19 Episode results for "Civil Rights Museum"

55. Barbara Hicks-Collins Is Turning Her Family Home Into the Bogalusa Civil Rights Museum

Museum Archipelago

00:0-1 sec | 2 years ago

55. Barbara Hicks-Collins Is Turning Her Family Home Into the Bogalusa Civil Rights Museum

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm UNLV there. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. Barbara Hicks Collins can describe the exact moment an idea for a civil rights museum in Bogalusa Louisiana entered her mind Hurricane Katrina, I was living in Wallington a home with devastating. So I moved back to Bogalusa which was great. 'cause when I moved back to the LUSA, I was able to help my mom, take care of my father is health was failing Barbara Hicks Collins father is the late Robert, Bob Hicks a civil rights leader and founder of the first chapter of the deacons for defense and Justice, the deacons were an armed, African American Self Defense Force operating in the segregated and violently hostile towards integration city of Bogalusa, and other towns across the American South in the nineteen sixties said about five years with him every waking hour that we could talk he would talk to me about what? He loves to talk about the civil rights movement. And when my father died, then I begin to realize that a lot of things are not permanent that meant to me that a lot of the history that I thought would always be year because we experienced history, and it was so important for people to know why they are where they are today, and the people, the history makers are legends. Our heroes are foot soldiers. They were dying off sooner than I expected. But I was thinking of a way how could we preserve the history permanently in the idea? The dream came up run out of neom where you can stop preserving the history, talk into some of the defenders and make them the civil rights museum. So this generation and generations. So I have would know about that today. Barbara Hicks Collins is the director of the museum and she joins me to talk about the process, progress and challenges of the Bogalusa civil rights museum project green from Bogalusa, Louisiana. I'm Barbara geeks Collins, I'm the daughter of the late civil rights leader, Robert, Bob picks and we live in Louisiana in Washington parish. I'm also museum director of the future museum, which is going to be a civil rights museum in Bogalusa. And how are you today? I'm doing great. I'm so I'm so excited to talk with you before we start talking about the museum. We have to talk about the town of Bogalusa, and the life of Robert, Bob Hicks moguls is a meal town of small southern meal tells and that's is a lot, the Goodyear came from New York. And they started the pay per meal. Llama meal here in Bogalusa, and they brought in people from all over the country when they heard that was going to be a meal. They brought him in, then they deal home for the people to live in insist was nineteen o six, of course, they are separated, so in vogue Luther separated where you have the blacks and you have the right and they build churches for blacks and churches for why. So that's how they tried to do. They say was equal, if he did it that way. So, you know, that story in the nineteen sixties, Robert, Bob Hicks worked and labor organized at the paper mill and lived with his wife, Jackie Hicks, and their children in a house in the black neighborhood of Bogalusa since our family house was known as a civil rights out, because we were civilized family. All the, the civilized workers, anyone who came into Bogalusa everybody civilized, lawyers. They would always come to the house. Out on February first nineteen sixty five after a series of meetings at the Bogalusa voters league Bob and Jackie Hicks invited to white civil rights workers William gates and Steve Miller into their home aware that they would not be safe in the nearby hotel, because of local Ku Klux Klan activity, robber and Jackie Hicks sat down for dinner that night with their children, including Barbara, and their guests Yates and Miller when they finished eating they retired to the living room to watch television and talk over the day's events. Suddenly there was a knock on the door, Robert Hicks opened it and found the Bogalusa police chief standing in the doorway. He had bad news. A mob of whites had gathered nearby, and they were prepared to murder the entire family and burn the house to the ground. If the Hicks didn't pull the white activists out, the officer added that they should expect no help from law enforcement as Lance hill writes in the deacons for defense armed resistance in the civil rights movement. Bob and Jackie Hicks were level-headed activists. And they mobilized quickly. Jackie promptly called several friends for assistance, when it became known that the Hicks family needed protection, the black men of Bogalusa responded swiftly. The police officers watched a line of black men armed with shotguns, and rifles rapidly file into the Hicks house. The mob never materialized. An ordinary family, but we will raise your to do extraordinary things. And that was who is my daddy say 'cause he divorced for the voices to be the person who was stand up for people who will say to send for themselves. That's what he did. And that's what we as a family beginning to do. And that's what we re scout. Well, he was doubt in the leader. And they got they thought the fear and so men would never stood up before the game can stand up and say no to the justed a few weeks later after more violence in Bogalusa. And on the day of Malcolm, X's assassination, Robert Hicks and fellow activists founded, the Bogalusa chapter of the deacons for defense injustice headquartered in the Hicks home and made up of many of the same foot soldiers who had come forward with their guns to protect the family on February. I in our breakfast room was the radio. So when people called in communication radio, we could hear that all over the house. And so some people were calling in for distress. They were they were they were been attacked. Somebody will catch this in a building rounded by plans, and they needed to deacon succumb to get we would hear all of that. I'm just trying to give you hints of what I want to show a want us to show, mortgages, the picketing the see the kids going to jail and be taxed the doll. My brother was bitten by police dogs and all of these things. And he was refused medical service that the local hostile because he shouldn't have been at the public park that was all right. And this way, the house served as not only the communication headquarters, but also as a safe house and the medical triage station for injured. Activists denied medical services at the state hospital. And now the house has one final us as the future Bogalusa civil rights museum, my family. I mean, that's where I grew up and that's where all the civil rights activity to play. So when I walk in the house, I see the family standing in the living room on Sunday morning with my father, giving the Sunday morning prayer before we go to church. I see that, and I see our bedrooms. And I've see I'm in the kitchen and all of that. Then on the other hand, I see the fear see the struggle at sea, where we had the men, some the he can say defensive Justice with guns all around to protect the civil rights workers have stayed at our house and to protect my father, wherever he went to protect the family. So. In the house in two different points of view of feeling two different ways based on that I want to show in the museum, what we went through as a part of the movement, and then maybe they could understand how difficult it was that this way of life was, not the way it should have been for any American this future museum, this house made into a museum will interpret what happened inside and outside against the wallpaper of a domestic scene for Barbara Hicks Collins, in her family, a closed front door didn't close out the world around her the radio, which was necessary because the city would monitor and occasionally shut off the phone lines. Could come on at any moment for all the other interpretations that the museum will present the clans threat to daily life is maybe the most powerful so what's the process of getting from here to there for Hicks Collins? Started with making small permanent changes to Bogalusa landscape that will pave the way for the museum idea of having a museum with the history that I said going through the process. So I think the first first thing that I did was to go to the zonings commission to make sure that it was on for civil rights museum that was a little complicated. You have to know Bogalusa I people to come in to support the idea. And finally, they approve the area for civil rights museum. So the second thing was to rename the street of the his family live to rename the street lava ball pick state, that doesn't do it, eventually, it happened. And so the industry is, named after my father by this time, we had the. Robert Baden picks foundation laid it solve a one c three hours Asian and from that point, we were able to move to get in a landmark the end, by the way, the landmark is right in front of the heat sound they never had a landmark of an African American in Washington pairs, never this was the first one. So we thought that was a Blake's assist. The Robert, Bob Hicks foundation is building support through fundraisers, a small grant to Louisiana division of historic preservation and volunteer efforts to physically prepare. The house for the museum Hicks Collins, also recently secure the grant from the institute of museums in the library services to record interviews with members of the deacons, civil rights lawyers, and others. But the whole thing that I want to say to you about this whole process and having a dream, and it's something you have to believe it, because it's not. Easy, but it's possible. It's not gonna occur overnight. It's like a drug on quality in all these little small country towns. And then in America, as a whole, it didn't come overnight, so you have to be committed, and you have to stay the course even though some people may not be with you. You still have to stay the course because, you know, the end result, you know, you're gonna give this generation generation Sofala something that was so valuable. And if you don't, if you don't go out with that mindset, you're lose it Collins is working to build the museum in time so that the few civil rights workers and foot soldiers who are still living will be on-site giving tours and answering questions. The museum project is entering what Hicks Collins calls face to restoring the house to make it suitable for a museum rerun during the stolen electrical system with updated codes. Installing security system and building a legend gallery with surround seats in the car park of the home. You can find out more information about Robert Hicks and the status of the museum by visiting Robert Hicks foundation dot squarespace dot com, and you can donate to the foundation at Robert Hicks foundation dot squarespace, dot com slash donate. Amarnath achieve birthday. We have the, the ROTC students to come in and they do the volunteer work. You know, still unexplained into them before they saw doing the work that this is going to be who. How's it was? And this is going to be a museum. The the whole still there. I insist started what museums have you been to? And she said, none, I said, no. I mean, have you been out of Bogalusa to go to museum anywhere? Not just in lucid. And she said, no, I haven't been, I never been to Mizzou. How could that be a scene of junior, almost a senior never been seen, and she worked harder than anybody else? And so I just heard say so you're the one you want to people that are working for working so you can have museum and you can. Let your children know that you are part of it. That gives me courage Moore more push to commute. This has been museum archipelago. You'll find a full transcript of this episode along with show nuts at museum. Archipelago dot com. Club archipelago members get access to a bonus podcast feed, but sort of like the director's commentary to the main show. Subscribe at patriot dot com slash museum archipelago. If this is your first show, don't forget to subscribe for free in your favorite podcast player. Thanks for listening and next time. Bring a friend. But, but I hear you say not our podcast longer than fifteen. Then is a lesson. Started. Do I do that Barbara? To my podcast. And she always tells me, you know what I like about your podcast. Short. Thank you um. I think.

Bogalusa Barbara Hicks Collins Bob Hicks civil rights museum Robert Hicks Jackie Hicks Robert Hicks Hicks house Bogalusa Louisiana Robert Hicks Louisiana UNLV director African American Self Defense Hurricane Katrina Ku Klux Klan Robert Baden
Photographer Cecil Williams Remembers the Orangeburg Massacre & Documenting Civil Rights Era

Democracy Now! Audio

22:24 min | 1 year ago

Photographer Cecil Williams Remembers the Orangeburg Massacre & Documenting Civil Rights Era

"This is democracy now democracy now dot Org the Warren Peace Report. I'm Amy Goodman as we bring you part two of our conversation with C. Soul Jay Williams. He's a photographer and author best known for his photography documenting the Civil Rights Movement in South Carolina beginning in the nineteen fifties founder of the sea so Williams Civil Rights Museum right here in Orangeburg in part one of our discussion. We talked about the ORANGEBURG. Berg massacre February eighth nineteen sixty eight. It was the year of the assassinations of Dr Martin. Luther King and Robert Kennedy. It was before the killings. Ken Stayed Jackson State. This was the first massacre on American University campus. US three students dead. Twenty eight wounded here in Orangeburg when students were simply protesting a segregated bowling alley the all star Bowling Alley just down the road from South Carolina State South Carolina troopers moved in and open fire on the crowd of students killing three of them to nineteen year old college students and a seventeen year old high school student See so Williams. has this all documented in the museum that opened just a few months ago in Orangeburg. It's great to have you with us and for us to continue this conversation. Why was the Orangeburg massacre so overlooked and yet so seminal in the civil rights movement? That's it's always puzzled me as well because here was an American tragedy. It was something that happened at a time when we had so many other things that were reported but perhaps maybe the war being in the background time and other things happening nationally maybe it did not get the attention that it deserved but it wasn't American tragedy but one that should should not have occurred. It should not have occurred and our state federal local people. They should have prevented this. They should have not even a symbol. The force had to try and stop. The students from the demonstrations the next morning when you found the casings that showed it was the state state troopers. There's not the students who opened fire. As if there was some kind of crossfire situation it's astounding that you came onto the campus and there was no crime. Same scene tape didn't give the incident enough. Respect even put yellow cramped of seen accosted around it and I was really by myself initially when I arrived on the campus then in a few minutes the maintenance staff from State College arrive and they started picking up debris but it was just an open field in fact understand that after the shooting in the late of the night that everyone left and it was just a left open area subject to anything and of course then the trial. All the state troopers were cleared but it was cleaved. Sellers lers a well-known civil rights leader. He was with Snick the student on Violent Coordinating Committee. He had come to town one of the leaders of the protest against against the segregated bowling alley it was only cleaved sellers. Who would be served time in jail? That was really an insult to really the injury because actually actually even charged not being involved at night but an incident on February the six two days earlier where I was present and then charged with inciting to right and some other trumped up charges but inciting to riot because he was one of the leaders of the movement to try to integrate this bowling alley in town. Yes yes he became involved And of course he had the spiritual head of well seasoned civil rights worker and was there to help but it was. It has principle purpose to be. In orangeburg Bruce Willis to integrate the bowling alley. And what happened to this bowling alley. I was stunned last night. Just going down the street here from in South Carolina State to see this decrepit abandoned bowling alley see the bowling bowl still inside. But there's no plaque there no suggestion of what took place and in fact even the plaque here at South Carolina state there's a small plaque on the site and then just down. The road is the is the monument to the students wounded and killed. Just the memorial them is not really on the site where the incident took place but about three thousand yards. Maybe maybe from where it happened really close to highway sixty one. They highway patrolman. And National Guardsmen and other law enforcement. People were in the street. The students were on their campus. It's ironic that actually to Edgeley fire upon them to how we patrolman left the street on the campus went up to heal and start firing at the students. For eight seconds. Unbelievable why is the plaque and the memorial not wear. The students actually fell. I have no oh idea. Perhaps it could have been because they had plans to maybe bill building on that site introducing the center of the campus. But I have no idea of real reason why it was built so far away. Well it certainly prominent in your museum see so Williams. Talk About Your Museum why you founded it and some some of the exhibits within it. You've got the casings. There of the state troopers well for many years more than a decade and I've been talking working with officials about trying to start using because I feel that the things that people in South Carolina did have gone from a historical standpoint mo much overlooked and and it was so much history here in fact in my opinion or any opinion of many historians This is a place where eating Clarendon county actually. The civil rights movement began the brakes versus etiquette. You Seem Clarendon. South Carolina was really the template case lead into what is called Brown Versus Board of Mitch -Cation and of course the historical event that most historians give to beginning the civil rights movement begun Alabama. Really they were reacting to the Brown on case was all about and so it's really impossible for them to be acted something but really started by South Carolina case. Wait so explain. We know it is Brown. V Board of Education Education Briggs only gets a footnote in history for many many reasons. First of all. They're of some Information that states that the judges did not feel the Supreme Court judges did not feel that it would be proper to name it after South Carolina case and if if the Topeka Kansas case which came on later which followed the Briggs Persons Elliott case would be the proper to Topeka Kansas case courses in the middle of the the United States. Involved Linda Brown. But it's the brakes case. That was really a template of the five cases and this was also the first case in history that attack segregation in schools so from that standpoint preceded all the things that most historians referred to as the beginning of the civil rights movement. Who is breaks Harry Briggs was at dirt foaming Clarendon County? He returned from the navy and as it was before he went into the service to give his time in serving this country and when he returned he found that things are not changing clarity county and much of the south for that matter so he wanted to change that he wanted to have his child to receive a better education. The dilapidated schools of Clarendon county as it was very common around. The state. Were really disgraceful. The educational facilities were not up report. Books were not available and so he wanted to sue initially for a bus so the kids would be able to ride some children clarity county. Tony had to walk over eight miles to and from school and where White School buses were provided for most most of white children to have enough African American schools so in addition to having dilapidated schools again the circumstances around that were we're also very outdated so something had to happen and it was in Clinton County thirty miles from where we sit in this auditorium that Harry breaks and others and and the Briggs versus petitions got together and filed a case. That really was the first case texts agregation in public education. And in your museum you have well talk. Talk about the Bible. I Again it has been my obsession to really change things and really make a museum that really not only Recognizes and collects this information but also to reclaim South Carolina's history is really has been the forefront of the American Civil Rights Movement. I want it to to get that kind of designation and seeing this was not being done I took it upon myself from our own resources to start this. I had thirty five hundred square foot building. That was formerly my stereo where my wife lived and I began to about six months ago. Change into a museum of the Bible that I I have obtained from the Brits family was the historical briefs Family Bible really wanted by museums mall more sixty years and this was really an achievement for the family to think enough of the display that I have placed in my museum to replace it in the Williams Museum for all to see I mean you. You have a remarkable history so williams you are now eighty three years old gives me. When did you first pick up a camera? I picked up my first camera at nine in years old per household camera but us mostly my brother and when he took up music then passed onto me and of course I was the best chest around the house taking my family as they were getting dressed but soon that escalated into maybe taking pictures around Orangeburg at twelve and thirteen years old. I was doing waiting ratings. It fourteen I became correspondent for national publication jet. And I think that was something that inspired me to go father and really be more intense in my coverage. The things that were happening at the time because again this is really the early of nineteen fifty five thousand nine hundred six when things really happening again leading up to Brown versus board of Education. What what did you film for? What did you photograph for Jet Photograph just about anything in in the state of South Carolina Relatives Civil Rights jet jet at the time and other publications that were necessary because the mainstream publications and newspapers and radio stations largely they do not cover African American news? There were marches that went on on reported so jet and other publications needed someone in the field so I was one of the twenty-five correspondence probably the only living corresponds because starting early age fourteen years will begin on the scene that time to combat. Thanks for national publications. Is it true you lost scholarship here at South Carolina state because because of the pictures you took of protests in Orangeburg South Carolina State about four months now for the Montgomery bus boycott. We they students that's and joined. The boycott was going on in Orangeburg where we have started movement that we called the Orangeburg Freedom Movement at the time and it was also so by the time I was getting ready to graduate from Wilkinson High School being the photographer. State College and clattering university mile. I was given a scholarship Russia to attend South Carolina State and a stipend and after my pictures appeared in jet magazine. That really showed the cooperation of the President of South Carolina. State University. The rescind on my scholarship President Manny of class universally did it offers a similar scholarship and obtained my degree from Clemson University. And explain your desire to be an architect and what happened happened. I mean you've been thwarted in various ways that you've very creatively got around but a very sad comment on higher. Education in America thought the educational occasional opportunities at both state and Klaff were memorable but I really initially wanted to be an architect because I scribbled and drew early age and then of course. The camera gave me the outlet for that but I thought that I wouldn't able to make a living. Maybe as a photographer so architecture was my real interest but it it would my senior year. I wasn't even able to get the application to attend Clemson University. It was the only school in the state that I could receive a degree in architecture whereas Clemson Clemson University in Clemson South Carolina in the upper part of the state and it was at the time segregated but it did turn out to be my destiny that returned in one thousand nine hundred sixty two clemson. Being one of the three African Americans only campus. At the moment that Harvey Gantt became the first of how race to really integrate Clemson. If you go to Charlotte North Carolina you'd see that the magnificence of his architecture shaped downtown downtown Charlotte North Carolina. He was outstanding student in the first African American to a tune clemson university and I photographed four G. and of course harvey gap became Mayor of Charlotte. Yes he later. Ran against a staunch segregationist suggests a hymns and He lost but again mitigate statement in by the way a young the Rock Obama was encouraged and worked in the campaign for Hoffy. Can't allow people don't relate that as well but There's a pitcher in one of my books of. Aw Barack Obama wearing one of harvey gains t-shirts at the time. So I'm sure he was by the Harvey Gains Bravery. So Barack Obama is here in two thousand seven there is a plaque back in the back of the MLK auditorium because he was part of the two thousand seven Democratic presidential primary debate with John John Edwards and North Carolina Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden and others of a picture that I took at the time of Barack Obama in when he was in Orangeburg camping around the state and I think that he did a magnificent job as the president of the United States. And what a contrast of what we have today. I think that a more reason why are important for me to preserve this history. The fact that We must pitch to people who sacrificed so much for this country to change changes country and you've grown up to date not seeing this in history books. What else is there for them to really be reminded of the sacrifices that were made they think would take a better interest in their own lives if they can look back and be encouraged by the bravery that was exhibited by people came before them and maybe then model their lives after them? You were photographer of John F.. Kennedy yes I met Kennedy. When I was a senior at Clemson in university I had gone to New York to stay with my uncle? Four days doing the semester break and I read in the paper that John if Senator John F Kennedy would appear appear at the Roosevelt Hotel. I didn't have my press pass with time. But appearing at the hotel the hotel security robot to throw me out and then Kennedy and Jacqueline came up to the podium. He saw what was going on. Stop them from throwing me out of the hotel and we became very good friends at the time. I think I became one of his favourite lensman because I was invited to really be in places and have really a positions of two photographing as per campaign for the presidency which later won so explain those moments in one thousand nine hundred sixty and what you remember most fondly or what most interested you as you captured. His percentage behind the camera again. I believe that Kennedy Haiti one. There was much speculation the fact that he was a Catholic the might not even be electable candidate so much debate between him and Nixon and others were interested in that office at the time and so when he announced it fact that January press conference he was going to run. I was really in his Kony. Thought he would do. Many things in his presidency and really lead this country out of the situation. We had especially a ratio change wise and really bring this country to realize that we're all Americans and we all in the same boat together but it was some of the most memorable moments of my life to be in the presence awesome person that went on to become one of our great presidents. This was a time where something like that. A little country boy at me Orangeburg South Carolina. Really I could not be encouraged anymore as it was when I photographed him. I have photographs in my museum of him and he was such a memorable unforgettable person. We're sending my life. What are your thoughts on the president? Today I feel less safe today. We're living in a climate. It seems like we are in a situation where it might be that. We'd have to fight the battle to overcome racism and so many the other problems all over again. We are very bliss. He'd be here. We feel that the administration is doing a very poor job of relating to Americans and really working on the things that really changed this country working on the big problems that we need to face in this country and so much every day There are things in the newest. I'm very disappointed in the government thankfully. The country has the resilience to really Be Self supporting in ideals and principles that even without great leadership Washington we are surviving. And we're doing well but it is something that works quite a bit and I hope that The people in this country are feel will elect a new president that would not have the same kinds of problems behind. We have we have with our current president. What are you must proud of Cecil Williams? Well I'm most proud. Of course my beautiful wife that I feel very blessed to be to pay young lady who. I'm the president of the Orangeburg W. C. P. I have. I'm very grateful that I had parents. That really believed in me they. They bought a camera equipment for me. Supported me or doing the years now. I feel very blessed that I have had the best of education in spite of the segregated segregated educational institution. I had to attend but I made the most of it and I feel that really. I had written a really great teachers. Even though it was a segregated institution that I attended it but I felt that the teachers were interested in the students and I feel very great for that. For the upbringing that had inspired the segregated South Carolina allowed. I lived in and finally what message. Do you have for young photographers. Just people in this country because because you were a photographer. You're an activist. You're a documentary of the history of this country. I would suggest that photographers today. In young people think more we'll be taking pictures and more about content. We need today with all the social media platforms and so forth and that we need to actually produce content of to appear on these poor content. That has a positive message. There are so many photographers offer now today. That actually photography itself. I don't think it's a wise choice for maybe some occupation for the future but again making something thing to be on in social media and on television using a camera might be may be something that would want to pursue but I would say that to the youth of America to really. Don't give up dream pursue it. You do have to work hard. Sometimes things happened just by themselves but largest left up to you and do the right thing and I just wanted to ask you one last question. When we came to your museum last night on the floor you had You had apparatus that you just brought from New York where we came from from the Jacob Javits Center because you had put on display. What you call a toaster is a film toast? Photographers like me. Who started shooting film today? We found ourselves in a situation where our film now. Because of the Asia he's like digital came along about nine hundred ninety nine and so my film was getting to be forty fifty years old. And it's beginning to fade away. The the current and the conventional way of digitizing film was using maybe flatbed scanner and that was to some slow. Especially when you had like I did like maybe six hundred eight hundred thousand fim so in converting them. I had to come up with an apparatus that did it much faster in the film toaster as I have called it does that. It really is a platform from which digital cameras mounted polite and so forth and then you able to make a close up picture of each negative but you do it in a fifth of second doc which is like sixty times faster flatbed scanner. So that's what I brought to the bucket and again I've been very blessed. I'm selling in all the world. I had a gentleman this week to arrive in New York from Brazil and he wanted to carry one back with him. I was able to put it together and that was the reason for that. Carter you saw on the floor of my museum as we were preparing to put away some of the things we brought from the New York. Show thank you so much for spending this time with US see Sel Jay. Williams photographer occur author best known for his photography documenting the Civil Rights Movement here in South Carolina beginning in the nineteen seventies. He's the founder of the sea. So William MM Civil Rights Museum

South Carolina Orangeburg Civil Rights Movement US Clemson University Linda Brown President Clarendon county Williams Civil Rights Museum C. Soul Jay Williams State College Orangeburg South Carolina American University williams New York Robert Kennedy William MM Civil Rights Museum founder Amy Goodman
NPR News: 04-05-2020 5AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 04-05-2020 5AM ET

"Live from NPR news Washington on Jail Snyder. President trump is warning. The country could be headed into a tough week. Predicting what he said would be a lot of death. Stemming from the corona virus pandemic at Saturday's White House briefing. The president also expressed eagerness to get the economy up and running as soon as possible and said the federal government is denying some requests from states for ventilators. Another assistance trump said the federal government is deciding how to allocate equipment in some cases as impure ceremony cabin reports. President trump has said New York does not need the forty thousand ventilators. The state has projected could be needed as the death. Toll Klein's without providing evidence trump accused of asking for more ventilators than necessary. Estate has ventilators as an example that they know they're not gonNA need. They should give them over and we should move them with the other ones. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says Oregon is sending ventilators to his date. Nearly three thousand people have died in New York and more than seven thousand nationwide. President trump says the nation. We'll see many more deaths particularly over the next two weeks Sarah McCamman. Npr News number of confirmed infections in the US tops. Three hundred thousand. More than eighty five hundred people have died. The president's health advisors say krona virus cases could peak this week in three major hotspots. New York Detroit in Louisiana States have been bidding on the open market for medical equipment like ventilators California attempting to bypass that Step as Holly J mcdade reports from Member Station K. Q. E. D. Governor Gavin newsom has launched a one stop website where companies can sell and donate medical supplies needed by hospitals and first responders around the state to fight Kovic nineteen have been overwhelmed and humbled by the amount of individuals and businesses. That are have been willing to support our efforts particularly critical medical supplies. Houston says California is still in serious need of equipment from hand sanitizer to ventilators. He says the state is working on acquiring protective equipment at scale to avoid unnecessary competition between states from our news. I'm hygienic deed in San Francisco. We Elizabeth due to deliver a televised address to Britain and Commonwealth countries. Today will be the first such broadcast and nearly twenty years apart from our annual Christmas Day. Message the BBC's Johnny Diamond has more the Queen will speak of the disruption to the life of the country a disruption see will say that has brought grief to some financial difficulties too many and enormous changes the daily lives of everyone. She'll offer thanks to those working on the front line of the jess to care. Workers into those in essential roles so recognize the pain already felt by families and thank those who have stayed at home to protect the vulnerable. This will says the palace be deeply personal message from the queen reflecting her experience in the difficult times this is. Npr news from Washington. A third cruise ship was corona virus cases on board docked. This weekend in Florida the coral princess arrived in Miami with a dozen people who tested positive. Among the eighteen hundred passengers and crew two passengers died. Passengers found fit to fly expected to begin leaving today. Others with symptoms will remain on board until cleared by doctors the ship docked in Miami after poured Lauderdale's port everglades Refused permission today. Marks fifty two years since the assassination of Dr Martin Luther King Junior Katie reardon of member station. Wkno a Memphis reports because of the crow virus pandemic. The National Civil Rights Museum is commemorating the Cajun exclusively online typically hundreds to thousands gathering. The museums courtyard for a moment of silence at the time. Dr King Shooting Six zero one. Pm But this year the public will have to reflect on King's legacy online with speakers and performers Dr Noel. Trent the museum's Director of Education Says Kings challenged inequality is particularly relevant today people who are struggling to find ways to feed their families while sheltering in place people who have forty hour week jobs but still can't afford housing. This year's programming includes a tribute from the Reverend Jesse Jackson and can be accessed via the museum's website and social media pages for NPR news in Memphis. I'm Katie reardon. The search of the Chesapeake Bay expected to resume today for two members of the Kennedy family made Kennedy mckean and her eight year old son. Gideon were last seen in a canoe. Thursday this is NPR news.

trump president New York NPR Npr NPR Miami federal government Elizabeth Dr King Katie reardon Governor Andrew Cuomo Memphis White House Civil Rights Museum California Gideon Toll Klein Snyder
NPR News: 04-04-2020 5PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 04-04-2020 5PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jeanine herbst. President trump says the. Us will be adding thousands of military medical personnel to help states deal with a pandemic including one thousand being sent to New York City that they're going into war they're going into a battle that They've never really trained for. Nobody's trained for this. Nobody's saying this at the daily White House briefing today. President trump says he wants to distribute resources on what he calls a fair basis around the country. Meanwhile New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says state is getting one thousand badly needed ventilator from China and several hundred from Oregon Cuomo says the Chinese ventilators come courtesy of the founders of Alibaba the Chinese e commerce giant. And they're set to arrive today. New York is the epicenter of the Corona virus outbreak in the US with more than one hundred thirteen thousand confirmed cases. More than thirty five hundred. S meanwhile the search for those ventilators continue as governors around the US have been pleading competing and scouring the global marketplace for needed supplies especially ventilators to treat the sick Cuomo says New York at one point made a purchase order for seventeen thousand of the devices but only two thousand five hundred came through the State of New Jersey is approaching a grim milestone as the number of deaths from the corona virus continues to climb that state has now lost about one hundred more people to the virus than the State lost in the September eleventh terrorist attacks. Npr SARUMAN has more New Jersey is one of the states hit hardest by Cova nineteen. The state also lost more residents to the September eleventh two thousand one attacks than any other state but New York. Now New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy says the number of deaths from the virus has already outpaced. The hundreds lost on nine eleven. Please let that sink in for a moment. This pandemic is writing one of the greatest tragedies in our state's history Murphy says the State is working to expand hospital capacity as New Jersey continues to face a shortage of medical equipment and staff with Palm Sunday and several other major religious holidays approaching. The governor is asking residents to find a way to observe those holidays at home. Sarah McCamman. Npr News in Italy. The rate of new deaths from the corona virus pandemic has slowed over the past four days but as NPR Sylvia Pohjola reports. The number of new cases is rising. The death toll is more than fifteen thousand of the total number of cases close to one hundred twenty five thousand Civil Protection Chief on Journal. Bodily said the number of patients in intensive care drop for the first time since the epidemic was revealed at the end of February officials believe Italy has reached a plateau ahead of an expected decline in the near future. Close to two hundred thousand. People have been charged for violating the lockdown and nearly four hundred persons who tested positive have been charged for violating their quarantine orders risking for years in prison for endangering citizens health so people jolie. Npr news row this is NPR news. Today marks fifty two years since the assassination of Dr Martin Luther King Junior but as Katie reardon from member station. Wkno IN MEMPHIS reports because of the corona virus pandemic. The National Civil Rights Museum is commemorating the occasion exclusively online typically hundreds to thousands gathering. The museums courtyard for a moment of silence at the time of Dr King Shooting Six. Pm But this year the public will have to reflect on. King's legacy online with speakers and performers. Dr Noel Trend. The museum's Director of Education Says Kings challenged inequality is particularly relevant today people who are struggling to find ways to feed their families while sheltering in place people who have forty hour week jobs but still can't afford housing. This year's programming includes a tribute from the Reverend Jesse Jackson and can be accessed. The museum's website and social media pages for NPR news in Memphis. I'm Katie reardon in Egypt. Officials say more than a dozen medics in the country's main cancer hospital have been quarantined after testing positive for Cova nineteen that is raising fears about the pandemic and health facility staff in the Arab world's most populous country Egypt which has a population of more than one hundred million of fifth of whom who live in the densely populated capital. Cairo has just over. One thousand cases more than seventy deaths schools and mosques are closed. Public gatherings are banned. And there is a nighttime curfew. I'm Janine herbst NPR news.

