georgia Anthony Davis Donald Trump Republicans Joe Biden Gabriel Sterling Kamala Harris UK Perdue Biden United States Reuters
"civil war" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:04 min | Last week

"civil war" Discussed on Today, Explained

"In march twenty twenty. Two gray went ahead with regional elections. Despite a ban from the federal government on one hundred percent of the seats be postponed the poll citing the coronavirus pandemic but the t l f says he delayed them to stay in power. How does that work. How does how does one region hold on election when the rest of the country isn't exactly. It is a very confusing situation to be. In and central government. Say any attempts to hold elections. Integra would be unconstitutional. The central government responded by cutting budgetary subsidies to the region and that was the point. Where the government's aid that amounts to declaration of war and from then on. It had been a very tense situation between the two greg of meant and the central government with both saying they do not recognize each other. We got a lot of people. Alleging illegitimate election hijinks in the united states. Right now i imagine this one region having its own election didn't go over well in the country definitely. The rest of the country had accepted to some extent to postpone elections covid. Nineteen seemed to be a legitimate reason and it was clear that tha gravy june going ahead with the election was more to the central government's through samuel. I mentioned at the top of the show. This all began the night of the us election when perhaps there was a sense of the world's attention was elsewhere. Is the world now paying attention to what's going on. With yoga conflict that could upset the stability of the entire horn of africa. Yes the world is definitely paying attention now. If this goes wrong it could be one of the worst wars as of now. We've seen the un a you nations like china. Russia all paying attention because given the geographic location if you appear its proximity to somalia and djibouti djibouti which has a lot of military bases. Including the us and china stability in ethiopia is important not just for the east africa but global superpowers legs of the us and china So far we've seen Several statements coming out of the united nations. The issue was also pushed to the security console. African leaders have tried to send mediators into the country and the prospect of having hundreds of thousands of refugees going from northern european through sudan to europe has definitely got attention. enough.

united states united nations djibouti Integra gray sudan africa china Russia ethiopia somalia europe east africa
"civil war" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:50 min | Last week

"civil war" Discussed on Today, Explained

"This episode is brought to you by the all new oculus quest to other worlds are waiting for you. Jump in and become a part of them truly wireless virtual reality is here and better than ever. Don't just push buttons. Push yourself player. Best with touch responsive controls that respond to your every move explore an expansive library of the most immersive and exciting games quest to push the limits as as oculus most advanced all in one. Vr system next generation performance and their highest resolution display yet. Offering you the chance to savor every little detail available now and starting at just two hundred ninety nine dollars. Oculus quest to play for real learn more at oculus dot com uncle. Frank is the must see film for your thanksgiving holiday. It's a heartwarming coming out and coming of age story written and directed by academy award winner. Alan ball that follows. Frank played by paul bet knee and his niece. Beth played by sophia hillis on their journey home to visit their dysfunctional family. Portrayed by judy. Greer steve zahn peter. Mak deasy lois. Smith with margo martindale and stephen root stream amazon studios uncle frank november twenty fifth. Only on prime video samuel. Help me understand how this conflict really get started between the easy open government and this northern region to guy. How long ago do tensions begin so to understand what happened in the pasta. Two weeks we need to go back to. At least to the coalition called the eprdf and eprdf there was a pm. Nint- party the the to gripe people see british on front with three other ethnic political parties and the reason in power is because they were the main rebels who hosted the then communist government in one thousand nine hundred one so nineteen ninety-one f. comes into power so for those twenty seven years. The economic growth of the country was amazing. Ethiopia's economy has grown at a foster right than any other african country in the past ten years but locally the political space and the economy was dominated by members so the population was not really happy with the dplf ship. As one farmer in the entire region told me in july of two thousand fourteen we do not like the government but we always vote for them. We have to because we get our seeds fertilizer from them. During times of drought we get food aid from them if we don't vote for them. We can't eat daily elections one ninety nine percent of seats and five years later improved on that and one hundred percent of seats which led to process that beginning to fifteen and did not stop until the hard to transfer reform itself to stay. But it doesn't really work right because a few years later. The teepee aleph is replaced by the current. Prime minister abi met exactly. Many people expected him to be another puppet prime minister with the still holding control but then he surprised everyone. He came in on a wave of reforms since taking office in april two thousand eighteen abbey has ended a state of emergency free political prisoners and got parliament to lift the so called terrorists ban on opposition groups recently. He shifted his focus to ethiopia's economy pledging to open up the country to foreign investment but at the same time he was slowly eliminating that dplf's from the leadership from businesses from political positions. And they were getting a bit targeted and and it was getting a bit clear and all this climaxed when in december twenty nineteen he more or less merged this eprdf the ruling coalition party into a singular national party which he called the prosperity party and invited other parties to join as well except the dplf did not join this party so they more or less became from the ruling party to the opposition within a span of less than two years. How's he being received internationally. Since prime minister became to power one of the first things he did was to make peace deal with the an emmy every chair. If yo- pierre an trae afford a border war from nine hundred ninety eight to two thousand that left around eighty thousand people dead and since then. The two horn of africa countries have been locked in hostilities for two decades. And he making this peace deal. Give him this. International image peacemaker forty premier had only been sworn in for six months when he brokered the peace accord with eritrea and he went on. I ahead to mediate in south sudan. He is helping with conflicting somalia immediate between richer and djibouti his internationally known as this mon- of love of peace monarch mediation so all these culminated with him. Finally getting the weeds. No bill committee has decided to award the nobel peace prize for twenty nine to zero pm. Prime minister alley biz is a liberal of love. Sustaining piece is hard work yet. We must jewish a nurture it. So what does it mean. Wh how is it being received that this guy who's been preaching love and unity at home and abroad who received the nobel peace prize is now at the center of this civil war. Who's brutally suppressing people in the north of ethiopia. It sounds confusing right. Yeah but if you ask the government they will tell you. This is not a war. This is restoring. The rule of law in in ethiopia and the reason is is ravaged with conflict from the north east south and the west and the finger always points from the government since i became into power. He's accused. Dplf off trying to call meet vigil coup in region throwing a grenade at. He must cutting people in several regions. So this was building up in the country for the past two and a half years and the central government would say an actual sense really hard being very patient with the. We've given them enough time to reform to change but they have not the key incident forward. The postponement of elections in ethiopia.

Ethiopia prime minister Prime minister communist government Frank Greer steve zahn Mak deasy lois Alan ball africa eritrea emmy sudan judy somalia margo martindale djibouti amazon
Obama: US 'adversaries have seen us weakened'

Dr. Lee Yardley

03:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Obama: US 'adversaries have seen us weakened'

"Barack Obama called Donald Trump at about three o'clock in the morning to congratulate him. Even though Mr Trump had lost the popular vote and took the electoral college by less than 1% in three states today, President Trump declines to accept the verdict of the voters despite losing by greater margins to President elect Joe Biden. Mr Obama hasn't spoken of the election standoff until today. We spoke to the 44th president on the release of his new book, A Promised Land, a memoir of his early years and first term. What is your advice in this moment for President Trump? Well, the president is A public servant. They are temporary occupants of the office by design. And When your time is up. Uh, Then it is your job, too. With the country first and thinking beyond your own ego and your own. Interests and your own disappointments. My advice to President Trump is if you want. At this late stage in the game to be remembered as somebody who could come country First. It's time for you to do the same thing. In your view, it is time for him to concede. Absolutely I will. I mean, I think it was time for him to concede. Probably the day after the election or at the latest two days after the election, I When you look at the numbers objectively, Joe Biden will have won handily. There is no scenario in which Any of those states would turn the other way, and certainly not enough to reverse be outcome of the election. More than the courtesy of a concession, the Trump White House is declining to free up the usual funds and facilities for the incoming administration. President elect Biden is not receiving secret national security briefings. As Mr Trump did when he was president elect. What In your estimation? Would our adversaries be thinking right now? Russia China about the fact that the transition is not moving forward. Well, I look, I think our adversaries Have seen US weakened not just as a consequence this election, but over the last Several years. We have these cleavages in the body politick. That They're convinced they can exploit. There's an old adage that partisan politics should stop at the water's edge right that. When it comes to Our foreign policy that it is the United States of America, not the divided states of America. We met the former president at a symbol of America's past divisions. The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery was a hospital in the civil war. Clara Barton and Walt Whitman cared for patients in the building where the 16th president consoled his wounded. We joined Mr Obama's peers in the gallery of the President's to talk about his book. I'm curious about the title. I think a lot of people feel that we are farther from a promised land. Well, I titled it the promised land. Because even though we may not get there in our lifetimes, even if we experience hardships and disappointments along the way That I Create a more perfect union, not a perfect union. But a more perfect union. You

President Trump Mr Trump Mr Obama Joe Biden Donald Trump Barack Obama Biden America White House Russia China National Portrait Gallery Clara Barton Walt Whitman Smithsonian
As Ethiopia's conflict rages, ethnic targeting turns deadly

PRI's The World

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

As Ethiopia's conflict rages, ethnic targeting turns deadly

"Ethiopia's northern tegray region has already left hundreds of people dead. The concern is that it could mushroom into a regional conflict threatening neighboring countries. The rule tell him a condie reports from nairobi. Kenya tensions between government under prime minister ali. Ahmed and the semi autonomous northern state of tigray have been simmering for months last week. They reached a deadly boiling point. That's why an according to abi security forces from tigray attacked ethiopian government troops. The isn't as secure but but the last week against other men and a woman in uni. Four of the northern command was kid out while they were at their most vulnerable and that the gemma's and among suze taught with the peace that was obvi- speaking on thursday one week into military operations launched against the tigray people's liberation front or teepee al f nazi governing party in the region. The was once a powerful force in ethiopia and politics for but that was before matt came to power in two thousand eighteen. The prime minister says the military offensive. He ordered is entirely justified. The federal government had every right to deploy forces and they use force in order to hand those implicated in corruption and gross human rights violation if ups is made up of different states centered around ethnic and linguistic lines each granted certain amounts of autonomy under the constitution. Tigray leaders say prime minister abi has been infringing on their

Tegray Tigray Condie Ethiopian Government Ethiopia Obvi Tigray People's Liberation Fro Nazi Governing Party Nairobi Ahmed ABI Kenya Gemma Matt Federal Government Prime Minister Abi
Ethiopia's conflict spills over border as thousands flee

The World

04:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Ethiopia's conflict spills over border as thousands flee

"This week, he sent federal troops into a province of his own country. Hundreds are reported dead in the northern region of Tigre and refugees air spilling over the border into Sudan. So what explains the shift from peace to conflict? Michelle Gavin is a former ambassador and senior fellow for African studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. Ambassador Gavin We're talking about the Ethiopian province of Tigre, where the violence is happening. It's squeezed into the northwest corner of Ethiopia. Figure it straddles the border of Eritrea to its north. What is so important about Tigre relative to the rest of Ethiopia? Well for many years, the Tigre and People's Liberation Front that sort of dominant political and military entity in Tigre was really first among equals in the ruling coalition for all of Ethiopia so to Graham's played an incredibly prominent role in Ethiopian governance, politics, security But with the rise of the new Prime Minister Ahmed There's been a bit of a re balancing in Ethiopia. And this is kind of opened up contest station from ethnicities across this incredibly diverse country. And there has been kind of widespread feeling that for too long, a small minority from Tigre had too much control of the federal government. So there's political tension between Tigre and Addis Ababa. Are there also historical grievances between two grand central government that we need to mention? I mean, is there a back story here? Tigre is now fighting at us. There's a lot of back story Ethiopian and certainly to Gran's were and incredibly, they weren't just dominant, politically and in the security services for many years, certainly under the leadership of Prime minister malice, But they also suffered most in the long and very costly in blood and treasure war with your tria. So there is there's also you know, a sense of probably grievance in that sense. Abby's come to power they feel targeted by new personnel choices by new policy choices. What maybe others in Ethiopia see as a re balancing the Tigre ins can often feel like persecution despite the tremendous sacrifices that they have made for the country. There are reports from Tigre oven. Ethiopian air campaign heavy bombardment at times. I mean, what's at stake here as far as you can tell ambassador Is it a possible civil war between two grands and Ethiopian troops? There is Tigre saying. We've had enough. We want independence. How should we interpret what's going on? We should absolutely be worried about a civil war, which I don't think would necessarily be contained just Teo, the Tigre region, giving all of the other tensions and actors. So what's at stake? You know the wellbeing of over 110 million Ethiopians. Regional stability. Conflict in Ethiopia has a very high chance of drawing in Eritrea. Sudan, tipping the balance of Sudan zone very fragile transition. Ethiopia's incredibly important actor in trying to bring stability to Somalia to South Sudan distracted and weekend. Ethiopia is really quite devastating, Tio this entire horn region which is strategically really significant, and there are a lot of actors external to Africa. In the Gulf, the Chinese and from the West, all of whom care deeply about stability in this region, so the prospect of drawing others in of proxy conflict it's really a powder keg, and the consequence will not be confined solely to what's happening inside Ethiopia's borders. Michelle Gavin, senior fellow for Africa Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. She also served as ambassador to Botswana from 2011 to 14. Ambassador Gavin Thank you very much. Thank you.

