21 Burst results for "Civil Rights Workers"

Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

07:06 min | 3 months ago

Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

"In June nineteen sixty four freedom summer also known as the Mississippi Summer Project was a volunteer campaign across America to attempt to register as many black American voters as possible in Mississippi. News coverage of freedom summer shed a light on the white supremacy and police brutality that black Americans face. We. Don't Tuesday night the finding of three bodies in graves at the site of a damn near Philadelphia Mississippi where three civil rights workers disappeared six weeks ago. Over the past few weeks we have been experiencing another freedom summer. Minnesota are saying to people in New York two people in California to people in Memphis to people all across this nation enough is enough cell phone videos and social media are once again providing glaring spotlight on the inequities and injustice that are woven into the fabric of American society. In this special season of the browns to politics, we are diving into the past in how is impacting our present and future. For protests to political campaigns and youth involvement change is in the air and the fight for liberation continues. We'll be hearing from some of the Black Women at the forefront at today's movement who are fighting for change in making history to ensure that we have justice for all. Her name was even floated as a potential. VP. Pick for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's. It is no surprise that would ever congress is debating issues of equity and justice. Congress will lease voice is one of the strongest and most prominent today we talk about her work as a college student, a member of the Black Panther Party and what Congress is, do we to fight systems of oppression to reshape reimagined our political world? Congresswoman Barbara Lee thank you so much for joining us and happy belated birthday. Breaking very good happy with you. I'm really excited to talk to you today and for our listeners, the congresswoman is such a legend and all of her work that she has done in. Congress over the years especially for Black Brown and indigenous communities by I have to ask you this question because it's something that I just wanted to talk to you about for so long is. You were a part of the Black Panthers. What was it like being? Black Panther I actually was not a member of the Black Panther Party I was what they call the community worker community workers had a lot of responsibilities as the Black Panther. Party. Members and remember the Black Panther Party began as a result of police Gupta brutality and the African American community. I mean. They stood down the police because things, police, murders, police Retali- as we know now were occurring then and they were the first organization that really took the police on, and so it was out of that that the Black Panther party formed, there's the Bible programs because it was not only an organization that address police brutality, but it was an organization that addresses chemic-. Racism and poverty. and. So what I did, and which was really phenomenal work and I was a single mother on public assistance with two little boys. I helped sell newspapers like math a newspaper on street corners I actually participated in the breakfast program for children who didn't have whose parents didn't have enough money to buy food and that's actually the breakfast programs from the federal government. Actually. Started as a result of the of the models that the Black Panther party you. I also really worked with you. He knew then did the research on his book Revolutionary Suicide. It was really phenomenal project I got to know Huey Newton Bobby Seale, Elaine Brown, Erica Huggins Joan Kelly, who just passed away and many of the leadership of the black. Panther party because community worker and student I was very involved in a lot of the work with party members. I actually brought Shirley Chisholm got involved in politics through the first presidential the first. Time. A black woman ran for president and that was sure children who was the first African American woman elected to Congress and so the Black Student Union president I invited her to come to milk college where I was attending and I got involved in her campaign by herb insisting that I register the vote and I had a class go because I didn't WanNa work in any of those campaigns. Well, bottom line is working her campaign and got the Black Panther party really involved in voter registration efforts. I. Was the one that went and asked Huey Noonan Bobby Seale to consider becoming politically active around early Chisholm campaign and they did. So I worked on all phases of the black. Panther. Party and all the different divisions I actually bag groceries. You know the panthers had a whole ten point program which again, the Free Breakfast program for the kids They started the Community Health Center Movement by instituting the George Jackson free medical clinic they did sickle cell tests. In fact, there was the Black Panther party that raises awareness about sickle cell disease as a as a disproportionate impact African Americans Fast Board Twenty Twenty people in the African American community and Black and Brown news still struggling disproportionately as it related to food security food desert healthcare disparities, unequal education. I. Helped. Start. Actually I wrote the first proposals for the Black Panther Party community learning center. They establish a Black Panther party school and so I was very instrumental in working on that project. So I did a lot of work with the Black Panther Party and I can just speak to how phenomenal they were and how necessary they were and how we should as we move forward. You know there's this Symbol in a gun and Andy. In government in Ghana called and Copeland. If the bird beautiful bird looking back holding an egg in her mouth and like in order to move forward in order to blackboard and you have to look back, we have to know our history we know where we've been and we have to build upon that so that we can move forward it. Now a wonderful young people in the Movement for Black, flags, or dreamers all the movements that are taking place are a continuation of what I see as the civil rights movement of of today, as well as what Black Panther Party actually started as it relates to stand down and and thing that that policing in our community. chain stop disproportionate killing black, and Brown people

Black Panther Party Black Panther Party School Panther Party Congress Black Women African American Community Black Student Union Congresswoman Barbara Lee Mississippi Huey Noonan Bobby Seale Philadelphia Mississippi Joe Biden Minnesota Browns Shirley Chisholm Memphis Ghana Panthers New York
Sit, Listen and Dismantle