New York City NPR New Jersey NPR Governor Andrew Cuomo trump Civil Rights Museum Governor Phil Murphy Dr King Cova Katie reardon President Npr Jeanine herbst Memphis Italy US New York Washington Janine herbst
EP 202601:  Garage Pass

Garage Pass National Show

03:59 min | 1 year ago

EP 202601: Garage Pass

"On New Song and Bubba Wallace Garage and Denny Hamlin paid a visit. She said he just want you to stay out there and just gather yourself to the national. Civil Rights Museum. Loss, I've been joking around the eleven cars had I. anyone gets and they can't win. ARC heroine PRN's garage Pez. Attention homeowners do you have a house? That's in need of serious repairs. Do you have tennis at never seem to make their monthly payments? How about code violations past due taxes or maintenance costs? You just can't afford. Then call my friends right now. With quick cash offer. It's just that simple one call, and you can get rid of that home headache forever they by the ugliest houses with instant closings, instant cash and huge savings plus there no realtor fees no listing fees. No repair costs just cash in your hands for that painful. Painful property they're buying a few more houses in your neighborhood this month, so take advantage of this cash offer and call quick cash offer, now eight, hundred, four, three, five, zero, eight, three, three, eight, hundred, four, three, five, zero, eight, three, three. That's eight, hundred, four, three, five, eight, thirty, three at Talladega Sunday a twisted individual, somehow hung news in bubble, Wallace's garage NASCAR said they were angry. Outraged in called it a heinous act. They're also launching an immediate investigation and said quote. There is no place for racism and NASCAR and. And this act only strengthens our resolve to make the sport more open and welcoming to all end quote now with the Infield area, only open to a limited number of track officials, team members, medical personnel and safety workers because of covid nineteen. Let's HOPE NASCAR can find out quickly. Who's responsible for threatening this young man's life and show that kind of hate can no longer be tolerated this on a weekend where Fedex took off all the branding from Denny Hamlin's car featuring instead the national civil. Rights Museum in Memphis, Hamlin spent some. Some time there last week and even stood on the balcony where Martin Luther King was assassinated so many motions. You know just you know. They let me step out there. And she said you not just want you to say out there and just gathered thoughts for a minute, and so you know I kind of look, and they've got on the street. They're kind of the straight line. Kinda from where they shot came from. You know just kind of looking down there on the ground and just thinking about you know that moment. was unbelievable experience, and and I took hundreds of photos there and just couldn't believe that everything that I've seen, and how much more educated now I am about the work that he's done and and really about near the African American community, and and where they've been over the last fifty years, and hopefully where they're going in the future, and now a game of commercial chicken brought to you by progressive where we see how long flow can go without talking about insurance ready go. Guess we should talk about something. How's the Vermicelli game in your town gotten a good Vietnamese restaurants. Vermicelli? Oh, it's noodle. Very good. Drivers switched to Progressive Save big. Okay, you win. We can't help it. Save customers money progressive casualty, insurance. Company and affiliates on Saturday at Talladega in thrilling fashion. Justin Haley won his first career. XFINITY series race with a car that turned out to have any legal triple digit number I've been joking around eleven. Cars had a curse. Gets an can't win. It actually took a sharpie before the race in one behind the eleven, so is one hundred and eleven car real small. I think that's going to have to start being thing. One hundred eleven, because eleven of just stay inside joke, but Rico the garage pass presented by progressive insurance cars, home boats, motorcycles, RV's and more at progresive dot com.

Denny Hamlin NASCAR Bubba Wallace Martin Luther King Talladega Civil Rights Museum PRN NASCAR headache Fedex tennis Rights Museum Memphis Justin Haley Rico African American community RV fifty years
#21: I Came, I Saw, I Conned

proof of my existence

23:13 min | 4 years ago

#21: I Came, I Saw, I Conned

"Hello hello and welcome to episode twenty one of the proof of my existence podcast gas. I'm creating a special episode right after the greensboro comic con that was held in downtown greensboro. I had the chance to speak with artists. Marcus williams a fool richardson and season 'cause play veteran eddie newsom so check out my interview and enjoy this is stephen in with the proof of my existence podcast on location at the greensboro comecon <hes> for north carolina and i'm talking with marcus. Chris williams the creator of the tuskegee airs. How're you doing marcus. I'm doing great man. This has been a great day <hes>. If you guys out here in greensboro greensboro miss this come up. It's real good out here. Marcus is an artist. He's a very good artist. A comic book head. I grew up reading comics comics and actually as part of this comecon they have created a poster drawn by marcus of the anti four the greensboro four <hes> that was put out in in cooperation with the civil rights museum. Yeah it was <hes> great idea <hes> they approach me with the concept <hes> just saying if i can put together an image that really depicted the heroic you know nature of those four gentlemen <hes> and the shadows they said we want them cast shadows that actually showed the heroic nature of the individuals so that's the concept they present it to me and they gave me the the wikipedia blink didn't my research. I was of course taking back but not surprising. I never heard of them. <hes> because there's all too many ultimate <hes> of our great heroes <hes> african americans that lived and died big they they are unsung so once learning about it. I got to read about it. I was very awestruck and just got to really marinate with the concept and figure out okay. How can i show it. I'm so we went through a couple of sketches and came up with the one that <hes> you know they green lit so it was a great great. Project is a great piece of art transitioning over to the topic of black history. You have a a piece of work work called gigi airs. Please tell us about this concept. Absolutely <hes> tuskegee years is a brainchild of me and my business partner greg burnham <hes> we came up with the concept last year. We did a kickstarter and mid january to february <hes> raise about seventy four thousand dollars for the project jack. We're gonna do two graphic novels the elevator of it is you have five young pilots <hes> eight years from now that are being raised by a descendant of the tuskegee airman we made up on this and we didn't want disrespect any families <hes>. He's trying to get the kids ready for this big war with the machine army. That's going to be released on the population of this planet and and they're going to be the last line of defense. They're flying the p fifty. One mustangs from world war two just renovated. That's not gonna cut it so they get an upgrade to these wonderful jets futuristic jets if they're transforming giant robots and that's where you get the jedi mind trick be young people don't realize they're learning we have real history and the comic but they're going to travel all over the world world uncovering lesser known historical facts so that's what we're doing with the comic. It's been great so far really well received <hes> we're taking it into elementary schools libraries anywhere where there's families and young people to get a piece of this history not being taught in schools so marcus. I'm a fan of your art. Looks like you have been doing this for a while. How long have you been doing this. And what are some of your influences when you were growing up coming up yeah <hes>. I've been drawing my whole life man. I have not always been good. That's one thing i try to communicate the young and upcoming artists. They think this is all you're so talented and oh my god. I was just have such gift. No no no. I was terrible for a long time <hes> but i have a passion for seeing the stuff in my head come to paper come to fruition and that's where my passion drove me to draw everyday today. What i'm doing now. I would say i give credit for the last five years. I started in about twenty thirteen twenty twelve <hes> with working on a comic called hero cats stellar city. That was my introduction into actually doing comics as the daily grind and i did that it got published with with action. Lab comics did great taught me everything that i learned currently with going to comic conventions <hes> which is how to speak at a table. Don't put your head down and you know it's a social event. You have to talk to people passing your table <hes> and then taking that understanding about the comic industry and how people make money with the comic <hes> we actually did the kickstarter with tusk years and so forth and that's where i am now where this is a couple of years handful years where i'm still doing it. It's a part of my business plan in my business strategy to keep myself in front of people <hes> instead of just kind of sitting at my desk and you know <hes> shying away from interaction with my fans and that's it's very very rewarded. Okay will thank you for taking some time to talk to me. How can fans find you online <hes> directly directly. My website is marcus. The visual dot com and <hes> tuskegee is skiers and that's h. e. I. r. s. airs dot com. You can order the book directly from our site issue to we'll be out very soon <hes> and also on social networks marcus the visual the mets m._a._r._c._y. s. t. h. e. v. i s. u._a._l. Marcus the visual. Thanks for your time greet me. I am here with a richardson and she is an amazing artist. She has done work with marvel's world of kanda and also top. Cow's genius is correct. Yes i had a really amazing time or even crazier journey working on a black panther the world will conduct genius and also <hes> all star batman attack on titan for credential <hes> gosh. I feel really fortunate that i get to work on all these things that i'm a fan of you know. So how did you get started along if you've been drawing and who are some of your influences how he got started i i started off actually as a musician. <hes> i started playing the flute when i was nine and <hes> by the time i was eleven. I was performing at carnegie hall. I went to <hes> laguardia af performing arts and <hes> studied classical music and went to junior juilliard program and <hes> realized i did not want to be a classical fauvist. Uh-huh i became a beat box artist and a singer mimicking singer so to speak <hes> and seeing background don't singing background in groups and things like that and went on tour and when i performed these different places i made my own flyers so i kind of had a job pretty early because said some point. My dad went in one direction. My mom went in the other. I was just kind of on my own as a teenager. I know my dad did the best good but <hes> it made me innovative so i had to figure out something so while i worked at a bunch of different jobs from bartending to working as a secretary or receptionist receptionist <hes> i had computers had photoshop on it taught myself. I love comics ever since i was nine years old anybody blue from <hes> nightcrawlers beast like i was all about it and <hes> <hes> i've just draw all the time every day and so it it started to merge together <hes> i you know teaching myself how to use different programs was really not much different than learning a classical piece. You know if you know what the fundamentals are or you can find the teachers can teach you then all you have to do is his repeat it slowly enough correctly. If you find out whatever that is and eventually the group will be written into your minds. You won't need to you think about anymore at any rate when i was oh maybe twenty four twenty five. A friend of mine walked into his editors office and was just like hey you know she's really really great artist. You should give her a shot and i was like oh. How am i going to do this and i put up my first terrible herbal comic under an alias and it was terrible but that's okay <hes> then <hes> after i was published i was like okay. Why do i put it out there. It's it's done. I can do this now. So i started putting my work online going to different conventions speaking to different professionals and just you know people whose work i liked. Neil adams was <hes> an amazing guide. You know everyone knows him as a very crotchety kind of stern person but who will tell you he'll tell you like it is as you know. He was very much like hey you know that graphic design and stuff that you do storyboarding keep doing that because you have to do comps because you love it now because you're gonna make thousands and thousands thousands and thousands of dollars <hes> the potential. Is there absolutely but it's going to be a lot of grueling work before. You're really able to make a living in that. If you want to do this afterwards so if you really love this do it but no. There's a long road ahead. You know i was just like okay. Not afraid hard work got it. If i can learn a concerto i can learn how to do this but <hes> i went on my first vacation to san diego comic con. When i was twenty six uh-huh i walk up to mark and i say oh my gosh. I really love your work. I've been following it for a very long time. <hes> here's a postcard casino their books folks. I don't want to bring like a massive portfolio. Please listen to my demo basically exactly. I know you're here to make money. I know you're here to like. Promote your stuff. Here's a small little postcard with my website on it and examples of my best work <hes> and they recognized one of my pieces <hes> because i've been doing covers is here and there but i was also in tourism singer like seeing background opening four rule issues parliament funke delic <hes> i performed with sheila e. I thought that music was where it was going to go but i was like. I'm not really good at making hobbies transition from from passion to profession i. I don't know how to halfway do things so i'm like all right. If i'm gonna do this going to do it one hundred percent <hes> unless it's playing video games. That's that i can kind of like not a pro. That's that's fine but <hes> anyway. I <hes> a lot of my influences stemmed from all over the place. I'm a big anime fan and i loved <hes> hideaki simmers blade of the immortal <hes> i also love heavy metal like <hes> presente eta for szeto which people don't know about <hes> also <hes> crisp shallow and <hes> claire wenling <hes> french illustrator. She's she's brilliant. Travis char issed <hes> who else who else else <hes> alphonse muka fan. I love like renaissance art and because i'm musician in jazz that whole air even though it was a little before then it still has that classic feel about it <hes> but i didn't wanna copy what it is that they did. I wanted to see what it was in their work that inspired me in you know see how i could do it my way in addition to that i <hes> after i stopped by marc silvestri table and handed him my card. <hes> a year later. I lost my job at a jingle house and <hes>. I was like oh man. What am i going to do now. I don't want to be a rb singer in the music industry. I don't you know i. I don't think i want another corporate job because i think i'm losing my soul. <hes> what do i do and literally. I'm like please. Do you start. Who what can i do now but i was just. I was still determined like okay. We'll just figure it out and i get a call hey we. I really liked your work and you're on a shortlist of artists that we want to work on this project about a <hes> black female tactical genius genius born in south central and i was like i'll do it here was like it was just the right time because if i was still working my corporate job and still working this other things things and i probably would not have taken the chance and then i still would have been working for somebody else and kind of being an employee and sad and compromising all of my ideas. He is just to be able to pay my bills and that sucks 'cause. I don't know if we reincarnate. We only have one life. It's been amazing to see you here. You're presence matters black representation matters if anyone that's in santa my voice any <hes> people of color women of color for people who are trying to find their place. What would you like to tell them okay. I it's going to be okay <laughter>. I understand as an artist. You are juggling a lot of different things number one. You're trying to figure out your style and that comes through repetition addition and fundamentals overtime absolutely drought you life but also go in the direction of fear if you're an artist and you absolutely love to draw single figures and characters and pinups start drawing backgrounds because if you're going to tell a story you need to put them in a place secondly draw every single day carry sketchbook with you even if the drawing sucks it's okay the repetition just the the groove that will be created from your head to your hands. It will thank you later. You know you've got to keep that that soared sharp <hes> next. Don't just be a great artist. Be a great business person. Don't be afraid to charge for your work. I understand you're learning. I understand that you're figuring these things out and when people say like oh yeah hey could you do this for exposure it actually it has to make sense people die. I have exposure honey they really do they will die of the draft and it's it's basically like saying you're good enough to hire but not good enough to pay you. Don't go into a restaurant and say this is good enough to eat but not good enough to pay for it. That doesn't work in life that doesn't work in art and i absolutely understand you know you can't charge a million in dollars. You have to create something of worth doing so you're going to have to push yourself and it's okay. It's going to be hard. It never gets easier it. Just you just kind of hate your work a little less. Honestly you're always doubting because what's in your mind. As a creative is always ahead of what your hands can do so you have to constantly instantly push in order to reach that but by the time you do your mind is envisioned something else now and now you have to keep working but now you can sort of create something thing of value. What can they get from you that they can't get from somebody else. What story has not been told or what story needs to be retold for. This generation because humans were evolving. We're changing. We're seeing these different things in in your work. You're telling your truth. It's not just entertainment. It's it's not something that just interns and holds the mind. It's something that inspires. Its something that makes people question. It's something that you know. It starts on the action. You get people intrigued. You follow them. They care about the characters. It's not just enough to create diverse characters and <hes> you know like oh. Hey i made a black character. Who's gay so what who are they. What kind of person are they. Who are they in the face of this. You know monster. What kind of person do they become. After facing this challenge kind of lessons do they learn who along the way helps them and those are the kinds of things that you have to create in order to get people to care about your characters as you can't just give them a whole bunch of power say their magical super and expect everybody to be on board because guess what you know even super folks have issues and it's the human part of them that we identify with and if i can say anything else besides carrying business cards postcards with you everywhere have fun. You're drawing stuff. It's fun. It's fun. It's fun. It's fun. It's going to be work. Everything is going to be work. It's going to be hard. People talk about oh well. If you love what you do you you never work day in the life. That's a lie. That's a lie there award is who are you working for. Are you an employee. Who are you a entrepreneur entrepreneur and if you are going to be an employee. Are you doing something that you enjoy. Are you going to do something that speaks to you and inspires you. Is it pushing pushing you in the direction of what you ultimately want to do and if it's not how do you get their start writing down. Make a plan every week. I have a little journal is the last bit i will write down needs wants what like and dream of that list the in enroll try to ride it over as many times possibly can and in the needs you know it's like toothpaste socks to drink more water stand up from the table more just simple things break it up into house. You know different categories next want and i would love to get a new computer. Be nice or you know more more copays mark margaret's whatever that is would like. I would really like this start mapping it out and then once you see it. It's it's not so far away and then as you start writing these things out. You realize like okay well. I need to make a plan and visualization where artist first we see these things. How do you make it real. Make it practical make a plan. Make it fun and make truthful. Wow this was so much more than a bargain for this was so valuable. I feel like i need to cut you a check or something. I'm getting ready to over here and i was going to do anyway but i'd like to get a signed copy because you were going to go places and i'll say i knew when win it greensboro comecon it was so great meeting you richardson great meeting you you can find me work at a four richardson dot com and <hes> all the internet's. They're not many foods is a episode frank you a richardson frank. You thank q. I'm here with eddie. Newsom at greensboro comecon and eddie is a cause player. How long have you been doing causley is blake about ten years now. Okay and who are some of the characters you have <hes> portrayed as bradley the very first captain catching america. He was a black man. Sam wilson captain america marvel comics had me as to cause play motto cover for sam wolfson captain america number one <hes> <hes> black panther quantum from quantum and woody just to name a few okay and i've seen some photos of you and costume and i've seen you with a aw chris evans the actor who plays captain america so you are famous because i do have a cause play board on pinterest and also follow the tumbler blur 'cause playing while black on social media so i've seen you before so you serve as an inspiration for african americans in the cause play realm tom have you personally encountered challenges while 'cause playing a yeah my very first year i came to san diego with my zeya bradley adly costume kyle baker the creator of the character saw me and took some pictures and a moral wanted to spotlight me and took some pictures and they put me up on the website that day and people were chiming again you know calling me captain inward and captain fry chicken and captain koon and everything else and it kind of got me upset and sad at the same time and then a few minutes later a friend of mine came to me and handed me their phone went who went back to the same marvel website comments and for every negative comment they were like five and ten positive comments you know telling them about the costume and putting them in check about it and everything which i thought was a great thing that people who don't even know me you know came to not just a defensive me but the defense of the character itself south okay well. I just wanted to <hes> thank you for spending some time talking to me and i just want to let you know that you what you're doing doing. <hes> black representation matters little kids that are coming up and myself. I gravitated. I'm from the era of teen titans. That was when i was in high school. The judas contract george perez cyborg. He was my do so for you. I think that you are an icon. Keep doing what you're doing. You your inspiration to the kids and adults alike. Thank you so much oh no problem and if you wanna reach me social media my instagram and twitter they both are ebony hero so you can catch me on that right there and see when i'm working going and right now working on the c._w. Black lightning custom. That's that's my next project. So if you wanna look that people all right. Thanks in just out of curiosity. How long does it take to put together a costume for example. If you ever go and see my san wilson captain america costume that one took about two months the c._w. Black lightning costume is going to be t._v. Accurate so that's going to be about a six month project. Wow well thanks for all that you do and it was a pleasure meeting no problem thanks a lot thanks for. You're listening to a another episode of the proof of my existence podcast. I'll be uploading images from the comic con and some video clips perhaps ups but links to a lot of artists and a lot of artists that were out. There were promoting their work. <hes> some talented very talented people. This is my first khan and it won't be the last so check out the links and images on breath w._w._w. Dot steph phenomenal dot com thanks.

greensboro Marcus williams tuskegee eddie newsom richardson san diego Chris williams stephen north carolina america america carnegie hall tuskegee sheila e marc silvestri civil rights museum marvel
Ed Williams