Tigre Ethiopia Michelle Gavin Ambassador Gavin Prime Minister Ahmed Sudan Eritrea Council On Foreign Relations Addis Ababa Graham Federal Government Abby Somalia Africa Gulf Ambassador Gavin Thank Botswana
Latest On A Military Conflict In Ethiopia

All Things Considered

03:39 min | 3 weeks ago

Latest On A Military Conflict In Ethiopia

"Prime minister, Maybe Achmed won the Nobel Peace Prize. And yet less than a week ago, he launched military operations in the country's northern region. Now that conflict is threatening to turn into an all out civil war. NPR's later Peralta walks us through what's happening and later to begin. Give us a sense of why the prime minister had won the Nobel Prize. He changed everything in Ethiopia. I mean at home, he ushered in a raft of democratic reforms, and then he also made peace with Ethiopia's mortal enemy, Eritrea. During his Nobel lecture, he talked about how he fought in that war, and he called it the epitome of hell. Let's listen to a bit of that speech of Sin Brothers slaughtering brothers on the battlefield. I have seen all their men, woman and Children trembling in terror under the really short ofthe bullets and alterations. You are makes for betterment, heartless and savage mint, he says. War makes for Bitterman heartless and savage men and when I became to power, people on the streets of Ethiopia told me that he was sent by God and now He has started this new conflict in the same part of the country where this war between Ethiopia and Eritrea happened and his air forces now bombing targets in his own country. What's the cause of the conflict? And at this point, how bad is the fighting? So it's complicated because, but it's essentially a power struggle. Document came to power in 2018 after huge popular uprising, and one of the things that he did was dismantled Ethiopia's ruling party, which had run the country with violence and brutality for almost 30 years, the guys who ran the show, where the TP left the Ti Guy People's Liberation Front. And they were sidelined. Since then, Abby has accused them of destabilizing the country by stoking ethnic tensions. Abby's allies have accused them of assassinations, including one attempt against Abby himself in last week. The government says that the TPLF sent forces to attack a federal military base, and that's when Abby ordered his army into the ticket region. Now how bad the fighting is, has been hard to report because the government has shut down phone lines and the Internet is often the region. I'm still waiting for a visa. Reuters, which does have reporters on the ground eyes reporting, hundreds are dead on each side. Sudan State media has also said that many refugees have started fleeing to their country. So it's serious. What are the TV I fighter saying at this point, it's It's a lot of bravado. They're calling the government dictatorial and treasonous. And those are the same words that the government is using against them. And they say that they're open to talk. But at the same time, you know, they also say that if they're hit hard, they plan on hitting back Justus hard. Either. We talked about the threat of civil war. How higher the stakes here they're huge. Some analysts say that this could be like Yugoslavia where Ethiopia breaks up in Ethiopia, by the way, is The second largest country in Africa by population, and the conflict also has the potential to draw in Eritrea and even Sudan, and if it's protracted, it can really destabilize the region that is already super vulnerable. And we can't really think of thiss as just a regional government against a powerful federal government. I mean, this is really one well armed, well trained military against another well armed, well trained military in a really fragile A place in Africa. That's NPR's ater. Peralta speaking to us from Nairobi. Thank you. Thank you. A

Ethiopia Maybe Achmed Abby Eritrea Bitterman Peralta NPR Tplf Sudan Government Reuters Justus Yugoslavia Africa Federal Government Nairobi
Ken Burns on America, selling his first film and more

KCBS Radio Weekend News

09:56 min | 3 weeks ago

Ken Burns on America, selling his first film and more

"With With such such an an acrimonious acrimonious election. election. We We turn turn tonight tonight to to a a man man who who tells tells the the story of America in all her divisions and struggle for unity. Ken Burns. Documentaries range from the Civil War to baseball, Vietnam and last year's country music. Burns calls himself an emotional archaeologist. He excavates lost love letters for gotten photos and overlooked heroes research so deep Viewers can feel like strangers discovering America for the first time. His films asked what it means to be American, so we asked, What does it mean to be Ken Burns? I have had the privilege of spending my entire life making films about the U. S capitol you capital s, but I've also had the privilege of making films about us. The two letter lower case plural pronoun that has a kind of intimacy and warmth to it in the country Music film Merle Haggard says. Country music is about those things we believe in but can't see like dreams and songs and soul is telling us that there is In front of us a kind of rational world in which one in one always equals two, but that the thing that compels us forward as human beings is that we look for one in one Equaling three. We find that in our faith, we find that in our art we find that in our love of each other, and I think one of things I discovered working on country music is that When I understood this dynamic between the US and US lower case upper case that I realized there's only us no them. The choice was easy because Thie American struggle to forge union from diversity has been Ken Burns obsession since he was 11 years old at the end of this lane in Ann Arbor, Michigan. In 1965, his mother was dying of cancer. At the same time, the fight for equality was in critical condition. Before my mom died, I would watch and I would hear from the other room about the dogs and the fire hoses in Selma, and it would make me as upset. As upset in my gut. As the worry about my mom. And it was almost as if I was transposing the cancer that was killing my family and the cancer that was killing my country. And if you look at my films, almost 40 of them, you can count on the fingers of one hand. The number of films that don't end up dealing with race. His early films included the Statue of Liberty and the Congress, but it wasn't until his seventh. That America returned. Ken Burns affection. The Civil War was seen by 39 million viewers, an 11 hour epic that immortalized a love letter and the walls. The Ashokan farewell. The fiddle to the fiddle tune that you could never get out of your head already died out of the home. The lament seemed written as a score. For the letter union soldiers, Sullivan Ballou wrote his wife a week before his staff. I shall always be with you in the brightest day in the darkest night, Always Always On When the soft breeze fans your cheek. It It will will be be my my breath breath or or the the cool cool air air your your throbbing throbbing temple. temple. It It should should be be my my spirit spirit passing passing by. by. I I think think every every man wishes he could say those words to the woman he loves. And every woman wishes that her man could say that that maybe our shot burns films are a letter to the country he loves, but not out of blind devotion. His is Theophile action that endures after confronting America's founding flaw. We hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal, yet he owned more than 200 human beings. And never saw fit to free them. Burns finds Thie American paradox in the wars we fight and the games we play that told people that baseball was the sequel to the Civil War, and I meant it. I meant it, how we play games and the nature of immigration and the exclusion of women and popular culture and advertising and heroes and villains and our imagination and race and race and race. Are who we are, and the first really progress in civil rights after the Civil War takes place when Jack Roosevelt Robinson, the grandson of a slave makes his way to first base at Debits Field on April 15th 1947. Then there's no question that the story of baseball is just going to take off. From the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the failure of reconstruction and moved to that to that moment. Ken Burns moment came in 1981 with his first subject, the Brooklyn Bridge, which no one thought was a good idea where you had an inanimate object and no one to interview right. Great television. Yes, and I look 12 years old, So I was out trying to raise money. And they say this child is trying to sell me the Brooklyn Bridge. No. PVs bought the Brooklyn Bridge and Burns structured his style. Animating images frozen in time and giving them voice here. I was 32 years old, suddenly in charge of the most stupendous engineering structure of the age. Famous voices volunteer just to be in a Ken Burns film Meryl Streep as Eleanor Roosevelt. Courage is more exhilarating them fear Tom Hanks in the war. You'd never realised now that he was one of those emaciated, tortured souls who survived by some miracle. The horror of that death march at the town. His films have the pace of patient revelation. And time. To think. This is a beautiful beautiful part part of of the the country. country. It's It's the the rhythm rhythm of of a a director director who who lives lives not not in in New New York York or or L L A, A, but but on on 50 50 acres acres of of Walpole, Walpole, New New Hampshire, Hampshire, where where even even his his apples have history. So these air cuttings that were taken from trees at Monticello. Of course they are. We met Burns before the pandemic at 67. He has four daughters from two marriages, but his longest relationship for decades. Is with PBS unfortunate that PBS exists. I can go tomorrow to a premium channel or or someplace streaming service and get it. $30 million to Vietnam. But no one's going to say you can take 10.5 years can. This was the main bedroom. He couldn't take his time because he raises the money and runs his own company, Florentine films. Producers, writers, historians, editors and photographers craft a half dozen films at once, so Burns can release about one a year, even though a series like country Music takes eight years to finish. Country music, the songwriter Harlan Howard said his three chords and the truth is, if you listen to 15,000 songs sifted through more than 100,000 still photos And did 101 on camera interviews. Why so much? One would think that making a film is an additive process your building this? It's not. It's subtracted. The best metaphor I know of is we make maple syrup here in this town. And it takes 40 gowns of sap to make one gallon of maple syrup. And that's what the process is. Burns has boiled down the history of Mark Twain, the national parks plus 18 hours on Vietnam and 19 hours of jazz kins films touched Something at the heart of our mythology and who we have been. At our best in that are worse and who we want to be a composer Wynton Marsalis collaborated on jazz and country music. Marsalis is artistic director of New York's jazz at Lincoln Center and something of an expert on improvising with Ken Burns. He'll be vibrating. And that'll be in the fourth year of something, and it will be one o'clock in the morning after you've worked since nine o'clock in the morning. So now is one o'clock, so he's still like, No, no right here. We need to where we need to. In the sea, like a person with that type of energy and just on fire like that. And as he's grown older, he's gotten worse. So you know the fire's got bigger. The fire is the fires. And just the enthusiasm fired of passion can told us that you see him. So What do you say? You know for me? I always feel like a kid. If you can retain that childish What are in wonderment and belief that you can change things. If you can maintain that. And that's what I see in him.

Ken Burns United States Burns Baseball Cancer Sullivan Ballou Theophile Merle Haggard Vietnam Jack Roosevelt Robinson Debits Field Brooklyn Bridge Selma Statue Of Liberty Ann Arbor New New York York
Ethiopia to replace Tigray region leadership as forces clash

Forum

05:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Ethiopia to replace Tigray region leadership as forces clash

"Let's move to Ethiopia, which is currently technically in a state of civil war. On Thursday, the Ethiopian military and officials in the northern Tigre region accused each other of instigating a civil conflict that has seen fighting between government soldiers and troops loyal to the regional administration. In a televised address early on Wednesday, Ethiopia's prime minister Abbiamo accused the local government of attacking federal troops, and he said the region's ruling party, the Tigre, People's Liberation Front, or TPLF, were traitors. We're going to the National Defense Force that has been in the bunkers for the past 20, plus years defending its people and the country by paying heavy sacrifices with its blood and flesh has been attacked this evening in Michael. And many other places by traders and the force they organized. The army has been attacked from behind by its own citizens, and many have been martyred, wounded and properties destroyed. This force of destruction has been engaged in many counterproductive activities for the past many months. The regional president of Tigre. Debra Montgomery kill, has described the actions of the military as an invasion were joined on the line out from Addis Ababa by William Davison. He's a senior analyst on Ethiopia for the International Crisis Group. Thank you for joining us. What's the latest that you're hearing how many casualties in the fighting? Well, actually, the number of casualties of fatalities is one of the things that is not clear. There is still a communications blackout across Tigre. But there are certainly casualties being reported from the hospital visits and outside the thing. Essentially, we have an active conflict, a CZ you've clearly described in the introduction. The fighting has been concentrated in West too great so far has bean incursions by the federal military from West agree that Paul is the horror region on horror regions. Forces have also been involved. To some extent. I think it's worth noting that degrades main supply route would be through West a great and into Eastern sedan reported on so that perhaps explains the focus of that fighting, and we've also seen small search skirmishes around medically. To grace capital and in the last day or so, that is involved air strikes by the federal military to try and take out military installations around metal. And that really indicates a major problem here, which is that part of the federal military appeared to be siding with a great vision. Can you explain a little bit of background to this? Why has this situation been allowed to reach to this state of hostility? Well, I mean offices that there's a very long political background to great region has a long history of autonomy to the central government, as well as being involved in central politics. More recently, TPLF was the preeminent party, the ruling coalition that lasted essentially until 2018 when Communist at the Army came to power. No off. He took power on the tplf. They lost a lot off their federal positions and power. And there were all sorts of accusations traded back and forth allegations of destabilization as we've heard what's on the TPL aside. They said that they were unfairly targeted prosecutions by the federal government and also discrimination and marginalization More general Then there was the creation of a national ruling party by prime minister Beyond the TPLF objected to that, Andi they sat it out, became formerly part of the opposition this year. This is evolved into an electoral dispute at the constitutional disputes. The federal government tried to extend all government terms when it delayed elections due to covered 19 Tigre opposed us. They run their own poll and that lets the federal government describing Tigre is government is unlawful and takeaways Government government, saying the federal government had overstayed its constitutional mandate. That is the buildup to the conflict We have now and William, you're seeing evidence now that the military in Tigre is siding with the Local government. Is that right? Yes, That's right. Like I say, information blackout. I can't be sure of exactly what's occurring on the ground. But yesterday, the federal government says that the military the air force to try to take out missile launches on missiles. Now that is Ethiopian military hardware. So that suggests either elements of what is called the Northern Command a very powerful units of Egypt's military that has been fighting the war on manning the border with Eritrea that suggested either elements Since there have defected or otherwise under the control of the secret leadership. Otherwise, the air Force would not be bombing those installations. This is a major piece of the puzzle in terms of the balance of power here, and it suggests that we could be entering a protracted conflict that is a conflict that is likely to escalate, it could destabilize Ethiopia and its armed forces it could bring in Eritrea. And it could generally destabilize the entire region. This is why dialogue and some form of talks is absolutely in Paris, and