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

09:06 min | 7 months ago

Sit, Listen and Dismantle

"First of all can like. I do every single time that I chat with fantastic folks like you. Thank you for your time. That is the one thing that you cannot get back and it is extremely valuable so thank you so much for taking some time out with us today. Thank you for taking the time and inviting me. The second thing I'd like to do is to ask you to tell us about yourself now when I say that what I mean is feel free to go all the way back to win it all started or you can start more current day. Tell us about sure. Well I guess going back to. When it all started I grew up in the nineteen sixties and was very much a part of all of the various political movements of that time and student movement in the Civil Rights Movement. I worked in the south as a civil rights worker in Selma and Montgomery in southern Alabama and south Georgia and then became very involved in social conflict and was actually at what you can think of as a professional conflict creator. And what then happened is I realized that if you wanted to achieve something like the right to sit in the lunch counter and be served demonstrations. Were a very good way of doing that. But if you wanted to change people's hearts and minds you had to dig deeper. And you had to have a different set of techniques you would adopt and so I had become a lawyer and was practicing constitutional law civil rights civil liberties law and then became a law professor. And after that I became a judge for the state of California in a couple of different administrative agencies and realize that what I was doing wasn't really very effective or very satisfying and discovered in nineteen eighty mediation conflict resolution and have been practicing full-time ever since now so I have now for the last. Forty Years Bene- fulltime mediator working with everything from divorcing couples families community disputes cross cultural disputes. Through litigated cases organizational disputes workplace disputes. I read several books on those and mediated hundreds and hundreds even thousands of those disputes. I also work internationally. I created an organization called mediators beyond borders. And we're working in a number of different countries right now so this has been an amazing journey. And what I've realized is that things that I believed in when I began are very much. A part of the process treating everybody with respect and dignity creating kind of equality in terms of who has the right to say what issues need to be addressed creating dialogues between people doing problem solving working together creating collaborative approaches to difficulties that people phase. That's the basic idea of conflict resolution. And what I basically do every day now came. We're GONNA take a step back a little bit and learn a little bit more about you. What's your favorite thing to do? My favorite thing to do is to work with people who are completely at odds with each other and find ways for them to discover something that is really quite wonderful about the other person something interesting something that they hadn't been able to realize before him some ability to appreciate the other person actually is to create conversations between people who haven't been able to talk to each other now going back to your background. You mentioned that you were involved in student rights and then civil rights does not normal. What made you want to be involved in that type of work? Well it isn't really normal. It wasn't normal at the time. It's a little difficult to describe today but we kind of can have a bit of a sense of it. Came from a rural place from a place that said that we are all human beings and nobody deserves to be treated this way. It came from a kind of fundamental belief in democracy that everybody should have the right to vote. Everybody should have the right to participate in deciding what is going to happen regarding the issues that impact their lives. Once I got started and became quite clear. The more that you read the more that you heard about what was happening in the world it became obvious that if you didn't act you were really retreating from a fundamental moral issue of our times and that even though it was scary to work in these environments we were attacked and had to face dogs and police officers in Ku Klux Klan and a lot of violence. The alternative of running away to me was scarier than the one facing up to a major challenge that everybody as We knew that if we didn't stand up to it something really important would be lost. I'm not sure exactly whether that answers your question. But that's kind of close to what I think. Most of us were feeling. That's really good. One thing that I wrote down was the alternative was scarier than the danger a lot of times when people even in business right you think about what if it doesn't work or what if it fails in? I know in my own journey. It was just that it was the thought the idea or the chance that I don't give this. A try is scarier to me than doing it in failing so I definitely get that obviously is not on her level of the work that you guys did but definitely get that principle. Do you see any parallels in today's culture to in the sixties or has. The conversation of the narrative been changed such that. We just don't talk about it as much because the issues are different. But it's not a lot different. Yeah the same meaning what these specific form of it was. You have the right to ride on a bus in an integrated group. Do you have the right to sit at a lunch counter? In order a meal you have the right to use a water fountain that says whites only on it. Those are the specific ways in which this would show. But the general the underlying issue was the issue of recognizing the value and importance of diversity recognizing value of importance of coming to terms with people and cultures and even personalities and political views. That are different from those that you have for yourself. And so that continues to this day and is a very fundamental. Almost I would say again a moral like question about how we treat each other and this is one of the reasons why we are divided really as a nation because we haven't yet gotten to the point that we are all in this together but that point is being made right now very powerful a by the corona virus. We are in fact all in this together. Everybody can get this disease. Everybody can die from it. Everybody is being impacted by all of the various measures that are taking place. And so there's a kind of a way in which we are being brought to realize that the little divisions that we create between them and US between if you're mailed with people who are female pure white people who are black Anglo Latino whatever. It might happen to be whoever you are. The entire world is basing this issue and we are stronger if we face it together and I think what we have to then realize is that this is only one of a number of global issues that no longer respect national boundaries. You can't deal with corona virus in one nation. Only art modern system of transportation means that it can go around the world in a matter of hours and if some group of people come down with it in one place other people are gonNA come down with it somewhere else. So we're being forced to look at this and I think there are other issues like that that we're being forced to look at by circumstance but the reality owes goes a deeper understanding that we can come to and my way of saying that in in all the conflicts that take place between them and us we have to realize there is no them. There's just us and the creation of the idea of a dam is something that has taken place inside of our heads out of fear out of frustration out of our own inner needs. It haven't been mad out of Hanker over some way that we've been treated but it's just a construct that we've created and it's one that isn't particularly useful and it's one that is incredibly damaging both to others and to ourselves