Revision Path

1:07:21 hr | 1 year ago

Ed Williams

"You're listening to the revision path. Podcast a weekly showcase of the world's black graphic designers web designers and web put through in-depth US you'll learn about their work their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals? Here's your host Maurice Cherry. Hello everybody welcome to revision path. My name is Maurice Cherry before we jump into this week's interview we've got a new review on Apple podcast coming. We haven't had one for a while. this one is from greater than and it's titled Great. Podcast here it is. This is a really great. Podcast gives a platform to the mini diverse. Black creatives. That are out there. Maurice has been able to get the stories of so many great creators with various backgrounds. Lovers Sam greater than thank you so much for that wonderful wonderful review. If you WANNA leave a review for revision. You can leave it on apple podcast you can leave it on Pod chaser. Lebron radio public a lot of places. You can leave these reviews. You can leave one on Stitcher. Let us know. We'll read it right here on the show and you know speaking of ways to kind of show your love for revision path. Have you taken annual audience survey yet? You know we really want to hear your feedback about the podcast and learn more about you and how we can make revision path. Better to take the survey head over to revision path DOT COM forward slash survey. Fill it out. It should take about five minutes or so to do and we'll choose. One lucky survey responded to win a two hundred and fifty dollar Amazon Dot Com gift card again. That survey is at revision path dot com forward slash survey. The survey will up until the end of the month. May thirty-first thank you so much for your time and for your feedback and now a word from our sponsor facebook design. Facebook design is a proud sponsor of vision path to learn more about how the facebook desire community is designing for human needs and unprecedented scale. Please visit facebook dot design now for this week's interview. I'm talking with Ed Williams a Memphis based storyteller and the founder of make entertainment. Let's start the show all right so tell us who you are and what you do. Hey My name is Ed Williams. I'm the of Bake entertainment and I am storyteller. I'm also a designer and I'm just really happy to be here. I have to say during this time. I love to hear that. I'm glad to hear that you can't see but okay so before we kinda get more into like what you do and your background. Of course we are recording this during this whole covert nineteen public health crisis this pandemic. How're you holding up? I am holding up. I have my good days bad days ahead. Good weeks in bad. We therapy has been incredible during this time is been so helpful but is managing honoring just both sides of the spectrum as ours emotions and feelings are concerned just realizing that we are in the middle of a pandemic you read in history books where right now living through it and that's that can be a bit much and being concerned about love. Wasn't things like that but I m holding up fairly well this. This is a good week. Yeshua affiliate about there being weeks and bad weeks like I was recording some episodes at least about a month or so ago maybe a little bit over a month and it was right around the time. Say Like mid March when the quarantine or self-isolation whatever people calling it when it was sort of just starting to get rolled out nationally and prior to that. I was supposed to be in DC for something that got canceled out supposed to be an Austin for something that got canceled and so I think I was still trying. Wrap my head around because it was still pretty early. Just telling people like taking it one day at a time. It is now as we are recording this for me. It's like day. Forty something forty four hundred forty something and I feel you about their be. A good weeks and bad weeks like last week for me was a bad week. Yes this week I feel like I have to like claim it with intention at the beginning of the week and I feel like if I can see that through at the beginning of the week. I'm good because I'll hit a part of the day. I'm just like you know what I can't do this. I'm just GONNA go in like stare at a corner for an hour or something do something else you know so soft to like focus for me. It has been has been. It's been tough to get focus and motivation to get things done. Because I'm like will. Is Anybody really gives us stuff done right now? I see a lot of people baking bridge. I don't know if I really understand the breadth phenomenon. This is like some medieval coping process. Bread is cool. Right as I have not been spurred of baking yet I've not made any isolation loaves of not made any pandemic pans of or whatever but I mean more power folks that are doing it is not ministry but Hey I. I'm Lebanese names. Isolated lows in pandemic pans of whatever? I changed mark those those. I'm here for so let's talk about your work that you do at the National Civil Rights Museum like what. Do your work as look like now at a time when I mean people aren't really going outside of their houses for stuff like this right. Well I have to say the majority of my work does not concerned exhibition design. I guess not my forte outside. I don't have anything to do. With how the exhibition gallery spaces. What I do in what I started doing that. There is just figuring out how to clean up the system creatively. We had a lot of different programs. Signature programs events fundraisers. We had just a lot of stuff going on so by came into the job noticing that we pretty much kept rebranding all of our signature programs year after year after year year year. And I was like what is going on here. Why add on this? I made it a point to crew AIDS Evergreen branding each signature program while also maintaining some consistency throughout the entirety of the whole brand. Selfish Marshall thing has been going in and finding where the system is weak creatively brand wise in finding ways to improve that system the processes around. It really doesn't implementing stronger brand identity messaging communications through a mostly. It has been just our signature events programming so far okay. Are you finding that you just have to move more things online more virtual stuff? Well yes we cut a took a break from the a lot of events and programming right. Now we're in the process of figuring out where the museum stands now like what is our positioning now and just really happened. So would that means to me is opportunity for us to really sit down five tune a lot of things. In the system that have not been working both creatively and strategically so just brand messaging brand storytelling all communications digital platforms and website and other communication pieces. Just really sitting down and running through a fine tooth comb getting all the data running all the analysis in seeing what we need to be doing right here right now and moving forward to create a stronger presence floor. The museum moving forward because we don't know how much longer to be here right. There's some risk opening up the museum at such a critical time. We don't want to be reliable for anybody. Catching the Mirus at along. Passing away from We're still figuring out where we are strategically where we are in in our community nationwide and internationally all at the same time. How did you first get started at the museum so I was living in? I was actually living with my parents. I had just moved from when I just moved but I had moved from Atlanta back to with my parents. North Carolina and on in June of twenty eighteen. My has friends down here in Memphis at. I met on facebook four years ago and I was like you know what I'm gonNA come out here. See WANNA hang out. And they were so excited at down here. I had no idea I would fall in love with Memphis the way that I did and it was just addictive. As soon as I stepped off plane I was like okay. A have to hear and stay for three days and it was like connecting with first cousins. That's how good the relationship is with him. And I said you know what I'm GONNA be back a move down here and I would search been hunting all of Internet for whatever jobs could find it methods and then this position popped up in. At first. I wasn't going to apply at all. I just had was Kinda over the non-profit thing I have been doing on process years. The bulk of Madison. has nonprofits More and it just kept popping up time of Tampa. Tom McGinnis limit is going to submit my resume. Cover letter. I did it like two three o'clock in the mornings. I woke up the next day and my now boss. She had emailed me she said. When can I interview you and I? It was the most unconventional interview process. Now Lebanon. I mean. We pretty much sealed the deal over the phone we had like maybe one facetime call and then that was an August so about in September down here to Memphis and start at the job. Wow sounds like it all happened really quickly day. It really did from June to September. Yeah one thing after the other. What is it about Memphis that she fell in love with? This is just a special enact. This has a soul like no other city from the outside looking in perspective. I just really felt something unique. I lived in places I've lived in Maryland really close to DC. I'm course North Carolina different parts of North Carolina Lanza but Memphis. I just knew as my soul had a connection with it. So the people out here. I had met some incredible creatives down here in Memphis in those creatives have become sort of like a family in the I just the bonds that I happen to these people and how special they aren't how much they need to meet. Despots really keeping me here MEMPHIS THE MEMPHIS CITY. Incredible but people have really done a number on me. Shore down here. Is there a big creative? Saying there there is there is a comma. Goodness has often because it's Memphis Nashville. Atlanta'S LA or New York is Memphis so it it doesn't get as much attention as it should but there are some creative powerhouses ingenious down here. Just the named a few friends. Dana James Milwaukee Guy who is founder of shears creative is a phenomenal web and brand strategist at esl. Tulsa down here who an incredible hand lettering artist in who is also an experienced director. My friend Darius Williams phenomenal photographer. He's like Rembrandt with photography. We got some other great creators as well. But it's the level of professionalism the level of skill expertise experience all those things. It's a lot down here. It really is. People are always surprising. Had A few people are friends or other? People come and visit into just enamored by what they see. They're always saying. How does this exist? You know how to find another because this is not common. Were Madness is hard to fire on. That you know so memphis is has a way of bringing people together in keeping them together. Wow Man when they opened up outside again. I got a visit Memphis through. Please do. We got a seat at the table for you. Trust me so just to kind of go back briefly to the museum stuff so you mentioned being more of like a creative brand manager not necessarily exhibition designer and we've had exhibition design here on the show before. He's sort of talk about his process. With how museum sort of gets I think they get requisitions for certain exhibits and they build everything kind of around the. I'm curious though like especially at this point in time where. You're kind of having to reexamine that. Just a museum's role in the community but also how people interact with it like. What is your process when it comes to your work for the museum. Can you talk a little bit about that? Yeah so I'm always GONNA go to story fires- would is the story that telling. It is not so much making up a story but it's identifying stories are already within the museum that we just may not be telling or not telling enough that we can fire. Push a little bit more. So for instance when we were in the process of rebranding of our signature programs King Day we have kingdom we also have April of commemorations. Candidate is the celebration of Dr King. His birthday in April flow commemoration commemorates. Today he was assassinated out here in Memphis Tennessee on the balcony of the the rain. Matassa so two very distinct events but the problem was with King Day. We were using a lot of imagery in things like that that you would expect for the commemoration that very first and foremost we. We've had a treat Dr King as this God. Among men right he never gets an opportunity to be human For the majority of him himself in conversations in how he's position so there was opportunity. King Day as we were celebrating. Martin not necessarily king but Martin who Martin the man. The husband the father was there was an opportunity to push that narrative over Dr King. God among men so that led all of our created conversations that led the brand identity that everything from you know the font choices colors that use just really trying to make an effort to humanize. Mar Dr King on King Day versus positioning him as he is in his role in the Civil Rights Movement as Dr King on April four salvage I always approach things from that storytelling perspective because to me story is the end all be all strategy. Everything is everywhere we use it all day. Every day story is is truly came for me and now before your work at the museum just from my research. I saw that you did. A lot of Brand Management Work for a nonprofit called trails ministries What was that experience like for you? So that's where I got my start when so I had graduated Edinboro University of Pennsylvania with a degree in computer animation. I wanted to work at Pixar. Ever since I saw saw I was. Oh my God a half to beat in like a half to work at. Pixar had to get a seat at the table. That's been ongoing for our school at work. My Butt off for ads out when it came time to apply for internship. I was Kinda declined several times and I was like you know what okay? That's cool hottest go. I make my own Pixar that we'll get into that story a little bit later. Let's timid because I couldn't find a job you know. I was good at what I did but animation on the east coast wasn't really fain unless you were like in New York at that time. I wasn't brave enough to going to move to New York at didn't have funds to do that and I wasn't going to the West Coast. There's just as a costly out. There has it is limited so my grandfather and my dad started trails ministries years ago. It is a nonprofit that helps the incarcerated in those families impacted by incarceration just the process of reentering into society and making sure that they're set up everything that they need to reenter society and not go back and on the secretary at the time had called me said. Hey you know you're good with art. Would you mind helping us? Redo our buttons on West side and I was like I had nothing else to do without getting causing college. Grabbed with no job. No money okay. Cool you know. What else do I have lose. And as I was designed the buttons I dunno something Emmy which side it feels like. There's more than buttons just wrong with this. I don't know I didn't have a language for back. Then it was. It was the brand by didn't have a language for started looking at just the different pieces of what made Trails logo website pamphlets brochures all stuck as to what? I'm sticking my toes into but what I WANNA do is figure out how to elevate this because I see what they're doing and I see what they represent and it's so big in so much potential. The graphical elements that represented art communicating. That all the way and that was how I got started with design and Brandon. Saad is trails. Abbas just you know just there for all those years working to figure out what is I was trying to do. In advantages led me down this road. That's hi billy guy my start. That's why I'm here right now. The national exam designing now you went to college in Pennsylvania. Then move back. Are you originally from Memphis? No I'm a transplant. I'm originally from a small town. Outside of Pittsburgh called beaver falls okay. Alright was designed kind of a big part of your growing up there and beaver falls art was I was. I was always drawing as a kid all the way up through actually be past college. I was always just still am. I just. Don't get to draw as much as I'd but I'm an artist. Was Your Family. Really supportive of you. Kinda going create rob. The you mentioned your dad. And GRANDAD founded this this nonprofit and you WanNa do something. That's kind of more arts. Supportive of that one hundred and twenty percent all day every day nonstop supportive. My parents have been phenomenal at always being supportive of what their children wanted to do. Then we'll get behind us. You know look good decisions. And things like that but exploration creatively or you know career whatever. The case was a have always been supportive in being in our backbone. Strong parental figures in support. No matter what it is wanted to do. When did you know for sure that like ardent desire or something that you could do for a living back? Then I wasn't so sure about the are are a new. I enjoyed it. I loved it but I didn't see that much representation as far as people who look like me. Latman or black women making art a career. You know denied these was rush. It was good but it was route in hands out in early. Two thousands was the same but Designed I saw that people had a need for design so it was like the art shifted into design and I could still do. Airports are but it was just in a different form. That would have been what I was used to. But it was also monetize evil. People would pay me for that and wouldn't necessarily pay me drawing a picture whatever but it was a design designed that things done design in people design was able to communicate and speak differently than my art was. And that's what I kind of knew I can keep going with design as as a potential career back then so you mentioned going to Edinburgh University of Pennsylvania. What was that experience like? It was very white. Okay I it was very much now. It was. It was interesting. Small campus of course was a PWI predominately white institution and it was a very small amount. you know black folks on the campus and we were Cubs Nate. It was interesting to a lot of great people who are still today my friends who are love and cherish cherish a whole lot but it snowed a lot. We were right on. What is we're right by Lake Erie so we got snow effects or whatever they call that so we would get crazy amounts of snow in one night. I mean the snow literally be covering up cars. We would still have to go to class. It would be below. It'd be like negative three degrees and we still walk to class. I mean there was no cancellation of classes. Because it's not we got used to it. Yeah yeah so it was. It was interesting four. What was it four and a half years in s. I gotta say on that. Do you feel like though at least like prepared you for for getting out there as a designer it. Prepare me in the sense of F- out at work ethic hours ahead before college but I think how just refined like it. It really helped me understand dat say this. I guess it helped me understand just who I was as a person. In what my what might brand of work ethic was. I was always the kid in the lab at four or five o'clock in the morning out as always kid learning more stuff to input. I wouldn't just go off. What the professor has said? I would take what they said a plaid. That goes five more information to make better address carried that same type of student mindset throughout you know throughout the rest of my career. All even now still still do that. Learn something new. I don't go down these rabbit holes figure out how to make better than what I was. Awed shown that's the Edinburgh helped me to refine for sure a rather learn about myself. Would you recommend Edinburgh is a place? I don't know how much has changed back when I went. Let me edit. It wasn't terrible like it wasn't outright for experience. I have a lot of great memories. There always something in the back of my mind said I should have gone to the HCC. You like I wanted to. Hec You experience had pledged. I'm a member of five hundred signal. It's not northern greed. Life isn't the segment southern black but tangent but I can recommend. Edinburgh is is a unique experience is it. They won't lead you astray. I mean a lot of people have gone off been successful from Edinburgh but I recommend looking just a little bit more Look for a few more universities and colleges for you set me for you to go from from Pennsylvania where I don't are there any HPC's in Pennsylvania? Yes Lincoln Lincoln. I figured there was at least one death anymore. Oh temple is temple. Acc You would say. Okay Laura Hammy on across. Saint I think temple is like Hec you ish is right. Yeah but it's not a nomination college okay but like now. You're in Memphis which is like I mean. I know Lemoyne is a memphis but they're like other. Acc use that are like close by at least in the Tennessee area. Uh-huh ACORN at Mississippi. I'm GONNA stop there because I don't want I don't want to like get all Rod Davis we can. We can just go a little because I know I know Lemoyne is in Memphis. I know that much. So what was your first job? Out of UNDERGRAD. Like you're out from Edinburgh. You're ready to go out into the world as a fresh graduate. What's kind of the I like? Sorta work that you're doing it was jails. I'll sure that was like additional school. Each that was that was where I got to learn and experiment and also worked for a paycheck at the same time. Ask Okay what was kind of the most memorable work experience you had there like resumes specific project or anything. That really stuck out to you re branding the organization in a they still have even if it was my first rebrand by ever a look at it. It's like God. You need to fix this fix that but it was not I when I was young twenty but I rebranded the whole organization on. Never forget how it transformed the culture in the mindset of everybody who worked there. They felt a whole they felt plea rather we felt. We felt complete. We felt like it was the best representation of us that we had seen. Today and that fueling was incredible. Saw kind of want to switch gears here a little bit because we focused on your work. We've we've talked about you know education leading up to where you are right now. How are you keeping motivated and inspired at a time like this? That is the question of twenty twenty is difficult I think as as the honest realist anthrax. Yet it's difficult like I said. Some days are better than others. Some weeks are better than others on last week at I barely had the will to get up in cook which is so tired in there. There's a lot of mental exhaustion. Going on. That would not aware about at. I read something that said that we are in constant like slider fight modus. Were happened to adapt all this new information that keeps coming out. We're just trying to figure out how to survive on a day-to-day basis. The weight of the change has gone on in addition to you know morning in grieving things that we were excited about. That are no longer happening this year. S Lodha were processing that. We don't know that we're processing and I think that is causing a lot of people to the mentally a holistically exhausted so given the toll of all. That Sunday's guided Sundays on Sundays. I consider from computer for hours some days. You may get ten minutes out of me. You know it just depends in. I give myself the grace to be okay with the days that I'm dragging my so Tunis Home Office sitting down and only being able to put in ten minutes for the day. I like that word grace. I really like that. I think you're the second person that I've spoken with on the show like when I brought that up that they were mentioning that specifically image that specifically as something that they're not only giving themselves but like trying to give other people too because I think earlier on in the pandemic when I was early I mean like early March mid March. Something like that. I think we're still trying to sort of saw this as a bit of a novelty like okay. We'RE GONNA BE INSIDE FOR. A few weeks. It'll be fine finally learned to play the guitar or else been I've been meaning to do. But like now that we're seeing a mix of either extensions on sheltering in place or some states just being like forget it we're opening back up for business in housing this weird tension then didn't exist before because prior to this you know we were like. How do we cope out of we get through and I don't know if it's just like the current culture I don't think is necessarily the current culture but maybe it is but like the number of like hustlers and steak oil salesman that have come out during this time that are like if you don't come out with a new skill or the third? You didn't lack the time you lack the discipline in all of this kind of stuff and I'm like there are not words to put into place to describe we are going through. We haven't went through it. Our parents haven't went through our grandparents having went through. This is a wholly new cultural experience. It's a shared grief as you've put it for the that we've lost the lives that we lived before this events being canceled. You can't see loved ones. I feel so missile bad for people who have lost loved ones during this. Because you can't even go to a funeral writer can't even sit like you have to sit now with that grief alone in your home which is also your gym and your daycare is your restaurant and your theater and everything in one. Because you're not supposed to be going out and social distancing and so I feel like now especially as states are starting to relax their their shelter in place. Method like people are getting antsy. Like I thinking like right around four twenty. Also people are going to be out. People are going to use this because like they need a release valve of some you know and like there's only so many lives if I can watch right before I'm like okay. This is enough because now television is starting to look like instagram live. Now you got the celebrities that don't have the sets or the makeup or the crew or the fancy production and they got a winger from home like everybody else and you'll see for some celebrities it's like. Oh once you strip all of that stuff away. They're they're kind of boring like oh you're you don't you don't have it like this. All of this was propping. You up you know. And it has been hard to to maintain creativity especially at a time when you're sitting with this and tried to deal with it but yet depending on like the work that you do like you know neither one of us are our first responders like the work that we're doing is not out here saving lives right but we still have to work like for me. I can just say on my end like we had a product launch at work. We were putting on a new podcast at. I mean I didn't get any sort of break between the starter my quarantine up until maybe last week. I was on last Friday so it was just like every I was like going going going going still with all this and then like you're getting sources from the news from national news like I usually didn't pay much attention to local news now. I'm watching local news every day to try to see like what do I need to be aware of and it was. I think I mentioned something to like a friend of mine about how this Friday was going to be like the first day that I've been off off work since this all of this stuff happens and you and they said something really kind of snarky about like. Oh you know. Congratulations to to workaholics. Anonymous and I got irrationally. Angry so quickly. I'm not working because I want to work because after because there are places where people are getting laid all like I know friends that have gotten laid off their companies like the infrastructure. That is the American dream as a house of cards. I think that's something we can all see this political on the show but like the first week or two of all this happening theaters are shutdown. Food supply chain is messed up. Shows supply chain is like restaurants out of businesses? All sorts of stuff is crumbling crumbling down and I work in Tech Slash. So it's already kind of a precarious sort of area to be in any way and like at my employer. They've been like you know we're not letting anybody go. That's not a thing you have to worry about so I do like that level of security. Yeah that there's still the the expectation of performance at a certain level because there are these milestones. We have to beat these projects that we have to do. You know. I've been fortunate that the company that worked for has exhibited that grace to say if you need to take a day like take a day or something like that and I work from home already so I've been kind of flexible in being able to take more breaks during the day when I need to. If I'm just not feeling it you know. Yeah especially now. We're I think we're at this point where it is no longer a novelty like this is what it is. This is what it is. I can that first month I know there was. You know you start seeing all these like novelties. Zoom backgrounds and stuff like that. It's like that stuff is is fun but at the end of the day is it really. It's sort of like tries to inject some levity already stressful situation. But I don't know I feel like I'm rambling here. Please feel is all relevant is Soho employees and I agree by the way I saw that tweet. I couldn't Rauma is hard enough. The one about if you didn't learn a new skill. Whatever whatever your situation is everybody else's I I happen to these single. I have no kids Alabama self right out war-time than two people or one person raising three kids vastly parent teacher. Cook housecleaners like all other stuff. They're not going to be able to do any of that. Their days are booked solid now to where they use the School whatever tax go that was in have some leeway in the day but now that the kids are home. It's a lot for a lot of heat. Wouldn't also people lose. Jobs have losing houses and having back home. Admitted everybody's situation. We're not on a global sabbatical. Yes I was listening to some news thing it might have been from like ap or something where they call this a hibernation period. I'm like no what is hibernating. What are you talking about hibernation period? Like we're GONNA just come out of this and do a big old strikes back to that is not going to happen. That's so insensitive in tone death to what is going on in the world is not you to be glad I mean Cope however unit call whatever you call it but the reality is this is I. Don't want to say on a level. The bluebonnets play entirely different. But if s scary because people are dying people are losing loved. Ones people you know. The economy is collapsing administration. That isn't giving the people any help whatsoever. You have people who are listening people protesting. I mean it's it's craziness as madness all day every day last thing. Anybody needs for you to tell them that you lack discipline in the middle of a pan. Denic debt is insane and so insensitive again grace grace on top of grace on top grace for not only yourself but each other in to help wherever you can help yourself like they say on an airplane puts earl mass almost helping somebody else. A lot of us you know. Put our masks on. I will actually. We've been putting are masculine but you know what I'm saying. Do that take care of yourself and then you try to help take your others at same time and just be mindful. Cognizant of the time we're living in. There's no need to push anybody to become an entrepreneur in the middle of of the people that have been like. Let me show you how to flip your stimulus. Check my God. Why why why that is not the move right now? So aside from you know how you keep motivated inspired during a time like this. What are you doing in your spare time like you have other projects that you work on or or things that you do outside of the work at the museum? Yes I like to say. I had two full time jobs. So course the one that you know keeping the bills pay in a roof over my head is museum but the one that I love through through is of course being the founder of make entertainment so make what we do at make is we are creating our own original superhero countable universe. That's featuring superheroes that don't typically get a lot of spotlight you know. We're just coming off a ten years of Marlton Matic Universe and we've had iron man. Captain America Thor Ant man but in that ten year span we've had one black panther say aiding was phenomenal right but I'm up more other people went was we're trying to do in what we're doing is positioning characters in stories of color. Black Brown Asian Samoan Different sexualities. Different RELIGIONS HAVE ABLE BODY. We have disabled positioning women of Color at the forefront of our city universe and that has been a project that I working on officially on the books for eight years. But since I was a kid be quite honest. Okay I miss you know knowing that you know this sort of has come out of a love of comic books in everything. Can you talk a little bit about? I guess the the characters or the types of stories that you tell through make absolutely so right now. We're getting ready to X ray production. Are you familiar with tall? Toe Legend. John Henry Yeah. Okay actually before you go into that. There was actually a movie. I don't know if you saw the John Henry movie that came out earlier this year. Did you it no okay? It's terrible. You probably shouldn't see it. Eilly mentioned this because I was thinking the other day of what was the last movie that I remember like actually sitting down and watching beginning to end before all this pandemic stuff happened. It was that movie. It's terrible so terry crews stars as John Henry who is a ex con or something. Wow and the nemesis is ludicrous. Ludicrous the guy. You know what I saw the trailer for that and I got like some weird thing on his a gold thing. It's a terrible terrible but also like really gory like. I watched it and almost like there's a lot of blood in this movie like I was not expecting John Hitter to be like a con gang banger or whatever but it's a terrible movie but anyway John Henry. I'm sorry that was a we. Take you know now that you mention it yeah. I I did see the trailer and I just didn't give John. Henry gave me is using some of the elements on using the name. John Henry they of course associated that with Hammer. Those are the two biggest brand elements John Henry and But it didn't feel like John Henry from the Tall Tales that we've all you know kind of grew up on her watch. The Disney had an amazing little cartoon. Yeah I remember phenomenal. Felt like they just took those elevates and slap them on Terry crews in his cottage John Henry. And that's what we were not settled doing. We actually wanted to honor who John Henry was in. Its folklore an continue on story so my issue with the story was that he ended up dead like He. It was just a phenomenal tale of this black man beating out the machine and he was a strong and courageous brave and just superhuman in his own. Right then he dies. It's like what the hell and it's like okay. How can we bring this character back to light in such a way that continues that narrative pose him out the grade honors that narrative annette character but also positions him to be in his rifle place as a mythical legendary figure that both needs a seat improbably? Well has the impact culture just needs to reclaim his seat so we we did a lot of back and flat of studying. Who The character was. Lot of just analyzing ballots John Henry and just really figuring out who this man was in what it is is we have John Henry. You see him. In a striking nails onto the railroad being stained Johnny Dies but at that moment is really great. John Hamry the tall tales world in the make world together and we bring him back using magic. Then we see John. Henry continue on historian. He's joined by some his fellow. Talk 'til figures. Johnny appleseed PA billion in Calamity Jane Okay and they're on a mission in their doing what they do and on the story it really is about just putting down the building blocks to who this legend is why he's such a legend and rebuilding his mythology in our universe and then we also introduced anansie. The spider in our own on him as he is our premier villain and what it is is nuns e pulling data and he's flooding the earth but rather with water. He's using magic and introducing humanity into the age of magic in his John. Henry that's going to help us figure out how to navigate and move through that world going forward interesting so is this kind of what makes up the entire universe whereas is just sort of one like tidal in. There's sort of several stories within that this is one title is several stories within that. What is it's really hard to introduce brand new characters and we've had a lot of success introducing our own original characters but what we found was is that when we mentioned the name John Henry. Everybody would perk up by old John that John Henry in their interest we get even go further down the rabbit hole. They were stay out of debt comic conventions they stay longer to talk about John Henry discovers of the other characters so we had this idea if we strategically put John Henry. In of course. Johnny appleseed clamming J. Paul Bunyan Anansie in analyzing these characters people familiar with but are also in the public domain or we can freely use them. Oh they know these characters right. And since they know these characters we at least told a crowd of people audience people in through that way in reintroducing to these characters but also began to introduce our own characters through lease. Todd Taylor. Folklore legends Saint Tar Interesting. I didn't think about that. The fact that there are public domain kind of does make it a lot easier to use. Because yes I would imagine doing you know comic book ideas of course plagiarism. Or or any kind of potential. Copyright infringement could be a big issue especially if it even has anything close to the word mutant I feel like marvel have like a Phalanx of lawyers swooping. You mentioned that so no no. That's that's good with these titles. Have you already started producing work that kind of relates to that or is it still kind of in the idea? Phase it has taken US eight years to create what becomes the first book John Henry and big and we have created several comments before that committee issues. There one page comments. We have two other full comments out as well for lack of a better term. Can't figure out right now but those are pretty much. Mvp So minimum viable products for us. They just US exploring our own universe in these characters in had take all of what we created over the last eight or so years and put it into a single book and had that book be the start of a much bigger story. It all comes to a head in this in this newly introduction of make universe in of course Jon Harry and John Henry in this interesting okay so with the ideas you WanNa make sure that. I'm just assuming this but are you only looking for those kind of ideas that are in the public domain? Are you also coming up with original stuff? Yes so we how we have actually several before we got down to the Johnny appleseed and things like that we have several characters that we had created originally and we they actually did a very good job in having these different characters. Fayek audiences by. We didn't necessarily need to include appleseed in Calamity Jane along with John Henry but we saw the reaction from John and it made sense including other tall tells figures along with him. Just kind of play off that you know that. What if that cross over titled Narrative Possibility that these legends were somehow together way back in the eighteen hundreds and doing what they do like they were the first superheroes and that was just an idea that we have entertaining older oriented finally did it? But we do have several other characters that we've created actually created one of them trimmer. That went out was at Edinburgh. It was for project. It was from my computer animation project and I created at the time was notice rock steady over the years. You know what from rock steady to trauma but he is perhaps the first he actually is the first. Make care that ever existed. He's been around for over ten years now. Wow Wow okay this sounds like I don't know if you've heard of this idea before I remember hearing about it. I don't know God has been at least ten years ago or so. Maybe that long ago but there was an artist out of out of Houston and he did something or he was doing something. Kinda similar called Gull Sifi mysteries as No does not get out so he was taking these kind of stereotypical black figures and transforming them into superheroes. So you had like uncle Remus Chef Rastas. Who was the the chef on the cream of wheat box And then the titular character up till character but the the main character was Miami but it was held m. a. m Dash e like mammy like head At that was basically looked like aunt Jemima but like had super strength. She took the elements of like a broom and iron and a washboard in like the broom was her like meal near you know what? I mean I remember. I think it was called the broom make or something like that and I remember seeing it because they were just a series of posters. I don't know if he ever took that idea and like went further with but I remember seeing just a series of posters that were sort of done up in like a old school comic book style and being like well I would read the shit out of that. He's really dull sounds written note. I'm like I'm like mammy is fighting uncle. Remus Man Chiffre. I remember seeing that. Just being so enamored with. I don't know if he ever took that further or took that to another level or adjust kinda stayed as these posters or whatever but it was really really interesting. I want to say John Carey might have been in that too or at least the tar baby was in it like rare rabbit entire baby. One of the things I remember seeing was called the grits of wrath like Miami fighting a huge monster made out of grits. I mean I love that like taking those elements and making them into something like that. I'm a huge Comic Book Fan. I I'm not up on comics now. Although maybe that should be the thing that I get into over the pandemic like get back into comic books against I really haven't you haven't been to. I know there's like house of exit all that stuff. I used to be a huge huge marvel fan. And it's just Kinda like Phil off from it. I had an idea for a long time to do a graphic novel like I had come up with my own characters plots and settings in everything and to be honest twenty. Twenty was going to be the year that I started to like. Kick things off with it. Yeah and pandemic has just sucked the life. I hate to say that but like I've had this graphic novel idea since I was like a teenager and now it's like Oh man this is going to be the year that I do and I may still be the year that I do like April. At least women record this late. April may still have time to start putting it out there in some small way. But I'm curious since you've been doing this on such a small scale. What do you want kind of the the end result to be you? Want this to be graphic novel. He wants to be a movie. Like how far do you WanNa take this idea well? We are starting with a graphic novel. And we've been taking the Manga approach to where so hit the the thing is we love Super Heroes Right where we also really love animated Lebanon the fantasy. Ads Are we had really a lot of our conversations had shifted to anime and Manga over the years. Because none of us were actually reading Marlboro DC. Either we fell off much similar to you. I don't know what it was just got tired of the same type of storytelling. I got tired of does not seeing the best representation just authentic representation in storage just starting to get to drive from me and so we had really started talking about among anime in the really love. The Way Manga was distributed can issues when pronouncing that network but when Manga. Let's say you're you know you're doing my here. Academia yeah super popular right now as far as enemies concerned with the MOM has been around since twenty. Sixteen thinking has been The net don't quote me on that but what it is. Is you start from the first chapter whenever that chat was published in? Then you just read full fullwood. There is no issue run through fourteen and things get rebooted in the and and then there's a new issue one after that and then it runs for six issues in the rebooted again. It's another issue and it's like okay. Where do I start wider sixteen different spiderman? What is going on that? I think that's probably why I fell off like I have well there my storage unit. But like I was collecting comics when I was a kid like. I have all my old comics from like the nineties and then I think as I went to college I was still buying comics here or there. I was getting remember Wizard magazine. Yeah I have. I still have a box of wizards in my room right now. I would have all that stuff but like it got harder to find where to buy. Print comic books and they'll stuff was kind of moving online and then honestly like I was like young and in college and was running the streets. I wasn't really like oh I got to get new experts high levels like we go onto the club tonight. I wasn't really wasn't in like top of mind. I still enjoy the concept but it wasn't I guess in a way where it was. I don't know maybe like super accessible. I mean now. Even while we're in this pandemic like comics aren't being printed now like comics have kind of come to a stop. At least the mainstream marvel DC etcetera have come to a standstill. So it's kind of a great time to catch up but like you say where do you start? Yeah where'd you start where you jumping remarkable? I'm going to jump in at the powers of x thing that's going on or has went on. I guess because that's supposed to be like the new is telling the new candidate whatever. Yeah I'M GONNA start their mom and see where I go because this certainly work comments I loved in the past and then they just stick direction and I was like. I don't like this anymore. I can relate I can relate. Yes will yet that problem. We didn't want to figure out how to play into that system. Didn't like our audience. People follow us to play as many more because I don't think s system is doing anybody justice then the marvel DC those those businesses companies and so. We sat down with it okay. How do we WANNA do this? It comes in three different tiers so I we have what we call seasons so season. Start a new arc in internally ended two so the first season we have coming out now with season one and then within those seasons are chapters just like Manga and chapters on the individual books within our so season can have three chapters can hash thirty in may have three hundred it whatever. The story costs for within that season. That's how many chapters will be in season and then together those chapters make up a volume in. That's the collection chapters with an SEC. Jon Hamm read the first season season. One chapter one is John Hayman. Invictus in this season has four chapters so we close out those four chapters that will complete season wine. He'll be able to collect chapters one through four volume set. And then we'll then kick off season two so since these ones chapters one through four season to kick off start with chapter five and look. GonNa go for however many chapters. That isn't what I say. The number is we have does the chapter twelve season to season to close which chapter twelve and season three kickoff with chapter thirteen and so forth Matt Ten Twenty Years. From now starting point will always should should always be season. One chapter one. Keep reading forward from there. Gotcha so you made it in a way where it's going to be easily accessible for anyone to jump in like even if it's the middle of the story they can say okay. This is chapter five to go back to chapter one exactly because like yeah with the regular comics. It's really hard to tell like. Yeah whereas whereas jumping in point so much lower end variants and just knowledge that you have to have even approach some titles and I think the cinematic universe is that a good job of sort of flattening that for a lot of getting people interested in comic books that maybe weren't interested because of that very likely to start with the movie and say I liked his character. Then you're like okay if you like this character than you might like these particular issues or or destroyed. Paperback Guard a bit of a bit of an inch. Appoint there so okay. Cool cool so one thing that we've got As sort of a running theme on the show for this year is about sort of you know lack this in black design in the future. So I'll ask you this question. It's the same question I've asked guests this year so far. How are you using your design skills to help build a more equitable future right now? Given the conditions where we're living in what were living in what we're living through and the amount of information both false and true the amount of random. The lack of transparency. The lack of clarity that everybody understands what social distancing meets right. That was a very new term that we had to globally figure out Understand in there still may be some grey areas however people understand when you say stay six feet bar or stay home or go out and get groceries once a week or you know whatever. Those bullet points are people can understand that. I think what is mainly at fault in what we're currently limited has been the lack of clarity in our messaging and the lack of transparency. And also that clarity in the stories that are being told so that type of I guess you said it happened taken that implementing that his design in Museum and I pushed his at make at the same job but pushes wherever else work to when we designed characters that make. We make sure that they are designed for optimal clarity. You can understand who news character is simply by looking at them. Their posture their stance. Color Palette designed choices is not a whole lot of flair. Anything on that character is absolutely essential to that character. If you take away something goes missing. If you ask something to it it becomes too much. It's the same. With rbis storytelling powdery. You know break down the lore a power sets if we can't explain it to a five year old. It's too complicated. If a five year old can look at this design in Raleigh either from memory by looking at it and it's too much for them is too complicated the same with the museum if we had explained this simply if we can't put messaging out there that is clear that communicates the intent. It gets people to take an action a specific actual Take it's too much. We're speaking too much. Nobody wants to read a dissertation. We gotta turn it down songs. Moving forward the more clear the more saint the more concise that we are into side in storytelling in an our messaging. The better because when we come luke things when things get messy and they get overly complicated. That's what we started lose people. That's we get mixed signals mixed messaging. People take their own interpretation of things it puts out different narratives that just confuses the population in. That's what we're going through right now. One Week it was Cozy is airborne. You'd rather one day it's airborne next isn't airborne one day is it gets through. Your eyes. Were Sunglasses Goggles next day. I'll I never heard of that. Is a whole lot of madness going on because we're not being clear in what were say. That's what I think is gonNA help create a better future in a better tomorrow. I mean I. I need every governor. Any mayor Political figure suggest use plain English. I think that's where a lot of Democratic candidates allowed presidential candidates suffer is they. Don't use clear messaging our third design or they don't tell a good enough story was pushed him over the edge. I mean we got Joe Biden because we got Joe Biden. It wasn't like he had a great story. Wasn't Obama was the only way to do it right. He gave us this this message in the story of Hope. It was very clear what we were getting with Obama. Everybody on the same page with Abban right. There was not a beat. Skit anywhere Bernie. I Dunno Biden Kamala Corey. I think I mentioned -joyed Lizzie Elizabeth. Warren I voted for the warm. And even at I I okay. You still don't have a struggling. I can get your platforms at what? You've got this website. Ibooks your story. Where is your narrative that really makes me just believe in what you're doing? I think moving forward clarity. Transparency in better storytelling is a little much better for us. Where do you see yourself in the next five years? Like it's twenty twenty five we are hopefully thankfully knock on wood on the other side of what we're going through right now. Yes what kind of work do you see yourself doing? Full time at make is all about putting things into the world that gave other people hope it is using your creativity bid storytelling artistry whatever it is you do you do it to give somebody else hoped somebody else feel powerful. That's just the core of our work so I'm hoping that I am five years now. You know we're talking about innovation or video game we're talking about you know the next Toyland We're having those types of conversations. Like we have arrived. Were here. You've heard about us in Hollywood reporter heard about us in enforce magazine. You know we have on God knows Oprah talking about what after eight. Is it within the next five years for looking to start casting people for a Netflix. Show something but that's where I am looking to position myself in the next five years. I'm looking to go all the way in with make within by twenty twenty trash will just to kind of wrap things up here. Where can our audience find out more about you and about your work on line so for me? All my social media is under. Its Ed Williams Act. He s edited Williams. So I'm mostly on instagram and twitter facebook. You may catch me now name. But it's mostly thanks. I mean instagram twitter on again. It's Ed Williams. Also you can find my personal website at Ed Williams dot me for all things make we are under. We are make 'em A. Y. K. E. ON TWITTER INSTAGRAM and facebook. And you can go to. We are make dot com to check out everything on May can actually sign up right now and get a three twenty page comments. You can actually get a feeling understanding in and see these original cares just got done talking about. We'll get that to you for free. You can kind of explore some of the early work we've done in building this universe in his comedy company. Right sounds good. Well I wanNA thank you so much for coming on the show you know. I told you before we started recording. I hadn't gotten back on the Mike in a few weeks ago. I was feeling a little rusty. You know just kind of as you were saying before about going through this pandemic like last week with not a great week for me and so I had even honestly was coming into his interview like. I'm not sure how this is going to go because I don't feel like I met like my best but hearing your story and hear your enthusiasm for the work that you do especially for telling stories whether it's through maker whether it's through the museum for me. It's been helpful like I needed like the beach. Wellness needed for people. That are listening. They'll get that as well but I'm really excited to see you do next. I mean a lot of people. Don't really look at. I think the south in general as a big creative area certainly probably not like Tennessee Memphis like that. But here you talk about the city and then seeing the work that you're doing coming out of the city I mean for be that gives me hope that lets me know that you know the south got something to say and so I definitely feel like you've got something to say with the work that you're doing it. Hopefully a lot of people will be around to hear that and see that in the future. So thank you so much for coming on the show every q at has been an honor and pleasure. Yes please come on now. We got a seat waiting for you when his pandemic is over. Please come on folks to methods and I thank you so much for having me on here. It's been an honor big big thanks to Williams and of course thanks to you for listening you can find out more about it and his work links and the show notes at provision path dot com. And of course. Thanks to our sponsor for this episode. Facebook design to learn more about how the facebook designed community is designing for human needs and unprecedented scale. Please visit facebook. Dot Design. Revision Path is brought to you by lunch a multidisciplinary creative studio in Atlanta Georgia. Are you looking for some creative consulting for your next project? Then let's do lunch. Visit us a Yep. It's lunch dot com. I'll put a link to it in the show notes. This podcast is created hosted and produced by me Maris Cherry with engineering and editing by RJ. Basilio our intro voiceovers by music man dray with music by yellow speaker. So what did you think of this episode? Hit US up on twitter or instagram or even better by leaving us a rating and review on Apple podcasts. Just like I said at the top of the show with Sam greater than if you leave a great review. I'll read it right here on the show as always thank you so much for listening and we'll see you next time