Tplf Ethiopia Prime Minister Abbiamo Tigre, People's Liberation Fro National Defense Force Debra Montgomery William Davison Tigre Federal Government International Crisis Group Addis Ababa Army Michael Paul West Andi Air Force Northern Command
The Birth of the Animal Rights Movement

The Book Review

04:00 min | 3 weeks ago

The Birth of the Animal Rights Movement

"Ernest. Friburg joins us. Now he is the head of the history department at the university of tennessee and his most recent book is called a traitor to his species. Henry bergh and the birth of the animal rights movement ernest. Thanks for being here my blizzard. Thank you all right. We have to start with the obvious question because this is not a household name for most people who was henry burgh will he was the founder of the aspca and brought the idea of an animal welfare movement animal rights laws to the united states. Right after the civil war in eighteen sixty six. Your area of expertise is nineteenth and twentieth century. Social and cultural history. It's easy to see why your last book. The age of edison looked at the effects of electricity on society. What got you from there to looking at henry bergh and the birth of the animal rights movement. Well in all my work. I think i've been interested in the way this time period. We sort of called the gilded age. The progressive era into world war one the way this shaped the modern world the world that we live in two books ago. I wrote about the origin of civil liberties civil Free speech rights coming out of world war one. The edison book was looking at are both love and hatred of technology. In this case. I was interested in the way. If you look at a an image of nineteenth century city you see horses and of course. There are many many other animals very closely together with with people in the streets but by the nineteen twenty s. That's not the case anymore. In a sense this you know. Our urban environment has been stripped of animals. One historian described it. As as you know we live in a world where in urban environments at least we only have pets and pests and i thought that that captured that that pretty well so i was interested in that transition and i think the animal welfare movement and henry berg's career in particular kind of captures the beginning of some really profound changes in the relationship between humans and animals that started in that time period ended israeli. Still with us today. To what extent is that that change the decline of animals in urban environments. A consequence of the animal rights movement and to what extent is that. Really just about technology industrialisation. Oh it's certainly all those things. I'm not suggesting that the animal welfare movement itself was a driver in any of this but rather was a reflection of its changing sensibilities and in many cases they welcomed the technological changes if steam engines and electricity could replace the horse. That was good for the horse. As far as the animal welfare movement was concerned. so yes they. They're they're really just part of a much wider chains. It's a way to get at people's sensibilities in this time period. This was a time when people came to care much more about animals but at the same time very technology that you're talking about made like pretty grim for many animals as well. The american city was not a friendly place for animals. Describe what a typical city. And let's just use new york because that is where erg lived. What did near city look like at its peak in terms of the number of animals in the city will think about the horses the motive our for the entire city so everything just about relying on horsepower and that meant enormous traffic jams of carriages and wagons and these these railroads that were really the first mass transportation in the city's fundamental to the growth of cities in this time period but then of course there are huge packs of stray dogs roaming in the alleys idea of animal was really developed during this period animal welfare movement. Lots of people are moving into the city from rural areas. And they're bringing with them their own traditions of keeping a cow in the backyard and chickens and and so forth. Pigs are rooting in in the garbage. There really was not very good sanitation control in most neighbourhoods so scrape pigs were part of the scene so it was a it was an enormously rich complicated and dirty mix of humans and animals in this time period.

Henry Bergh Henry Burgh Henry Berg University Of Tennessee Aspca Ernest Edison United States New York
Having Made Peace Abroad, Ethiopia’s Leader Goes to War at Home

Chad Benson Show

00:17 sec | 3 weeks ago

Having Made Peace Abroad, Ethiopia’s Leader Goes to War at Home

"Overseas. Ethiopia is approaching civil war The country is Nobel Peace Prize winning prime minister ordering the military to confront a well armed regional government in Ethiopia, accusing it of a deadly attack on a military base. The U. S and United Nations urging and immediate de

Ethiopia United Nations
Hope And Pray (MM #3513)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Hope And Pray (MM #3513)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation it's election day here in America and like many I'm hoping and I'm praying I'm not talking about which political candidates I'm pulling for. I'm talking about while the world we're living in. I'm hoping and praying there won't be any violence at any polling places today. I'm hoping there won't be any violence tonight. If and when election results are announced I pray for how do I say this that we don't begin to engage in a civil war because right now we're very divided right now. It truly is them versus us and all depends on which side of the coin you're living on. It's very scary. It's very frustrating. I remember as a kid growing up in the sixties and they said they were turbulent times. I'll be honest with you. I don't know if these are more turbulent or not. It's kind of tough to say but I hope and I pray and I know that's kind of taking the easy way out when you hope and pray for people you're not really doing anything. I've done my part I voted and I hope for the best not just for my candidates but for our entire country cuz I'm truly concerned and I'm not the only one month.

Kevin Nation America
Hope And Pray (MM #3513)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Hope And Pray (MM #3513)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation it's election day here in America and like many I'm hoping and I'm praying I'm not talking about which political candidates I'm pulling for. I'm talking about while the world we're living in. I'm hoping and praying there won't be any violence at any polling places today. I'm hoping there won't be any violence tonight. If and when election results are announced I pray for how do I say this that we don't begin to engage in a civil war because right now we're very divided right now. It truly is them versus us and all depends on which side of the coin you're living on. It's very scary. It's very frustrating. I remember as a kid growing up in the sixties and they said they were turbulent times. I'll be honest with you. I don't know if these are more turbulent or not. It's kind of tough to say but I hope and I pray and I know that's kind of taking the easy way out when you hope and pray for people you're not really doing anything. I've done my part I voted and I hope for the best not just for my candidates but for our entire country cuz I'm truly concerned and I'm not the only one month.

Kevin Nation America
Hope And Pray (MM #3513)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Hope And Pray (MM #3513)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation it's election day here in America and like many I'm hoping and I'm praying I'm not talking about which political candidates I'm pulling for. I'm talking about while the world we're living in. I'm hoping and praying there won't be any violence at any polling places today. I'm hoping there won't be any violence tonight. If and when election results are announced I pray for how do I say this that we don't begin to engage in a civil war because right now we're very divided right now. It truly is them versus us and all depends on which side of the coin you're living on. It's very scary. It's very frustrating. I remember as a kid growing up in the sixties and they said they were turbulent times. I'll be honest with you. I don't know if these are more turbulent or not. It's kind of tough to say but I hope and I pray and I know that's kind of taking the easy way out when you hope and pray for people you're not really doing anything. I've done my part I voted and I hope for the best not just for my candidates but for our entire country cuz I'm truly concerned and I'm not the only one month.

Kevin Nation America
Hope And Pray (MM #3513)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Hope And Pray (MM #3513)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation it's election day here in America and like many I'm hoping and I'm praying I'm not talking about which political candidates I'm pulling for. I'm talking about while the world we're living in. I'm hoping and praying there won't be any violence at any polling places today. I'm hoping there won't be any violence tonight. If and when election results are announced I pray for how do I say this that we don't begin to engage in a civil war because right now we're very divided right now. It truly is them versus us and all depends on which side of the coin you're living on. It's very scary. It's very frustrating. I remember as a kid growing up in the sixties and they said they were turbulent times. I'll be honest with you. I don't know if these are more turbulent or not. It's kind of tough to say but I hope and I pray and I know that's kind of taking the easy way out when you hope and pray for people you're not really doing anything. I've done my part I voted and I hope for the best not just for my candidates but for our entire country cuz I'm truly concerned and I'm not the only one month.

Kevin Nation America
Women the ‘driving force’ for peacebuilding in Colombia: Deputy UN chief

UN News

01:07 min | Last month

Women the ‘driving force’ for peacebuilding in Colombia: Deputy UN chief

"U N Deputy Secretary General Meaning Muhammad has stressed on Friday the importance of the full implementation of Colombia's 2016 agreement at the end of a forty eight hour virtual visit to the Latin American country Ms. Muhammad also highlighted how rural areas hit hard by violence and covid nineteen needed sustained support. She told journalists that immediate priorities were the creation of development opportunities, improved security and the increased presence of government after decades of civil war and the ongoing pandemic. This is the time to think about measures to rebuild better to leave. No. One behind and to achieve a sustainable peace she said in an online press conference. The deputy chief also welcomed the role of women in ensuring that the twenty sixteen peacedale was implemented in full she spoke about meeting young women, peace builders in Vista Hermosa, an area deeply affected by armed conflict and of their commitment to finding peace and dignity for their communities although the Peacedale is not without challenges Miss Muhammed insisted that the UN stood with Colombians seeking to implement the peace deal to support the growing momentum for economic and social reintegration. For. All

Ms. Muhammad Deputy Secretary Deputy Chief Colombia Vista Hermosa Miss Muhammed UN
‘No, I'm not part of the problem’: Corbyn responds to anti-Semitism report

C-SPAN Programming

01:46 min | Last month

‘No, I'm not part of the problem’: Corbyn responds to anti-Semitism report

"Reports quote. Labor has suspended its former leader, Jeremy Corbyn, after he said anti Semitism in the party was overstated. Following a damning report from the equality watchdog. The move is likely to ignite a civil war in the Labour Party. Korben condemned his suspension as a political intervention and said he would strongly contest the action. Mr. Corbin gave an interview then to the Guardian newspaper. What I said today Wass that anti Semitism is unacceptable in any form. What I said exactly what I said was the numbers of cases in the public perception had become overstated The existence of the problem I fully acknowledge, which is Why I took action to end the problem in the party by introducing a process to get anti seen lights out off the party. No, I'm not part of the problem. The problem is anti Semitism, historically anti Semitism in the presence on the fear that many people have off being under attack at the synagogue, or, indeed mosques, temples and lots of other places within our society. We need to tackle racism in every conceivable form. In our society and that's former Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn. The Guardian Story goes on to say that quote the Equality and Human Rights Commission report found labor responsible for unlawful acts of harassment and discrimination over anti Semitism. It's site serious failings in the Labour Party leadership in addressing anti Semitism and an inadequate process for handling anti Semitism. Complaints. Well, thank you for joining us on

Semitism Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn Equality And Human Rights Comm Wass Mr. Corbin Korben Harassment
Under Your Feet