Civil Rights Movement Ku Klux Klan United States California Selma Professor Alabama South Georgia Montgomery
"civil rights workers" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:49 min | 10 months ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"App this is one eight I'm Todd twi'lek in nineteen ninety eight the movie Mississippi burning debuted at that film would go on to do more for unsolved civil rights era murders than anyone might have expected by sparking the curiosity of one journalist who was there in the audience here's the opening sequence from Mississippi burning three civil rights workers are being chased by a mob in cars until one of those cars turns on police lights and the civil rights workers nervously pullover heads up this clip contains racial slurs and violence there's stuff case to tell you guys don't say anything alright we'll be alright just relax stop thinking driving speed you want around here you had a scared to death man don't you call me man Jew boy no Sir what should I call you know calming nothing in June for you just listen yes Sir now you started a small lot but what take it easy will be all right sure you will seeing the face any good you don't want to see in the face don't make no difference now more we'll.

Todd twi'lek Mississippi
"civil rights workers" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:54 min | 11 months ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on KCRW

"Soon as he got out of the way I was in that car and down the hill my descent into the world of races killers began when I saw the movie Mississippi burning but the couple FBI agents who investigate that case which involves three civil rights workers were killed and sixty four in Mississippi to them from here in New York City but that the thing that's just always stuck in my crawl is for someone to get away with the crime especially murder and that's what happened in these cases in what made these cases so great just for the fact not just that these plans may god away with murder but the fact that everybody knew these Klansman got away with murder that's what upset me I talked to back with not too long after that and he'd figured it out by this point that I've done the stories so I talked him on the telephone he said I'm gonna live to be a hundred and twenty I don't know how much longer you've got your reckless driver you may have a Richter somebody made a list you do you know somebody who would do that and I said do you at it frightened me and I remember checking in my car for awhile and the thing I realized was he could kill me what I also hated bullies probably because of all those times I got the crap beaten out of me on the playground and I wasn't going to be intimidated by Byron de la Beckwith so I persisted he was arrested hauled into the court room and then one day in the courtroom he spotted me yelled at me is the apple over there when he does he's going to Africa.

Mississippi New York City murder Klansman apple Africa FBI Richter Byron de la Beckwith
"civil rights workers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 11 months ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Soon as he got out of the way I was in that car and down the hill my descent into the world of races killers began when I saw the movie Mississippi burning but the couple FBI agents who investigate that case which involves three civil rights workers were killed and sixty four in Mississippi to them from here in New York City but that the thing that's just always stuck in my Craw is for someone to get away with a crime especially murder and that's what happened in these cases and what made these cases so great just for the fact not just that these plans my god away with murder but the fact that every body knew these Klansman got away with murder that's what upset me I talked to back with not too long after that and he'd figured out by this point that I've done the stories so I talked on the telephone he said I'm gonna live to be a hundred and twenty I don't know how much longer you've got your reckless driver you may have a rack or some of them made the list you do you know somebody who would do that and I said do you at it frightened me and I remember checking into my car for awhile and the thing I realized was he could kill me what I also hated bullies probably because of all those times I got the crap beaten out of me on the playground and I wasn't going to be intimidated by Byron de la Beckwith so I persisted he was arrested hauled into the court room and then one day in the court room he spotted me yelled at me over there when he does he's going to Africa.

Mississippi New York City murder Klansman Africa FBI Byron de la Beckwith
"civil rights workers" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Students for dominantly from black and Puerto Rican neighborhoods stayed out of city schools. Many of the students and their parents joined picket lines at their campuses or protests at the board of education offices, Russ and proclaimed it as the largest civil rights demonstration in the nation's history. One and a half times the size of the March on Washington six months earlier in the end, however, the protests yielded little change newspapers. City officials even some advocacy groups that supported school integration all responded to the boycott with indifference or criticism and without real progress. New York City schools would continue deepening their patterns of inequality in the years ahead. As students in New York. We're taking their STAN plans for a new campaign of political empowerment were also underway down in Mississippi. The snick organizers who had come to the state in nineteen sixty one during the summer of the freedom rides had never really left, but the hostile resistance. They encountered had kept their progress. Slow during the intervening years by nineteen sixty four less than seven percent of eligible black mississippians were registered vote. But with a national election coming up in the fall, civil rights workers launched to statewide efforts to mobilize black voters. The first starting in April was the formation of a group called the Mississippi freedom Democratic Party or the DP the MFT P was meant to challenge. The all white segregationist Democratic Party establishment of the state M F D P members prepared to send an alternative integrated delegration to the democratic national convention in August and challenge the party's credentials committee to recognize them as the rightful rep. Tentative of the state one of the leading figures in the m FDP's mobilization was Fannie, Lou Hamer. A forty seven year old former cotton plantation worker from sunflower county Mississippi Hamer had begun organizing alongside members of snick in nineteen sixty two after she attempted to register to vote. She quickly suffered a vixen threats and economic reprisals, but they only drove her further into the movement in the summer of nineteen sixty three Justice, president Kennedy made his national address on civil rights. Hamer had been part of a group of activists detained by police and brutally beaten after staging a sit-in at the town of wino-. A few months later Hamer unsuccessfully ran for congress and Mississippi second district attempting to unseat one of the states entrenched, segregationists, her efforts helped lay the groundwork for the MFT broader campaign that summer, and she would serve as vice chairwoman of the MFT peace delegation Hamer's work with the MVP occurred. Alongside the second mobilization program what organizers were calling the freedom summer project in the freedom summer scheduled to run from June through August, a coalition of civil rights groups in the state invited volunteers from across the nation to organize in Mississippi. Their work would involve registering voters and launching educational programs known as freedom schools, the campaign, ultimately, drew hundreds of all in tears ninety percent of them white, which all but assured that media coverage would follow even before the freedom summer. Campaign began news from Washington gave reason for hope the civil rights Bill made a crucial breakthrough in congress a lengthy filibuster. The longest in the Senate history at seventy five days finally broke the following week. The Senate passed the Bill seventy three to twenty seven sunny it to the house of representatives for one final vote. While the debate raged on in Washington, the freedom summer volunteers spent a week in Ohio training for their campaign. But nothing could have prepared them for the violence that awaited the fury of Mississippi's white supremacist descended. Immediately. Just as the first wave of all in tears arrived three civil rights workers two white one black disappeared in a show by county as their families and fellow. Organizers feared the worst local sheriff whose deputies had participated in the abduction insisted it was all just publicity stunt staged by movement activists by then clansman had already executed and buried the three men though. A handful of the volunteers still waiting in Ohio dropped out after the news. The vast majority continued on ordering the next wave of buses. Imagine you're a white college student on the seven hundred mile bus ride from southern Ohio central Mississippi. You cross the Mississippi border a little over an hour ago. You know, it won't be much longer to your destination. You lean over to the young black woman across the..