Memphis John Henry facebook founder Edinburgh Johnny appleseed apple Tennessee New York Maurice Cherry Dr King Pennsylvania Atlanta Pixar National Civil Rights Museum Ed Williams Lebron
Remembering The Late Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Ep. 6, 2020)

In Black America

28:58 min | 1 year ago

Remembering The Late Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Ep. 6, 2020)

"I from the University of Texas at Austin K. U. T. radio this is in black. America came to be known as the blood. It is possible that the pre spend leave. I looked over that man on the ground and one of the robbers were still around as possible that they felt that the man on the ground was merely faking acting like he had been robbed and in ought to seize them over their love and bath quick and he's deceased so the first question that the priests ad the first question that the lead by squalls. If I stopped the help this man what will happen to me. But then the Good Samaritan and came out and he reversed a question. If I do not stop to help this man. What will happen to him? That's the question before you tonight. Not at past stuff to help the sanitation worker. What will happen to my job? Mount Stopping the help the sanitation workers. What will happen to all of Iowa's spending my office every day and every week as a pathway jeff question is not if I stuff to help this man and need what will happen to me? The question miss if I do not stop to help. The sanitation work of will happen to them. That's the question reverend. Dr Martin Luther. The King Junior would have been ninety one this year. Had He lived out a dream for racial equality in this country. He was a man walking down the oppressed and for a man who question unfair laws and went to jail rather than submit to them. King was passionate fighting for civil rights and although he died by violence his life and teachings were dedicated Kennedy to a deep disrespectful violence and its consequence he won a Nobel Prize for peace. His lectures and dialogues stirred the conscience of the nation. Doc in November one thousand nine hundred eighty three legislation was signed creating Martin Luther King Junior day making it only the third National Holiday born in the twentieth century in Fall Nineteen ninety-one National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis Tennessee. Sasser made it was dedicated to his remembers on October sixteenth. Twenty eleven the MLK memorial dedicated on the National Mall. I'm John Leo. Hanson junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program a tribute to the late reverend. Dr Martin Luther King Junior in Black America. UH-HUH MM-HMM Aw Dr Martin Luther. The King Junior is considered by many as the father of the civil rights movement. Born on Tuesday January Fifteenth Nineteen Twenty nine at the family home in Atlanta Atlanta Georgia. He was christened. Michael Luther King but in one thousand nine hundred ninety four daddy came changes name at the young Martin experienced racial prejudice in nineteen forty four at the age of fifteen he graduated high. School ended Morehouse College in Atlanta with the intention of becoming a medical doctor but changed his mine in his junior year in April nineteen forty eight. Cain received his bachelor's degree in sociology and quotas theological seminary in Chester Pennsylvania. Wayne in May nineteen fifty. One graduated with a bachelor of Vinegar. Degree Anas Valedictorian and student body and I team fifty five. I burned his doctorate in systematic theology from Boston University in Spring. Nineteen sixty three kings. Nine violent tactics were put to the most severe test asked in Birmingham Alabama doing a mass protests for fair hiring practices and the desegregation of department stores police. Brutality used against the march dramatize the plight of African Americans to the nation at large with enormous IMPAC king and others were arrested but his voice was not silenced. Wallet Is Jail Cell. He read a public statement by eight Alabama clergyman that criticizes activities as untimely and unwise on the margins. Other newspaper. He can pause. It's classic Pie Letter from Birmingham. J. Up to refute his critics. And your statement. You assert that I- actions even though peaceful must be condemned because they precipitate violence. But there is this a logical assertion. Isn't this like condemning robbed man because his possession of money precipitated. Evil Act of robbery isn't this condemning socrates because his unswerving and commitment to truth and his philosophical inquiries precipitated the act by the misguided populists in which they made him drink. Hemlock isn't this like condemning Jesus because his unique out consciousness and never ceasing devotion. To God's will precipitated the evil act of Crucifixion. More and more. I feel that the people of ill will have used time much. Lloyd Oy effectively then have the people of goodwill we would have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people but for the appalling silence of the good people now is the time to make real the promise of democracy and transform our pending national allergy into a creative SOMMA brotherhood. Now is the time to live on national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of of human dignity. I have no fear about the outcome of our struggle in Birmingham. Even if I'm motives at present misunderstood we he will reach the goal of freedom in Birmingham all over the nation because our goal of America is freedom abused down SCON- or we may be Destiny is tied up with America's destiny before the pilgrims landed at Plymouth. We were here before the pen of Jefferson Edson majestic words of the declaration of independence across the pages of history red. We were here. More than two centuries off Obama's labored in this country without wages they made competent king. They built a home Salaam masters. While suffering gross injustice in shameful humiliation and yet out of a bottomless vitality they continue tended to thrive and develop if the inexpressible crew is our slave raid. Could not stop us the opposition. We we now face will surely fail. We will win Freedom because sacred heritage of our nation and the tunnel final will of the Almighty God bought it and Echoing demands never before have I written so long Maleta. I'm afraid that much too long to take your precious time. I can assure you that it would have been much shorter if I had. I've been writing from a comfortable desk. But what else can one do when he is alone in our jails sale of than write long letters think think long Forbes and pray long prized via said anything in this letter that overstates the truth and indicates an unreasonable impatience nations. I beg you to forgive me if I said anything that understates the truth and indicates my having patience that allows me to settle for anything less than brotherhood. I beg God to forgive me. I hope this letter finds you strong into fade. I also hope that circumstances will soon make it possible for me to meet each of you not as an integrationist as a civil rights leader leader but as a fellow clergyman and the Christian brother as all hope that the dog clouds of racial prejudice will soon pass pass away and the deep fog. Misunderstanding will be lifted from our fears drenched communities and then some not too distant Tamara. Ara the radio. Stars of love and brotherhood will shine over our great nation. With all the scintillating beauty yours for the cause of peace and brotherhood Martin Luther King Junior and nineteen fifty seven in New Orleans seeking to build upon the success of the Montgomery bus boycott with the hope of greatness status of southern blacks and America's poor king summit together number of black leaders to lay the foundation for the organization Tation now known as the southern Christian leadership conference at C. L. C. King was elected its first president and he soon began helping other communities. Organize is their own protests against discrimination the envelope Andrew Young former mayor of Atlanta and. US Ambassador was one of King's most trusted advisers looking back on it. We think of those as the best days of our lives. Actually at the time it was We really didn't know what we were doing. We knew things were wrong and somebody had to do something about it and we just stumbled along from one thing to the other two. We found a way to make it work and in Fortunately most of us had read a lot about India and we understood some of the nonviolent methods of Gandhi. And we just I experimented until we find out how to organize people nobody was trained as an organizer. We knew the black community. We knew the cities that we working in fairly well and We learned gradually over a period of time. How to get things done? What type of impact at the late? Dr Martin Luther King King have on you at that time. Well Martin was an amazing young man. He had been sort of thrust in the leadership. He never really really wanted it. And yet he couldn't get away from it and he was essentially trying to do something for other people that kind of dedication and the sort of things that he said matter of factly. If a person hadn't found something that they're willing to die for they probably not fit to live anyway. You know. Somebody's dropped that on you in a joking kind of friendly conversation it makes you think you know what is it that I'm willing to die for and you begin to to the thing about your life and think about other people in a new way. I mean he was amazing that all of the things that he did and he never lived before two years old and yet in the midst of it all he was still privately of very easy going. friendly joking. O'Kane clowning lovable guy in nineteen fifty three king completely. His doctorate and was granted. The degree two years later upon completion of his dissertation Asian married at the time he returned to the south to become pastor Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery Alabama there. He made his first smart on. The civil rights movement came fight for justice and equal rights began on December fifth nineteen fifty five five days after the late Rosa Park with foods obeyed. The city rules mandating segregation on buses and nineteen fifty six at the boycott continue Kane gang national prominence as a result of the sectional speaking skills and personal courage although increasingly portrayed as supremely black spokesperson King did not mobilize mass protests activities during the first five years at the Montgomery Bus Boycott had ended on August twenty eighth nineteen sixty. Three King led a massive march on Washington. DC lead and deliver it one of the most passionate addresses of his career. Even the state of Mississippi state sweltering with the heat Toko injustice sweltering with the heat oppression be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream my four. Little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content that character. I have a dream today. Have a dream that one day and in Alabama with its vicious racists with its governor having in his lips dripping with the words of the position another vacation one day right there in Alabama little black bars and black girls will be able NBA join hands with little white boys and girls has sisters and brothers. I have a dream the I have a dream that one day. Every she'll be salted never healed in mountain. It should be made low. The rough places would be made plain and the crooked places will be made straight and the law be revealed and all flesh Celsius get together. This is our hope. This is a faith that I go back to the south. With with this faith we will be able to hugh out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the JANGLING discords Savan Nation into a beautiful symphony brotherhood. With this we will be able to work together to pray together to struggle together of a to go to jail together to stand up for freedom together knowing that we will be free one day this will be the day. Hey this would be the day. When all of God's children to sing with new meaning my country tears is it? The sweet land of liberty of Diaz seeing land where my fathers died land. But the pilgrim's pride from every mountainside let Freedom Ring America's to be a great nation. This must become true. So let freedom reign. Hilltops of New Hampshire let freedom ring from the mighty mountains New York. Let Freedom Win from the heightening alleghenies. Pennsylvania let freedom ring from the snowcap Raptors Colorado let freedom ring from curvaceous slopes of California. Not only that. Let Freedom Ring from Stone Mountain Georgia. Let the Freedom Ring from Lacob Mountain of Tennessee that freedom ring from every hill and Moan Hill of Mississippi from Ed Mountain let Freedom Ring and windows happens when we allow freedom ring when we let it rain from ever village in ever hamlet from adverse state and every city we will be able to to speed up that day all children black men and white men Jews and Protestants and Catholics will be able to John and seeing the way the all Negro spiritual free at last free at last. Thank God Almighty in Nineteen Sixty three time. Magazine named King is a person of the year a few months later in December nineteen sixty four recipient recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize after Victorian for Norway King took on a new challenge and Selma Alabama. He led a voter registration campaign campaign they ended in the Selma government. Freedom March King Gratis Crusade to Chicago where it started program to rehabilitate the slums and provide housing housing. In April nineteen sixty kingland support to the memphis sanitation workers. He wanted to discourage violence and wanted to focus national attention on the plight. Of the poor and unorganized workers of the city. The men were ugly for Basic Union representation and long overdue raises. The strike right became the new testing ground for the new direction of the poor. People's campaign was taking which merged civil rights issues economic concerns on the eve of his assassination assignation it was king and Seo Sea sick and the tip at a nonviolent protest march. I just want to do God's will and he's allowed me to go to the mountain. I've looked overall. I've seen the promised land. I may not get back with you to northern night. We have people who get could the promise man happy tonight. I'm not worried about body. Have seen glow civil rights leader. Dr Martin Luther King Junior was shot in the head and is now in critical condition in a Memphis Tennessee hospital. The latest reports from Memphis say Dr King was hit by Mike gunfire while standing on the balcony of his hotel room. Just before seven o'clock eastern standard time noted in his face he was standing at acute angle and the Boola not them up off of his feet in that direction against alleged over them. You couldn't tell it was a shock onto his face it sound lack of dynamite lodge cracker. Police say a man wearing a dark suit dropped the weapon about a block from the shooting scene and jumped into a late model. An Old White Car Ladies and gentlemen. May I have your attention please. At seven ten this evening Martin Luther King was shot in Tennessee Martin Luther King Twenty minutes ago died for those of you who are black and are tempted to be filled with hatred and distrust of the injustice of such an act against all white people. I would only say that I can also feel in my own heart thing. Kind of feeling kills the he was killed by White Man UH is too small for his spirit but we commit his body to the ground is too narrow for his soul but we commit his body to the ground no coffin North knowstone can hold his greatness but we commit his body on Sunday October sixteenth. Two thousand eleven some ten thousand spectators in dignitaries gathered on the national mob for the dedication cases of the memorial for Dr Martin Luther King Junior among the speakers were a WHO's who of civil rights leaders kings children as well as President Barack Obama Emma President Obama Herbs Nation that date to celebrate the dedication of the memorial by continuing to press for the goals and hopes of the black picture with no official official rank or title who somehow gave voice to our deepest dreams and help make the nation more perfect earthquake and a hurricane may have delayed this day but this is a day that would not be denied for this day. We celebrate Dr Martin Luther King. Junior's returned an to the national mall his life. His story tells us that change can come. If you don't give up. He would not give up no matter how long it took. Because because the smallest hamlets and the darkest slums he had witnessed the highest reaches of the human spirit because in those moments when the struggle seemed most hopeless he had seen gene men and women and children conquered their feet because he had seen hills and mountains made low and rough places made plain and the crooked places made straight and God make way out of no way. That is why we did this man because he had faith in us and that is why he belongs on this mall because he saw what we might right become. That is why Dr King was so quintessentially American because for all the hardships we've endured for all our sometimes tragic history. Ours is a story story of optimism and achievement and constant striving that is unique upon this earth and that is why the rest of the world still looks to us to lead. This is a country. Three were ordinary people find in their hearts. The courage to do extraordinary things. The Courage to stand up in the face of the fiercest resistance and despair and say this is wrong and this is right we will not settle for what the cynics tell us. We have to accept and we will reach again and again no matter the odds for what we know is possible possible that is the conviction we must carry now in our hearts s toughest times may be. I know we will overcome. I know there or better days ahead I know this. Because of the man towering over I know this because all he and his generation endured we are here today in a country that dedicated monument to that legacy and so with our eyes on the horizon and our faith squarely placed in one another. Let us keep striving let us keep struggling. Let's keep climbing toward that promised. Land of a nation a world. That is more fair and more just and more equal for every single child of God. Aw Thank you God bless you and God bless the United States in September nineteen ninety one the national civil rights in Zim Lorraine Motel was dedicated. The resume museum traces the history of the Civil Rights Movement for Miss Beginning to the present. The museum was built around the Motel King State while in Memphis his room and that his aides have been kept as it was fateful evening in April nineteen sixty eight doctor. King had been in Memphis prior to the assassination and prior to the Coming in March for the for the march that broke out in violence. He'd come here before when he'd stayed at the Lorraine and this was the rule that he'd used we stay tonight's as room and is a king sized bed. Even for that time you know that would have been nice so he stayed here and we have kept the original furniture. That was in the room at the time. And it's been redone to look as it did in nineteen sixty eight but this is where he was the night of this assignation bathroom real seven now cross here is room for six and this is the room that has been occupied by some of Dr King's age with the double with the two beds in here But this is the room that he walked out of Just prior to being shot He'd been in here with Abernathy and some others when they were as you can see. Having some food there's some catfish on the plate over there and dishes into glasses and milk and the like and this woman has been recreated to appear as it did on the evening of the assassination and a game the furniture and the room is all of the furniture. That was here here at the time. One other thing that I like about this room as business. Dan's in here and reflects and reach stays display lines and they light up. You know when it accident you also hear Miami Miami Jackson softly singing precious. And that was Dr King's favorite song so it's just it brings tears to your eyes when all awkward. I was just so struck by that lasts. No line with them. Put in casket on the plane. That just tells it all somebody said. It's just an ordinary i. It really lost. Somebody didn't let me let me any time. Not only are we Martin King. Junior's thirty thirty nine at the time of his death. He was shot while standing on the bathroom of the rain. Motel in Memphis Tennessee. This has been attributed to the right. Reverend in Dr Martin Luther King Junior who would have been ninety one this year of you have questions. COMMENTS OR SUGGESTIONS ASTRA FUTURE IN BLACK AMERICA programs. Email us at n Black America had K. U. T. Dot. Org also let us know what radio station you hold is over. Remember to like us on MM facebook and the father was on twitter using the opinions expressed on this program are not necessarily those of this station or of the University of Texas. Ah Austin you'RE GONNA have previous problems online K. U. T. dot. Org until we had the opportunity again for technical producer. Day with Alvarez risk. I'm John Leo Hanson. Junior thank you for joining us today. Please join us again next week. CD copies of this program are available. And maybe you purchased by writing in Black America CDs K.. Ut Radio one university station Austin Texas seven eight seven one two. That's in black America CDs K.. Ut Radio one university station Austin Texas seven eight seven one to ooh. This has been a production of K. U._T. radio.

Dr Martin Luther King King Martin Luther King America Dr Martin Luther Memphis Tennessee Martin Luther King Junior Civil Rights Movement United States Alabama Birmingham Martin King Atlanta University of Texas Martin National Civil Rights Museum Montgomery Alabama John Leo Hanson Emma President Obama
Roy Wood Jr.: Father Figure

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

48:45 min | Last week

Roy Wood Jr.: Father Figure

"You're listening to comedy central support for the daily show. Comes from mayo me wines. Mayo me. Winds are carefully crafted pulling out the best from california to push flavor in new directions for a taste like no other with california vineyards carefully selected to offer the true expression of their respective appalachians. Mayo me achieves unforgettable balancing complexity for wine. Sutter truly flavor forward okay. I have no idea what i'm talking about here. But i will tell you i do know my wine i do love meiomi and i do understand what flavor forward means and they are not lying when they say this learn more about mayo me and shop delivery or pick up at mayo. Me dot com. That's m. e. i. o. m. i. Dot com please enjoy responsibly. Mayo me wines. A campo california the daily show with trevor noah is supported by expensive fi. Expensive keeps money moving more than ten million people around the globe. Use expensive is pre accounting platform to reimburse expenses manage business credit cards generate invoices pay bills and plan trips from one. Easy to use app whether you're working for yourself managing a team or closing the books for your clients. Expensive fide makes it easy so you have more time to focus on what really matters. Download the app or sign up at expensive fai dot com slash the daily show today. I'm permanente live long enough to teach you everything you need to know. Solicit run through a couple of things. Rolfast number one. I need you to treat them with respect. Always if you think you're right be respectful number two. Don't mix white and dark liquor. That's how you end up in. The back of a police cost speaking of which get you a white friend. Black man with white friends a thirty eight percent less likely to be shot by the police. Are you listening. You just gonna stare at me just is what you do. This is serious stuff man. I'm gonna put this on video for you when you're old enough you come back and watch thank you. But if we get rid of the confederate flag magano who the dangerous white people saying the flag out a couple upsize. Let's be real about and keep it around. But i grew up in the south. Tell you how many times to confederate flag came in handy. Stop him for gas at a strange place to in the morning. And you see that flag hanging from the window you know this is not the to get rush to get rid of the flag especially if you y y you should want to keep the flag for a little while world so at least black folks you because if you do not an asshole that's the one thing that helps us identify you. Get rid of that flag. You got to seattle way to know who to cool widens the cool white people start giving y'all wristbands a handstands dark alley. Let us know what the struggle every your gate being song komo. The brisbane look at all. This needs to go down. We'll had wristband linda. What's going on man. thank you man. The south man from birmingham birmingham man. No south we got some tension gotta issues you know. I talked about uncle about it. You know my uncle first thing we need to do is get better to inward. My uncle. Don't like to wear derek inward. We're trying to trying to quit the end. Where the way people try to quit. Cigarettes limited time word. Craven's you say it or you don't be calling me every week with updates only full time full time now sending cheat day. 'cause i watch football see some grown man i down i got the call the n word this is the end. Were like at this point. Black folks if we're trying to get stuff done politically in this country. We inching we're doing ancient we inching but at this point. I think it's time for us to schedule a meeting with people because gay people get waymo shit done. They don't miss gay people should shit down. They won't something. The goal is gone. They don't fool around every week. It's five six new words. You can't call gay people we've been working on the n. word since eighteen. He can't get one word at the american vocabulary. Gay people up to date of sabah words. We need to go to narrow and have gay people seeking salad issues over soups out. You can't even say gay modus. How the gay people are the only word left to address gay people by better not fumble that word in the sentence. Seo as us gay their own context at work and see if you don't have to go talk to seal via an hr hr be on your s immediately mumble gay. One time the wall was by yourself. You said shit you still got in trouble. Walking through the cubicles tell a gay jokes. He was on the break room was alone. Get ships got stuck and you. It'll mean you a bad person. You will always say anything when you're hungry. Every banning all bentham chips get stuck at the top of the machine. You try to jostle the machine a little bit different shifts. Though falling nobody got changed for dollars. You can buy seal the alive. Seal the security to the break room security. Let's see you go 'cause you call some chips. That's the power of the gay agenda. They figured out a way to influence the political process of this country to make sure that the issues or at least heard even if people don't get the bills passed they at least listened to them. And that's what. I'm trying to tell my uncle. You don't like the n word man you wanna get of the n. Word is all you got to start calling gay people nigga tomorrow listen. I don't like it either all right but that's the best idea i got right now. I want to teach my son. I'm a father figure. I got to show him the right way. Try to divide us on television. You know there's a lot of people that aren't black. They're standing on the right side of issues that affect us appreciate those votes linnea people out there. Care about black stuff. Seen man i went to. I went to black history museum. I had a white to threw me out for turns into brother that was on the tool of me. I'm this dude. He the white dude. It was a white dude. Telling me about marsh. It was good was trying to hate ended thing straight up a real limited. You wanted to use wristbands real quick. Go down with respect support for the daily show with. Trevor noah comes from a omi wines from diverse micro climates to rocky soils ocean air cool mornings and warm afternoons california's rich appalachians provide meiomi wines and unforgettable balance complexity and richness of flavor offering pinot. Noir cabernet sauvignon chardonnay and rosa. That are crowd-pleasers at any summer event. Mayo me wines are carefully crafted pulling out the best from california to push flavor in new directions for a taste like no other with california vineyards carefully selected to offer the true expression of their respective appellations. Mayo me achieves unforgettable balancing complexity for wines that are truly flavor forward. Next time you're shopping for wine. Choose meiomi they're easy to love and hard to forget made like no other for a taste like no other. It's definitely a regular in our refrigerator here at home and at work to don't tell my boss learn more about mayo me shop delivery or pick up mayo. Me dot com. That's m. e. i. o. m. i. Dot com please enjoy responsibly. Mayo me wines. A campo california. Some folks got a problem with that. You don't wanna white person a black history museum. I understand his a thing. I'm not saying they better than the black tour. I think black tour guide or the civil rights museum. I think they better equipped to speak on the experience because they bind them live that life they can speak certain exhibits from a perspective. That nobody else. Can i just think if you go to a black history museum. You gotta black tour guide. You need to go in the morning while he's still in a good mood. That brother stressed can't walk around slavery all day for eight alice and not close it somebody. Somebody didn't tell him nine in he just finished at griddle. Name is is my pleasure to take your journey. Look he's exhibits merican. History exhibits good mood at thirty. He'd been staring at slave out. Everybody he looked done go-to the gift shop people crying. Something's wrong man. Just don't be one of these people that surprise black folks got issues then the people i deal with. I read the top to somebody. That don't agree with me. That somebody has had the is closed. Did you black people are people angry. Angry new happened last. Couple years back votes but to tell y'all forever hanson issues. We'd say we invented the blues signed. Need we literally invented an entire genre of music based on sadness. that's how sad we lose was created. Here that is an american art form that is not made of africa. The african music should us happy because we was free. Every africans love you sleeve ship. We've been saying tracks not patriotic. We don't like the national anthem. Minimal shock to you man. You are no a black folks phil and just listen to their music music. Tell you everything has gone on in the black. A beautiful telegram nowhere in the history of black music. Is there a hit. Adriatic song what we do. We will cover song but like we were no original patriotic song black artists because we got a conflicted relationship with the country. Right now honest patriotic song. You gotta lead to white. Dr ain't had a good time. Good time in america. You damn right. You should be writing the patriots series. You couldn't possibly expect that level of patriotism from a race of people that have so many issues you care. It's not realistic black. People don't we don't seeing about america. We sing about specific cities where you can have a good time. We'll talk to country. We can tell you where the party the do. That day of number of america limited by city where the heat is on all night on the beach to the early mall to miami. That's what you've got to california mugabe. Will you had to go down in california. Well california knows how to party city. La the city a good old watch and the city of cop. Did they give a reckless. Shut down to black people. Don't do patriotism. Maybe georgia on my mind. That's the closest republica. Maybe that maybe that's a good song. It's warm it's about the country ray. Charles george mama good song. The keyword. let's song is owned my mind. Ray charles was just thinkin about jordan. He didn't tell you to go georgia's like every other part of the south. It's got some pockets. You should not be in after dark to s ray charles to be more specific on wind georgia to go go to atlanta where the players played and they on them mulberry. Try to shut me down on them. Would about james brown living in america. Let patriotic jane brown singing dot america is original and key black. Who knew this is a good song but keep it real man. James brown wrote that song for rocky for and soon as he finished seeing. Apollo creed died in. The ring is sad song. Can you hear living in. America not think about apollo creed has fallen lifeless nickleby jordan losses. Daddy de anything. Living in america is not patriotic is. The opposite is a secret message to black people. James brown is one of the most masterful musician to ever walked this earth too. Brilliant song america. That entice on living in america's a secret message two black phones. All you listen to andrew song very and delivered in america. All james brown do is just start. Naming cities entered lunar new orleans. Detroit he just naming safe places for black folks. It's crazy how much we have to pay for outdated impersonal healthcare and even crazier that we all just accepted. It's time to face. Healthcare is backwards. Luckily there's forward a new approach to primary care that surprisingly personal and refreshingly straightforward forward never makes you feel like just another patient backed by top rated doctors and the latest tech forward gives you access to personalized care whenever you need it. Using in-depth genetic analysis and real time bloodwork forwards top rated doctors provide you with in depth insights to better understand your genetics mental and physical health. They then create custom easy to understand plans to help guide you to achieving long-term health with forward you get unlimited in person visits with your doctor and access to care anytime via the forward app offer. One flat monthly fee. It's time to stop accepting backwards. Healthcare and start moving. Your health forward visit go forward dot com today to learn more that's go forward dot com love black music man hit you. That's why i have. I have a hard time going to see civil rights movement. I have to go see civil rights movies in the middle of the day so nobody can see me cry. Movies be hitting civil rights movies. Give me that negro humming. Oh my god. I break down. You know every civil rights movie just got that scene wishes some for you. Don't break down the middle of a civil rights at hamad serious happening on screen trying to do but butter on a waffle will be in the ball and civil rights movies. Give me all the time. They get new with the humming and then they always make black people fall in slow motion every civil rights movie. Black person follow. Why you've to slow down. My pain just played at regular speed anytime person following the civil rights movement that double bouncing the dirt and the to come here. Dr scott most powerful civil rights movie scene of all time to selma could name the scenes when oprah winfrey guests leaped. stu slept fad. The second time not the first time she slept sick is do slept. Oprah winfrey so hard. She fell in slow motion. And it was negro humming the theater. I couldn't tell you how to move in st powerful amount motions. First of all oprah conan. She was getting slept she. She didn't know she was good. Slap dude that was that was that was director. She made that choice. Good as director. Duvalier went up to that actor between sings okay. We love what you're doing. Okay look in a lot of good stuff from you. We're just gonna change it up this scene okay. This time this town oprah's gonna come over and she's gonna do her lines over. She finishes her lies. He's slept shit. Snuck over what able to do over. Oprah came over that do man. You can see it in a face. She slept was coming to week. Right out me. The thing about this country is this well. Americans people know to say that. I think people want to say when. We're your american american. We'll just hail we. Are we all americans. But we live in two different americas. What it is people. Forget that. I don't think everybody that doesn't understand what we go through is necessarily racist bigoted safar jump a lot of full suggests straight up. Don't know what it's like you got. Educate you gotta educate them on the kind of america you live in. I'd go to best buy give a do some straighten straight. Ms wooten due to this by decide. I don't need a bag with my purchase. You just have an iphone case at big you could just pop that open. Nonni poppin shit. You've in a bag. Well you need a bag. You need a bag. It's wasteful recycled. Don't you care about the earth. Service has nothing to do with the earth. I'm a black man in america. I gotta leave the store with the background safety black. I don't get the luxury of walking out. would shit. My hand is a roll of the dice. Then more fun day. If i know not only do i lead. The bad bitch need that receipt staple to receive my hand stable my receipt to the outside like chinese. Carry out hold it up in the air allying. Kiat who data out of gas by his. He just didn't understand. He thought he'd saving the earth but he will saving the life. That's what he says nothing to do with recycling because you might be a cool person. He might cashier. Might be a cool as do but we don't know what the security guard been through. Franck come out the best. Buy naked ass. I phone case comes security. Excuse me sir paint for that. Oh yeah. I got the received data support for the daily show in the following message. Come from warner brothers. Pitchers space jam. A new legacy get ready for the slam dunk of the summer. Yes we are talking about space jam. On july sixteenth the iconic looney tunes are back like you've never seen them before in space jam a new legacy and they're teaming up with lebron james other stars from the nba in wnba in an epic adventure. That will take you beyond your world and into a whole new dimension. This movie has everything heart comedy. Action huge stars of course the beloved looney tunes. It's got bugs daffy lola bunny tweety tasr speedy gonzales yosemite sam roadrunner e. coyote all the beloved tunes. More are teaming up with basketball's finest lebron james damian lillard klay thompson. Anthony davis the list goes on and on so on july sixteenth prepared to enter a new dimension explore new worlds and experience the event of the summer whether your team tune squad or team goon squad. You won't wanna miss this one space jam. A new legacy is in theaters and hbo max. July sixteenth rated pg everything a racist about to percents To percents ain't races you got to recognize two percent i was. Mcdonald's is do cussing everybody swill racism. I walked in this fast food. Spot is do because everybody this is the thing like fast food spots already shady stuff saying they don't deserve to because they do they deserve a good cussin' every now and then there's the thing they do now. Somebody's fast food spots. They loved the charge if a sauce. When you get nuggets you know you want extra sauce. Which nuggets is going to be. You want another salt brother. It's going to be twenty five cents. You charging for sauce. That's out i want to. I need a quarter beat. The guardian at the saul students serious. You've got a different colored shirt from everybody else at work. So now he arrogant supervised. I show up caen. I would give you another sausage up. Teen won't to sauces. But how painful was wrong. But i walked in this spot. Man do was cussing out the whole store spoil. It was racism. And i'm not saying that racism wouldn't want her to call him getting bad service. I'm just saying he jumped to that conclusion. A little fast. He didn't go through the progressions. He ordered a six piece nugget. Five nuggets in the bucks. And i didn't even know what was going on texting as soon as i walk in the door. I'm texting. I hear this dude dude over in the cook do go kill everybody. In knew paul's he's in q. Everybody in this bitch already had a foot in the door and my technically in this bitch buddhist foot out and go to arby's swore was raises. Man y'all still note down white folks folks to homes to hash it. Maybe it'll turn them decided to date children's nuggets. If that was white added knock backed off can help us do might little. I know you man ladder. Racial tension in the world but dissing racism. This is a fast foods but it two o'clock in the morning some of them folks back there can't count to six six nuggets. You need to order a four piece and a two so you tricked again and get to sauces for free. This employee's i appreciate the food. Employees are rude. I like it. Lisa's from the heart. Because people too nice now you go out to these doors everybody. Hey how you doing are you. Thank you for choosing people. Want to be your friend or they'll get fired for not speaking. Which one you think it is because ten fifteen years ago nobody spoke to you in the store. Now all of a sudden everybody wanna kick it with joe ask our corporate mandate and i read the you matt do get into grocery stores. There's too many questions to register. Just ring up the shit. That's on the bell. We gotta be. i'm here. I'm spending money you own. What else do gotta be your friend to the price you pay for politeness is your time so you want somebody to be nice to use us. Cool enjoy it. But i'd rather get the minute back with somebody. I know need all his politeness man. I'm cool people overdo it. I went on a cruise. Is the weirdest thing you go on a cruise. You meet every employee every on the cruise. I met the captain of the boat. The captain of the cruise ship does laps around the boat. Everyday speaking to people does too much. I have no need to meet you. There's no no point in my vacation. Do i need to meet the highest ranking officer on the boat i at the pool he come to captain. He's got a stupid jacket on he. Sachet the captain. Yes you haven't pleasure osha. Pleasure stupid medals dangling office jacket out too heavy fire and caused a male. I don't know how he got him but he's got. We are having fun in the ocean. You having fun bitch who drive it you go on a cruise in makes you appreciate airline pilots. Respect airline pilots airline pilots. I know chitchat for you. Know small talk before the flight. You only meet them to flight job. You get on the plane who you see i. It's the flight attendant. Welcome aboard captain. Got time to talk to your goofy s. You get on the plane looking to copy. What you see to alcoholics checking buttons. That's how you see two grown as men. Who did you check out up here. Wouldn't you just don't just check started with the ladies and gentlemen won't be a slight delay. Get a recheck oldies. But think of choose. That's the captain's job over to entercom. Let you know what's happening. That's it no jokes all business. That's what he calls the movie. They stopped serving drinks. Because the captain got important to say gentlemen to captain we so sit down three up there. Something wrong tilted him in back. Help you me on trying to flooded bitch. Don't you come up here. My doors locked. I've got a shotgun with captain is all business respected. He's all business until the plane lands. That's when he knows time to get some respect from y'all captain knows that he did some dope shit. I want you to know he did some dope shit. I just flew you five hundred miles an hour. Thirty thousand feet. I landed this flight and a fifty mile hour across win on the first attempt. I want you to know who your god is tapping one respect. That's why when you get off. The plane can be standing in the door like a ball so i was the next tool. But to the capitol hill. That real quick risk own jump daily show with. Trevor noah is supported by expensive expensive money moving more than ten million people around the globe. Use expensive is pre accounting platform to reimburse expenses manage business credit cards generate invoices pay bills and plan trips from one. Easy to use app whether you're working for yourself managing a team or closing the books for your clients. Expensive fide makes it easy so you have more time to focus on what really matters. Download the app or sign up at expensive by dot com slash. The daily show today trying to lose weight are losing weight. They tell you everything about losing weight so for how much is going cost is hard when it's time to lose weight drinking all these damn smoothies. Expensive five six dollars for fruit and ice in. how how how. How was it five six dollars for fruit and ice in may trick smoothly. They try to trick because they put in extra words adjectives in the name of the. They don't fall fruit ice okay. You had a mango sunset. Peach tranquillity tranquil tranquility out holding tranquility. That should not get down to three fifty. Does she get it down smoothly so expensive on surprise rappers. Don't talk about him and they saw the damn about a rapid with her damn nice cars and jewelry. You wanna impress me. Kale out in the club. I got some frigging girl in the bikini. Was soy milk just drizzling. I don't know about marriage a lot of my friends and mary. I'm at this weird age now. Is we age will i. I got friends get married late. And i got francis getting divorced. And i don't know who to go celebrate. This is my thinking about divorce. What i love about divorce. I love that people won't shut the hell up a winning but they divorced none of your business. That's not cool. You run your mouth all the time about your engagement. Y'all break-up what happened. i want to know. Tell me what happened. Especially if i went to the wedding if you divorce. I'm entitled to a one page explanation. Exacerbate daily get divorced. And you give me back. The i about your so good toaster. That's full slice but the crowd tree. That's you'll know about that bagel but nestle bolas. Derek told me to watch. Titanic you will learn how to woman you've got to watch country for you know how to rule one limbaugh. Utah shoulder leo dicaprio. Boy that boy got one girl was out of his league. He pulled then he died. He died happy. He was smiling when he was the smart. I went back and watched our tannock. Titanic is not that romantic of the movie is looking film. But ain't romantic titanic. Tanning is basically a movie about an old lady gaga. Some big so good. She went back out into the ocean to say goodbye to it. That's pretty much the movie. Go back to watch. The whole thing is a flashback. Ninety year old lady and she's on the bow of a ship the whole moves. A flashback is the ninety year old lady. she's looking out into the water and then it flashes back to everything that happened on the ship he drowns she lives. They come back day and she's looking out into the water and then people coming up and talking to man while you're thinking about all your friends you lost out there. I don't think about that. Dick dick that water right here seventy years ago. This is where i got my back beat out digital that young gentleman poverty stricken put that pipe only. I couldn't handle it steaming up prison of hand on that car window. That's why what like this could give it a junior. She threw that jewelry into the water. Titanic romantic movie of anything is a superhero movie. Severe a movie. Lille dicaprio's a superhero bre one time and once had sex one time and titanic. She remembered it for the next seventy years. You now game to put it down once for seventy years. That's all she can think about. Think about how much stuff you probably will forget that. I know i'm ninety. I'm not gonna wear my know where mcarthur park and you know my grandkids names on my pills and monday tuesday wednesday trap door. This lady is ninety and she never forget that one to his date beat alzheimer's okay. So i just got to tell you about shopping at home sense. Oh yeah. I need to check. That out is a good. It's better than good. trust me. it's a whole new way to shop. Maybe even life changing seriously see home. Sense is part of the homegoods family. So you know going in that everything will be less than you expect to pay. I love that. And here's the best part. Home sense is never the same store twice. They put out new items all week long. So there's always something new every visits kind of like a treasure hunt the other day. I found zebra print. Accenture could use a new chair. Home sense has stuff to plus up every room in your house. There's so much to choose from furniture. Rugs lights all the decor so many throw pillows while art and bulls. Okay you got me. I've got a check out home sense. You can take a virtual tour online and to get directions to the store at home. Sense dot com o. And when you go yeah take me with you deal. I like old people man i. I'll open blessed enough to live long changed diet up and a couple of years on the back end opie. I want to get to that age. Where i'm just because people out for. No reason saying just unprovoked. Stoute's yes you already smiling you almost there. You look a little young. You got a little more time but you just you already trained you already because people you. Oh you just cuss people out. For no reason i was in a grocery store is do rolled up on me man mother fucker. I'm an produce. I'm picking up. I'm not bothering nobody from japanese. He rolled up his sleeve. He showed me the scars. Dues old eighty eighty five years old. Look at scott asthma asthma. how. I got the scott. Got it into struggle. You don't know what it was like in sixty two. What was it like. It was a struggle. And this is the thing this is old black people and all black people like you can't disrespect them because they have physical proof that they were willing to die to make the country a better place for me. So i have to salute. i paid for groceries. Just do coming motherfucker for twenty minutes et pay for groceries just offer spec got me thinking on the way home would have done. And that's that's a very sobering fillings. A sobering realization. Have to realize that what you've done doesn't quite measure up to what that man did you know is do call motherfucking and got free groceries. That's how much he put in work. I know i'm not gonna get that same. I wish i could. But i know because the thing is that you start reflecting you start reflecting on what you've done that compares to that and i look at the things that i try to do now like trauma best to be socially active. I try my best to do stuff on the daily show that fix change a tra- what i do now is just making up for lost time because i wasn't always like that and something i'm ashamed. I didn't go see obama. Get a naga rated because it was too cold. That was my excuse. That was my excuse for missing. History is cold. I'm a homeboy. Is called round the bus. We go to dc radical. Though i got cable i didn't go to second time i have four years. Tobacco still didn't go see him skipped history twice this embarrassing. Because sooner sooner or later my son's gonna be doing a book report on that. And he flipped it. Obama inauguration page you can see thousands of black people out on the national mall. Just he's gonna come to me. And i gotta be accountable for my absence. Daddy were you there. Crop me out. I was right there on. I just hope that you know what i try to do. Now is enough so you can do is which you can do. But i won't groceries. I'm not sure. What i did is enough so i might have to just spice up my story. Just add. whatever happened when i'm eighty. I'm gonna go in the grocery store. 'cause now keith. Wouldn't struggle mother. You don't know what it was like in two thousand seventeen. What was it like. It was a struggle in the twin. Seventeen motherfucker elite police perform. I ordered six nuggets. The white folks only gave me petit sausage. Thank you all for coming. The the daily show with. Trevor noah years addition subscribe to the daily show on youtube for exclusive content and stream full episodes anytime on paramount plus summers spinal here. And it's time to get out and enjoy the water hike and back with friends but life with the hassles of contacts and glasses slows. You down the center is giving you a summer of freedom. Thanks to eileen with. I designed to point. Oh from dr boutros. Lazic the eye center as even more affordable with huge savings and zero percent financing. Join the thousands of people with clear vision. Thanks to dr boutros. One of the top surgeons in virginia with five locations schedule. Your free lasik consultation at the center today. Mattress warehouse knows that buying a mattress can be tough with so many choices. Where do you start introducing bed match patented diagnostic system. That determines your pressure points and recommends the mattresses that are best for your individual sleep needs and it's found only at mattress warehouse. Come try bed match at a mattress warehouse near you. Visit sleep happens dot com for locations and get free next day delivery on select purchases. His dot com. This comedy central podcast.