The Past and the Curious

06:09 min | Last month

Under Your Feet

"You may remember Charles Wilson Peel as the man featured in episode thirty four all about museums in Philadelphia's independence hall above the very room where the declaration of Independence was signed. He opened a museum to display a whole bunch of unusual things. There were mammoth skeletons, ancient artifacts, a wily and well traveled little prairie dog and a wall full of portraits of very important people. He painted those VIP portraits himself appeal among everything else was a remarkable artist and the paintings that he made of the many people who lived in the late seventeen hundreds are some of the best of the time period. We should remember that in the seventeen hundreds there was no television or computers there weren't even photographs. So the average person would probably never actually catch a glimpse of someone famous like George Washington or Ben Franklin and person. which meant that they might not know what they really looked like. Isn't that funny thing to consider if you were alive at the time and wondered what a person look like looking at a portrait was just about the only way to see a famous face. So, curious people were happy to pay Peale's museum admission to see paintings of these very important people and finally put faces with the names they had heard about all the time, the old animal parts and the little prairie dog that peel had on display. Just a nice bonus. Now Peel was just one man and he couldn't paint everyone. Appeal portrait was typically an honor reserved for only the most notable people, presidents, founding fathers, famous personalities. You had to do something pretty special to get appeal portrait. And here's another thing to keep in mind. This was the seventeen hundreds in America and the early eighteen hundreds. So all of the faces that tended to fit those descriptions at that time were white faces. All except for one. On the wall that peel filled from floor to ceiling portrait's in his museum, one painting certainly stuck out to any visitor. It was the face of a black man and he was very old. And the dark skin on his narrow face was accented by white tufts of beard hair in the painting. He's wearing a knit cap on his head. Mike one you'll probably be getting out soon with the rest of your winter clothes. If you haven't already the old man's eyes looked bright and strong and his expression was one of satisfaction. It's an incredible face to look at and many people have wondered who was this man in a way the portrait happened by accident. In eighteen nineteen peel had traveled from his home in Baltimore to Washington DC to paint James Monroe the fifth president of the United States. while. They're peels. Curiosity was piqued when he heard about a free black man who is a practicing Muslim and who not only owned a home in nearby. Georgetown but was a successful business man who had helped finance the bank. This was remarkable and because this was forty six years before the civil war and the end of slavery, it was very unusual. This man was called Yaro Mahmoud. And people said he was one hundred and forty years old. That part was fake. He was probably around eighty at the time but everything else was true. Peel had to make a special trip across the Potomac River to meet Yaro talk with him about his life and have him sit for a very unusual portrait. Painting portraits takes a lot of time as you might imagine, which means there's plenty of time to talk, and that's what Yaro did. The little that we know about him today is mostly because Peel wrote much of it down. It's a pretty amazing story and one that challenges our ideas of the people who were living and thriving in. America at the time. In the year. Seventeen. Fifteen euro was only fourteen when he was captured and taken from his home in West Africa he like millions of other men, women and children was victim of the slave trade. People were kidnapped from their lands, take into another and forced into Labor. Euros people were known as the Fulani and it is believed that his family were wealthy Muslim leaders in this community. Historians think this because Yaro knew how to read and write both in the Fulani language as well as Arabic. Later in his life he learned to read and write a bit of English as well. Making him literate in three languages. That's a feet for anyone at the time but especially unusual for someone who would live much of his life and slavery. Most. Enslaved people would be kept from learning to read and write at all. But for euro, it helped him stand out. After the terrible journey on a slave ship across the Atlantic Ocean Yaro landed in Maryland where a man named Bell bought him directly off the boat. Everything and everyone Yaro new was gone never to be seen again, the man who legally purchased him was a wealthy farmer who owned several properties that depended on the work of enslaved people, farms, watermills, things like that pretty quickly though bell figured out that Yaro was more well suited for work other than hard plantation labor luckily, for Yaro, his education lead to another old, he became what is known as a body servant. In this role young Yaro traveled with bell everywhere he went. When he met with other farmers, Yaro was there. He met the people he would sell his grain too Yarra was there. When he met with powerful politicians, Yaro was also there. And nearly every one of those people would remember meeting Euro. Mahmoud. How could you not? He was obviously incredibly talented and smart, but also by being in the room when business was happening. Yaro was able to learn how to make it happen himself.

Yaro Yaro Mahmoud Charles Wilson Peel America George Washington Philadelphia Ben Franklin Peale Potomac River Maryland Bell Mike James Monroe Georgetown Euros West Africa President Trump Washington
The Birth of a Nation & The Origins of the NAACP

Black History in Two Minutes

02:26 min | Last month

The Birth of a Nation & The Origins of the NAACP

"Most early films consisted of one real. Lasted around fifteen minutes and cost a few hundred dollars to produce. All of that changed in Nineteen fifteen. When a film called the birth of a nation? A three hour long saga was released by Director D, W, griffith it instantly stood out as a technological and storytelling marvel. It also stood out as a monumental piece of blatantly racist propaganda. The birth of a nation fixes, certain story of the civil war and reconstruction in the minds of the American public, and that story is that black people were too lazy and ignorant to fully master the citizenship that they were offered by reconstruction. Birth of a nation really didn't have black people it. So these white people in black face portraying congressman who are obviously not ready for self-government. Portraying the idea of. Rapist and these all the stereotypes that are believed by many many Americans. The film was met with fierce resistance from African Americans particularly from a recently founded organization focused on the advancement of the race, the end up boys EP. One of the most important early initiatives of the N. Double ACP was. Against the birth of a nation, they generated a lot of interest by protesting FM and drew in a great deal of support from African Americans. Despite its best efforts, the NWC couldn't persuade censorship boards or theaters. To limit the film's reach. But the young organization gained national prominence because of this campaign. That year membership almost doubled. And that number would continue to grow as it melted the fight against Jim Crow. Those activists descended at the time. Those dissenting voices were always there. They were there during the darkest periods of American history and remembering that tradition to me is almost more important than remembering the failures and the losses and the terrorism the black people faced.

Jim Crow N. Double Acp Congressman NWC Director D Griffith
"civil war" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

11:46 min | 8 months ago

"civil war" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Begins. That will last until July third the battle of Gettysburg Pennsylvania. The bloodiest battle of the civil war dashes robbery lease hosts for a successful invasion of the north Sunday Sunday Sunday but actually a Wednesday Thursday and Friday Robert e Lee's a mouth of the south. He rides a horse named traveler. He takes on George T meet in the battle of Gettysburg the old snapping turtle seriously. I didn't even make up that nickname. He rides a horse named Old Baldy also seriously. His nickname suck. We're going to tell you the whole seat but you'll only need the edge. This battle involves around eighty five thousand men in the Union army of the Potomac under Major General George Gordon. Meade approximately seventy five thousand in the confederate army of northern Virginia commanded by generally casualties at Gettysburg. Total twenty three thousand forty nine for the Union. Twenty eight thousand sixty three for the confederacy. More than a third of Lee's army. These largely irreplaceable losses to the South's largest army combined with the confederate surrender of VICKSBURG MISSISSIPPI. Marked what is widely regarded as a huge turning point? Perhaps the turning point in the war against the south although the conflict will continue for nearly two more years union naval and land forces attack defenses near Charleston South Carolina July tenth and Eleventh Among the Union troops is the fifty fourth Massachusetts Colored Infantry the first African American regiment of volunteers to see Combat Hail Nimrod. How men must have fucking loved to fire confederates. I mean how can you not how we're victory would not be there as confederates would fend off? The attack on July thirteenth draft rights begin a New York City and elsewhere as disgruntled workers and labor seething over the draft system seemingly favors. The rich attacked the draft office in African American churches. Holy Shit. The rights continue through July sixteenth attacking. The churches. See like I said earlier. Not everyone in the north really. Gave a shit about the plight The plight of the black southern's life near Falling Waters Maryland July Thirteenth Fourteenth Union troops skirmished with. Lee's rear guard that night. The Army of Northern Virginia crosses the Potomac River in the Gettysburg campaign in July Eighteenth Marxist second assault on Battery Wagner South Carolina leading the Union infantry charges the fifty fourth Massachusetts colored infantry commanded by Colonel Robert gowd Shaw who's killed and buried with the dead of his regiment. The South again fends off. Union soldiers on September nineteenth and twenty. Th the battle of chicken. Maga Georgia's is thought. I had not heard of this one. The Union army of the Cumberland under General William Rosencrantz defeated nearly routed by the confederate army of Tennessee commanded by General Braxton Bragg Rosencrantz army retreat to the supply base at Chattanooga. Tennessee was sixteen thousand. One Hundred Seventy Union in eighteen thousand. Four hundred fifty four confederate casualties. The battle of chicken Maga or chicken Maga was the second Kasese battle the civil war ranking only behind Gettysburg. By far the deadliest battle fought in the west crazy how much more well known the battle of Gettysburg is. I'm guessing partly because no one cares about second place and also chicken Maga not as catchy as Gettysburg Lot. More fighting happens over the next few months. November Nineteenth President Abraham Lincoln delivered at Gettysburg address. Lot more fighting happened for another month. December eighteen sixty three Lincoln issues proclamation of Amnesty and reconstruction. Which would pardon knows who participated in the existing rebellion? South for the most part doesn't give a shit keeps fighting February nineteen sixty four after weeks. Dig In one hundred. Nine Union officers escaped from the notorious Libby prison in Richmond Virginia largest most insatiable escape of the war though forty eight of the escapee's later captured to drown. Fifty nine made their way back to union lines. How bad ass civil war jailbreak Wiesner movie about that? I hope some of the nine survivors live long lives February seventeen to eighteen sixty four fucking submarine shows up the Hell's the submarine doing here and the first successful submarine tax civil war the CSS H L Hunley a seven manned submersible craft attacks USS. Houston HOUSTON ick outside of Charleston. South Carolina struck by the submarine's torpedo. I think Houston tonic. I missed out on a tonic. Broke apart and sank taking all but five of her crew with her unfortunately because it was eighteen sixty four and submarines really sucked the Hunley also lost never heard from again until discovered in nineteen ninety-five those poor bastards inside. What a quick roller coaster emotions for them who did it. We just sunk their battleship. Shit why are we thinking? Because it's eight hundred sixty four. This is a fucking submarine or are we thinking doing this? March third in eighteen sixty four ulysses grant assumes command of all union armies in the field. He immediately celebrates by getting shit faced. Over the next four weeks the confederates lose several times in Louisiana then on April twelfth. They win Tennessee that day. The captured Fort Pillow Tennessee after a rapid rate through central and western Tennessee confederate cavalry under Nathan Bedford. Forrest attacking overwhelmed the union garrison at Fort Pillow among those garrison. The fort were African American troops. Many of whom were murdered by forest angered troops after they had surrendered. The affair was investigated and no charges of an atrocity were denied by confederate authorities. Of course the events for pillow cast a pall over forces reputation remained an emotional issue for the rest of the war on May fourth and Fifth Generals Grant and Lee Clash Virginia and the Battle of the wilderness the opening battle of the overland campaign or Wilderness Campaign General Grant a company Army of the Potomac under general meade issued orders for the campaign to begin on May Third Lee responded by attacking the Union column in Dense Woods and underbrush An area known as the Wilderness West of Fredericksburg Virginia Most agreed that union casualties were around seventeen thousand eighteen thousand a confederate casualties whereas highs around eleven thousand four hundred based on the numbers. The Battle of the Wilderness was the fourth bloodiest battle to civil war ranking behind Gettysburg spots over the unions Atlanta campaign begins. I may seven with three union armies under his command. General William T Sherman March South Tennessee into Georgia against the confederate army of Tennessee. Under General Joseph Johnston the objective being the capture of Atlanta. The Atlanta campaign would run from May to September directly precede Sherman's infamous march to the sea. The number of union soldiers engaged the Atlanta campaign varied from about ninety eight thousand. Two hundred twelve thousand. While the number of confederate soldiers was around fifty thousand on May fourth and fifteenth as part of Atlanta that campaign. The Battle of soccer Georgia raged this battlefield over one hundred fifty eight thousand total troops ninety nine thousand with a union sixty for the South Jer. General Sherman's armies are blocked by Razaka by General Johnston's Army of Tennessee or blocked at Razaka after two days of maneuvering intense fighting Johnston withdrawals German advances but takes precautions against order. Any further mass assaults were high casualties may occur both sides lost around two thousand eight hundred June fourth. I through the third general Lee gets his last major victory to civil war in the battle of cold harbor. Virginia was a sprawling two week engagement left more than eighteen. Thousand soldiers killed wounded or captured. The South Wins again on June tenth and the Battle of Rice's crossroads Mississippi despite being outnumbered almost two one confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest Attacks Routes a union command. Under General Samuel Sturgis. There are two twenty six hundred union casualties at eighty five hundred troops compared with less than five hundred confederate casualties out. Thirty five hundred. On July nine th the confederates damn near You. Create an opportunity for themselves to attack the capital. This is when the battle of monocracy Maryland goes to south way in an attempt to draw union troops away from the ongoing siege of Petersburg and Richmond a confederate force under jubal early quietly moved north into Maryland. Early had made excellent progress until he reaches Frederick where a force of six thousand federal troops under General Wallace is a raid to delay his advance though. The battle was a union defeat. It also touted. I was touted as the battle that save Washington for it succeeded in holding back early. March until troops could be sent to the capital defense during the fighting. Roughly Twenty to twenty two hundred men were killed wounded or captured or listed as missing from the from the Union. Nine hundred confederate Oh I'm sorry. Twenty two hundred total confederate. Jesus Christ so many numbers dizzy. Sometimes July eleventh and twelfth two confederates attack Washington in the battle of Fort Stevens. Jubal early troops arrived on the outskirts of Washington. Dc trade cannon fire with the Token Union force remaining in the fourth round. The city President Lincoln is able to see the fighting right from the capital. He's observing the skirmishing from Fort Stevens reinforcements from the army of the Potomac arrive in quickly. Fill IN THE WORKS. Early withdraws that evening luckily the south over three years into the war. Pretty crazy three years of union forces attacking him and three years of the Union. Mostly winning the war on southern soil. And they're still not ready to raise the white flag and they almost take DC July twenty first and twenty second is the battle of Atlanta General. James McPherson Commander of the Union Army of Tennessee killed during the fighting of these thirty four thousand eight hundred sixty three union troops engaged in the battle. Three thousand seven hundred twenty two killed wounded captured or missing. Confederate forces suffered estimated fifty five hundred casualties out of over forty thousand soldiers. Despite Losing Gentlemen Pherson the Union or to General McPherson or. Excuse me despite losing the Union this battle despite losing the General Jesus Christ despite losing general McPherson. There we go. The Union wins battle and it sets the stage for the union taken the city in September. I didn't understand my notes. There and then that paves the way for Sherman's March to the sea lot more fighting occurs over the rest of the summer on September first Atlanta falls completely confederate troops under General Hood Evacuate City General. Sherman's army occupied the city and its defenses. The following day union casualties about thirty one thousand six hundred man. Lot of casualties to take the confederate casualties. About thirty five thousand. An estimated four thousand four hundred. Twenty one Four thousand four hundred twenty. Three Union soldiers died during the Atlanta campaign. An estimated three thousand forty four confederate soldiers died so much more fighting happens over the next few months. My Heck Gosh. Dang on November eighth eighteen. Sixty-four Abraham Lincoln is re elected president of the United States. And he starts his second term famously by holding a press conference and telling the south to and I quote suck his big black Dick No. He doesn't fucking awesome. If you would've said those exact words used funds suck my leg dig. Wait wait what so confused on. So many levels on November Sixteen General Sherman's Army of Georgia begins the infamous march to the sea which includes some sixty thousand soldiers on a two hundred eighty five mile march from Atlanta to Savannah. The purpose of Sherman's March to the sea is too frightened. Georgia's civilian population into abandoning the confederate war effort. And it works. Sherman's troops marched south towards Savannah in two wings about thirty miles apart on November. Twenty seven thousand five hundred confederate cavalry start a skirmish with the Union soldiers at Griswald Ville end so badly. Six hundred and fifty confederate soldiers were killed or wounded compared to sixty two Yankee casualties the southern troops initiate no more no more battles with Sherman instead they flee south ahead of Sherman's troops wreaking havoc as they go. They wreck bridges chop down trees burn barns filled with provisions before the Union army can reach them. They're burning down their own stuff. The Union soldiers are just as a terrible. They raid farms plantations steal and slaughter cows chickens turkeys sheep hogs taking food especially bread and potatoes as much as they can carry..