Lou Hamer Mississippi Democratic Party Washington sunflower county Mississippi Ohio Senate congress Puerto Rican New York City Russ STAN New York clansman president FDP
Who's really to blame for the recent mail bombs?

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:03 min | 2 years ago

Who's really to blame for the recent mail bombs?

"Alabama was known by another name bombing hail bombing ham. Alabama be OEM. Be Jeff drew grew up on a street called dynamite hill because so many black families were bombed for moving into the predominantly white neighborhood. It would push the furniture off the floor break the windows and and scare us to death. So terrorism is nothing new, but this part of Birmingham, Alabama, we experienced it firsthand. They were more than three dozen unsolved racially motivated bombings in Birmingham during the civil rights era, mostly houses, and churches, and drew says there was a pattern after the attacks. Authorities would accuse victims of planting the bombs most inhumane thing you could you could think of who would bomb their own. House, but that rumor was widely circulated in white circles says Diane mcwhorter who wrote a book about the Birmingham, civil rights movement. The understood motive that blacks were bonding their own churches and buildings in order to raise money and get publicity for the movement. She says it was repeated publicly by politicians, including Alabama's segregationist governor George Wallace other common theories were that the bombings were ordered by Martin Luther King junior. We're part of a communist plot orchestrated by the FBI. It was repeated so often I mean, I grew up hearing this from my father, you know, I think they started believing it and part of the reason they were able to believe it was that until the sixteen th street church bombing in September nineteen sixty three when four young girls were murdered. There had been no real talented, even after that deadly Ku Klux Klan attack. Police said I zeroed in on the churches. Black janitor as a suspect. Historian Taylor branch says conspiracy theories were rampant across the south as African Americans pushed for rights shows the lengths that people will go to not to acknowledge something that they don't wanna believe. For instance, what happened in Mississippi during freedom summer in nineteen sixty four free of the civil rights workers were kidnapped by a sheriff's posse of clansman and murdered because the bodies weren't found. Mississippi officials denied that that segregation is could have done this crime and said first of all they said there was a hoax Senator James Eastland, even cold that to the president on the phone. Down here. I believe it for. Branch says polarizing times then and now lead to an ideological climate where conspiracy theories thrive it's a low point for the country says democratic Senator Doug Jones of Alabama. He's a former US attorney who prosecuted the Birmingham church bombers. We are living in a time. Where words matter just like they did back in the sixties. There were so many things that happen then based on the empowerment that public officials like George Wallace gave do people not understand what it takes to kind of tone down the rhetoric to make sure that things like this don't happen with some deranged fool out there who wants to try to hurt people thinking that he's got the okay to do it federal officials declined to talk about potential political motivations. But in a news conference announcing the arrest. Attorney general Jeff Sessions acknowledged the suspect, quote appears to be a partisan,

Alabama Birmingham George Wallace Birmingham Church Bombers Diane Mcwhorter Taylor Branch Jeff Drew Ku Klux Klan Senator James Eastland Mississippi Jeff Sessions FBI Us Attorney Martin Luther King Attorney Senator President Trump
Blaming Victims For Mail Bombs Carries Echoes Of Civil Rights Bombings