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Democracy Now! 2019-01-11 Friday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:02 min | 2 years ago

Democracy Now! 2019-01-11 Friday

"Pacifica. This is democracy now. Willingham civil rights institute. Not only owes me an apology personally, but should apologize to. Paul people who stand on the side of Justice democracy, now, exclusive the scholar and activist. Angela Davis speaks out days after the Birmingham. Civil rights institute rescinds a human rights award for her apparently due to her activism for Palestinian rights and support of the boycott divestment and sanctions movement, targeting Israel. The institute's move has sparked widespread condemnation Birmingham's mayor said he was dismayed by the decision. The Birmingham City council unanimously passed a resolution recognizing the life work of Davis who is from Birmingham. Doctor. Angela Davis will respond to the news and talk about her decades long record of supporting Palestinian rights, we need to engage the kind of conversation that will reveal the meaning of antisemitism. And. How to extricate ourselves from this? Mccarthyite keffer to equate. Boycott strategies and solidarity strategies with anti semitism. We will also talk to Angela Davis about the recent anti spill in the US Senate and CNN's firing of Marc Lamont hill after he spoke up for Palestinian rights at the United Nations. All that and more coming out. Welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org. The Warren peace report, I made me Goodman, some eight hundred thousand federal workers who've been furloughed or forced to work without compensation will receive no paycheck today as the partial government shutdown stretches into its twenty first day with no resolution in sight on Thursday government workers and their unions stage rallies outside federal buildings across the United States. This is Elaine Suryono, a furlough d- EPA. Scientists speaking at a protest in Washington DC. Someone in. I've asked him if I can get a loan for mortgage, if this doesn't I mean, my mortgage payment, if this doesn't end at the end of January, so and if it continues longer I'll have to go into my retirement money to pay the bills those keep coming. They don't stop the protests came President Trump travel to mcallen, Texas, along the US Mexico border Thursday to repeat his demand for more than five billion dollars in funding for a border wall. And what would be an unprecedented move. Trump is considering declaring a national emergency in bid to circumvent congress. He's ordered the US army corps of engineers to look into raiding funds from thirteen point nine billion dollar disaster relief Bill meant to help Puerto Rico, Florida, Texas and California recover from deadly hurricanes and wildfires after a photo op at the border. Trump granted an interview to Fox News host, Sean. Kennedy who was reportedly given special access to the president by White House deputy chief of staff Bill shine, a former Fox News executive. Earlier today that it's likely that you're very likely going to declare national emergency. How soon without happen? If we don't make a deal with congress, most likely, I will do that. I I would actually say I would I can't imagine any reason why not because I'm allowed to do it the laws. One hundred percent on my side. In fact, many legal scholars and lawmakers say such a move would violate federal law and could set a dangerous precedent. Carol rose of the American Civil Liberties union said, quote, he can try, but he's going to be challenged in court by the U. And by about a million other groups unquote, Trump's visit was met by protesters who rallied on both sides of the border and Reynosa, Mexico and mcallen, Texas Ephron. Lavarra of the Texas civil rights project said Trump was stoking racism, xenophobia and fears about a crime epidemic that doesn't exist. The crime rate is much lower here than it is in Houston and Austin. So it's total falsehood that there's crime that the prime rates are high or there's a security crisis. People have homes ride next to the river. And they live there peacefully without any fans or without a new wall. That's the way it's been for generations. Now, we have this president that with rhetoric. Phobia racism, this trying to make people who are not from here. Believe that there's a crisis for the people who live here. We know what it's like. And we know that it's completely falls that there's a crisis in the border on Capitol Hill. There are no signs that lawmakers will resolve the government shutdown anytime soon after eight House Republicans joined Democrats and approving spending Bill that would reopen the treasury department. Well funding the IRS tax season gets underway. Senate Republican majority leader Mitch McConnell refuse to schedule a vote Thursday on a companion Bill calling it a political stunt in climate news and major new study published in the. Journal science finds the world's oceans are absorbing heat at a far faster rate than previously predicted of finding with troubling implications for the future of life on earth. The study found greenhouse gas emissions are warming the oceans forty percent faster than even the dire. Predictions made by the UN's top climate scientists five years ago, the authors write quote, this warming has contributed to increases and rainfall intensity. Rising sea levels, the destruction of coral reefs declining ocean oxygen levels and declines in ice sheets glaciers and ice caps in the polar regions. The Pentagon says it's begun the process of withdrawing US troops from Syria as ordered by President Trump, but declined to comment on its plan timetable or the movement of troops the reported US with tro came as Turkey said it would invade parts of Syria controlled by Kurdish militias, unless the US rapidly completed withdrawal. This is. Turkey's foreign minister among which was up to those. But if this process is prolonged or extended over a period of time, and as I have said before if they delay this process with false and absurd excuses like unreal statements such as Turks will slaughter the Kurds, then we will put this decision of starting an operation and east of Euphrates into practice in Egypt. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo, presented his vision for US policy in the Middle Eastern speech at Cairo university Thursday that times directly contradicted, President Trump on peyot promise, the US will expel every last Dirani and boot from Syria, even as the president has vowed to remove two thousand troops from the region. Peyot repeatedly attacked former President Barack Obama throughout the address telling his audience quote, the age of self inflicted American. Shame is over President Trump has made the decision to bring our troops home from Syria. We always do. And now is the time. But this isn't a change of mission. We remain committed to the complete dismantling of ISIS, the ISIS threat and the ongoing fight against radical Islamism in all of its forms. But as President Trump said, we're looking to our partners to do more. And in this effort, we will do so going forward together. For our part airstrikes in the region will continue as targets arise did not mention gross human rights abuses, committed in Egypt under president of defile CC or the fifty thousand political prisoners human rights groups, say are currently blocked up in Egypt's jails locked up than chip Shen shells Pompeo will continue his Mideast tour over the weekend with plans to meet with Gulf Arab leaders, including visit with the Saudi Royal family in Riyadh during his Cairo speech Pompeo, barely mentioned Saudi Arabia and not once did he mention Washington Post columnist Malka show. She who is reportedly killed and dismembered by a Saudi hit squad October second inside the Saudi consulate in stumbled Turkey before his body parts were smuggled away on Capitol Hill. Thursday, lawmakers Mark the one hundred days since the killing both congress and the CIA have determined Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, very likely ordered the assassination, although PUM. Peyot and President Trump have disputed the conclusion, this is house speaker Nancy Pelosi, the murder of kashogi is an atrocity and an affront to humanity and the days after his disappearance members of congress both sides, the aisles both sides of congress demanded information and dedicated ourselves to holding perpetrators accountable in Washington DC police arrested five activists Wednesday for holding banners outside the supreme court calling for an end to torture and the closure of the prison at the US naval base in Guantanamo Bay. Cuba, the protests came on the seventeenth anniversary of the opening of Montana mo- in the wake of the nine eleven attacks. Forty men remain languishing there many of them have yet to face trial. This comes as McClatchy is reporting. CIA director Gina has spo- a secret agency black site for prisoners Kuantan amo- the claim is based on a partially redacted transcript of. Secret hearing at Guantanamo last November has sports responsible for running a secret black site in Thailand in two thousand and two where at least one prisoner was waterboarded and tortured in other ways during her tenure hassle. Also saw the over the oversaw the destruction videotapes showing torture at the black site, but she was previously not known to have operated out of Guantanamo in. Venezuela. President Nicolas Maduro was inaugurated Thursday to a second six year term overseeing an economy, that's an freefall. Amidst US led economic sanctions aimed at ending his presidency. Madurai has accused the US along with Canada and twelve Latin American allies of plotting a coup against his socialist government repeated the claim Thursday's inauguration. Sanctum been as well as the center of a World War of imperialism, allied, governments may have tried to turn this formal legal constitutional and peaceful ceremony into a World War against our country. The US and its allies have refused to recognize as presidency calling last year's election. Illegitimate. Other Latin American leaders, including Evo Morales of Bolivia Danielle Ortega Nicaragua and Miguel DS canal of Cuba. Welcome Medeiros reelection enjoying Thursday's inauguration and dacas the Trump administration's continued to ratchet up sanctions against Venezuela. Even as its economy faces hyper inflation with severe shortages of food and medicine about three million Venezuelans have left the country in recent years with many settling in Colombia and Brazil in Brazil, newly inaugurated far right price at shy year bull sonata said Wednesday hill, pull out of United Nations agreement protecting the rights of migrants Brazil joins. A handful of countries led by the United States that refuse to ratify the global compact for safe orderly and regular migration last month. More than one hundred sixty other nations have signed on back on Capitol Hill. Vermont independent Senator Bernie Sanders was joined Thursday by democratic house members introduced legislation to dramatically rollback prices that Americans pay for prescription drugs. The Bill would allow the health and Human Services Secretary to negotiate for lower prices, while pegging the price of prescription drugs to the median price and five industrialized countries. It would also allow Americans to import lower cost drugs from Canada and other countries. This is ill Hon. Omar freshman congressperson from Minnesota, I believe that healthcare is a basic human right Americans pay the highest prices to access to drugs in the world, including three times, the price of drugs in Great, Britain alone, and instead of taking donations. From pharmaceutical industry, we need to hold them accountable for taking advantage of the American people medications are too expensive, and we must act volt Louis to lower prices Senator Bernie Sanders apologized Thursday, two women who've come forward to say they were sexually harassed or discriminated against by male staffers, while working on his two thousand sixteen campaign, the accusations surfaced after more than two dozen staffers penned a letter to Sanders requesting a meeting to discuss sexual violence and harassment on the two thousand sixteen campaign in the run-up to the twenty twenty election several of Sanders. Top aides have been implicated. This is Senator Sanders speaking Thursday pews that is part of our campaign on there was some women who are harassed all mistreated. And I thank them from the bottom of my heart. Was speaking out a what they experienced was absolutely unacceptable. And certainly not what a progressive campaign or any campaign should be about and other news on Sanders possible run for president is two thousand sixteen campaign manager, Jeff Weaver has said he will not return to the same position of Sanders decides to run for president again, but Weaver is expected to stay on as a senior adviser, President Trump's former personal attorney and fixer Michael Cohen said Thursday, he'll testify to a house committee next month about his work for Donald Trump, Colin has been sentenced to three years in prison for tax evasion. Bank fraud, campaign finance violations and lying to congress. After admitting. He broke federal campaign finance laws by paying hush money to women during the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign in coordination with an at the direction of President Trump. This comes as the Washington Post reports the White House has added seventeen new lawyers to its legal team in recent weeks. As President Trump and his inner circle brace for Robert Muller to complete his investigation. A key Republican lawmaker and close ally of President Trump defended white supremacy while sailing the diversity of the incoming lawmakers and an interview published Thursday, I wha congress member Steve king told the New York Times, quote, white nationalist, white supremacists. Western civilization. How did that language become offensive? Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization, unquote. Congressman king went on to criticize the freshman class of democratic lawmakers with its record number of women and people of color saying, quote, you could look over there, and the Democratic Party is no country for white men. King said and in Montgomery, Alabama, an African American transgender woman was murdered over the weekend. What the human rights campaign reports was the first known act of deadly violence against a trans person in the US. In two thousand nineteen thirty one year old and a Martin was found in her car and a roadside ditch with a fatal gunshot. No arrests have been made a sale you of Alabama spokesperson said quote Dona. Martin's death is Representative of the continuing danger that transgender individuals face simply for being themselves, and those are some of the headlines, this is democracy. Now democracy now dot org. The Warren peach report, I mean, he could Mun the Birmingham. Civil rights institute is continuing to come under fire after recinding a human rights award for the scholar civil rights activists and author Angela Davis in September the institute announced it would award Davis. The Fred L. Shuttles worth award named after the civil rights icon. But last Friday the institute voted to withdraw the award and canceled this year's gala event in February Davis is a Birmingham Alabama. Native who grew up in a neighborhood known as dynamite hill because it was bombed so frequently by the Ku Klux Klan, the institute rescinded the award days after the Birmingham holocaust education center sent a letter urging the board to reconsider honoring Davis, according to AOL dot com. The January second letter cited Davis's, quote, recent outspoken, support of the boycott divestment and sanctions campaign against Israel, which is very troubling. As targets the Jewish people excessively. The letter said it went on to state, we do not suggest that Israel should be immune from criticism, but Bedia signals gross human rights transgressions by other countries around the world and focuses solely on Israel, the world's only Jewish state unquote, others in the Birmingham area, criticized Davis for her support for the Black Panthers and communist party, the institute's decision to rescind the award has sparked outrage in Birmingham and around the. Country Birmingham mayor Randall would Finn said he was dismayed by the institute's decision, which he said came after quote protest from our local Jewish community and some of its allies unquote, the Birmingham City council voted unanimously to express support for Dr Davis as did the Birmingham school board. In addition more than three hundred fifty academics have signed onto a letter supporting Davis that was organized by Jewish voice for peace. The letter states in part, quote, the decision seems to stem from the misinform view that to advocate for Palestinian human rights, somehow offensive to the Jewish community, unquote. Meanwhile, three members of the Birmingham, civil rights institute have resigned including the chair, and I vice chair following calls for their ouster over the controversy. Angela Davis is now scheduled to attend an alternative event in Birmingham next month on the same night. She would. Have come for the shuttle's worth event, which is being organized by a coalition of grassroots groups well on Thursday, I spoke with Angela Davis and her first television interview since the controversy began she joined us from Oakland, California. I began by asking her to respond to the Birmingham. Civil rights institute decision to rescind the award honoring her with the Fred shuttles worth award win. The informed me that I had been chosen to be the twenty eighteen recipient of the Suttles with human rights award. I was quite honored. And I was looking forward to returning to. The place where I was born and raised by the way. I did know fridge huddles worth. And I went to school with his daughter Patricia. So it was it was quite an exciting development. Last saturday. I sa- Mayes shortly before they release the statement, the Birmingham, civil rights institute contacted me and simply read the statement to me when I. Made requests them to offer me more substantive reasons for the recission of the award. I was met with responses very abstract responses, such as it's a matter of public record. And so during the very brief own call. I really did not know what it was that caused them to take that position. It was only after I was informed that an article head appeared in the magazine southern Jewish life that basically detailed some of my activism around Palestinian human rights for Bedia against some of the policies and practices of of the state of Israel. I don't think they were aware that the response would be so immediate. And so overwhelmingly in favor of my receiving the award. I have heard from literally hundreds of individuals and organizations. Letters of being circulating circulated not only by Jewish voice. Appease. But by. Historians. I think it's American historical society. I may be wrong one of the professional organizations that. Include scholars who do work on civil rights. I have been contacted by many people in in Birmingham. Some of my oldest friends are involved in organizing the event the alternative event, which is scheduled to take place on the same day that the Birmingham civil rights institute event was a regionally take place. It's actually quite. Exciting to see the issue of of of of Palestinian Justice Justice for Palestine emerge as a. Topic of popular discourse we have attempted for so long to encourage a conversation like this. I don't know whether I enjoy be at the center of the controversy. I think I've had my share of controversies in my life. But I'm happy to assist in the process of encouraging more discussion on racism antisemitism on on unjustice for Palestine. I wanna turn to Birmingham. They Arango would Finn. Who said in a statement as I consider the controversy over the Birmingham, civil rights institute's decision to honor Dr Angela Davis with the freight. Shuttles worth human rights warden its subsequent decision to rescind that on her after protests from our local Jewish community and some of its allies by overriding feeling is one of dismay. Why am I dismay d-? I'm dismayed because this controversy might have been avoided entirely had been handled differently. I am dismayed because as has been the case throughout Birmingham's history. People of goodwill behaved reflexively rather than engaging in meaningful discourse over their differences and seeking. In common ground. I am dismayed because this controversy is playing out in a way that harks backward rather than forward that portrays us as the same Birmingham. We always have been rather than the one. We want to be I'm dismayed because I believe that we should be able to expect better from ourselves and from one another again, that's the those are the words of the mayor of Birmingham Aranda would fin the youngest mayor in more than one hundred twenty years who even has offered to facilitate a conversation, interestingly, he's on the board of the Birmingham civil rights museum. The as it's known the Birmingham civil rights institute, but was not included in that emergency phone caller, the executive phone call that was held last Friday in the vote that took place that a number of people are demanding notes be revealed about. That led to the announcement on Saturday. Angela Davis your thoughts on mayor would fins response will I will find it very exciting that Birmingham. Now has a mayor who is bold and outspoken and willing to take risk and who has certainly played an important role in generating the the protest against the decision of the board of the Birmingham civil rights institute. I am aware of the fact that he is an ex officio member of the board is Edessa woeful who is the person who has been over the years the driving force for the creation and the continuation of this institute. She was by the way my Sunday school teacher. I think she's about ten years older than I am. And she. She was an ex she's an ex officio member of the board and the chair America. I don't think that she was involved in in the discussion at all. So it's interesting that they are unwilling to reveal precisely what their process was. And that we are left to speculate about the influences that were responsible for this decision. But, but but let me say I think it's important not to generalize about the Jewish community in Birmingham. Just as I would suggest we not generalize about the the black community. There are people representing very different political positions in both communities. I am aware that there are progressive members of the Jewish community there. I know that Jewish voice for peace has contacts and in Birmingham. I. I think it's important as we engage in discussion around this controversy to be aware of the extent to which antisemitism can also be force here. I would just guard a gays catagorizing the Jewish community, and and Birmingham in such sweeping terms scholar and civil rights activists Angela Davis Birmingham, civil rights institute recently rescinded human rights award apparently due to her activism for Palestinian rights will return to Angela Davis in a minute. Shut up. What is your hip? Smith. Good head would get. Possession. Sean. The. Them. Piece by lethal, skills and charge amount sewer. This is democracy now democracy now or the Warren peace report. I'm Amy Goodman is we're return to my conversation with the scholar professor civil rights leader. Angela Davis the Birmingham civil rights institute recently rescinded a human rights award for her apparently due to her activism for Palestinian rights. This issue of your support for Palestine and Palestinians and the boycott divest sanctions movement. Can you talk about that? Would you describe yourself as a supporter of Bedia? And what does that mean up -solutely never concealed my support for the boycott sanctions movement? As a matter of fact, when Beatty was created in two thousand five I believe as a response to efforts by Palestinian civil society. Diety to take measures that are in the spirit of the civil rights movement. As a matter of fact, it has been characterized as a nonviolent f it by Palestinian civil society to challenge. The the the the Prussian that is so pervasive in occupied Palestine, I have been a supporter of Justice for Palestine almost as long as I can remember at least since my years in and college more recently, I have been perhaps. Attempting to guarantee along with many others that the issue of Justice for Palestine be placed on social Justice agendas. More broadly, and it is I think the fact that that those of us who have been doing this work over the last I would say seven or eight years nine years the last decade or so have been relatively successful. There are there is support for Justice for Palestine on college campuses across the country, particularly black student formations have embraced of this. 'cause we know that and twenty fourteen when the Ferguson uprising took place when the Ferguson protests that erupted it was Palestinian activists who were the first to express. Solidarity and as such help to help to develop a global solidarity movement for black lives matter. So I I I think that's a Canada relation of the media's as a. As a way of knowledge ING, the South African the boycott against South African apartheid and using using those strategies within the current situation is is absolutely accurate. So I have been yes, I've been involved in the effort to encourage professional organizations. I'm a member of the American studies association ASA was one of the first professional organizations to develop a resolution supporting the boycott the national women's studies association. I've been involved actually in many different contexts to help incorporate to the a call for Justice for Palestine in our social Justice agendas. More broadly. And of course, you're at the two thousand fifteen. Vuk freedom is a constant struggle. Ferguson Palestine and the foundations of a movement. I wanted to read more from the letter from the Birmingham holocaust education center to the Birmingham. Civil rights institute. They said we don't suggest Israel should be immune from criticism, but Bedia ignores gross human rights transgressions by other countries around the world and focuses solely on Israel, the world's only Jewish state. The Reverend Martin Luther King junior said when people criticize Zionists, they mean Jews, you are talking antisemitism. They said, quoting Dr king, can you respond to this? Angela davis. Well, first of all as I pointed out to Bedia emerged from Palestinian civil society. And its purpose is precisely to focus on Israel, just as the boycott against South African apartheid was focused on the South African apartheid state. So the first. Could assist them they propose. I don't think is valid at all. Dr king may have made that a statement indicating that people when people could assize Zion is they criticizing dues at a particular moment in history. But I am certain that if he were alive today, he would he would point out that that Justice is indivisible is a matter of fact, he argued that for the indivisibility of Justice Justice, anywhere. He wrote is an assault to Justice everywhere. So I'm quite certain that that that he would not remain silent on the question of the ocupation the continued occupation of Palestine the. Agregation that recalls the segregation in South Africa and the segregation in the southern states doing the pre civil rights era, and I'm certain that he would identify with Palestinian activists who have taken up strategies developed by the US civil rights movement, for example, of the Palestinian freedom riders who were inspired by the freedom writers of the civil rights era in attempting to protest the segregation of highways of thoroughfares that lead from one settlement to another settlement and from which Palestinians of barred. Jaja the trip that I made to Palestine in twenty eleven with a delegation of women of color and indigenous feminists was revelatory in a way that I had never expected. I thought that I was aware of the conditions and occupied Palestine, but when I visited Roane and actually saw signs that barred Palestinian automobiles and Palestinian pedestrians from certain streets. My response was segregation in Alabama did not did not bar black people from the thoroughfares. So in many ways, it it seemed to me to be even worse than the segregation of my childhood. I think the world needs to speak out against these. Conditions. Of course, as you pointed out, the Jewish community is not monolithic Jewish voice for peace. Condemned. The decision by the Birmingham, civil rights institute over three hundred fifty academics across the country signed onto the JV academic letter in support of Angela Davis. The letter reads, quote, the cancelling of this award by the Birmingham. Civil rights institute is unjust, insulting and it'll conceived especially because it's likely premised on professor Davis's longstanding support for Palestinian human rights. The decision seems to stem from misinform view that to advocate for Palestinian human rights is somehow offensive to the Jewish community. The letter goes on to state as a Jewish organization dedicated to Justice, dignity and quality for all people in Palestine Israel. We share professor Davis's visionary commitment to the indivisibility of Justice and believe we are all responsible for pursuing social Justice for whole human beings, without exception, which includes pursue. Social Justice for Palestinians. Professor davis. You're talking about not only what happened with the cancelling of the award to you. But then the organizing that's taken place around both the issue and in support of you, you'll quite exciting. As a as as I said. The issue of of Palestinian human rights and its relation to the struggle for civil rights for people of African descent in this country is finally being discussed in an open way. And I'm I'm quite excited. That grassroots activists local organizations established figures and the Birmingham community professionals people who were involved in the civil rights movement over a half century ago of all come together to try to make the point that the board of the Birmingham. Civil rights institute does not represent the sentiment of people. In Birmingham, Alabama. And I am looking forward to returning to Birmingham on February sixteenth and participating in a range of events that are being organized by activists on the ground. There. Go to a controversy that happened. Well, a few months before you about CNN contributor. Well, former CNN contributor and temple university. Professor Marc Lamont hill who was recently fired by CNN forgiving, a speech at the United Nations, supporting Palestinian rights and November CNN dropped him as a commentator after conservatives and pro Israel groups such as the Anti-Defamation League, condemned his comments, calling them anti semitic. Well, last month one Gonzales, and I spoke to Marc Lamont hill about his firing specifically calling or speaking to my believe that a one state solution is the most fair just and workable possibility right now, I did call for a free Palestine, and once as Lucien for me is the way to do that many people responded, however, and we're frustrated by that or or said that I was secretly dog whistling for violence. I found that a bit hard to. Aleve. There's absolutely a long tradition of black support for Palestinians long support of black internationalism. And if we're going to be honest, there has been a long deep support of African Americans and black throughout the Aspro for the state of Israel. So we can't ignore that history either. But it's a long complicated story. But I think in the last fifty one years I would say since the day war we've seen the black left for sure engage in a kind of international them that looks for solidarity. Not just in Palestine. But with a movement in Africa in Latin America and attempt to really sure up a base and a community of freedom fighters that understand any quality and injustice, not local. But it's a transnational experience in order to redress any problems. We have we have to look internationally. That's Malcolm X, attempting to do that's Martin king was doing at the end of his life. That's what the Black Panthers were doing. And we look at current MU. Movements like black lives matter. One of the first things that I found impressive of the black lives matter movement was affected. They were looking internationally. That's temple university. Professor Marc Lamont hill who remains professor at temple. But was fired by CNN. He tweeted on Monday, this is shameful. I stand with my dear sister, and friend. Angela Davis responding to the recinding of the award for you. Professor davis. Your thoughts on this kind of pressure being brought on well people like Marc Lamont hill will. Absolutely shameful for CNN to capitulate to pressure and fire. Marc Lamont hill. He was speaking at an event takes place every year. At the United Nations on Palestine solidarity day. So are they suggesting that they will attack? Everyone who speaks at the UN on Palestine solidarity under the guise that they are anti semitic. I think it's time for a conversation on what constitutes antisemitism. The relationship between antisemitism, and racism and the difference between critiques of the state of Israel critiques of the occupation of Palestine. And anti semitism, of course, of all of us reserve, the right to criticize the the the United States of America the government, especially doing this period. No one would argue that by criticizing the government. We could've sizing all of the people of the US as a matter of fact, I think is very important to point out that there is a significant resistance among Jewish citizens of Israel and side, Israel when I. Visited Palestine and Israel in twenty eleven. I had the opportunity to speak with Jewish activists who were opposed to the occupation of Palestine. I think that. With a tax on people like Marc Lamont hill and the organizers of the women's March. So it seems as if there may be an effort to prevent black solidarity with with Palestine, I I don't. Subscribed to conspiracy theories. But it seems as if we're witnessing of consistent attack on particularly radical black activists who are encouraging international solidarity with many struggles in other places, but especially with the Palestinians, scholar and human rights activists. Angela Davis daughter of Birmingham. Doctor Davis is a professor emeritus at the university of California. Santa Cruz will continue with my conversation with her in a minute. Down Birmingham way down south Dixie land. I thought that I would stop awhile. Take a vacation southern. Got southern hospitality. Down there and a southern hospital. The sun said welcome in on governor Wallison Rin tin thin. Is that come along and watch the fights. While we feed our dogs on civil rights. Now, don't get us wrong. Some of our best negroes are friends Birmingham jam by phillix. This is democracy. Now democracy now dot org. The Warren peace report, I'm Amy Goodman, as return to my conversation with Angela Davis, the scholar human rights activists. Former Black Panther for more than four decades. Davis has been one of the most influential activists and intellectuals in the United States, and I kind of the black liberation movement. Angela Davis was set to receive the prestigious Fred L. Shuttles worth award from the Birmingham civil rights institute. But on Friday, the board voted to rescind the award during our conversation. Angela Davis talked about anti semitism was this. Ideological of afoot to equate anti anti semitism with. Well. With much-needed critiques of the policies and practices of the state of Israel and the expressions of solidarity with the Palestinian people should be revealed for for for for what it is. And I am I'm hoping that we will hear more. Jewish people speaking out. I know that Jewish voice for peace has done an amazing job of the less peer yet. And I've done work with JVP. But I think this is a period when as as Jews will the first white people to step up during the civil rights era to to speak out against racism. I think that we we need to we need to engage in the kind of conversation that will reveal the true, meaning of antisemitism and help us to extricate ourselves from this mccarthyite effort to equate boycott strategies, and solidarity strategies with antisemitism. I should say that. I know that previous recipients of the federal the Fred shuttles worth human rights award ah, very angry about what is happened. I received a call from Danny Glover, I received a call from Harry Belafonte, both of whom indicated that they will be contacting the Birmingham, civil rights institute, an an and protests. I think these protests have to involve serious conversations about the meaning of antisemitism, and an how to this particular late charges of and anti semitism from civil rights and human rights strategies that are designed to protect the people of Palestine ask you about the proposed combat ING. VDI act which was included in the first Senate Bill of this new session, the legislation aimed to prevent opposition to these rarely government by allowing state and local governments to sanction any US companies which are engaged in a boycott against Israel the Bill failed to pass earlier this week. Amidst the government shutdown newly sworn in Palestinian American Congress member Shida to leave of Michigan criticized the Bill under mockery. Now this week agree with Senator Sanders ACLU and others. See this not as a see this as anti beach anti first amendment Bill. The fact that we have our senators that right now could be voting on opening up our government. They have the bills in their hands are voting on this. That's distracting us from what is our focus, which is the American people, and I can tell you looking at this push among even just the state's saying that. You will not employ someone that doesn't sign some sort of allegiance to say that they will not boycott another country. It is literally at the core. Right. There is literally an attack on our constitution on our one of the most critical rights that we have in our country is freedom of speech. I cannot imagine our country not having the right to economic boycott think about. Alabama Montgomery think about McGovern Alabama and all around the country this rights movement, that's ver- sheet it to leave the first Palestinian American woman in congress one of two Muslim women along with Ilhan, Omar part of the most diverse congress that has been voted in in the history of the United States more than hundred women serving in the new one hundred sixteenth congress of the United States your response. Professor Davis will excited to see the new congress. And of course, very happy that the Senate Bill Senate Bill one did not pass. However, I think it should be pointed out that this is not going to be the last we hear about this act to combat Bedia. Bedia? It reminds me of the McCarthy era. The effort to require people to ineffective sign loyalty oaths that they that they will not engage in the boycott of the state of Israel. I'm trying to imagine. How that might have played out doing the era of the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. If if people in as many states have have passed these acts of would have been required to agree not to advocate or engage in participate in the boycott of South Africa. This is this is absolutely unconstitutional. And it it hearts back to a period of our history. Which many of us thought we had surpassed. But it also indicates how important it is to engage in the kinds of conversations and struggles that will enlightened people as to the implications of such measures the. Award. You were set to receive is named after the civil rights icon, Reverend Fred shuttles worth who led the struggle in Birmingham, Alabama to end segregation. When he died in two thousand eleven the civil rights leader and Georgia congressman John Lewis said quote, when others did not have the courage to stand up, speak up and speak out. Fred shuttles worth put all he had on the line to end segregation in Birmingham in the state of Alabama. This is Fred shuttles worth talking about the immediate visceral danger. He encountered is one of the leaders of the civil rights movement conclude to brew me in the him Romeo away. But you don't queue leaves. You don't hear the did you kill the person would God save me because he had to have to go through a spectacular. Demonstration of his pile to live in Birmingham. And wanted tech said to me say if I were you get out of town quick kid. I also you're not me, and you go back and tell your plan brother that if God could save me through this. I'm here for the duration at warzone. That was Fred shuttles worth civil rights icon. His biographer Andrew Manis softer of a fire. You can't put out and professor of history at middle Georgia State University. And making has said since you're award was rescinded. I can't even imagine. Fred shuttles worth hesitating for a moment honor. Angela Davis this way, Fred was willing to work with anybody, regardless of their politics, if they were on the side of freedom as soon as possible equality as soon as possible, he was on board with them, unquote. As you listen to Fred shuttles worth you knew Reverend. Shuttles worth. Oh. Yes. Reverend sons worth was the first really rebel leader. Doing the period. I was growing up in Birmingham. I met him. I went to school with his daughter. I remember when his house was bombed. And I also remember that oftentimes he was a alone voice eventually people of smoke out and supported him. But he was courageous. And as the clip from a discussion with him, you just played indicates. Nobody could turn him around. Nobody could turn him around. And I I was quite proud to have been often the Fred shuttles worth human rights award, which of course, was promptly withdrew. Sean. But I. I think that friendship fourth continues to inspire. People who are struggling for freedom freedom, not only for black people, not only the struggle against racism, but in all struggles for Justice for against misogyny against homophobia for economic rights for for global human rights. Well, let me ask you professor Davis that top three members of the Birmingham. Civil rights institute. Have now resigned over this decision to throw you out. And this is you know, as the many in the community are demanding that the leadership resign if this were to be re offered to you to honor you in the name of Fred shuttles worth. Would you accept that honor? Birmingham. Civil rights institute. Not only does me an apology personally, but should apologize to. Okay. People who stand on the side of Justice should apologize to all people who believe that Justice is indivisible. This was not primarily an assault against me as an individual. It was an assault against. A whole generation of activists who have come to recognize how important internationalism is. And in the words of Dr king as I pointed out earlier injustice anywhere is an assault to Justice everywhere. So for the time being I. I would hope that they are considering the possibility of such a broad apology to people of four this recision was an affront everywhere. Alangelo, dave. Thank you so much for joining us. And I want to wish you an early happy seventy fifth birthday as you celebrate. Thanks. In which Dr Angela Davis, the scholar and human rights activists, professor emeritus at the university of California Santa Cruz, author of many books, including freedom is a constant struggle. Ferguson Palestine and the foundations of movement for more than four decades. Dr Davis has been one of the most influential activists and intellectuals in the United States and icon of the black liberation movement. Last Friday, the Birmingham, civil rights institute rescinded a human rights award for her and cancelled its February sixteenth gala altogether. But Dr Davis still plans to go to Birmingham her hometown on that date for an alternative event organized by members of the community who are outraged by the institute's decision. Visit democracy now dot org to see our our long special Angela Davis where she talks about how a wreath a Franklin offer to post bail for her and much more naming thanks for joining.