Union Union army confederate army South General Sherman Atlanta Gettysburg Tennessee Abraham Lincoln Robert e Lee Hundred Seventy Union South Carolina president Virginia Union infantry Token Union Army of Northern Virginia Gettysburg Pennsylvania Washington
"civil war" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

10:34 min | 8 months ago

"civil war" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Sunday Sunday Sunday. Yes march ninth. Eighteen sixty two was actually a Sunday the USF monitor versus the CSS Virginia. A new metal era of naval warfare. The Virginia decimated a union fleet of wooden warships. Today before and it was just getting started with crowds watching from the shores Virginia. Cannonball the Monitor's pilothouse and it limped away totally fugard. The South wins the day. So that happened. Battle had roads Months later on April sixth and seventh the battle of Shiloh Pittsburg landing first major battle of the war fought and Tennessee confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston veteran of the Texas War of independence in the war of Mexico or with Mexico considered to be one of the finest officer. The South has is killed in the very first fighting. The Union victory further secures the career and fame of union general ulysses unconditional surrender Gret. It was an extremely bloody battle. More than thirteen thousand of grants approximately sixty. Two thousand troops were killed. Wounded captured missing. A forty five thousand confederates engaged. There were more than ten thousand casualties and feel like now is a good time to talk about how these battles were fought because they keep doing all these numbers but but how will these battles actually fought first an overview of this particular battle on the morning of April six eighteen sixty to forty thousand confederate soldiers forty thousand votes under General Albert Sidney. Johnston struck encamp divisions of union soldiers near Pittsburg landing on the Tennessee River. The overpowering confederate attack drove the unprepared federal soldiers back threatened to overwhelm Major General Ulysses. Grant's Army of the Tennessee. Some federal units may determine stands and by afternoon. They established a battle line at the Hornets. Nest repeated rebel attacks supported by massed artillery killed or wounded many of the defending. Yankees pushed their lights back further. Johnston was mortally wounded replaced. By general Pierre Beauregard fighting continues till after dark and then the Union army held by the next morning grant had been reinforced by the army of the Ohio under Major General Don Carlos. Boil and heavily. Outnumbered bull regard grant then launched a counter-offensive along the entire line overpowering the weekend confederate forces driving regarding from the field the confederate defeat any hopes of blocking the union advance into northern Mississippi. But how did this go down like these lines are talking about these battles were brutal? The main weapon of the civil war was the springfield. A fifty eight caliber black powder of excuse me black powder muzzleloader rifle with a forty inch. Barrel firing ammo called mini balls. They could fire two to four loads permanent depending on the skill of the soldier because of the relatively inaccurate weapon there was this woman pretty inaccurate and the lack of marksmanship training for most soldiers. It was usually used in mass fire. Tactics be large numbers of soldiers standing in long lines shoulder to shoulder firing simultaneously to saturate a target area. Most of this fighting was done in open fields. The shooting offense started when soldiers were two hundred fifty to three hundred fifty yards out. You know from their opponents because they could fire so far out but they weren't that accurate But could be. They could reload faster than earlier. Rifles the best battle tactic was just to have waves of hundreds of men. Hold their lines right so. Just be these long lines of dudes in rows of them shoulder to shoulder marching and firing directly at a line of enemy soldiers direct multiple lights. Thus about. If you tried to crawl towards your enemy. They would just have more time to shoot you so that was out if you tried to run wildly haphazardly across the battlefield loose formations. Then you weren't GonNa hit enough enemy soldiers to overtake their position and they would pick you off so that was out so the best plan was just to march in broad daylight straight into enemy fire knowing. That was a very good chance you'll be shot. Imagine being commanded to be amongst the first wave of soldiers walking into that man but those guys were saying prayers to make peace with God before they started walking. You often tried to flank your opponent. You wanted to march to the end of their line. Put their line perpendicular to yours that way when they're trying to shoo their friends are in their way then there was artillery to consider. While you're marching directly enemy fire there was cannons big metal tubes on wheels a ten or twelve pound piece of iron or lead would be stuffed into these canons with a bag of black gunpowder and then be powder we'd get the hell out of the way because the recoil on these canons would kick the cannon back up to eight feet. The cannon would send a piece of metal half mile to a mile and a half away. Some shelves were rigged to explode over the heads of troops and rain shrapnel on them others exploded on impact. When troops got close Canas could fire grape shot coffee cans full of twelve to twenty seven metal. Ball's shooting out like a gigantic shotgun. Blast you know just rip holes to multiple men. Oftentimes it was brutal. And then there was the cavalry soldiers carrying rifles worn horseback. The roles of the cavalry were in rough priority. Reconnaissance COUNTER RECONNAISSANCE DEFENSIVE delaying actions pursuit harassment of defeated enemy forces some limited offensive actions long distance rail against enemy lines of communications supply. Depots railroad that kind of thing so think about all this down to one battle. You're walking across a huge field. You're carrying your rifle. You're walking briskly lightly running depending on what point in the battle it is shoulder to shoulder as artillery fire. Rains down for hundreds of yards before. Your enemy is even firing range. Then they're starting to shoot at you. You're pausing to shoot then load in advance. Then shoot then load in advance over and over the line of soldiers directly in front of you. You know if you get close enough. Now you're bay and AETNA now it's hand to hand fighting if you can overpower them. Or flank them. You know when you get closer you have great shot ripping through your line oftentimes if you get overpowered and you start to retreat then sometimes the cavalry can rush in and pick you and your remaining fellow soldiers apart. Maybe get cut down with the cavs officer's sword if you're wounded but live. You might be carried away to a field hospital. Where if you've been shot in any of your extremities and the bullet or shrapnel didn't pass very cleanly through your limb you are now having that Lim crudely in quickly amputated amputations extr extremely common although the exact number is not known approximately sixty thousand surgeries about three quarters of all operations performed during the war. Were amputated right. Roughly seventy five percent of every operation of every operation is just cutting off a limb. Doctors often took over houses. Churches Schools Barnes for hospitals field. Hospital was located near the front lines. Sometimes only about a mile back anesthesia's first recorded use was in eighteen forty six. It was in use during the civil war. Thank God chloroform. Was the most common anesthetic using seventy five percent of operations usually applied to a clause held over the patient's mouth nose and then was withdrawn after the patient was unconscious. If chloroform wasn't available you had your arm or leg amputated after taking nothing. More than a Swig of whiskey while other soldiers held you down. And then sometimes you would wake up because you weren't given enough chloroform mid amputation. Luckily this was somewhat rare but it did happen fairly often. A capable surgeon could amputate a limb in ten minutes if he were somehow conscious. I bet that ten minutes didn't feel very fucking quick surges work all day and night with piles of limbs reportedly reaching four or five feet high in major battles a fucking pile of arms and legs five feet high. The hospitals were filled with the screams of the dying. The smell of blood and Gore does Whiskey louder. Saw lack of water and time at the doctors didn't have time to wash off their hands or wash off. Their instruments was bloody fingers. Being used as probes bloody knives for scalpels 's doctors operating covered in blood and pus. Staying Coats Surgical Fevers and gangrene. Were constant threats. One witness describes a civil war civil war field hospital like this tables about breast high been erected upon which the screaming victims were having legs and arms cut off so clearly. They're feeling it. The surgeons and their assistants stripped to the waist spattered with blood stood around some holding the poor fellows while others armed with long blood knives and saws cut and sawed away with frightful rapidity throwing the mangled limbs on a pile nearby as soon as removed. If a soldier survived the table he faced awful surgical. Fevers oftentimes it was hell everything about fighting. That war sounds absolutely horrific. And these men were butchering and being butchered by other Americans. Sometimes they were fighting. People gone to school with Some people have been friends with some cases. They fought their own neighbors. Brothers sons fathers and families were some members chose to fight for one side and other members chose to fight for the other. I understand that all wars are messy but this ooh especially messy now back to the timeline April twenty fourth eighteen sixty to a union. Fleet gun under Admiral. David Farragut passes confederate forts guarding the mouth of the Mississippi. Unable Twenty Fifth Fleet arrives in New Orleans where they demand the surrender of the city within two days. The Fort Falls into union hands in the mouth of the great rivers under union control. Big Union win the Battle of seven pines fought near Richmond. Virginia on May thirty first and June first eighteen sixty two general Joseph. Johnston commanded the confederate army in Virginia is wounded and replaced by Robert Ely. I think I've heard of Lebron James's command. The Army of Northern Virginia Union casualties were five thousand. Thirty one confederates. Six thousand hundred thirty four. There was the largest and bloodiest battles war to date after Shiloh eight weeks earlier. Both sides claimed victory June. Sixth the Battle of Memphis Tennessee has waged a union. Tila under Commodore. Charles Davis successfully defeats Confederate River Force on the Mississippi River. This city in Memphis renders the Mississippi River is now in union control except for its course west of Mississippi where the city of Vicksburg stands as the last southern stronghold on the Great River in the fighting union casualties limited to colonel. Charles Eliot the colonel later died of measles which he contracted while recovering from his wound. Disease all those weapons. I spoke of earlier all the saw. Happy doctors and then also so much disease. A precise confederate casualties not known but likely around two hundred August. Thirty first the battle of second bull run is fought on the same ground where one year before the Union army was defeated sent reeling in retreat to Washington and again. The Union army's defeat it total casualties for the battle. Top twenty two thousand union losses numbering almost fourteen thousand just two weeks later the battle of Antietam Maryland becomes the bloodiest single day. Civil war loss ends. Generally I attempt to invade the North. The Union suffers Twelve thousand four hundred one casualties confederates ten thousand..