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:33 min | 2 years ago

Blaming Victims For Mail Bombs Carries Echoes Of Civil Rights Bombings

"This podcast. And the following message is brought to you by jet dot com. Your one stop shopping destination. The jet experience provides a unique and relevant Dortmund with no membership fees. Start shopping conveniently at jet dot com or on the jet app today before thority apprehended a suspect in the mail bomb spree. The case prompted all kinds of speculation about the motivations that could be behind it. Here's what a talk radio host, Michael Savage, had to say is a high probability that the whole thing is set up as a false flag to gain sympathy for the Democrats to get our minds off the hordes of illegal aliens approaching southern boarding that kind of talk echoes back to another era in American history when bombs were tool of political intimidation. And peers Debbie Elliott reports in the nineteen fifties and sixties Birmingham. Alabama was known by another name bombing ham bombing ham, Alabama, be OEM. Be Jeff Jrue grew up on a street called dynamite hill. Because so many black families were bombed for moving into the predominantly white neighborhood. It would push the furniture off the floor break, the windows, and and scare us all to death. So terrorism is nothing new, but this part of Birmingham, Alabama. We experienced person there were more than three dozen unsolved racially motivated bombings in Birmingham during the civil rights era, mostly houses, and churches, and drew says there was a pattern after the attacks. Authorities would accuse victims of planting the bombs most inhumane thing you could you could think of who would bomb their own house, but that rumor was widely circulated in white circles says Diane mcchord or who wrote a book about the Birmingham civil rights movement. Understood motive was that blacks were bonding their own churches and buildings in order to raise money and get publicity for the movement. She says it was repeated publicly by politicians, including Alabama's segregationist governor. Owner George Wallace other common theories were that the bombings were ordered by Martin Luther King junior were part of a communist plot orchestrated by the FBI. It was repeated so often I mean, I grew up hearing this from my father, you know, I think they started believing it and part of the reason they were able to believe it was that until the sixteenth street. Chores Bonnie in September nineteen sixty three when four young girls were murdered. There had been no real the Taliban even after that deadly Kukoc's clan attack. Police said I zeroed in on the church's black janitor as a suspect historian Taylor branch says conspiracy theories were rampant across the south as African-Americans pushed for equal rights showed along the people will go to not to acknowledge something that they don't wanna believe. For instance, what happened in Mississippi during freedom summer in nineteen sixty four free of the civil rights workers were kidnapped by sheriff. Posse of clansman and murdered because the bodies weren't found. Mississippi officials denied the segregation is could have done this car and said first of all they they said there was a hoax Senator James even told that to the president on the phone. I don't leave it free. I don't believe it free. Got it down here. I believe it for the star. Branch says polarizing times then and now lead to an ideological climate where conspiracy theories thrive it's a low point for the country says democratic Senator Doug Jones about Alabama. He's a former US attorney who prosecuted the Birmingham church bombers. We are living in a time. Where words matter just like they did back in the sixties. There were so many things that happen then based on the empowerment that public officials like George Wallace gave do people not understand what it takes to kind of tone down the rhetoric to make sure that things like this don't happen with some deranged fool out there who wants to try to to hurt people thinking that he's got the okay to do it federal officials declined to talk about potential political motivations. But in a news conference announcing the arrest. Attorney general Jeff Sessions acknowledged the suspect, quote appears to be a partisan, Debbie Elliott NPR news, if you like this podcast. Discover the. Rest of the NPR portfolio at NPR dot org slash podcasts. And learn more about eight of the country's top twenty podcasts according

Alabama Birmingham Debbie Elliott George Wallace Birmingham Church Bombers Taylor Branch Diane Mcchord Mississippi NPR Dortmund Michael Savage Jeff Jrue Us Attorney Taliban Jeff Sessions Martin Luther King FBI Bonnie
"civil rights workers" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"The cell phone video. Obtained by WJC Saturday capturing a Baltimore City police officer repeatedly punching a man outside. Of business. On the east, side four Four The man's family identifying him as Sean. Greer the video has now gone viral is now part of an ongoing investigation that will also include reviewing body worn camera, footage interim police, Commissioner Gary tuggle saying he's deeply disturbed in this, statement he put out adding at the officer who has not been, named but has been with the agency for a little more than a year has been. Suspended attorney says the officer and his client had a previous encounter in June An investigation, into the apparent murder of. A civil rights workers now been reopened almost eighty years after it happened authorities in Haywood county Tennessee are looking into the June nineteen. Forty death of Elbert, Williams the body, of the thirty two year old civil rights worker, was founded a river three days. After being taken from his home by a group of white bit led by a. Police officer no one was ever charged in the case, since nineteen forty one nobody's asking anything but I'm coming retired lawyer Jim Emerson has done, extensive research on the case of the man. Thought to be the first civil rights worker killed in the south Jim Griselda CBS news nine forty one and it could, be a big, step toward housing more homeless people in southern California. The state Senate has passed a Bill that would create the Orange, County housing trust it gives the thirty four cities and the county government a tool to. Pool Alder funding staff abilities toward creating a more housing for homeless persons And the programs that go with that house. Anaheim democratic assemblyman. Tom Daley tells.