Dr Angela Davis Birmingham Civil rights institute Birmingham civil rights instit United States Israel Palestine President Trump Palestine Reverend Fred shuttles congress Alabama president United Nations Birmingham City council Birmingham civil rights museum US Senate professor
S2E6: Walk Hard

Citizen Critic

52:12 min | 1 year ago

S2E6: Walk Hard

"It's a basic truth. People need each other. It's why Penn Fed. Credit Unions I members joined together for a better financial future for eighty five years. We've been there for our members and communities and we're here for you today. We can help you bridge a financial gap. Save wisely. Make confident decisions with your money. We know we are always stronger and better together. That's why we hope you'll join us. Membership is open to everyone. Apply today, Panther Dot Org insured by NCUA. Yes obviously fresh apply cast. What hip hop and puppet takes connect. Between. Salty should be less than making topics. We suggest. Address when we talk wittig Guest Oak Nightingale. Frank Goo rocket with the best. GOBSMACK y'all stuff that debate check podcast are hard. Reputations listen to waiting on reparations on the iheartradio. APP Apple podcasts are every that your podcasts. Citizen critic is a production of iheartradio and double Elvis. That's not what I I love Corn I love Kansas. I love. I love cans. I even said. Lawrence Kansas! That's on their license plates. Coin I love Kansas. This episode of Citizen Greg. A self proclaimed comedy. Expert weighs in on walk hard the Dewey Cox Story. A couple of yelp reviewers reveal that the Johnny Cash Museum and a real problem with children. And One woman goes to great lengths to gain access to the legendary Sun Studios. You don't want no part of this shit. This is citizen critic. Welcome to this episode of citizen critic. I'm Joost Scott Scotch events and I'm the other Guy Greg calmly. I saw. Twitter told me you were watching Aquaman the other day I went and saw that in the theater. I was watching. Didn't watched. Maybe five minutes tops is wow. Like a fist looks bad. Wow, yeah! I mean. It was. Like. I probably told you it was good. Because like I enjoyed the shit out of it, but I was also kinda drunk around Christmas in the theater with my brother-in-law was having a great time. Yeah, big explosions! The beginning was just so goofy. And this is coming from somebody who just watched the entire, fast and furious franchise. That is top to bottom. You should get some sort of degree for that way. That is unbelievable to me that you committed the time. People have gotten PhD's for less. Yeah, I really I really put in the effort you put. Effort, and you sequenced it differently like for some reason you don't have to explain it to me again, because no it. Burns a little of my solo every time. You skipped over Tokyo. Draft and then went back to it. Exactly which I think is that's a lot about you have a PhD. Furious minimally you. Have you have a masters in Vin diesel that's. Yeah maybe? You have a masters in fact. Dr, in diesel. Today. We're GONNA talk about walk hard. The Dewey Cox Story, Yeah, wonderful comedy. It is a wonderful comedy bombed at the box office did it I didn't. I mean I. Guess It's I. Don't ever go to see any of those movies in the theater. I won't see comedies in theaters. Now no I see like Oklahoma. Or Star Wars movies. I mean like big block like I'm with you I I'll. I'll go to comedies in the future. If there isn't one of those movies, playing does not like one of those that I wanna see. Yeah I. Mean it used to be like if I just wanted popcorn, I'd be. No, but this movie I loved this movie I. Think it's so funny 'cause it did. Come right on the heels of walk the line. Yeah, it was pretty soon after both. Walk the line. and. Ray, yeah, this. This takes a little bit from, both it's obviously much more johnny cash. But. It's kind of just sending a both style, the style of both movies. But I love, walk the line. I love with its when I discovered. Why didn't discover it then? I was just like fucking with. She's in so many movies and it's like it's only later in life. It's like I fucking like everything that reese witherspoon. Does everything every goddamn movie? She's in I. Don't care if it's a sweet home Alabama. Can Love. That movie I never watched it. So. Yeah, back to walk hard. Yeah I love I I you. Know I'm a sucker for all of those bio-pics, especially those to raise and. Walk the line or both very well done yeah! The music in both is really good and the music and walk hard. The music and walk heart is asking. Is Shocking how good the music is a walk hard now. I don't even know if you know this, but our friend Mike Viola wrote. Along with there's multiple contributors, but my guys who wrote a lot of the music and great stand. This saw the performance. Great John C Reilly's. Performance music inches musically is fucking great. Yeah, he sings all those songs. Oh I didn't know that Yeah I. Listen I was listening to the soundtrack like vacation listening to a by the pool. Why wouldn't you? Yeah, but. Did Not. Do well, but it has become. A cult classic and it's on. It's on cable all the time. Those people would argue against apparently co classic means. It's very special to some people. So if they don't think it's a called classic, you're not allowed. It's not. It's not a classic. What do you mean? Like, IMDB people are just like everyone says. This is a classic, but you know it's not an here's why. Yeah, but you're not part of the cult. That's what I call, too. So point like. Coke classic is like you know like diagnosing something. It's not you know it's I it is you don't get to say. Yeah Dumb Shit It's funny. I read like an oral history of this movie piece that was written not long ago I don't. You you do have some free time. Is. The Guy Fucking. How many hours of Nintendo switch have you been playing? I'm just saying I mean. That's the switch that's that's food for the brain. This this is a film that I love. Yeah, of course I'm going to. Read the oral history when it pops up in my face. Look for the written word, it's wasn't going to the library. It wasn't my facebook feed. I was like yes. I do WANNA. Read the oral history of Walk Card. I didn't even know that. Microfiche. The, history. Oral history is basically just an article where they just there's there's like an intro paragraph, and then it's just quotes from people involved in the making of the movie. Oh, I get it I, got so they? They look back on it and say Oh yeah. This is what was going on and Johnny Riley is like. You know I you know. I approach this really seriously like I. I said this is a great movie I. Don't know if I was busy I. Wasn't sure if I could do it, but I was like if somebody's GonNa do this. It should be me. Because I. Was Right I can't think of anybody else. Who has who is equipped? As I am to do this because like he could sit down comedy. Obviously, he's a great actor he can. Sing and play. like yeah, he's like you know. It might sound kind of egotistical, but now I'm in fucking right. It's truthful. Great imagine could could could do that. Do we you have me. Let me say this. I just in in preparation for this was looking at some. Johnny Johnny cash stuff, and as we know from the movie and. that his his brother was. killed. On a table saw right at his job, he had like a job disappeared. Yeah. And it says that he was nearly cut in half, and now here's the kicker died from his injuries a week later. Oh, yeah. Cry Nearly cut in half and live for a week. fucking now that is off, yeah. I mean I. Guess It was nearly cut in half. You can see how that might have affected young. Johnny Cash Right. If, you're nearly cut off, why would they leave the bottom half attached? Just sort sorta seems like flesh waiting to Rod. A rule of thumb on. Yeah, how much of your body he's! He's fifty four percent. CUT IN HALF I. don't I don't think we should keep the lower? Here's the rule of thumb on that. If you have thumbs, they're gonNA. Keep the whole body. That's the rule of thumb at seems a bit arbitrary. See what happens. Yeah, all right well. Let's go to some reviews. For! Today's feature presentation. Walk hard the Dewey Cox, story. So. We have some reviews here. This movie did pretty well on rotten tomatoes. Seventy four percent I think that's the cold classic of a couple of quick excerpts from pro reviews from the pros cinna passion. For Nando F- Croce. Croce from? From from Paseo on. I am nine low of curled shape from Senate Paseo hone. Sounds like a cinnamon desert. It's everything I want out of my movie reviews cinna passion flavored. Sounds you want the Senate passion, drizzle or I'll have a scoop. A Tutti fruity a scoop of Santa Passion. FERINAND OFF CROCE says. Like the drunk guy who squeezes your arm and tells you the same joke over and over until you laugh God. Damn you laugh! It's that's a little specific. Yeah, I feel like he might be talking like his partner. He's just like. When you get drunk, you get very specific about movies. Yes, Ted, please stop. Squeezing my arm and screaming at me to laugh, a little a passion from you look, I could take it down a notch, yeah! other one from L. A. Weekly Jim, Ridley says. Walk hard blimps soft. I, don't know. How do you write something like that and not feel like you're going. Yeah, yeah, you're right that sentence and you think job well done, yeah! Work And I gotTA BE HONEST LIMP softly. Sounds great to I'd watch that that should be the art Garfunkel Bio. Pic Art Garfunkel limp softly the art Garfunkel Story. Some some user reviews mail. Including some from letterbox, this one's a four star review by Brad Pitt Brad. Oh, I see what did I'll explain it to you? Leader Greg. This guy says. He has a name Scott. Brad Pitt Says No. Required viewing for any fucking idiot, who wants to make another unnecessary cookie cutter music bio big for whatever Goddamn dumb ass reason if that seems pointed, it is a Oh. I love that he reacts to his own. A Oh yeah, he does he because. It's great to be your own Ed McMahon are here's a one star. Other end of the spectrum. Watched by arise, underscore therefore. This sounds might might be already Garfunkel. Arise therefore. I bet you are. Horrible over a vegetable dip at a party. Somebody who corners you at a party to talk about the novel that they're writing. Arise therefore says this shit lost me early on Johnny. Cash's brother died after an accident with a table saw an traumatized johnny for the rest of his life. That's funny. Personally yeah too soon. He died in the thirties he did was break. Call me oversensitive whatever, but that doesn't seem like comedy material to me you but I guess this movie thinks otherwise was movie. Fuck! Fuck. Yeah this might make you oversensitive. The Johnny Cash didn't come out with a statement. After walk hard came out so just fucking hacks. For the record I'm not pro kids cutting themselves and. Tables up. One and a half stars by red is my. This guy loves the BMX bike movie. Thing. Rad Is. My thing says I was very drunk. Watching this in to get wage you seriously or so, I've been informed. And Review. This is my favorite. It's. of You of themselves than it is of the movie I was very drunk watching. and. This is an apology to their friends that they were watching the movie. Yeah or so? I've been informed to my loved ones. I'd like to address you all one by one. Son I know that you who look up to me. And I apologized for the way I react to. Just, drunk and shirtless screaming at the TV. From I, M D, The Internet's own movie database Tim. Dash Eight, four nine, putting no effort into your screen name no! One at a ten overrated and under delivered. I've read reviews stating that this movie is funny or that. People who don't find it funny are missing the point. Not True as Enjoys all comedy from parody too Raunchy to romantic. Phases of comedy. Yeah, those are the kinds of comedy like of the evolutionary chart. And you know what if you don't enjoy wildcard? You don't enjoy all comedy. This. Comedy wait which category it's not romantic carrots, PARROT Says definitely parody and has even performed at some open mic so boy. Oh, no buckle in. I completely disagree with people who say this movie has any cinematic merit, so so you know that I know I went and put my name on a list as someone who enjoys all comedy and has performed at open mic Almaty including parody. Rom coms Yeah Mozilla. parody Raunchy and her. Inch. There's gotta be more categories of comedies. I've never like legitimately tried to use the word Raunchy. No! Either as a description of something. It's for me. It's more aspirational like I wish there was more raunchy things in my life. Not There's nothing wrong Jameh Meraj. That's Raunchy like the seventies. Yeah, the Seventies. Zuber Russia. Good old ranch calms. I love comes I love Ron Johnson. Even know what movies like what falls into that category. It is an empty bucket. My aunt shared. Like. Rodney dangerfield like easy money. More like porkies. Animal House may be. That Super Specific Raunchy meatballs. Now those meatballs three three. Ronge? I was hopeful that the movie would be a gut buster. Who are not an expert on comedy am sorry Tim. Raunchy and gut buster goes into a comedy. Movie is just like I hope it's not a gut buster. 'cause I still have stitches. My! Gastric bypass. Yeah. The basis of my Lawsuit Against Twentieth Century Fox. You made a gut busting movie. I am my gut. or at the very least a cult classic, it was neither. Co classics define themselves they they grow. It's not yet. And you don't get to say no. I think we've again stumbled into a gene Shalit review I was hopeful it would be a gut buster, or at the very least Rashi. It was dry slow. Gratuitous. Describing bad sex. It's slow gratuitous. And unlike other parodies was sorely lacking in biting wit or cleverness, twenty minutes into the movie I, thought to myself, quote. All Right? It's got to start getting better soon the running out of time and quote. Unquote himself. Just put like a thought bubble into is. and. That was like A. Harrowing things are to self. Thanks for recounting that conversation. You had in your own mind. They're running out of time. Was Twenty minutes in. Twenty minutes in. They're running out. This guy has anxiety problems. That's what you're worried about. Man Like I wouldn't recommend this movie. No Shit unless you have a couple of hours to kill and don't put a high premium on your time. Flow I don't actually. I watched all of the fast and furious movie. Yeah, I have I. Do not value my name at all. Here's one more from IMDB. One at a ten. An absolute waste of time walked out to sea. I am legend. Thank you for being so specific I hope we get a review. That does this turn into a I am legend review. Let's see this reviewer is called. Man by which I assume he means the ultimate man by which I assume. He means the last man on Earth by which I assume he means. I am legend. Ultimate than ultimate. I get to rethink. My username. I gotta be penalty in the second to last man. This movie is God awful. It is a failed attempt at making fun of walk the line and contains no substance, but rather just quote shock value. Well! How do you know you walked out I? Use? I am legend in its entirety. On none of this movie. Everything said done, and shown is simply for shock value and has no place in the story line. What, what's the story line aside from everything that's. Said done and shown. Yeah, he didn't do the work, but he felt compelled to review the movie. He didn't see either one of those movies if you ask me. Let's go find his review of I am Legend A bad movie Internet itself. I've seen that one. Yeah me, too. I love the movie and You love that movie I. Don't Love It, but I like it. I I watch it. It was it was stop saying you love things. I know I know I'm I'm. Great I'm like a fucking late age. All of a sudden I love everything. Movies man. Oh, it's a coup. Within the first thirty minutes there were multitudes of the F bomb at unnecessary times. Ridiculous references to marijuana and cocaine naked men walking around flaccid penis displayed on the screen for five seconds. Five seconds is second. Time that he was like. Yeah one one thousand. Two. So. Five seconds of Flaccid Penis, what's the point of that? Moore What's the point five seconds? At. What point does it become a non flaccid? And five seconds. I Dunno pause. My wrote this particular theater. You know you give me the before picture and I. There's nothing I can do with it. What am I supposed to use my imagination? So angry. It's simply a movie to watch. If you want to see a director attempt to make his crowd shocked, and not for someone looking for a good movie, not for someone looking for hard core porn. I walked out thirty minutes into this movie. And I saw I, am legend such a good decision. Save your money and see something else. Specifically I am legend. Does finding a job feel like the hardest job ever with linked in learning. You can take a course like ten ways to stay motivated while job hunting one way is to create a vision board. It'll be there for you. Reminding you wire looking and what's most important. Keep learning to land your next job. Get this course and thousands more top by industry experts free for one month at Lincoln learning dot com slash trial linked in learning. We're in it together. Working from home. Conference Calls On Me John with everything. We have going on right now. It's never been more important at the sleep. We need quality. Sleep is a natural immune booster, and only the sleep number three sixty smart beds, sensitive movements at automatically adjusts your covered support on both sides your sleep number setting so all those other things we're doing to stay healthy and happy well they'll work better to. And now during the lowest prices of the season, the queen's sleep number three, sixty, four, only twelve, hundred nine save four hundred dollars, only for a limited time to learn more go to sleepnumber dot com. Citizen critic Reviews Greg. This is really honing in on a johnny cash element. Yeah, let's let's drill down on the Johnny cash bonus of it all the Johnny Cash Museum and cafe. I loved it. There's a cafe by the way. A CAFE! Museum wasn't enough. It's. Some refreshments. By just! Fair Stephanie Wheeler rates this a one out of five stars of the museum. Yeah, she says we went into the museum and I literally had shirts in my hands to purchase while I was continuing to shop. My kids tried to use the restroom and the manager Megan Let them through and golf. They had bought something. If a nine year old kid comes up doing. Is this like continue your bathroom? Yeah. The answer's Yes who knows maybe her. Kids are full grown adults your kids. Think? They're just trying to boot up some heroin. Okay can I use your bathroom? My Mom's got. She's walking around with. My derelict son needs to use your bathroom. Is that all right? Do you also have a thick elastic band? Use. Toilet. Plastic spoon that I could do. Do so lighters. I'll take a lighter. To suvaini spoon. Memorial pay for it. She's got the shirts. Megan We went over. In told her we were buying merchandise, and still she wouldn't let the kids back to the restroom and was very rude about it. Well the just by it. Are you going to buy it? I assure you I'm holding the items I'm going to buy. Yeah, sounds like you gonNA. Pull in over on. Megan, why don't you buy one now? faming wonder why you wouldn. The sheriff's turned into a bathroom hostage. The? Kids are GonNA themselves credit card. That my fucking restaurant right now. For the record, you're holding fourteen of the same t shirt. So I don't. Don't think you're being honest you didn't. You didn't think through I. Don't think y'all to being honest. y'All, WANNA to. Needless to say, we put everything back and bought our stuff elsewhere where. Where did you buy? You bought abundant? Johnny cash stuff not at the Johnny Cash Museum because I wouldn't let your weird kids you. Went down to the piggly-wiggly and bought some Johnny. Cash it there. and honestly like her kids must have been like just by fucking Shit like if they had to go to. The bathroom is like no OUGHTA principle. You let my kids in that bathroom. Kid is just holding it in as fierce as again kit. Tease. They're cracking under the effort the whole their. Mom by the teacher got. The fucking. Because the beginning of this review I thought I thought she wrote she wrote I literally had shirts in my hands at I. I thought it said I literally had shits in my hands go. Well. She loved. Present! Thanks a lot. I literally had shits in my hands when I started with shirts in my hands. I ended with shits in my hands. Meghan. What does stand to take where you're like you're going to go? Put all the merchandise back and be like we're going to buy our johnny cash merchandise. Summer I spent thirty five minutes putting their shit bag on the shelves. Folding it putting it on the Hanger said he was pretty polite for some just got. To by Meghan or kids are like mom fucking serious. You're folding the shorts. Meghan where y'all put these hats. I'll be there in a minute salmon. I will not give mega satisfaction of restocking these items herself. You think I'm going to drop this shit. Right on the camera and split. Another thing come in Meghan. This place is going to be neater when I leave them when I come in. Where's your swiffer? Where's your? At. You good dust bunnies in the corner. Abortions! I am dying. Remember this kerfuffle started with? I'm going to Shit my pants. I'M GONNA. Take a stand with my kids, colon and bladder right here. Let's see what happens your stores GonNa Look Like Gallagher Show. The watermelon was spoilt. Sweating. The worst hill to die on. All right. Sarah, says one five stars. If you want to waste your hard earned money on a business that has zero regard for human life. Zero regard for human life wow. Like if Hitler Diner I mean then you could say zero regard. WanNa waste your hard earned money on a place that proposes a final solution. I think you're you're using Megan's apathy with the zero regard for life. Your Comfort is not a regard for human life. No, then waste your money here. My husband and I came into town to visit friends and decided to visit the museum. We are huge johnny cash fans. Instead of the friends were like. Let's go. See the Johnny Cash, museum and or cafe. Should we go see? Kevin and Margaret or Go Johnny Cash Museum. Kevin Makes Pretty Shit Tuna Melt. We entered to a very busy room as it was rainy outside. That's why people go to the Johnny. Cash Museum for for shelter? It's raining and the only place. That was Ruth Johnny Casimir. Quick to the Johnny Cash. It's seven miles away, just go. You should buy an umbrella. It's the only place they sell them. Johnny Cash Commemorative Umbrellas. Men In black umbrella. I do not recommend coming on a rainy day. Again very crowded. I mean. Why would you recommend doing a tourist attraction on a rainy day? Like I want to go to a place where everyone smells like a wet dog, yeah. Hey only you know i. only go to the loof on rainy days. It's wet French. People Jazz. That is a bunch of wet Frenchman that is sex. Move, YOU'RE GONNA. gave her a wet Frenchman. clorox wipes to get through that one. We waited in line for a while before we actually stepped foot into the actual museum, but shortly after we stepped in my nine week, old started crying really hard. Wife. Bring it on Rye nine week. Old Baby Number one out of the house. You took a nine week old to the newborn baby. Yeah, to visit friends from so you're going out of town. Yes you're traveling and then you're going on a rainy day to the Johnny. Cash, museum. Wow showed up at our friends house. I was Crowning Sarah We. Didn't have a nine week old. You're missing the point. We did not have a nine week. Old Only left the house. This was a cross country trip we took. Nine gold started crying really hard weird. Yeah? In a crowded room with a bunch of people in sounds that. Cash Of! Course, my natural response was to turn around and leave good. The good thing you've said fighter flight type situation there. The Rude Lady, taking tickets yelled at me and told me I couldn't leave. Couldn't leave on. No I'm sorry. I couldn't leave that way. She was going out the wrong way. I thought that the lady was in. Grave. Yeah, that's it! You dug it. You y'all are not leaving this story. We're going to see that baby turned ten. y'All give me that baby I'm GONNA. Take on the. As I. Get this tour. Teething won't be teasing for months. I'm not only a certified tour. Guide certified wet nurse. y'All. Just hand me that baby. Can now go out that way. Give it to you. Give Up. Price using that door one baby. She says because of the Fire Code. Made sense whatsoever well. It's fire code. I'm sure she would have. Let you leave another way so. She told me I needed to make my way through the crowded museum with my husband and our baby stroller. Well you let her take the payment. She says it was a nightmare. What! Biggest, this museum. It's not big. Small. I walked along slowly, apologizing to the hundreds of customers about my not. Calling foul. Everyone I'm sorry for my baby. Sorry for my did I know I should not have brought a newborn baby. I'm sorry. Have you seen the umbilical cord or placenta because I had it at the beginning. that. Baby has no face now y'all to call. We just haven't cleaned off the call yet. I ended up leaving with the baby and my husband's specifying. We figured you kept your husband. I abandoned my and maybe and sprinted. I'm surprised. The baby made it. Through my baby, Meghan sprinted through the news. Magazines like why is it so slick? Ended up leaving with the baby, and my husband walked through the museum as quickly as possible with the stroller since they wouldn't let him leave wouldn't let him leave through the entrance either husband. Fire Code. Why would they make sure him and not you baby? Did you just get a text from Jan Rutta? John and I are watching a show on Amazon called forty. One and Bizarro Greg is in it your British. Oh my God. It looks just like you. Know then. That's not OK. Jarring. I'm GONNA put this. On our instagram. My God! I'm not okay with that fucking crazy. I'm glad that was that was during the episode. Amazing my husband asked if we could enter, so I could at least see the museum since we pay twenty dollars per person and twenty two barking Holy Shit and they rudely told him quote not a chance. They were reveling in being shooter. You bought a human whose age is identified in weeks into the fucking museum. Yeah, YOU FORFEIT! You don't get to go through I. Wonder if they charged twenty dollars for the nine week old baby. Or just ten, so I went back inside to ask for a refund, and before I could even open my mouth. The Guy at the front desk said no way. SAR coming. When I told her about being treated rudely by the associated the entrance, she not wants apologized. She responded with. Oh. I love that. You're associate at the enter, and she's like okay. Is that right? You're brought a nine fucking week. Old Museum Yay. y'All a suspect. You're going yet gone at. The baby's head is softer than pudding. Your him break. Public, what is fucking wrong with you Nashville is a touristy town, and you would think that new thing. Customer Service was important. Not of Johnny Gouge Museum. That's. It's not the bad decision museum. Right, lady. It's the Johnny, cat. You made a mistake. Your baby started crying. You couldn't walk out the front door yeah. It's incredible to think that. She thinks she comes off well in this review. Support for this podcast comes from rat bubble. Everyone's gotta thing. Maybe you love dinosaurs, or you're obsessed with donuts, or you live and breathe super weird. True crime shows this is who you are, and if you want to express it, you should come to red bubble wrap. Bubble is a marketplace with thousands of artists around the world who are into dinosaurs, donuts and true crime chose. Chose to, and they sell t shirts, stickers, masks, pillows, posters, and more featuring original designs of celebrate them, so you'll find stuff that you can trust will be perfect because it's lifting. You love made by an artist who loves it too wrap-up. Dot Com find your thing. Pay An artist. My name is Kimberly drew. If I've learned anything in my years of studying an uplifting artists. Is that. We all have the power to create something beautiful. That's why I'm. Please introduce you to people who have broken down boundaries in fencing and helped to create the first ever smart store. They're a big deal and it's time we give them our attention. Listen to your attention. Please Hulu podcast with iheartradio on the iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. It's inspired by your attention. Please now streaming on Hulu. Watch for a fresh point of view on black history. WHO. Moving onto yell. Helpers these are yelp reviews of Sun Studios the legendary. Recording Studio in Memphis. where Elvis Presley was discovered by Sam Phillips, and where Jerry Lee Lewis and per johnny and Johnny cash of course. Do they still actively record there, or is it just like a museum? They can. It is still a recording studio. Give Tours. I've been in, but not. Working Recording Studio the working recording studio that gives tours, and in fact, our friend Sarah Gorgeous did a session there a few years blah. Yeah, that performance is available as video online that you can search for Sarah. Gorgeous Sun Studios no cool I. think that they do sessions like that as promotional. Material. Maybe week a record something there. Yeah, let's go right now. We're recording this podcast right now. They're direct to direct to Acetate. It it's only available on LP yet record. And these are reviews of the studios by people who took the tour? Including Mindy Am. Hundred, percent satisfied. I guarantee one. Of Snow Cam at Mindy come on. Making me out to be Eliah Mindy, says Rude Rude Rude Rune Rudrud. What happened to that southern hospitality? Certainly not today a rather quiet Monday in November off season. That's an interesting so then. What happened to that southern hospitality? Certainly not today. Not, today what! I didn't I think what's the off season in Tennessee? Summer I. Guess Probably so I would I would. Not November. Since November. Fuck, that's like the perfect time to go to. Get. Their leaves changed. The weather's still nice. That's when you WANNA go. Dim Mindy. This was on my bucket list. Visit I never realized. I mean I haven't made my bucket list yet. Better do it soon, buddy. You are looking good. Judging by that clip of the movie forty-one you. You're in the hospital. You're not doing well I'm not doing well at all, Sunday they closed before we got there. Stopped by today at two fifty PM. A courtesy, the cruise bus people gave me to stop by and take a few pictures who VIP yeah taken a cruise bus. Yeah! I was told it was for paying tour. People only. A gentleman said he was going to go. G.. L. O. A gentleman was said he was going to go in as his wife was in there. I asked him if he could click a few I asked him if I could pose his wife. He could click a few picks. Take, my camera and just snap some pictures. She's just harassing people walking into Sun Studios. Yes, boy! Okay, that's what I think you. You've really pinpointed their. You're a hop on hop off bus. Exactly. Excuse me gentleman. I feel like it's more arose. Genteel man. I asked him to a few picks. Just so I could feel that I was there the guard? Said No, the guard send you know. The guard had shut that shutdown. First of all, there's no guard. There's probably just a guy said by the psych. No, don't don't bother this. Don't bother this good gentlemen. You are Genteel man why you are not a- genteel at all. I was mistaken. I asked for a manager. Of course, he did Karen spoke with a smiling woman. Who Said you're wearing me down? fucking unbelievable what? You wearing me down I'm exhausted from the center. You know what it takes to get the manager of a tourist trap. Digs, come right out with your wearing me down. The number of Shitty people ideal within a single day on any given day over she trying to accomplish like she wanted this gentleman to go in and just take pictures of the studio. For her and then bring the camera back out to her. Of course, it's. Quite a bit. She's asking a lot. Another older man said No. GNC's basically just panhandling for pictures. Older man even works. They're just another guy on the street. Oh! Leave these people alone, yeah. I have a lead on the janitor he'll take. Here rise in four hours for his shah. An hour later I was trying to burrow in through the through the. Floor there I was on the. Of Sun Records. Matthew G also gives it a one out of five stars. Don Studios Sound. Studios Super Cool took a road trip stopped in Memphis, saw the civil rights museum was beautiful as well as Graceland. It's a weird thing to describe the civil rights. Museum is just super cool. Supervisor Roger Dude! Civil Rights Museum. Fuck in Purley Yo. Hit was and Yeah Rad. Man It was like kitchen. Have you envy ever sketched on the roller blades. Gleaming the cube and the Civil Rights Museum. Rosa Parks Rich and by Britain by PUCCI. The Dog. Goes on. You know what sucked so studio? I changed my mind on civil right. I am now against civil rights. Studios Stars and bars on the car. Why well I couldn't bring my one year old on the tour, so here's a picture of the outside. Not Pictured is my sweaty middle finger and a one year old Heidi you think newborns and one year olds wanna go to the Johnny. Gat Or one goes on studio any of these places. Before, we go. I wanted to plug. Jake's episode of disgrace land. Fuck him he did. I don't like him either. Greg, he's a bad person, but he's a good podcast, or and he did an episode of disgrace land on Prance. If you liked our episode prince in our in the prince, Spirit. Did you Have something you WanNa given anything to play. Do as another one, and it came up on my spotify. WHAT IS IT release radar? The News Lurks on yes. It's I've always thought he was absolutely so great, and I was like oh great like he has a new album and listen to the song, and it is so fucking good. Let's get to know what's the name of the Song I can't see myself without you. Okay. It's really good from the album. Is the album called patients? It is called patients okay. But it is a joyful, joyful music, joyfulness and the chorus hits, and it's just like A. Great great harmonies, it's so good. Check out. I can't see myself without you by Sunderland. Yeah. As always follow us on Instagram at citizen critic, Greg both on twitter and. Leave us a rating and review. And subscribe and subscribe showed it subscribe, and we'll talk to you next week. Citizen critic comes to you from Double Elvis and is executive produced by Jake Brennan of disgrace land, it was created by Jake, Greg Conley and Scott Janice I also composed, recorded the music and engineer and. For more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio, APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. My name is Kimberly drew if I've learned anything in my years of studying and. Black artists. Is that we all have the power to create something beautiful. That's why I'm. Please introduce you to people who have broken down boundaries in fencing and helped to create the first ever smart store. They're a big deal and it's time we give them our attention. Listen to your attention. Please Hulu podcast with iheartradio on the iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. It's inspired by your attention. Please now streaming on who? Watch for a fresh point of view on black history. Hi I'm Tom. CALICO, I'm a chef, restaurateur, food advocate and the host of the new podcast called citizen chef on iheartradio. People might turn on the news and see the stories about her DEMOC. Immigration policy our healthcare. Icy Stories about food. On this podcast will toward the car political climb. Looking for inroads the food wherever we could find him from the supply chain. We hear the Tyson might be closing another block Monday in Tennessee Labor? An executive order on immigration. We want American the jobs who Americans have the healthcare? We WanNa take care of our citizens disaster. I'll. Systems cannot handle shoot disaster despondent. That is the reality. These are the stories of our food. Episode One of Citizens Jeff is available now subscribe and listen on the iheartradio APP apple, podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