Union army Albert Sidney Johnston Virginia Tennessee officer Mississippi Army of Northern Virginia Unio Great River Mexico Mississippi River Memphis confederate army Shiloh Pittsburg USF General Albert Sidney Confederate River Force Yankees Tennessee River Big Union
"civil war" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

11:05 min | 8 months ago

"civil war" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"The South definitely went to war to keep slavery going but did the actually go to the war to end slavery. No no they did not. This is another common myth. The North went to war initially and primarily to just hold the nation together not to free southern slaves. That's an important difference. You know so so get off your High Horse. Yankees await a I gotta get off. My High Horse. Evidence shows that abolition became a bigger and bigger motivation as the war went on but not in its early years There's proof August twenty second eighteen sixty two president. Lincoln wrote a letter to Horace Greeley abolitionist editor of the New York. Tribune stated if I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it and if I could save by free all the sleeps I would do it. And if I can save by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that what I do about slavery in the colored race I do because I believe it helps to save the Union and what I forbear forbear because I do not believe it. I do not believe it would help to save the Union. So Lincoln's own anti sediment was widely known this time so widely known that it helped prompt the southern states to rebel in that same letter he wrote. I have hosted my purpose. According to my view of official duty and I attend no modification of my off express. Personal wish that all men everywhere could be free. So Lincoln was concerned. You know that making the war about abolition would anger northern unionists. Many of whom cared little about African Americans? He wanted to free them personally. But that wasn't his primary political motivation for the war. The whole notion of the north where the obvious goodguys nobly fighting against slavery in the south of the obvious billons hoping to keep Africans. Enslaved forever is overly simplistic and just not true. Not all southerners wanted to hold onto the institution of Slavery. Not all northerners gave a shit about the rights of African Americans just like we can all agree and political candidates and political issues. Now we couldn't back then either. Wealthy southern landowners were in favor of slavery. Of course it helped them build your wealth. It helps keep them rich. But if you are some poor southern White sharecropper why the hell would you be in favor of slavery? The plantations are helping to keep you poor by not having to pay you a fair wage to farm. Because they're having someone else do it who doesn't get any wage some in the south didn't care about keeping slavery live and they're planning the north who didn't care about ending it segregation following the civil war not stopping at. The Dixon Line proves that schools the north were openly segregated shopkeepers. Indeed displayed whites only signs after the war even celebrities such as former suck subject Josephine Baker right decades after had a hard time finding hotel rooms and face Jim Crow treatment in restaurants when they toured the north. So why did Lincoln Push to free? Slaves towards the end of the war will because by late eighteen sixty two. It became clear that ending slavery in the rebellion states would definitely help the war effort whenever US forces drew near African Americans flocked to their lines to help the war effort to make a living most of all to be free. Some Lincoln generals helped him see early on that. Sending them back into slavery would just help the confederate war. 'cause when it became obvious that freeing the slaves would help the Union win the war unite the nation then. Abolition became a primary motivation for the war of the North For the North Another important Mr Squash regarding civil war. It was a douse of African Americans. Both free and slaves fought on the side of the confederacy neo. Confederates have made arguments since about one thousand nine hundred and outside of a very small group of soldiers in their final weeks of the war. It's bullshit one reason. We know it's bullshit is a confederate policy flatly. Did Not let black become soldiers until March of nineteen eight or March of Eighteen. Sixty five no documentation whatsoever exist for any black man being paid pension as a confederate soldier. There are some altered photos floating around the propelled. Smith a looked into one altered photograph considered by many to be evidence of black confederate soldiers. However University of Virginia researchers found out it had been intentionally cropped and mislabeled the photograph of Union soldiers not confederate once white officers did bring slaves to the front you know for the confederacy were. They were pressed into service but doing laundry and cooking. Some confederate leaders did try to enlist African Americans but it was shot down in January eighteen sixty four confederate general Patrick Cleburne or claburn proposed filling the ranks of black men. When Jefferson Davis reportedly heard that suggestion he rejected. The idea ordered. This subject dropped and never brought up again in the closing weeks. General Robert E Lee was desperate for men. He asked the confederate government to approve allowing the slave men to serve in exchange for some form of post war freedom This time the government gave in but very few black signed up in the in. The war was soon over and of course very few signed up. I can't imagine any signing up. Who aren't either forced to do so by their owners or mentally ill. Why would she do that? I'm signing up the war baby. Those no them bastards win. We'll be free not on my watch. No Sir Are we supposed to do? Their freedom? Enjoys go to bed when we decided try and do southern. We actually might enjoy for work. No thank you you can take that personal fulfillment and destiny ownership. Showed up your well-intentioned Yankee. S another Mr. On his civil war slavery was on his way out and had the war not been fought. It would've just soon anyway Slavery was hardly on his last legs. Nineteen sixty in the south that year the south produced almost seventy five percent of all US exports on the Labor of nearly four million slaves. According to some historians slaves were valued as being worth more than all of the manufacturing companies and railroads in the nation. No elite class in history has ever given up. Such an immense interest voluntarily in eighteen sixty slavery was actually growing more entrenched in the south not going away. Unpaid Labor made for big profits and the southern elite were growing ever richer. Slavery's institutional nature essentially crowded out other economic development and left the south dependent on agricultural society. Okay so now. We're almost the timeline They'll take key events leading directly to the civil war and through the war itself including. Oh seventy battles before we do that. Since we now know that the issue slavery was the primary reason for the war. Let's take a look at the history of slavery You know in in American a little bit elsewhere. Little mini timelines slash overview before. Today's big time line The history of African Shuttle Slavery in America complicated and tied to the larger transatlantic slave trade and requires a suck unto itself to properly understand but we can learn a lot today here in a little bit of racial slavery. Didn't happen in the colonies overnight. It wasn't limited to the south. It was a slow. Gradual process. Started out with non-racial indentured servitude and through a little law. Here the legal precedent there it. Morphed solidly into racial slavery directed towards Africans over roughly a century time slavery in America started in sixteen nineteen the year before the mayflower brought the pilgrims when the privateer the White Line brought twenty African slaves ashore in the British colony of Jamestown Virginia. The crew had seized the Africans from the Portuguese slave slip shit slave ship Sao Joao Batista. They were the first African seized by slave traders to arrive in one of the American colonies. But the but it would be indentured. Servitude they wouldn't be lifelong slaps. The African slave trade has started over one hundred fifty years earlier in fourteen forty four with the first public sale of African slaves occurring in Lagos or Logos Portugal Portuguese way into slavery. They also soon had Japanese and Chinese. Slaves began trading with those nations also in the early years. Most of a their slavery was indentured servitude and it was not limited to foreigners a wealthy Portuguese landowner could have white Asian and black indentured servants. The only group they wouldn't enslave was you guessed it a post people So Nice police. We try to stick themselves into slavery situations. They pretend to be some kind of white human but the Portuguese would always be able to spot them because they'd be doing stuff like Like sweeping the floor using the handle end of the broom or or DIG UP. See Out of the ground instead of you know instead of platinum. You know that kind of stuff you get it. Jk Fourteen fifty five Pope Nicholas. V gave Portugal to rights to continue the slave trade in west Africa under the provisions that they convert all people. Who are enslaved Good job pope very godly. The pope just wants to let her know that is in favor of slavery but die. Slaves muscles must be Christian. If there's one thing that really chaps the gods ass it is a pagan slave amen and carry on and so forth You have a weird. The pope's I I fucking go for fourteen. Ninety two Portuguese star building a into their first permanent slave trading post at El Mina Gold Coast now Ghana. Fourteen eighty three the Portuguese I forge relationship with the African Kingdom of Kongo. This relationship would soon lead to the large scale. Slave trading of the transatlantic slave trade after Columbus discovered the Americas and Fourteen Ninety two Portuguese explorers aim to spread Catholicism. Africa called. Is both people landing grow? Rich upon developing a trade deal with the Portuguese Congo king new cool converted to Catholicism after his death his son and heir King Zinger Mabamba took the name King Affonso the first and declared his kingdom. Catholic state firmly bonding to nations and in fifteen twelve team affonso. The first negotiated an agreement with the Portuguese giving them rights to African land and direct access to Congo's prisoners of war. Who would be the first live sold specifically into the Trans Atlantic slave trade also fair to point out? The slavery was not new to Africa when the Portuguese began doing what they did in African. Kingdoms slavery been around for centuries before this agreement but it wasn't like what it would be in the American south a few centuries later it was not permanent and it was not inherited. Children OF SLAVES. Were not automatically. Enslaved King Affonso arrangement provided a model that other European nations in Western and Central African Kingdoms. Would follow for centuries the first people sold again. We know mostly prisoners of War African kings but this time often in conflict often Absorbing smaller nations or other groups into themselves the vast ethnic linguistic and religious diversity in these kingdoms allowed for easily identifiable differences among groups make an easier for kingdoms to sell their enemies in exchange for weapons and goods to expand and protect territories grand empires such as the Congo Rubel of Benin Asante were vying for wealth and power in the regions and Europeans were need of laborers to build their colony so they may deals goods traded for people and that wasn't new to Africa. People have been trained in the Middle East in the Roman in addition empires and many other civilizations going back to the earliest kingdoms records for By Sixteen nineteen again when those first African slaves made it to Virginia the Trans Atlantic slave trade had been in existence for more than a century as early as fifteen one. Both Portugal and Spain began building their young colonies and Brazil and Uruguay through slave labor. Other European colonizers soon followed a Britain in the fifth fifteen fifties France and the fifteen seventy s the Netherlands in the fifteen ninety s and Denmark in the sixteen forty s in the fifteen hundreds of Spanish with I bring Africans to North America.

Africans Lincoln institution of Slavery Union Americas US Portugal Yankees Africa Tribune Horace Greeley confederate government president Congo University of Virginia Josephine Baker Jefferson Davis Robert E Lee
"civil war" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:15 min | 8 months ago

"civil war" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Away from secession away from war and they would all fail in the end. Politicians on both sides of the aisle dug their heels in the south seceded the issue that most divided the US for decades prior to civil or unquestionably slavery. A war regarding slavery had been in the making since the US had I become country. Vermont Abolish Slavery. The same year declared independence from Britain. Seventeen seventy seven fourteen years before it became a state. Pennsylvania bullshit in seventeen eighty By the time the revolutionary war ended in seventeen. Eighty three Massachusetts and New Hampshire New Hampshire. Excuse me hit. Abolish Slavery Rhode Island Connecticut quickly followed in seventeen eighty four. The seeds for civil war were sewn years before the constitution was signed in seventeen eighty seven as the pro and anti slave factions moved towards an inevitable. Confrontation the ability to win. The war appeared to tilt in the North's favor. The North had a lot more men lot more war material than the south at the beginning of the civil war. Twenty two million people lived in the north nine million people. Nearly four million of whom were slaves surreally. Five million possibly pro slavery people lived in the South huge difference had the south had a larger population. The war could have went in a very different direction. The North also had more money more factories. More horses mill more railroads more farmland on paper. All of these advantages made the US a much more powerful than confederate states. The main advantage of south had was fighting a war on their home court. They were fighting defensively on territory territory. They knew very well. They also have the advantage of sheer geographical size of the southern confederacy. This meant that northern armies have to capture and hold vast quantities of land across the south to win and that would create supply. Chain problems for the union is a south would have also been located much colder climate with more rugged geography that also could've tilted the war in the confederates favor since they weren't union soldier didn't have to face giving winters like the Nazis didn't Russian World War Two as they pushed further south. They also didn't have to navigate pass Steep Mountain passes. Were they in. Their supplies could be easily ambushed. And yes other meats. I do know you have mountains. Beautiful mountains like the Appalachians with the APPALACHIA's ain't the Alps not the rockies. Important geographical advantage in favor of the confederacy also was Atlantic coastline. So many ports so many places to a needed goods for the war efforts from oversee merchants right the south maintained some of the best ports in North America New Orleans Charleston. Mobile Norfolk Wilmington. This helped the confederacy immensely. In his efforts to mount stubborn resistance despite most military advantages facing the north two years into the war it was still anybody's ballgame the north. Probably a couple runs points. Touchdowns goals whatever other sports scoring reference. You WanNA envision for sure but people weren't leaving the stands just yet and then Gettysburg happened. We'll go over plenty of battles today. Maybe none were pivotal. As the battle of Gettysburg. It was the bloodiest battle of the war. By the time the battle began. July first eighteen sixty three. The war had already fucked up the confederate landscape in life. In general pretty bad in the south of the presence of vast armies throughout the countryside meant livestock crops other staples being consumed quickly in an effort to gather fresh supplies and relieve the.