officer Commissioner Gary tuggle Sean Haywood county Tennessee Baltimore City Tom Daley WJC Anaheim Jim Griselda Jim Emerson Senate Greer CBS Elbert murder California Bill attorney Williams
"civil rights workers" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Has more when you call nine one one in ocean county. Basically we opened a one time data channel to. The users own they opt in no special app needed near smartphone camera becomes. Another set of eyes on the situation with the c light system made by carbine James Nanos is director of regional sales and also check abilities God forbid and where it's not safe to talk they. Have the ability to communicate, silently with the thirties via the. Chat function companies rolled out its products in Israel where. Nanno says it's been able to dramatically speed up the. Emergency response from confidently. Find a caller on their mobile device within ten feet, of where They're calling from it's going, to continuously update as that callers move it goes live in. Ocean county next month Ian Bush KYW NewsRadio of, district, attorney in. Tennessee is reopening the investigation into the abduction and, murder, of a civil, rights, worker in the nineteen, forty authorities in Haywood county Tennessee are. Looking into the June one thousand nine hundred forty, death of Elbert Williams the. Body of the. Thirty two year, old civil rights worker was founded a river three days after being taken. From, his home by a group of white bit led by a. Police officer no one was ever charged. In the case tonight Dane forty one nobody's asking day but I'm glad it's coming retired lawyer Jim Emerson. Has done extensive research on the case of the man thought. To be the first civil rights worker killed in. The south Jim Crace Ilda CBS news KYW news time seven forty one everyone..

Ocean county Haywood county Tennessee Jim Crace director James Nanos Elbert Williams Israel Ian Bush Jim Emerson CBS Tennessee Nanno murder Dane officer attorney Thirty two year three days
"civil rights workers" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"That you were not he wrote we should never forget that everything adolf hitler did in germany was legal and everything the hungarian freedom fighters didn't hungary was illegal now the hungarian freedom fighters that he's reloading to one thousand nine hundred fifty six were freedom fighters against communism and against the evil communist russian regime came says it was illegal to aid and comfort a jew and hitler's germany even so i am sure that had i lived in germany at the time i should have aided and comforted my jewish brothers if today i lived in a communist country he wrote where certain principles deers of the christian faith or suppressed i would openly advocate disobeying that country's anti religious laws here he is not only saying that he would disobey communist laws if he lived there what are you saying is the very profound point for a man of deep faith the communism was anti religious the fact that king remained anticommunist did not deter j edgar hoover and one of the things that has become increasingly clear with more and more research and more and more documents being declassified and given the light of day was just how deep his hatred for king became and part of this has to do with criticism that hoover received even before king became prominent in the civil rights movement hoover was criticized because his fbi the most vaunted police agency in the whole world was unable until later to apprehend the ku klux klan murders and mob leader's and killer's who were slaughtering black people in the south and attacking civil rights protesters the movie mississippi burning dealt with the fbi eventually catching the people would kill the three civil rights workers in near philadelphia mississippi but the the point about all of this is that hoover had been criticized and he reacted to criticism very very poorly he reacted to criticism by starting investigations of his critics and he not only investigated king but he tried in a sincere way and despicable way to force king to commit suicide how we will get to that and more.

adolf hitler king hoover fbi mississippi germany hungary ku klux klan philadelphia
"civil rights workers" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Point to individuals sam bowers who is the leader of the white knights certain of his inner circle circle members another thing that allowed us to name names was stupid there's some great legwork and actually uncovered an individual that that had reported this bounty to the fbi and himself got involved in carrying some of the money unknowingly from atlanta to mississippi that was to be used in the valley payment of course bowers is dead dying about twelve years ago wasn't he also charged or convicted with other murders two oh yes bowers was one of the things again it pulls it together bowers group canal confirmed that had been trying to kill king for some four years and they were doing other acts of racial violence but he his group was actually convicted in the mississippi bernie murders the civil rights workers in mississippi and they were tied to a variety they were tied to ride violent acts and designated by the fbi is the most violent racist group in the united states and when you were starting to do your research how did you point yourself toward ballers as one of the lead characters in this thing we'll be sort of three different trails that all independently when you follow them wind up at our doorstep there's that individual that larry had referenced named on this and who gave him formation to the fbi about a bounty offer that was being fronted by the white nights that could have been investigated much further than it was and if you do you get the sam hours there is the evidence that i discussed at the very beginning of the show from the selfdescribed she terrorist for the white knights of the.

fbi atlanta mississippi united states larry sam bowers bowers group canal twelve years four years
"civil rights workers" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And actually uncovered and individual that that had reported this bounty to the fbi and himself got involved in carrying some of the money unknowingly from atlanta to mississippi that was to be used in the bounty payment about twelve years ago wasn't he also charged or convicted with other murders too oh yes bowers was one of the things again that pulls it together bowers group we can now confirm that had been trying to kill king for some four years and they were doing other acts of racial violence but he his group was actually convicted in the mississippi bernie murders of the civil rights workers mississippi and they were tied to a variety they would tighter variety of violent acts and designated by the fbi is the most violent racist group in the united states when you were starting to do your research how did you point yourself toward bowers as one of the lead characters in this thing trails that all independently when you follow them wind up at at bowers doorstep there's that individual that larry had referenced named don nissen who gave information to the fbi about a bounty offer that was being fronted by the white nights that could have been investigated much further than it was and if you do you get the sam bowers there is the evidence that discussed at the very beginning of the show from the selfdescribed she terrorist for the white knight to the ducks clan who is by the way still alive who's on tape saying he got a rifle to shoot martin luther king two weeks before the assassination he had been obviously working very closely with sam bowers and then finally there's this their reports and this is really what the h sea was looking at of strange activity it a place in mississippi that was a gathering point for the white knight to the kucuk clan and if you follow all three leads and that's what we do in the book it really aligns quite well and in fact it's if they had been more competent more thorough both before and certainly after the assassination we may have actually prevented the assassination but we certainly could have figured out who was behind it they just needed the connect the dots the way larry had described earlier the shooter that's where we're going to run into some some controversy we sort of we're vague about this in the beginning but we actually think.