Johnny Cash Johnny Cash Museum Greg Conley Meghan johnny Megan Twitter Sun Studios Sarah Gorgeous Joost Scott Apple civil rights museum Johnny Johnny John C Reilly yelp IMDB Johnny Cash Museum and cafe Dewey Cox Story Hulu Kansas
Crazy Legs from Dont Be A Menace - Mouse from The Jaime Foxx show - Suli McCullough

Doin it! with Danny and Jenny

51:24 min | 3 months ago

Crazy Legs from Dont Be A Menace - Mouse from The Jaime Foxx show - Suli McCullough

"ITW home page Every time every time every time you think you're not going to cry but yeah, I'm like a veteran during the national anthem every it's like it just it chokes me. Yeah, it's like Whitney Houston sing Oh Doris Adam. Yeah, I mean Samesies right? I mean we could just walk around all day, but we have a great guest do you want? Yeah. I'm really you always do the better introductions. Do you think so you do actually actually I was going to do it anyway cuz Okay, I think she likes me more than he likes you AJ. We're fast becoming best friends. I don't like it. By the way. I don't know. I know it's actor. It's comedian writer, but it is suing McCullough every month up front like that Ginny. You just went right to it. You're like, he's done some things know it's a comedian is a stand-up comedian. He's crazy. Eggs, come on. Yeah, I found that out. The last time we were going I think only shipping a work like had to confirm you were crazy legs off you you detected you can't touch that you have a fantasy sequence. That's what I have to tell you. Just before we even get started watching you like when we've done stand up and everything and you will do a set and then you throw that in if people don't like you'll just go about you know, I was crazy. The whole audience was like, oh shit is crazy. It's really it's really really weird. Like I've done a few sets now that I'm vexed. I'm not bragging. I'm just saying and the other night I was like, you know what? All right. I'm just going to just put it out there. And so I did like I did it in the middle like just sort of threw it away. Yeah. I was like, yeah sure why not. Let's just let people know if they've made a comedy club. To go out and sit out and watch some comedy. Here's a little bonus for you. And the second I said it there was this couple to the left of me and she just shouted out. Yeah, that's you know, I felt like I felt that way when I was like I wanted to confirm free. We were I was talking to Danny on the phone like, you know still like I'm like, oh, I love soon gotta get him on the podcast like, you know, he was crazy like Danny there was just as hush. I thought I lost you took like connection wise it was like Holyshit, e always funny is I spent like the year and half before the pandemic touring was Shawn Wayans and I'm just called me out of the blue right one day. He's like do you want to go do some shows together? And I was like, yeah cool and you know like his his fans, you know are my fans too, but they don't know if she yes, so that was where I really got to see first-hand like that character really means something to people in a very odd, you know, I don't trip out like that. I don't trip off it and it's like it's part of the past and you know, like I'm proud of it but I every now and again I do see like like reflections of oh people really liked that character a lot like people dress up as Crazy Legs for Halloween, like that's that's a trip in and of itself like gotta be it's weird. I created a character that people are for Halloween. Like I created a Halloween character, right? That's that's insane. I get that. I know you gave me chills just talking about I guess that's what I mean. It's like you're a cultural Touchstone. It's a big deal. It's it's it's pretty cool. Like I was I was doing shows with Sean in Florida and it was like a second show and he just doing two persons shows where I would go up cold and you know, I'd get a generic intro and I do my set and then I'd make reference to it and it literally like the room would explode and not you know, do my thing bring Sean up he does his thing so I you know would watch on set. Sometimes this dude came up to me once and he just kind of hovered around my area and he goes dude. This is going to sound weird, but He goes man that that character is really great. And I was like cool. Thanks, man. And then he kind of like walked away. Then he came back. He goes, I can't believe I'm talking like really great and it was like, you know, you just don't get that kind of feedback for something that you created because usually you make it off you hope that it does what it needs to do to get you another job, right? You know, if it doesn't you got you know, and then you just start over but it is that was the cool thing about touring with him was I got to really see yo people like some stuff that you've made. Yeah. No. No, I mean that's huge effort. You know. I took me a while cuz to me, he's always been sw1, but I guess so what you're going about Shawn Wayans? Yes. Yes. Yes, I am. Yes. What's that In Living Color? It was it was awkward and that's when we first met. Became friends. I did I did a sketch on In Living Color called the homeboy Shopping Network. Oh, I remember I remember that a white. What? All right. Here's the images. I'm just going to give all my obscurity credits. I want yeah, I do it cuz you were I'm going to jump in on one like cuz I did I wanted to just like before we're having you out. I just want to look at some of the other stuff. Okay, your amateur show. I was on Mister show. That's the weather obscure one that really the life. Yeah. The life raft was I mean, it's it's a very funny sketch rights movement and I play the jilted lover that shows up out of nowhere on the swimming in the water and I climb into the raft David or like a little yeah. Yeah. Well, the funny thing is like that character was based on a real guy on one of those Jerry Springer episodes and that's how he dressed. It was Fabian Fabian was his name. Oh, yes, and he had he kind of was wage. Prince ish? Yeah, like he had this big pompadour and dressed in purple and had his chest out like I often do yeah, I got hiking with saline out twice. I have been three times of birth smoking, you know guy takes like my company's a black McConaughey. Yeah, but this you never puts it. Yes. I'm always walking around with my shirt off. So people like that. I also was in the new class on Mister show which oh bucks Clan was trying to Rebrand themselves that that sketch is actually Timeless. That's more timely now than it was when it first came out so often sketchy there was trying to Rebrand themselves and they were now more inclusive and user-friendly. So it was a commercial for the new plant. How did you get associated with was not an audition or did you know, you know, it was funny as like I was friends with those guys, you know, just from being in the clubs and stuff and they would Workshop their stuff at the HBO. Workspace I remember I saw them there and so I would just do sketches every now and again with those guys. I was in the mister show movie too. So that was the what's the guys name? The the cops gave across character. What was that? Yes, I forget. Yeah. Yeah. I'm not that good. We're getting up there. Yeah, and then the and then the other thing that I really like as in terms of obscure things that I've done I guess start on Married with Children and I played this guy that worked at a record shop that new Factory record. The Record Shop was called final vinyl and Al Bundy had this song and the on the on the tip of his tongue that he couldn't remember this episode page and he went to final vinyl and he hummed the song and I knew exactly what it was amazing. Yeah, so I have these very like when I work damn it, I thought Look, you know you you come in that you're the closer. I am married him. I'm I'm Jamal Crawford. Another one comes off the bench and I score I scored was just fantastic. Give me another one. Give me something else. Well, okay. This is I'm going back to Atlanta next month for my daughter's graduation. She graduated from Spelman and when I'm in Atlanta, I'm in total dad mode, right? Like I'm not even thinking about anything remotely Hollywood, but I was on The Jamie Foxx Show and I did play Jamie Foxx's real good friend mouse mouse Dwayne Abercrombie. What's my character's name? I did twenty five episodes of The 100 episodes. Wow. And so when I go to Atlanta, Georgia, I instantly become either mouse or Crazy Legs. Those are your like it's like when Tony Soprano took his daughter to college. He couldn't escape. Yes. Yes. Yes, so it's like that song. Like well, you know, that's amazing. Yes. Yes. So does your daughter that's amazing. Yeah, it's great. I'm excited for her. We're going back next next month. They're having a ceremony. When when the pandemic HID bulb Ida fly out there on a red-eye remover out, you know real quick and it was like going back in time because when we locked down we were in total lockdown, we took it very seriously. Going back to the South. It really was like travelling in time. Like guys don't know what's coming but it's not going to be good. If I go try to graduate like remotely at home. Yeah. She was a little that was that's that's so heartbreaking to cuz I think if I didn't get to graduate from like when I graduated from college, like what a huge deal it was a tremendous loss. Like I'm I'm still hyped about my college graduation song playing and I'm walking in the Coliseum at Sam Houston State University. I'm like teary-eyed. I can't believe it off. You believe it was taken away from you know, it's terrible semester of your senior year. What could be more I still like I'm like some of my favorite times happened right then. Well, what's interesting is my daughter right before the pandemic. They did her senior trip where they went to Puerto Rico her and her girlfriends went to Puerto Rico and then they went to Miami for the weekend right off. So I had some friends in Miami. I hooked them up with a table at live right when I got on the hot club, you know, he's going to get it all of them. Right? I had hooked it up for them the day they got to Miami Miami was shutting down for the pandemic. So my daughter flies back to Atlanta I jump on a red-eye Thursday night and fly back to move her out. And so I feel like this graduation trip next month. We're going to do all the stuff in Atlanta that we're going to close it up like I'm going we're going home. Magic City we're going to have we're going to have lemon pepper wings in Magic City. There you go. We're doing it for real. We will also go to the the Civil Rights Museum just to mix it up, you know, so we're going to do you know, we're going to do it all Magic City and the Civil Rights Museum. So just cuz I'm a good dad. You know, I'm the same way. It's like for me it's like, you know Sports jobs and and I was at my kids school trips was to the the office out here called The Museum of Tolerance and I've been there. Yeah, so last name for a museum to yeah, and and you know the corn dogs they're fast and I didn't I didn't. Yeah, but I was we were waiting there like somebody like there were a bunch of people was like they were dead. Leaning about getting it aligned and stuff and like there was a thing and I was just like I had like the ratings slide. It's like it's the Museum of Tolerance. Yes. Yes. Yes. It was a big Applause. You got an Applause break at a museum cars break in line at the Museum of Tolerance. That's fantastic. That's good work. That's good work. The reason that's the reason we are fast becoming friends. You know, I just thought I was riding. It's like smiling all through the exhibits, you know? Yeah, but it was I really go into Amsterdam a few years back and like I was in line and Frank Smith, so there are people that were like how fucking long do we have to wait like guys? I think that maybe we can put a pen and the attitude. Yeah. Yes. I feel like mrs. Francke did it? Yes. Longer. Well, I love going to civil rights museums and I love experiencing that that quasi guilt that happens from home. You know people that are like, you know, we've gotta do this and get into like everyone let you go in front of them. Like it's the the guilt is hilarious. Like I like looking to at the at the people where I'm like, oh, yeah you belong in this Museum. Like I saw dude at the Civil Rights Museum wearing a kente cloth belt and I was like, yep. Yep. You can go in front of me, sir. Right off your cosplay. Yes. I want you to have the Full Throttle experience of what this is Chuck Schumer with their yes, exactly exactly that but I love the kente cloth belt because that's just like I'm going to subtle represent and I don't my pants leg Yeah bagging sends a whole different Method All Purpose. Guess it is accessorizing and then again, it's like a boomerang when wetherspoons like I got secret mushroom off. A clock on the inside. That's funny. You're funny. I know we were talking about like where was like you're starting comedy and how did that have that kind of come about that? You always like when you were like in school was like like were you going to be a comedian or were you going to okay here? Here's the thing. I was a little different than most stand-ups where I like to say. I was the the smart Class Clown. Yeah and what I mean by that is I could make the kids in my class laugh, but then I would answer the teachers question correctly. So I learned how to play Both Sides so I get the laugh and get the right answer and so I wasn't a disrupter know what I mean. Yeah. Yeah, I was you and I it's so funny that we have so much weird shouldn't comment that was exactly how I describe myself. So I would I could make the kids laugh. That was a laugh I didn't care about as much but I could also log Make the adults laugh. Yeah teacher who really didn't like me and I would try new drugs. I try drum. I couldn't one time you sent me down to the principal's office cuz I got a big laugh. That was I thought it was but I never was like using whoopee cushions I wasn't you know, it was like yeah you were yeah you had received forever, but the vice principal of our school thought I was the funniest guy in the world. So I would get sent down to the vice principal and Thursday. I basically would do a set for the vice principal. That's fantastic. I loved it. So I I'm with you I mean the big I I think my first like my first kind of like when I took was inching towards it in high school, I did the morning announcements and that would be in the you know in in the school office and I would do wage an ounce minutes and then I would conclude with a dumb joke of the day and I'd frame it as the dumb joke of the day which was I didn't realize it but I was actually protecting myself and I was smart by Drake That because I lowered the stakes, you know what I mean, like calling it the dumb joke man. I'm not putting too much on it. Right? So that was a free space to work material for sure. It's so crazy. I do the morning announcements do and I worked out doing that. Yeah, I would like I look bus ride into school or you know, I would frequently like would be working on like what's the comedy bit? I'm going to do here and yes and get into the app. So goddamn weird my experience if they wouldn't let the students do maybe that's because we were terrible but I was an office aide so that meant for one. I would go to all the classes and give notes for kids or whatever and sometimes it would be like, oh that kids in trouble and that was my way of like a practicing my you know, my stick of like yes, this kid did this. All right. Knock knock. Yeah Enrique. Yes. He's in trouble today. Yep. Had your you had your guests are interested. Yeah, I could open the door and like high and then shut the door. Yeah, so so, okay, so like but like to get money like that was like the introductory stages and I always paid attention to stand up like I remember you from first I was born in Los Angeles, but I grew up in Northern California. Okay, so I went to Cupertino High School. My junior high was across the street from Apple computer. I don't know maybe you've heard of it and I spent two years at San Jose State before transferring to UCLA game at San Jose State. They had a comedy competition but they held it in the pub and I wasn't old enough at the time to be in the pub. But I remember that the way this Pub was was situated they had windows so you could see the people drinking inside of the pub and having fun and I just remember while this competition was wage. Hang on I was outside looking in to the window. Like if I could just get there or so. Yeah, that was like the that was a way that pivotal moment where I think I saw my future and just had to figure a way to get there but I didn't I didn't start doing stand-up until I transferred to UCLA. We had a comedy club at UCLA we would get together like once every couple of weeks work help each other with our material and we would do shows in the dorms for our fellow students and we had a budget where they would hire one working comic and because it's l a and you know, I like it was the best of the best. So that's where I met like, you know, David Spade and you know, like working Comics that were just about to pop and that was dead. My bridge into stand up and also like when we were in college, we were really resourceful. We used to pitch comedy shows to the fraternities for their Rush of week activities. We would charge them a budget we would pay like we would book one of these known Comics that was you know, local and in the circuit, so it was a way to sort of befriend working Comics put money in their pocket where they didn't have to go on the road, which is better the one night or in town. Like when I when I think back about that, I, I wish I still had that hustle now. Yeah, like if I really was kind of ahead of the curve in that way, you know, it's kind of genius and what they think about it you guys were off you sounds like you were in art now are any of the guys who were in that comedy club are any of them people are like a couple like there was a there was a guy Fred tatasciore who wage? Is a writer now pretty successful writer Chris Spencer who you know is is a regular at The Comedy Store and you know producer of birth of a bunch of different things being him were really good friends in college and we kind of like, you know sort of held down comedy at UCLA. You know what I mean? Like we thought it was just funny how when I think back about it, it's like that early twenties. I'm I'm the funniest thing ever Cockiness. Yeah, you have no idea just how not funny you are in the big scheme of things. Yeah, but Cockiness and bravado gets you everywhere. You know my God a hundred percent. It's amazing. What confidence can be? Yes. Yeah, which amazing about it is it's like confidence get you everywhere, but it's like show business and performing it creates inatome. The most insecure brittle of us absolutely absolutely weird fucking it's just weird shit cuz I always feel and whatever I act confident. I'm just doing it like a Caribbean. Yeah, we'll play a character piece. Yeah, not self-loathing for a couple of minutes. Well, it's so funny. Like when I think back about those early years like I started when I was Nineteen and I ended up this was the thing and I haven't even told you the like so that's what we were doing at UCLA. I wanting to break Jerry Jerry Seinfeld didn't show it UCLA and four of us from the comedy club got to open for him. And we each did five minutes like the opener had 20 minutes so they divided it amongst us and I remember being so cocky back then that I was like five minutes. Like I almost I almost decided to take myself off the show so my friends could have them. Extra minute-and-a-half like it's insane. That's like the level of cocky those five minutes. Like how are you going to fax me? It's like I have warmed up son at exactly I have upwards of 12 minutes a day. So it's Jerry's managers. George Shapiro was in the audience afterwards. He approached me and he said I think you have a lot of talent and give me a call and at the same time like how naive I was super cocky but naive yeah, I didn't know who George Shapiro was horse. I had yeah, why would I I'm in UCLA thought to Comedy or Shapiro should know who I am. Yes, so I had a friend that was a little more established my friend Jordan Brady who's a director job. And I called Jordan Brady and I said, you know this guy George Shapiro gave me his business card. Shy call him is he is he legit? Right? I think I said is he there's no internet to Google this shit. So-and-so Jordan goes that's one of the biggest managers in comedy. Right? And so then I had to act like I was cool and go. Yeah. All right. Well, I guess I'll call him this week's kind of packed but I'll get yeah. Yeah, I got a midterm in two weeks, but I'll Circle back with you. Yeah. Yeah. Well, maybe that's what happens on that call. You call them. Not only did I call him and he said I want to meet with you. Once again, this is like how cocky was at the time I go. Yeah cool. We should have a meeting my friend Chris Spencer also does comedy you should meet with him to oh, you're a good friend on top of I am like wow. Aside from being cocky. I am a good friend. Yeah, George thought that that was so thoughtful and revealed like my character it does because it does suck. This is not a prevalent thing. Like when I was in that world. It's like people are not like it's like there's a limited number of spots. Most people. Yes. Yeah, just like here I am trying to get my friend did in other Comics are like, oh you need to get passed at the store. Like, how do I do that? Really fucking good luck. I don't. Yeah, right right. I can't help you there. So George took the meeting with both of us, even though he was he was really just interested in me. They ended up signing me. I still had a year left of school. And that's when I started em, seeing at the Laugh Factory in The Improv. Wow, so that was I thought it was great because signing with George Shapiro legitimize the dream of doing stand-up and you know, it was like I knew this was going to be A real career path for me. That's a how cocky did you get after that? Well, here's the funny thing was when I when I started M seeing in the club. I started to hear you know, I mean, you're you're just working with the best of the best. Like that's when Seinfeld was still doing guest spots during the week. That's when it was the early nineties. So like I I graduated college in nineteen so is when Tom and Roseanne were in the clubs it was you know, like Janeane Garofalo was in the clubs Adam Sandler was still doing spots in the clubs. Like it was a really interesting time to be in the clubs and and it was like this this wave of comics that were just about to Super blow up so long, even though I I was cocky about being funny. I still respected the fact that I was in the a list of talent. Yeah and home And and as and I was emceeing and so I was just in awe of everyone that I was working with, you know what I mean? And you know, and it was interesting too because I would not here at the time always he's good but he's green and that would just frustrate me. So like you know what I mean? Like no one like, you know, no one wants to be called green, but I had to accept that dude. You're like you just brought up Jerry Seinfeld or you know, and like during that time that's when like Rodney Dangerfield would drop by and do guest spots. So I just felt like I was blessed with being in this this world with the best comedians. And even though I was I was confident and cocky I still was like you're getting the ability to learn from the best. Yeah on a nightly basis, you know? Yeah, like I I feel the same where I don't want dead. To be surrounded by people that are not as like I want I want to be the worst and a group of really good Comics because I always yes. Yeah, they'll push me to be better. I don't want to be the gray box, cuz I'm not yes, like let me be around people that are that like who was someone for you though that you looked up to like as you were growing up like who was a comedian that made you was there someone that you saw that you were like Shaq is what I want to do. Well, I mean, it's it sounds weird to say this now given what's happened, but I was really influenced by Cosby early on I was just I see that because you did drug me on one of our I was like, oh man this guy it's like I can see the early influences and kind of glad she said that before I was going to leave that out, but and I don't really set myself up like, you know, it's like that's a but In fairness Hobbies drug game was on top of the childhood Heroes that I am. Are now in trouble Woody Allen, you know Cosby O J Simpson apparently used to be a good football player. OJ Simpson the the football what happened things in Vegas? Yeah, and and only that he stole some shit and that was that was that was the extent. Yeah other than that wage is not guilty the extent. Wow Cosby with someone. So was it Cosby's like stand-up or the sure like, well, I used to listen to I used to listen to Doctor Demento back a day. You know, that was my source of Comedy. I really loved that wonderfulness album where you know, he does the bit about the chicken heart and life. You know, like I just thought those those bits were You know, they were storytelling they were solid they had character like, you know, I was just like this dude is so good, you know and a great guy to home so great. I felt the same way. I was super lit so blessed that I never liked him really like I was like his stuff. I like and I think part I don't know why but it was like I think maybe it had to do with my dad liked him but the a friend of mine's older brother was had bought for stand-up like the stand-up we listen to it that point was like it was Steve Martin and it was Richard Pryor like albums, you know time it was like I just loved that so much more. Yes, Here's the like I will I will say this Danny like, you know, my initial, you know, love of Cosby sort of led me down this path of studying all the greats so birth. You know like you start with Cosby and then you get to Prior and then you go. Oh man, like the things this dude is doing plan where he's drawing from like and I read, you know took her convictions and you know all those great biographies about prior you just but you just also come to realize the the things that he was drawing from life going to ever be that destructive to be that funny. You know what I mean? Like no, it's not. Yeah, that's not going to be your that's not going to be your voice, but I don't know about you but I'm always like the comics I and and comedy I loved the most is the stuff. I don't think I can do huh? That's interesting. So like I like seeing Comics do stuff that like, well that would never be like that joke would never in a home in a room for a hundred years of the typewriter. I never going to write that joke and not like fascinating because with the other stuff I kind of know how it's done and now I guess you're right though at a time when George Younger I have no idea what I could do or not do and who am I so and obviously I like a lot of things that I would not hold up today prior sure sure. It's funny like wage. It's just you know, this path is so interesting because you never know exactly where it's going to take you but if you trusted it does take you to the right places. Like I was a fan of Garry Shandling stand up before I was a stand-up like I thought his takes on stuff were so funny and he used to like he used to do that joke about seeing ugly people kissing the mall and I worked at the mall at that time and I was like, how did this dude see this? That's so funny and then I became friends with Gary off now which you know, I was friends with him for eighteen years and you know, like the Friendship got deeper and deeper where we ended up writing together and but it was just like I was a fan of birth. Stand up before I did stand up and then became friends with him. So, you know, you just never you never know. But you know, what what's coming your way? Yeah, you're right. It's the best thing about this business Garry Shandling my favorite joke of his when he talks about maybe I want to marry my mom and he's like, I've never seen anyone other than a blackjack dealer off service. Yeah. Yeah. I can watch that him deal tell a joke a million times and never don't laugh like yeah. Yeah, It's still not such a brilliant. Yeah person when I saw the joke that he did that was like, I think it was just talking about like seeing like the tiniest Little House in the Hollywood Hills, I guess for like millions and he's like and the real the real thing but look at the view and it's like like two million dollars there should be boobs, press yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah pressed up against the window. Yeah, that was like and then like off. What I saw it's Garry shandling's show. I like cuz I was not aware of it drawn things. I fucking loved that show. Yes so much. Yeah, and then obviously Larry Sanders and and you know, I mean Larry Sanders to me was my favorite show on T at the time and it's still one of my favorite shows that has ever been created. Like I just felt like it was so grounded in reality. Yeah, and the comedy all came from this very real place. Yeah that I was just drawn to it. And so that's how that's how I met Gary like I got cast on that show and it's so it's wow. Like I said, it's weird. It's weird how life sucks. So I was a stand-up in an actor, you know guest starring doing stuff. I got cast on that show as a writer and I wasn't really writing for people at that wage. And so I was this the episode it was it was an episode with John Stewart. And I played a writer on the show and Gary and I you know, like I guess start on a couple of other things like Married with Children, you know, so I knew what being a guest star was, you know, you just sort of popped in you do your thing. You say your lines you try not to get anybody off and hopefully you do a good enough job where you don't get cut out and maybe they'll ask you back if you're lucky right, but that's the nature of the Beast. So I went into it with being a fan of that show and just so happy that I got cast to be on it very and I started talking on the set and we started talking about Muhammad Ali back and he is a big Muhammad Ali fan as I am and we had this, you know, like 45 minutes to an hour conversation about Muhammad Ali and he starved asking me all these questions about you know what my experience has been like in the business and it was one of those kind of conversations where I mean, you know how how typical conversations go in this business. You're very surface see like around that time. Most of the conversations were did you think OJ was guilty, you know like that off so light-hearted on our side so funny the way so it's so perfect gluten-free. Yeah. Exactly. Do