US confederacy North America Vermont Britain New Hampshire New Hampshire Gettysburg Rhode Massachusetts Steep Mountain Pennsylvania Charleston Wilmington confederates
"civil war" Discussed on Raven 23: Presumption of Guilt

Raven 23: Presumption of Guilt

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"civil war" Discussed on Raven 23: Presumption of Guilt

"Bus and they had right away and so when you saw awesome coming down the street they were extremely intimidating. I think partly by intent security reasons so They just added an air of abnormality to To the traffic and then the standard procedure and this is not black. Waterson playing in the middle of this is what the state urban diplomatic security like. Never get a change. They wanted us to go to these. You know very visible conflicts And and they would just beep at honk and maybe they literally. GM people in the road to get him out of the way. I don't I mean it wasn't keen to ram but They would just make life miserable for your regular Iraqi driver. You'd have to like get over. Get Out of the way. We zoomed through so so it was exceptionally disruptive and that had been going on long before this the source square incident. So I cannot. I can't say that we were particularly popular As with our military forces in our black water and all in two thousand six the Bush administration admitted that its policy in Iraq was failing. The country was slipping civil war. There was a lot of talk about whether sending more more troops to tamp down the violence and make Raqi hatred of Americans worse but in the end President George W Bush decided to send a surge of twenty thousand more troops to Iraq at a last ditch bid to get the country under control to get an idea of what the situation was like on the ground. We spoke to Eric. Parker Eric is what you would call a total ass. Kicker he served in the. US Army special ops and he was a member of Black Honors Raven twenty two tactical support team. This is how Eric described. It was like to be in frontline's Baghdad. Two thousand seven was very very hard year. I mean it started out hard From January twenty third two thousand awesome Sabbath lost five guys from an attack on the venue and You know a little bird helicopter was shot down to where we had to go out. Search for. Those guys is a recovery. There remains where we've got ambushed Did there Right after that. The Central Railroad Got Hit it on then you would Complex tack to where one of our guys ended up being shot a fifty cal hit through all awesome. Wouldn't you adapted which luckily he made a recovery. Even just the the week meeting up to September sixteenth I mean September Nights Adamant City all on the City Hall. got hit were grenade was thrown over which started up a fight where all the TNC teams were having to push out and they actually locked down a traffic circle down there so the team through the X.. Fill a couple of days later. Oh well. The tactical sportifs got hit with the The F. P. explosively formed projectile. which basically there's not much that can stop become molten? Think about a molten lava bullet. That will go right through six inches. which is a skill to one of their views in which we had two roles a sport in which there's ended up in a firefight ups and there were a lot of the things that were going on adding to the chaos was the fact that it was impossible to tell Iraqi police from insurgents dresses addresses Iraqi? Police here's Robert Ford talking about the confusion. That situation created Iraqi uniform on a black park back isn't it gets into your corruption issue. So we're they're insurgents dressed as Iraqi police absolutely but I am very hard pressed to pick an occasion. We have Iraqi police themselves. Fire on Americans in two thousand seven hundred seventy two thousand eight boy. I can't think of it. I doubt I would remember because that would have really changed the way we had eh. So Jeanette doesn't take logged review. The events of two thousand seven to realize that Baghdad was a terrifying place in fact it was the most dangerous city on earth. Here's here's Robert Forty again describing the collision course that the US. The Iraqi government Iran as the bloody fall of two thousand seven approached will close out with these words from passenger Ford until our next episode. I think this is an important context to understand the American forces both Me Less military predominantly. US military but like this square incident. We killed hundreds and hundreds and hundreds congress of Iraqi civilians over the years. And Iraqis aren't stupid. I mean they knew this and It was done with a sort of unity in a place that you know family is a huge huge deal in the United States. We have here in. The United States is sort. SORTA individual you know self fulfillment and self expression. We'll have that an Iraqi culture you know you're part of the family and you do. The family expects tries so I mean this was a hugely sensitive issue the way the American Reacted armed armed American reacted with Iraqis. So there's that and I don't blame Blackwater for that but it's context that had grenade baited than the situation with the disorder square sort of like all this headed up. disatisfaction erupted UH Raven. Two three is a production of think against studios. It's written by Gina. Keating eating and Mike Flaherty our producer Ashton Smith Gina Keating and Mike flaherty executive producers of Tiling Lindsey fellows and Valerie McGowan Mitchell wind. Bum edited this episode. And he also serves as our associate producer. Along with Kyle Hartford in Tina graph. Lindsey fellows Aaron Fuller and supervised the music art theme song is performed by Khloe Caroline. Thanks to Antonio corkery for their kindness and generosity. Finally we owe a debt to our men and women in uniform warm. Thank you for defending our freedoms that strangers may one day. Enjoy them as well for more information about this podcast go to think again dot me there. You can find additional national research and primary resources regarding the case of rape into three you can learn about future episodes and receive updates events continue to evolve. You can also learn more about our future projects as well as award winning films music and books created by our teams. Thanks to everyone who donated so much of your time and talent to this passion project.

US Parker Eric Iraqi government Iran Baghdad Gina Keating Iraq Robert Ford President George W Bush Antonio corkery City Hall. rape Raqi Robert Forty Jeanette Lindsey Mike Flaherty
"civil war" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"civil war" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"But you do believe that. The Republicans have turned themselves into a tribe in the in the in the common understanding of tribal meaning not cradle but but based on color religion faith And so on right. Well I would say that. I think that they have come to see themselves as threatened by the diversity of the country entry. I think that that's clear both in the way that they. I mean if you if you look at Fox News. Every night Demographic panic is a frequent topic of conversation on law. Laura Laura Ingraham and Tucker Carlson's shows and when you saw in the reaction to Yoni Appelbaum piece Discussing sort of demographic changes to the country. The the response was one of anger and panic from conservative Readers we're looking at that and I don't think it's a coincidence that a lot of trump's brain trust is from California L. A. -fornia state that was once the Nixon and Reagan heartland and who's In the Republicans harsh approach to immigration basically locked him out of power right Where where I so I just WANNA say that I? I really enjoy Daniels piece. I was really I thought her concept of monopoly not just in the economic but also in the social she'll round was really important. I think where I differ from. Danielle is that I think You know in some ways. This system is standing in the way a of the rebalancing that's necessary So you know. A A huge contributor to polarization is income inequality but we have in the system. Senate Madison designed. Is this sort of weird coincidence. Where this very conservative White portion of the country can wield disproportionate proportionate power because they are ideally geographically distributed and this has created a sort of artificial politics. Scarcity where you know people who are extremely wealthy a used their power and influence to to exploit the choke points in the system to prevent redistribution which in turn exacerbates the politics of scarcity. That already already exists in. And and and make our politics more fractious along You know certain particular. Factional Lines Because politicians are they're willing to exploit people's economic suffering and hardship by blaming people who are different And there's no you know and when you look at like in American history in the past the pendulum swings you had the new deal. And then you had Eisenhower and Nixon sort of accepting that liberal consensus for a few decades and then you had Reagan and you had like Clinton and the D. L. C. types basically accepting You know the the the world that that that that Friedman built But there's been no way for the pendulum to swing back in part because of the sort of weird electoral college in the way the Electoral College. The Senate is like the system system that is designed sort of is kind of weirdly stuck in the snow and there's no clear way to get the chains on the tires to pull the car out Response so I think it's a good image to say the system as weirdly stuck in the snow. I think that's exactly right I think they're archaic given climate change. But we'll move moved to another conversation But I do think that there are ways of getting things started again. I don't think it's exactly an easy path that I think the question the Electoral College College and the Senate is really the hardest piece of it. I've been a defender of the Royal College in the sense that I think you have to protect minority interests and decision making including role minority interest. This but it may be well. It may well be the case that the combination of the Senate Electoral College is excessive protection. At this point I think that is a conversation that we have to have As a country but more importantly there are a lot of votes that are left on the table. There's a lot of voting power that's left on the table and I believe that with ranked choice voting which drives politics back towards the kind of competition Aimed at the center not the extremes that will be a mechanism for pulling more votes back into the conversation I think that if Congress understands itself as the first branch which it is it's not a co equal branch with Second Branch The article one for a reason. The legislature is the body responsible for rendering the will of the people If Congress worked hard to build its own power including Degrees of power over things that have been and set up as independent functions Federal Reserve and so forth. I think that there are avenues. for Economic Policy Making That could drive country and into Galateri Direction action so I do think it's possible to pull more voting power into the electoral system in ways. That would Dr Gal -Tarian focused in policy. And then also if if Congress thinks about its own functioning and so forth and wants to reclaim its own power. There are ways of Reshaping economic decision making for the sake of the wellbeing. uh-huh Adam let me frames given what Daniel talked about. Let me frame for you a question that relates to your your apiece There would be people. Let's let's say we move toward a conversation in the coming years about redistributing power in a way that finally acknowledges that Montana Wyoming North Dakota South Dakota have fewer people then in Queens And that we're going to have to rebalance the country and rebalance the distribution of power in a way that makes it makes us country more representative. There are people who are going to say. That's going to cause a civil war because the whites in these in these rural areas are going to rebel against What they would see as their disenfranchisement So what we have to do is paper over the differences and we have to. We have to prevent civil war at all costs and therefore we have to be civil with each other and we have to compromise with each other and we have to accede to their her feelings I ask this question obviously in the context of your piece which you in which you argue that we overvalue comedy compromise and civility liberty. You're not you're personally person but But you also believe that we can make a fetish of this. Well I think like you know. Democracy is a system for managing conflict inflict right and so I think you have to allow people to fight with each other. You have to allow people to argue and and and have disputes and not. Shut them down and I think particularly equally we would bothers me is when people who are you know saying well. My rights are being violated. And they're they're they're told by people in authority that they're being uncivil civil and they need to shut up in the thing about that is that we tend to romanticise certain periods in history such as Martin Luther King in the civil rights movement but they were also considered annoying and UNCIVIL and people did not like discord. And then you you go back to Abolition Ism and you hear Frederick Douglass saying things that you would would never hear a prominent liberal pundits. Say today which is you. Know the way to nullify. The fugitive slave law is to make a few dead kidnappers which is really tough but the thing is is that sometimes that happened that I mean it did happen before the civil war so I mean my my concern basically is this is that because the system seems to incentivize this kind of regional nationalism? That trump has embraced It makes it basically impossible for one side to recognize that the other side is also part of the same country and it incentivizes Republican politicians to treat Democratic Democrat constituencies. As though they are not legitimately American and you can look like in and I don't think it's just about the Senate But I do think it is about democracy in a sense and I don't think that there's only the only way that this has a happy ending is if this dispute is resolved in favor of multiracial democracy and my fear With the emphasis on reconciliation. Is that in the past Those kinds of really deep conflicts have been resolved in favor favor of simply excluding non whites from the policy. And you can see attempts by the trump administration to do that now whether it's with The most prominent example example is the attempt to use the census case To Institute essentially a nationwide racial Gerrymander in order to make it easier for Republicans to win elections without without majority's I think that sort of thing is a much bigger risk than whether or not people are sort of nasty to each other and political conversation. I also think that Dat Dat Nastiness is at root a symptom of the larger problem. Which is that our experiment with multiracial? Democracy is very a young and some people had not entirely accepted it.