fbi atlanta united states larry sam bowers h sea mississippi don nissen ducks martin luther twelve years four years two weeks
"civil rights workers" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Fbi documents the became available later so they they kind of sketched out the framework but they couldn't connect the dots and that's where it's kind of where we came in and you both name names in this book killing king what we do and we can we can be pretty specific because the leads point to individuals sam bowers who is the leader of the white knights certain of his inner circle members another thing that allowed us to name names was stupid there's some great legwork and actually uncovered in individual that that had reported this bounty to the fbi and himself got involved in carrying some of the money unknowingly from atlanta to mississippi that was to be used in the bounty payment of course is dead dying about twelve years ago wasn't he also charged or convicted with other murders too oh yes bowers was one of the things again it pulls it together bowers group we can now confirm that had been trying to kill king for some four years and they were doing other acts of racial violence but he his group was actually convicted in mississippi bernie murders of the civil rights workers in mississippi and they were tied to a variety they were tied a variety of violent acts and designated by the fbi is the most violent racist group in the united states when you were starting to do your research how did you point yourself toward bowers as one of the lead characters in this thing like trails that all independently when you follow them wind up at at bowers doorstep there's that individual that larry had referenced named don nissen who gave information to the.

fbi atlanta mississippi united states larry sam bowers don nissen twelve years four years
"civil rights workers" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The leads that stu and i were able able to see with the fbi documents the became available later so they they kind of sketched out the framework but they couldn't connect the dots and that's where it's of where we came in and you both name names in this book killing king what we do and we can we can be pretty specific because they leads point to individuals sam bowers who is the leader of the white knights certain of his inner circle circle members another thing that allowed us to name names was stupid there's some great legwork and actually uncovered and individual that that had reported this bounty to the fbi and himself got involved in carrying some of the money unknowingly from atlanta to mississippi that was to be used in the bounty payment of course bowers is dead dying about twelve years ago wasn't he also charged or convicted with other murders too oh yes bowers was one of the things again it pulls together bowers group we can now confirm that had been trying to kill king for some four years and they were doing other acts of racial violence but he his group was actually convicted in mississippi bernie murders of the civil rights workers in this society and they were tied to a variety they would tied a variety of violent acts and designated by the fbi is the most violent racist group in the united states when you were starting to do your research how did you point yourself toward bowers as one of the lead characters in this thing like trails that all independently when you follow them wind up at our doorstep there's that individual that larry had referenced named don nissen who gave information to the fbi about a bounty offer that was being fronted by the white nights that.

fbi atlanta mississippi united states larry sam bowers don nissen twelve years four years
"civil rights workers" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And going back to atlanta because ray was in for years and it wasn't he couldn't take advantage of it and that that was the starting point and the and the problem was they discovered a lot of other things that would have fleshed out that story and that bounty but they didn't have the evidence and really couldn't see the leads that stu and i were able to see with the fbi docu the became available later so they they kind of sketched out the framework but they couldn't connect the dots and that's where it's kind of where we came in and you both name names in this book killing king what we do and we can we can be pretty specific because the leads point to individuals sam bowers who is the leader of the white knights certain of his inner circle circle members another thing that allowed us to name names was stupid there's some great legwork and actually uncovered in individual that that had reported this bounty to the fbi and himself got involved in carrying some of the money unknowingly from atlanta to mississippi that was to be used in the bounty payment of course bowers is dead dying about twelve years ago wasn't he also charged or convicted with other murders two oh yes bowers was one of the things again that pulls it together bowers group can now confirm that had been trying to kill king for some four years and they were doing other acts of racial violence but he his group was actually convicted in mississippi bernie murders of the civil rights workers in this society and they were tied to a variety they were tied a variety of violent acts and designated by the fbi is the most violent racist group in the united states when you were starting to do your research how did you point yourself toward bowers as one of the lead characters in this thing trails that all independently when you follow them wind up at our doorstep there's that individual that larry had referenced named don nissen who gave information to the fbi about a bounty offer that was being fronted by the white knight that.

atlanta ray fbi bowers group mississippi united states larry sam bowers don nissen twelve years four years
"civil rights workers" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Ended its anita's toby about going to the c the president about certain issues and and that the he had briefed the president on what was happening and that he sent memos to robert kennedy because he never went to see robert kennedy of his own volition he didn't like roberts he liked the president and you know he conveyed that he at great disdain for robert kennedy who he thought was a a young whippersnapper but he also really didn't like martin luther king actually i don't think it was so much that he was he didn't express the kind he king gall at said that the fbi was not providing protection to the civil rights workers who were at had dig below reach out through the king and tell the fbi is investigating but it has no jurisdiction or responsibility to provide protection that's not it's it's a thority and the king went onto make statements that you know the bureau wasn't providing protection again and so who got ticked off the king didn't understand the proper role of the fbi you you write in your book as describing this scene as hoover spoke at cross my mind that perhaps the director was jealous of the esteem the public had for king but such an explanation would seem so petty for a man of hoover's stature i yet distinctly recall thinking that who were just unrealized that gang is much more than just its name irreparably a movement ongoing amongst particularly blacks but minorities in the united states and.

"civil rights workers" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on KOMO

"Getting a new and revealing look at the investigation into october's may shooting in las vegas a left fifty eight victims dead in previously sealed court documents unsealed by a judge at the request of abc news fbi agents outlined their needs first search warrants the documents are from october fbi agents asking for access to gunman steven paddocks email instagram an amazon accounts they say paddocks girlfriend told them her fingerprints would beyond the ammunition used in the attack because she sometimes helped him load magazines and that in the hotel room near paddocks body three cell phones were found to were unlocked in add nothing useful on them agents were trying to gain access to the third blocked phone alex stone abc news a former ku klux klan leader convicted in connection with the 19th sixty four killings of three civil rights workers died in the mississippi prison at ninety two can nineteen 64 edgar ray killing was a preacher a sawmill operator and a ku klux klan leader coauthority said organized a group of men who killed three civil rights workers in philadelphia mississippi weeks before president lyndon johnson signed the civil rights act of nineteen 64 into law let us lay aside irrelevant difference killing was acquitted at a federal civil rights trial but forty one years to the day change cheney michael shorn earn andrew goodman were killed later dramatize in the movie mississippi burning he was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to sixty years in prison brian clark abc news abc news komo aaa traffic every 10 minutes.

las vegas fbi coauthority lyndon johnson civil rights cheney brian clark search warrants steven paddocks amazon ku klux klan mississippi philadelphia president andrew goodman forty one years sixty years 10 minutes
"civil rights workers" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Percentage of his appeal is racism churn simple i do that's what all that is susie hasn't is you know that you know that it's almost like it's like you know she a crowded hearables sporting event you know put ronald reagan who everyone now a doors and close including democrats without uh reagan who have had any this run reagan taught the country to heat government and to not even know what government is he wasn't so great with the people of other races either i would say a non white folk opening up his his campaign around the corner from essentially where where three a civil rights workers were were killed or george bush senior why can't think about was initialled anymore but you know not the rhetoric bush the previous george bush right first willie horton ads yep but the problem is that even people who were alive and don't remember anything you know and and certainly people are younger couldn't possibly remember that but the way that the republicans have succeeded at all is by racism period the other stuff is just gravy and where do you i mean where do you place like a you know when you when you think about someone like uh clinton and welfare reform and uh his try and thought it was horrible right i i didn't i didn't write bill clinton big because he was way to the right knee apopka was to raise money here and believe me i am not you know that left you know.

susie ronald reagan george bush bill clinton civil rights willie horton
"civil rights workers" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on KELO

"About uh there's been no penalty i i mean even even when it's police officers for goodness sake there are people who get convicted and have their lives turned upside down you you may remember that after the riots and after all of that the rodney king officers i went to prison ryan and and in in in that particular case and certainly people and by the way we have we have done very well it's taken years in some cases to prosecute people who killed civil rights workers but we've done that even years later because when you're involved with murder that usually doesn't run into a statute of limitations donald you're right america has a troubled troubled racial history very very far from perfect but what you said is outrageous and it's just wrong and i believe that the overwhelming majority of americans whether they're blacker there wyde whether they're muslim or christian or the jewish or whoever they are are going to want to see this guy get the death penalty uh which is why the death penalty exists is precisely for evil killers like this by the way he has also said on his website that he was a great fan of timothy mcveigh an even worse keller who did get the death penalty appreciate your call let's go to motion lakewood new jersey you're on the michael medved show hello my group michael uh no happy holiday starting tonight yes go yeah i harm to the point i'm a conservative republican who did not vote.

ryan civil rights murder america timothy mcveigh keller lakewood rodney king donald michael medved
"civil rights workers" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights workers" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"And when obama was elected he decided to put the movement to sleep and to try to govern as a conciliator spiraled it into died democratic democratic national committee and sort of put it to sleep and he made a strategic choice too um tried to minimise opposition to what he wanted to do by reaching out across the aisle and doing all of that all of that conciliation staff which really got him nowhere rather than mobilizing maximizing the support he had and it so ironic that usually win often when republicans get into office even by one vote they claim it's a mandate uh you know george bush did that so forth when republic when democrats get in they say oh we have to prove our legitimacy we have to reach out in in you know be fined kids and obama had i think a very inflated sense of his own capacity as a facilitator and as a mediator and it really backfired in a deep way he had those first two years were golden years for him now the reaction the tea party reaction of course to be understood the and a lot of it was racially based in i think we have to really acknowledge that end and recognize the you know the groundbreaking character of obama's election breaking the color bar at that level was a big deal for this country which has been grounded in institutionalized racism since its foundation and so of course that was going to be reaction uh just as there was reaction civil rights movement back in the '60s uh and that fueled a lot of reagan's work in the south i mean reagan kicked off his campaign in the town where three civil rights workers had been murdered any good men michael schwendener james cheney that's where he launched his campaign there is nothing subtle about that at all so this sort of combination of race and class in politics it's sad it's not just rat action reaction it is deeper than that and i think the big challenge that that's that's being face now is not.

obama democratic national committee reagan george bush civil rights michael schwendener james cheney two years