Senate Congress Senate Electoral College Daniel Fox News Reagan Electoral College College Nixon Laura Laura Ingraham trump Royal College Danielle Adam Yoni Appelbaum Martin Luther King To Institute California
"civil war" Discussed on Thank God I'm Atheist

Thank God I'm Atheist

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"civil war" Discussed on Thank God I'm Atheist

"And but what we is absolutely nuts about this whole thing is that the far right? Is now there's this bubbling, sort of, like speculation about civil war over this issue. Right and talked about the parents, this has been going on for a long time. And so the direction I wanted to go with this isn't like, oh my God. They're planning civil war. It's what is this mindset? What do they how do they see the world that the that they think that civil wars coming over the right? Well, here's here's one of the tricks, one of the tricks of this thing is that it is. It used to be only the crazy fringe like prophet, you know, sort of the sort of, like, you know, the firemen profit types or, or the or fucking what's his name over at info wars. Alex Jones, Raver, see theorists. All of these nut balls are always claiming that everything's going to turn into a civil war. You know what I mean? They they've been saying this for a long time, now it's starting to move into more like nut mainstream, but more mainstream. So or yes, like Rick Joyner is one of the people we play him on the show. Yeah. Nearly regularly. And he's like one concentric circle informality Jones. He's sure phrase's still crazy shit. But, like there's like this magazine called, charisma. First time I'd ever heard of parents. It's huge has millions of subscribers. It's sort of the media voice of the Pentecostal. Assurance. Charismatic movements. They've run at least according to this article in regarding. Has run at least half dozen articles contemplating the possibility of an imminent civil war. My god. And an concerns, there is a little bit of concern because obviously, you don't want a fraction Eunice small fraction of your country. Starting to think in terms where the issue that they that they care about most, which is abortion. Could lead to civil war. Meaning they're mentally preparing themselves to take up arms. What does that mean? Right. Yeah. And this morning in the shower. I'm thinking through this whole thing. And, and it was like it was like if there was a little skirmish that broke out in some part of the country, and I don't think it would be near where we live. But, but if it started to break out. What, what would what my attitudes be about civil war in America? And I was just like fuck that. I want nothing to do with that. And then I'm like, well, what if it actually turned into the thing? Yeah, right. Yeah. And it's like no dummy, it's not going to turn into a thing. And then it was like, well, would Donald Trump try to suppress it? That's a that's an interesting question. Or just be an apologist for it like he was for the racist in Charleston. Yeah. I mean surely this won't come to armed conflict. I don't see here's the thing..

Rick Joyner Donald Trump Alex Jones Charleston Raver America
"civil war" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"civil war" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"Ladies do them and help me. Welcome our expert tonight. We are talking about the civil war and this man teaches classes at Pepperdine university on that very topic. Professor Stuart Davenport, ladies and gentlemen, put your hands together for him as he makes his way to the stage, Stewart and are comedic pants Caitlyn Gail Colton Dunn Nick through ladies it in them and say. As they make their way to the stage. Exciting stuff. Exciting stuff. Hi, everybody. Colton has to bud lights in case, you're listening. We're talking about the civil war. You gotta put one on I I, Nick. Thank you for coming dressed as a confederate soldier. That's nice. It's actually as a toddler. We have a couple in the audience tonight, actually, Dan. Caitlin. How are you? Okay. Well, thank you for doing this. Thank you all for being here. And professor or Stewart, I guess you'd like to be call me, whatever you like. Okay. Cool. Do We. we still we tell me something? Why the civil war? What made you what made you study that? What made you get? So why are you so interested I'd like to know? Why are you teaching it to a ton of Christians? Because I got a job at Pepperdine and why teach it I'm actually from the south. So there would have been which side of this who are you on? No division here. Definitely a union, man. Okay. Good. Good good. That's the right answer. It's money to get into. It's only been one hundred fifty OK union easier. You know, the central conflict of our history. Our nation's story of the burden of racism and slavery. It's central to our our identity as a as a people, and it's more than two central to our identity central to your family. Right. You told me that you told me there's a little anecdote. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. So by the way, don't yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Me. I'm not wondering. My I'm such a nerd about this that I've named my daughter after a civil war battle. It's not a second bull run. It's not. Her name's Shiloh and Shiloh was a place of pretty gnarly battle in the war. But it's also a Hebrew for place of peace, which is I like irony. I like incongruity and now I've inflicted on my daughter, but we've come to the right place for me. School shiloh. And also there's the guy that played young Indiana Jones shallow above and that's nice do. Not a funny joke, and I will look. So so let's start. Let's start before the beginning. How about that? Well, you gotta try one more time. Oh, you think. So if I do it again, try the joke. Maybe I didn't put enough kind of attitude into it. So it's like. A different film. Okay. What else was he Horace formers holes? He's in a movie called holes believe okay channel, I heard of it. But I'm gonna I think that might be the one. Okay. Oh, you know who else is named Shiloh and Jelena's child. Yeah. But you know who else? I didn't know that would get such a big deal. Laughing at you. Okay. Professor guests who else was name also has that similar name the star of Disney channel movie holes Shiloh LA buff. I mean, here's what I would do get rid of the Labbaf Shiloh buff..

Dan Caitlyn Gail Colton Dunn Professor Stuart Davenport professor Pepperdine university Stewart Caitlin Jones Nick Disney Jelena Indiana
"civil war" Discussed on The Inquiry

The Inquiry

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"civil war" Discussed on The Inquiry

"Welcome to the inquiry podcast from the bbc world service with me reflects under each week we bring you fool expert witnesses answering one pressing question from the news the bodies lay out in the open on the halt dusty streets eighty three people it was reported with gun a knife wounds they been executed by socalled islamic state just before the militants had been driven out of town elkarri attain a small town built on an away sis in the desert of central syria these 83 when the only residents to lose their lives in the recent fighting this town has been through a living hell but you might not have been aware of it stories like this a horribly common in syria where a civil war is in its seventh year the don't always hit the headlines anymore civil wars on the tories lead difficult to end but they do end in the inquiry this week we're going to try to work out how syria's minds we'll examine three civil wars elsewhere in the world and how they were brought to an end to see what lessons if any can be drawn for syria i'm really selig's under and we're asking how do you end a civil war part one military might.

syria civil war selig bbc
"civil war" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"civil war" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Civil war is emptying huge swaths of south sudan the violence has uprooted four million people including two million who fled to neighboring countries in the last year more than a million south sudanese have poured into northern uganda alone crossing makeshift bridges like this one to flee fighting hunger and brutal attacks on civilians dis contribued fighting british rule midafternoon disputed our properties to defraud when similar pies family went to one of the refugee camps initially he stayed behind to look after the families most precious commodity their cattle he hit for a year to escape the violence the refugees carry whatever they can salvage mattresses parts clothes note folks remnants of once peaceful lives turned upside down pat's checkpoints ugandan soldiers searched their belongings for weapons before the refugees proceed to reception centres after entering uganda the refugees sign in a smaller way stations for many it's the first night spending safety after walking for days to escape fighting levy etiquette fled with his wife and four children new did not run aground sort started we lead under a tree with the former because there was nowhere else to hard we waited for the forty two style and then we gotta started walk into your garden uganda now shoulders most of the burden of africa's biggest refugee crisis managing a constellation of camps which require food water health care and policing at in that be camp now home to more than one hundred twenty thousand south sudanese new arrivals receive vaccinations hot meals and basic items such as seoul and plastic tarps to build a house the government also gives each refugee families a small plot of land about a twentieth of an acre where they can build attend shelter and grow crops to eat or cell but the land often proves to rocky for farming after completing the registration process the new arrivals will receive their plot of land.

Civil war sudan uganda pat seoul africa
"civil war" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"civil war" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

"Bringing suit rosenberg he is uh along with benard mcgurk uh on one of the hottest radio programs in the country wabc new york city nine to noon now rosemary former sports caster now does a general analysis of the news and i wanted to get your reaction on my portraying the nfl controversy as a cultural civil war you buy into that we'll go forth well thanks for having me on it's just a huge honour and secondly yet that's exactly uh that's exactly what we've got here we've got a cultural civil war but you know you know you talk about eric read goes on the view and he something that just warren true you know a lot of folks would say that this whole endeavour from the very beginning which based on something that's not very true which of course other numbers bump police brutality which cali cap when it claims is a huge issue he detractors will say it's really not up but that's why look i believe there is a court here bill i really do i do believe is racial inequality in this country him would come to the justice system and i do believe vip voices that need to be heard my issue with the way they're doing it pick a different venue stand out of a police station it that in fact is part of the problem gather in the city like chicago were kids are being murdered every single day they can be heard there was a voice to be heard out there the way they were doing it is incorrect and all it does by the way is corridor this cultural civil war and get to not being done well against people angry and mobiliser there's an upside to that because people started to pay attention now.

rosenberg civil war eric chicago wabc york nfl warren
"civil war" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"civil war" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Civil war the fact of the matter is eight right they were fighting for it with a right to own play yeah it if you look uh i just pulled up and that's what why people are offended by the confederate statues now obscene i pulled up a couple of documents um they were called the declaration of causes of cheating state basic leave its primary document the written by eating state um saying that we're building the union they were effectively the declaration of independence for the confederacy your look adam guess what stage right not mention one time slavery mentioned eighty three time and we combine built people are spreading this have no clue what they're talking about uh and like that you don't get to be a patriot to america and waiver confederate flag your yogurt to be a patriot and wave a swastika it doesn't work so how do you balance in in your arm you see researching history etc how do you balance the idea that everyone has the right to protest that great reporters while you what i think most americans think you're possibly to an end when wag and ueva flag if they want right absolutely that they could have the right to view i i would never say uh vat a private citizen should not waived the confederate flag or have actually when they're courtyard ravioli you can do it uh but i wanna look at you and say i i don't like that guy that guy he's got a patriot because people about right i would very bad we're we're talking public land they should not be confederate vacuous we should not have confederate flag on public property uh that that are acceptable you that honestly admit make our a little extreme but i do on fee there being any different than the swastika beckham enemy of our nation and in fact will war was by far the biggest loss of american life or any war you're working on to a vietnam the bear if you added up every war that america was they added up could be more deaths readiness civil war alone but if if their enemy all.

Civil war america civil war adam
"civil war" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"civil war" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Is civil wars a history and ideas were onto the 21st century but we must pause at the debate over three kinds of civil wars that the professor identifies in the late seventy and thoroughly eighteenth century now understood to way a way of describing what has happened over the last eighteen 100 years these succession civil war we know that when a king dis the csections civil war will come to that in the american model of the american civil war one body withdraws from the sovereignty of the whole and to create its own state but this one is the most striking of all the super session civil war what is that professor well if these are times i've fabricated myself to uh not least to help myself think about the different species of civil war to soon professional super cessionist civil war is a is a war uh between two sides sometimes modem two sides but from two sides uh baffling pool authority to supersede one another one another in your feet of authority in a particular society so uh unlike the um um the successionist civil wars well which arise in monarchical societies this is the game of thrones motion of civil war lights say so unlike the secessionists civil the way of the attempt is made to the news the five t a shoe professional civil war is maintaining the boundaries of the society which might be molecule might not be but with different side battling for supremacy shoop a session with a particular uh polk political community and that would not describe the american civil war unless and until but it does describe the french revolution and the russian revolution why did they call it revolution and not civil war well those of a long standing prejudice going back at least to the eighteenth century about civil war something which was not necessarily backwardlooking after this stake destructive uh always uh tearing down foundations rather than creating new possibilities and.

professor civil war eighteen 100 years
"civil war" Discussed on KFC Radio

KFC Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"civil war" Discussed on KFC Radio

"Yeah but sometimes when it games this fun so i i like doing it in like i like doing at a private setting and i also think i've just retired i need to be able to sit down so it comes down to some car game some fuck and drinking game i'm good if i had my my first with by civil war with civil war no good nougaro game three on three beer pong split it's it's anything goes taking turns people a diving on the floor boxing each other out i'm like i'm all said i want to play like quarters where i can just city or throw a coin a couple i drank i'm good you know that's the kind of should i can get down with you take that the beer pong anything to seared taken into serious you at the bar bug and hatred guts we got a very important question here i got should on the other day for this so please be the voice of reason if someone goes at the bar hey let's get around a shots and one person deviates from what the rest of the group is having is that person and astle for instance if the group is like let's get jameson and you decide to get it a shot does that make you an astle our literally never heard of this the most definitive yes you are an asshole i've ever heard of my entire life i can't believe this is the thing i almost wish sometimes i wish it was because i do think there are weird shots that people i think james is weird i think it's weird that the world agreed let's do like warm whisky as like the party shot i don't think that very that really is applicable to everyone it's i'm not i wish.

civil war jameson james
"civil war" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"civil war" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Uh people of were on the same level as a slave prior to the civil war after the civil war in after the southern leads were disenfranchised in under occupation um all of a sudden had this uh mindset that's been telling propaganda that kind of established port white people as being superior to the african american community that was there yeah and there was a weird there is it indentured period back in the early part of the colonies were white the white bench was beneath his very all kinds of crazy stuff like that right right so i feel like think the way we approach it is were approaching racism today as a topic that it it it's basically an oilfield that we're trying to stop downriver instead of attacking the the the main force up the river like the though the class thanked also though i i would argue that i think i think some of what were the reason that it's it's so stay with us is the trauma turn slavery was vets face it more dramatic even than being even if you're a were lower the scale as white you know rovers of you still word be traumatized way the black community was and um the the trauma the civil war self i think still then that body count is almost at the point of let's hard to represent around this and a holes struck congress wiped out in the perpetrated a lot of the race's sort of stuff reserve a backlash and it so this i something is there to his not justifiable but kinda understandable you know you go and the housing laying a mole but.

civil war