you have a cat a bath? So like, you know, like I just came away from that experience feeling like yo, I I liked this guy stand up cuz that was hilarious. I'm just talking to him and connecting with him. Like I like him as a person and you know, I got invited to play in his game and I played in his game for sixteen years and his game. Was invite-only and yeah, and and for the people listening, this is a you'll to a basketball game that he hosted. Yeah. He hosted this game on Sunday and the Only Rule of the game was you couldn't talk about the game. So yeah, it was Fight Club. It was fight club with better jokes. That's what it was and you couldn't tell apparently. Yeah, it's true. Yeah, exactly and and it was it was like this great mix of people in the business that were smart and creative and ambitious and you know also loved basketball and loved Gary and so it was the closest thing he had to to a family and it was really special and it was like my Oasis from Hollywood. In a very Hollywood situation that makes sense. Yeah, I mean, is that what you meant our mutual friend Kevin Nealon that is where Kevin and I met oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah Kevin played in that game Sarah Silverman played in that game. And then occasionally we would get a weird guests are like Brad Pitt. So wait to just throw his shit out when he tried to jump on Westheimer. What are you doing here? Well, it is funny. Like like Jim Gray would show up usually like during the game or afterwards. It was almost like we had a real, you know, professional commentator for mediocre basketball like it was fantastic. It was just pissed if he didn't do the, yeah. You're one gem Jesus David Duchovny played in that game. And you know David Duchovny already has a lot of things working well for him. Well, you know, he's dead. He is good looking and yeah, he's a really good basketball player on top of that like he played. Yeah, exactly. It was like come on dude really like Jon Hamm had a huge dick. It was like yes, I got to sleep every night. Just assuming it's tiny and that's what has yes. I think I'll hog hanging out at home asleep. Yeah enough already. He's going to pay in the next life. Well, man, we're at the point in our show now, I mean where we like to talk about the shit, we've been watching. Oh wow and and recommendations and I'm curious It's been something that you've been like obsessed with it or well you you've given me I'm really bad about watching stuff. Like I I come to it late the things that everyone's talking about. I'm like I guess Yeah, like two years later. I'll be like man. That show was The Sopranos is really good. Right? I was that way with only read recently watched suggestion like the whole there's like and then it felt like I couldn't even like tweet about it because your it's a I was that beep when V family really holy hell this is off. But yeah, they've won like everything. How are you not watching what what are some of the what's an example of give me an example of something. Well, I mean I have too many of those but I'll give you an example of something that that is like, I'm just like a little obscure thing that I found that I like Netflix has this show called Last Chance U that I really like. Yes, I that's a meal by the way. Yeah, it's it's yeah, it's very exactly if you want to see like if you just want to root for people to just figure it out in a sport dog. Setting three chance use is amazing. I watched that it with the feeling of like I don't have kids and I'm like I want these like they're my kids are like, come on. Don't get home you come on baby. Yes. Yes. Yes practice homework. Please do this you can use like I'm so emotionally exhausted. But yes, that's my that's my little show that I feel like, you know, I'm rooting for them, you know, and I and I hope that they can figure it out. Yeah, that's a good recommendation. Yeah, so last chance he was wrong and it's 5 Seasons in it starts out with these Juco football programs. Yeah, and this season the newest season is a basketball program up in Oakland and and growing up in Northern California. It just reminds me of of all mine or cow Hangouts and stuff and you see some of the most birth Did athletes yes ever seen that yet. Don't throw it away. Well, what's what's interesting too is all of those kids on that show. They feel like they're going to the next level and so few make it to the next level that they don't have a back-up plan. They're not they don't realize how crucial it is off to lock in. You know what I mean? I feel like you know stand up there's no rules to it and you have to sort of be self-disciplined to succeed and it's very similar to Sports in that way where you have to love this to your core. Yeah and put all the work in and just minimize. Yes, you have to try and make sure he's all the pitfalls. Yeah, that would musicians were fantastic. My son is like a like I was a musician but my son is like it's amazing guitar and it's because he just likes to practice like it's not like yes, yes boss was on his like I watched his in his room or you know, there'll be a moment when he wasn't doing anything just I'm going to go upstairs and he's like and he'd play guitar for yes. Yes, and and and I never had that and that life. But I did have that with comedy. So it's a different story. You know, it's like yes. Yeah, there's that difference between like passion and like a hobby and yes see the difference with passion. It's like first one to practice last one to leave it then you get home and then you keep shooting baskets and you're drunk and you're still like you never saw. Yeah. So what any way for you, you know, I because I just saw that they added this to HBO Max but the other two which was oh yeah. It was on Comedy Central that Chris Kelly Sarah Schneider made and it has Molly Shannon and it's they just put the first season on HBO package. It is one of the funniest, what's what's it called the other to the other to the other feelings of a famous. Yeah, like like a thirteen-year-old girl pop started that goes like one viral video. That's how it's and his name's Chase and they're like, it's Chase dreams. Ken Marino plays his manager in his in his Streeter a.m. Just somewhat like scooter, you know, yes. Yes. Yes Shannon is the mother and then there's the two older siblings ones trying to be an actor one used to be a total losers Club fantastic. They have this fantastic. We little brother that is all of a sudden blowing up and he's on you know in Times Square on a billboard and shit and they're like, okay his in his hit single was I want to marriage at recess. I'm checking this out. Yeah that works completely. You'll enjoy what about you Danny God, you're just reminding me of like with Ken Marino just move. I think it is really late. I didn't even know existed until like maybe two years ago and then watched their two seasons, but you ever see Bernie love. Yes. So it's like the mockumentary of Bachelor Bachelor. Yeah. You know first season is The Bachelor and it is and everybody who's funny like, it's Natasha Leggero as one of the bachelorette like trying to date him. She got a contestant wage. Aliens, that's great and then second season, which is also funny as June Diane Raphael and and and and and it's just like it's really fun. Both of those are just off their brutal and funny and they're great Burning Love look for it right now and it's so silly and like that's all I want to watch right now is things that make me happy and I'm I'm in a I'm in a highbrow this a little busy if you don't we go. Oh God, I don't know. I'm going to start off with this this sentence watch a lot of documentaries. Yeah, ten years truly wage a little bit. Let me get my monocle real quick. Hold on. Let's start all this episode hard with Julie. Remember I did preface this by saying I'm I know you you you you just ended up early. So I'll tell you just a great documentary. If you just want to feel like a little less pandemic e and get out of your sense of being dead. Contained yes, the the Rolling Stones documentary where they tore Brazil and is fantastic. What what is it called on Netflix? It's like Rolling Stones Rio something like it up. I'm pretty sure shortly after this was when I saw an announcement. That was like Mick Jagger expecting another baby with yes, that makes sense. Yeah, but it's it's they Chronicle, you know, when when they toured Brazil year was America, it's actually like 2016. Oh, so but I I stumbled upon it one night and I was like, I feel like I'm somewhere else and not on tour with the Rolling Stones. I'm going to see that I watch I watch one that was out a recent one that came out and called The Quiet One about Bill Wyman, and there's all from his perspective where he was like dead. He documented everything. He had a camera the whole time and then yes, that was that was really good. Yeah, I mean like Olay Olay Olay or something like that. I don't know. I'm look I'm I'll find it only took I don't know. I don't know. That's what I was going to call my auto card. It's just a stupid like just something I was watching something on YouTube. He was catching up on like Joe's old old Between Two Ferns, but then I saw there's a guy in Dallas and maybe you know this guy I Gordon Keith. Did you ever hear? No? No, I'm Gordon Keen. So I was its I click on something and it is it's called I think would say like awkward Zach Galifianakis interview. Yeah prior to between two four hours long, but there's this guy Gordon Keith who is basically he still does it was between two ferning like clearly. They saw this guy cuz Will Ferrell was on it and Thursday. Developed he's gotta be the inspiration for what Zach was doing on this cuz he's so and he at first you're wondering is he in on the joke? Yes. It's like I forgot what movies at home. Like how does it compare to how does this movie compared to other to all the other movies? What do you mean all the other movies ever made the answer like really crazy and and it's like off and it's he's just genuinely funny. Yes, I couldn't believe this guy. Okay, there's a local that's one thing. I say that one last night Danny the was its name? Oh. Let me recommend that too cuz I got Matt Berry and Rich Fulcher had a show that aired six episodes many years ago called snuff box back on YouTube premium or yeah. Okay, and it is so I know you want to ruin it for you. It is ridiculously absurd and funny and they have these recurring events will tell. That you said me put more posts that video of the fuk U video every episode. He approaches some woman who's like looking woman looking for an apartment is like U Don't Wanna Live in there or you want to live in their neighborhood and their chemistry and it's like I walk you like yes. I just need to return my I just need to go visit my boyfriend and and you just fuck you and you like drunk. It's always unrepairable Charming scene that ends with her eyes. Only mentioning boyfriend. Yes. The one that I the first one that I liked the first sequence of that was like, oh, let me help you with that. He's holding a an aquarium with all her fish swimming is not dead. She's like one of my husband gets back from work smashes it wow. That's hilarious. Does these recurring been so that's what I would recommend. That's hilarious. Thank you so much for being on our show. This was this was amazing. I mean, come on. I I first of all I didn't move. Are you guys did a podcast and I'm like, I like both of that. I know I know it's like we have a lot of cross. It's very weird that we've only met now. Yeah, it's that's really bizarre. I have so many people he talked but better happy that we met I know by the way the unfortunately on Instagram I posted your name on the first time. We went hiking it's like Shaq is the greatest like honestly like George. Yes, sweetheart. You know what you guys need to help me design my dating profile because this is this this is what I need. This is what I need. We're going to talk. I mean we happen to have this talk anyway, but this page are talking on dating exactly. Anyway, it's it's great to talk to you and and thank you so much and I'll see you in the mountains. I'm sure absolutely and Jenny will talk sneakers when we talked to me. Of course, we will talk off. Individual sneakerheads, yes, but thank you for being on Suli. Thanks for having me. This is fantastic.

Civil Rights Museum George Shapiro Shawn Wayans UCLA Museum of Tolerance Atlanta Cosby Miami Jordan Brady Doris Adam Danny Magic City Holyshit Jamie Foxx Fabian Fabian Prince ish bucks Clan Dwayne Abercrombie Chris Spencer Francke
MLK Day in the NBA

The Jump

38:03 min | 6 months ago

MLK Day in the NBA

"We want the best of both worlds. We want a hybrid a smarter. Hybrid cloud approach with ibm helps banks personalized experiences with watson. Well helping keep data secure. The world is going hybrid with ibm. Visit ibkr dot com slash hybrid cloud arts league regarding are still show up a lot this season freshly j. I'm extremely committed to it. Lowered begging change. Take different than i think. We all have a responsibility. Birth better than was found. Not just for today but moving riding calendar year into listen to our communities or people see ways we can help was before my life. I was young black men in this world. You know trying to find ways to still have friends and family in that situation on their voice. There's just a difference in education equality and all fronts notice world but education. A big piece committed to say in the advancement of my community than african americans. But at the same time committed people doing right by everybody and to see that. Everybody's treated fairly so then that always try to find ways to get back for it okay especially in homage to him So looking forward to door. What a perfect tone setter for today. Now the timber. Wolves and hawks tipped off a few minutes ago special. Mlk day game. The hawks sporting they're amazing uniforms. Mlk seemed and we're gonna take you behind the scenes of the hawks effort to pay homage to martin luther king later in this show so stick around for that robert ory. What did it mean to you to play. Martin luther king day for me. It was so special because when i first got into the nba. He wasn't a official holiday. So now it is. A holiday in these teams get recognized. Mlk day in go out and present to the people. What their message is it for me. I remember the special mlk day. It's it's kinda off the topic but it was implicated in memphis and we plan and all of sudden someone tests me on the shoulder in his morgan freeman. Why and i'm like god talk me by. Mlk day. and i'm like a little kid in the candy store just sitting watching him and appreciate this guy who's so much who's been around. And he was basically living legend so that was a special moment because if we wouldn't have mlk day. I'd never got a chance to meet him in. That moment would have never happened. That's awesome. that's amazing. I mean for me I was the first time head coach. black head coach when i got the memphis job and you know to go to the to the spa about anything else but to play on that day as such honor would you know and understand what others had gone through before you To to be able to get in the spot that you're in so that's what that day. I think really means and i really believe that the nba is doing such a great job of really understanding what it means ultimately about being a servant serving the community a day of service and so Our guys understand that. And i think very it is. It is really remarkable. I love that evolution from when there was no. Mlk to now how we see things. Welcome to the jump. I'm rachel nichols i'm alongside indeed. Nba coach our head coach. David phys dale and seven time champion. Robert ory got james harden posting a triple double in his nets debut over the weekend. He said it was easy out. There must be nice to tell us why maybe just a little little round flat out the nets stick around for that. First though i do want to circle back to the legacy of civil rights icon dot mirc. Dr martin luther king junior assassinated of course april fourth nineteen sixty eight outside of the lorraine motel in memphis tennessee and coach. I do want to ask you more about the coach. The grizzlies you made a point of with your team. Touring the national civil rights museum which is right built around glory motel. Yeah what stood out to you the most when you were there. Will you know first off to just moves you immediately. Understanding the significance of what happened in that moment and understanding what it is our country what it did to the black community what it did for black and white relations in our country and you feel it the gravity of as you pass through it you know in that moment there well it was they let us stand in a spot where he was killed and for me. I think what broke me down was here. I am a black man. I'm the head coach at a memphis. Grizzlies and i'm two generations removed from a sanitation worker from mississippi who went to jan cro. My grandfather and that is who dr king was there. Fighting four was the sanitation workers and for some reason it overwhelming. It's still overwhelms me now to think about just two generations later what we've accomplished where we are now. And so the best way we can honor him as to pay that forward and continuing to serve and trying to change the world for me. That even though haven't had a chance to just watching you now moment it gets emotional especially being a black man from the south because you see all the trials and tribulations that black people have to go through and what we have to overcome and it's so hard mentioning so hard heartfelt that people around the world really now trying to see what is going on in his country. And i know right now. Everybody wants us to be full forcing it to happen now. Because that's the day and age we live in but it's going to be baby steps just thinking about it and i just talked about not having. Mlk day when i played now we have one and you know hopefully by the time. Our grandchildren Childrens children have this moment. It's is it is equality and it's just a moment you know. We have to be patient. We're going to have to work towards it. You know it's not just gotta sit back and stay silent when you sound. Things don't don't happen so we still got to keep voice. Keep that message in front. So we can move forward and the celebration of martin luther king of course also a celebration of so many men and women who have made so much progress pushing this country forward in the battle for civil rights. Clearly still going on today. It's important to recognize just the breadth of the movement that there were so many people who put their lives their families on the line because the change had to come and we have so much respect for all of them and it's up to all of us to keep keep their keep doing it and we'll be talking about it throughout the show today. I want to get to a little basketball too because earlier today. James harden posting a thread of tweets skies thanking the city of houston thanking the rockets organization. Saying the city has given me everything i could ask for and more he goes on to write. He's forever indebted to the city and quote. It's far from a goodbye. As i pay all of my debts as for hardens future. We did get our first look at him as a member of the nets alongside katie on saturday. He had thirty two points. Fourteen assists twelve rebounds. Oh by the way k. D. dropped forty two after the game. James said quote. It was easy out their heart and responsible for sixty three points against the magic when you look into right Between third most all time for a debut in nba history behind his rockets debut. Twenty twenty twelve kyrie's nets debut last season kyrie. of course that out saturday's game and just reported by whoa jr also going to miss tonight's game against the bucks on tnt as he works his way back into playing shape after missing. What will now be seven games due to personal reasons robert. James said it was easy. How easy do you expect it to be for the nets moving forward. This is one of these projects that you have to wait and see because when you come to a team for the first time you're excited so you have all this energy you have all this emotion and you wanna see how does is gonna work out in ten more games. You have that same energy and that same emotion. Will your teammates feel the same about because we know. James has the tendency to hold a ball dribble dribble but when he's not when he's doing that and you're losing. How are your team is going to react because right now this is the honeymoon and we won't see how it wedding is this match can be you know. Twenty games in ten games in because that's when a true team is going to merge because right now like i said this is the honeymoon. Everybody's happy during the honeymoon. Well i think we're not gonna see team lose too much too much talent too much shooting on the floor. I think you're going to see this team play very well very fast and you could see. The transition was pretty seamless. Why is that. Hey tony maybe we'll see look at this jazz hard. Making plays off the pick and roll k. D's such a big target. He can hit them out. They're getting easy shots as a cake. Shots for k. d. The work for these right here because james harden draws so much attention with. This is the play jazz hard recognizes immediately that katy has the mismatch cagey swings a to brown. Who is the other and if they keep making plays like this great. That's when they're going to be dangerous when they don't care who the next guy is and they trust that trust. The past with that much talent is going to be very hard to deal with them. That could be career in the corner next time eventually. Great i mean that's the idea. So swing swing. Swing swing to kyri. You've got a little bit. Just switch them all around. I'm just going to be like whoever has the matchup that guy's going to have the ball and he's going to create in long as he keeps trust in this guy's good things are going to happen for this team teams that cruise through a regular season and then the playoffs. It gets harder what he knows. What do you think robert. What is sort of the thing that they have to work on throughout the regular season. 'cause fizzes right. There's going to be a lot of nights. it's just kind of easy and one ball out there. And so what do they need to work on and sharpen so when they get to those tougher tests in the playoffs. They can be up for them. Huguenots go board on the teamwork. It sounds simple but it is because careers a ball. Hannah in how he's gonna react with james ball and i think katie is the one who's gonna sit back because i think he he can realize. Hey i don't have to use that much energy helena rock. I could come off screens and shoot the ball but we always talk about office but we also have to know they got to plan and they lost the three best defensive player so he's really going to be interesting how they can mixed it altogether together on both ends because these guys are all capable of playing good team defense katie especially kyrie has done james even done it. I know his reputation but he's he's done it. I live in houston. Hasn't bought into that often to the i want to get to move from the nets of course to the pacers as part of that fourteen trade but news over the weekend is out indefinitely after an. Mri revealed a small mass left kidney during a physical prior to finalizing the trade. Now the pacers talked about the fact that they discussed. Should we avoid the deal. Right and robert ory. You told the story on friday's show about you. Were part of a trade for sean elliott. When physical review part of his kidney problem in that deal was voided the pacers decided though they did want to stick with the trade brooklyn centene additional two point six million dollars to indy to ensure that the deal held up so i'm sure that helps to l- avert will undergo further medical tests. Of course the entire community hopes to see carris back out on the court as soon as possible and it is a good sign to get into his private medical business but the fact that the pacers decided after seeing his records and seeing the mri. We don't consider this such a long term problem. We want to keep him. That's just good to sort know as we all think and wish the best for him that hopefully it's not a super significant life altering type of thing and he can get treatment. Get back on the court as soon as possible. Another team in that deal the cavaliers. We learned that they intend to trade or waiver. Twenty nineteen first round. Pick kevin porter jr. during an outburst. He had friday after finding out his locker was given to taurean. Prince who was acquired in that deal porters locker had been moved to a different side now. Puerto hadn't played this season for unspecified personnel reasons and we of course know that he had a legal incident that they were trying to get him. Some help According to reporting was first reported by the athletic conferred by espn the puerto reportedly got into a screaming match with cavs brass and gruesome food in the locker room. Remember jr smith through the bowl of chicken tortilla soup years ago. I don't know what it is about food and the cavaliers locker room but there you go after that altercation. Puerto was told to clean out his locker. Other members of the roster were informed. He would no longer be on the team as mentioned the athletic first reported this incident. Coach is what is your reaction to this. is sad because because obviously you're starting to see continuous incidents happen and you hate to see that kind of spiral. Start to take place where the kid and you know. I know as a black coach. I've been View said that term a lot this show already but as a black coach knowing what some of these kids go through to get to where they are and a lot of people don't understand about a lot of these kids and i'm not excusing his behaviour but a lot of these kids suffered trump. When you grow up in a neighborhood were gunshots is bringing out all the time or the potential for you to get rob. Is there all the time or or polices. Is you know basically occupying our neighborhood. There's trauma that comes. That can tell you from from the standpoint of my own personal trauma. Because i lived in the neighborhood like that and i know where this kid is promised so is unfortunate to see him. In these circumstances you hope that people around him can help him and galvanize him and get his career and his life back on the right track to where because he's super talented. Nba players. Not the question is is. Can we get all of the other stuff taken care of and you know i know. Jbs tried to do everything they can for the kid It works out for you know when these kids come out of college and you have these issues. People sometimes think oh he has money. He's an nba no status that these problems might not they might go away and this is not always the case and i think these teams. They don't think like this. They think for me. I think every team should have a former player. A player s looked up to on their team in our recommended director personnel. Like that with these guys can go to encompass. I'm not seeing a therapist like that. But someone they can go to and confidence a yale out this issue have this problem so they can talk to someone so they can have a big brother or father figured they can talk to because these guys need sometimes need an outlet and you have outlets on the court when you burst out because you can't go to someone and yell and scream curse even tell my kids some days. If you want to read a friend you need to let some things. I do it because once you get it off your chest you feel better than we can solve the problem and teams do have those resources now more so than when back back in the day but it's also up to the players sometimes to take advantage of them and as you point now guys can be. They can be closed off about that stuff because they dealt with so much trust issues like some of these guys are really. They trust anybody to tell anybody anything and what he's talking about is really important. I really spent a lot of time with the knicks. Bring it back all her former knicks trying to get them talking to the guys engaging with them about their experiences their ups their downs the pitfalls that game. There's that can happen at home. Things that can happen with family. So that is a critical part of our our job for these young guys and hopefully again can we get him back and get him on track to be a good professional and live a good life. Well we will keep watching that one all right coming up zion williamson played a little bully ball against the kings on sunday. Is this the version. Zion we've been waiting for stick around to find out ever buy something and then it like pants. They fit great at the store. But after awhile you avoid sitting in them they're itchy and the windshield wipers are hard to find okay. We're talking about cars here. That's why carmax is introducing the love. Your car guarantee with twenty four hour test drives in a thirty day. Money back guarantee you can take a car home and get comfy with it because sometimes you just don't know it fits until you fall asleep on your couch and sorry talking about pants again. Carmax which should be fifteen hundred mile limits carmax dot com for details. Dr king you know the first name you think of when you think of the city of atlanta. It's hard to describe it. The you definitely understand. I mean what he's done for for atlanta and just. I mean georgia loan. Just that in itself. You understand the history and you understand what he's done for the state and for this city he's stood for equality for openness in every aspect being that atlanta's such a heavily african american populated city. And i feel like his legacy truly resonates with people here. You know when you talk about city edition. There's nothing better than we can do to represent city of atlanta than in rolling out some jerseys that represent dr king and the legacy of dr king every year to nba honors the life and legacy of dr martin luther king junior this year. The atlanta hawks will honor the civil rights icon with commemorative jerseys with the letters m. Okay beginning on. Mlk day january. Eighteen very first idea that i had was. It would be amazing if we could honor dr king's legacy in an elevated way with a uniform back just on king day but throughout an entire season the black and gold represents dr king and his fraternity. The stars on the jersey represent the many times. Dr king was arrested fighting during the civil rights movement. By feel like for me just gives me a little bit of a edge a little bit more of a chip to play harder and proved the city. They baleno that we earned these letters as we have been pushing so hard to tell. Our fan atlanta hawks. Mlk black and gold jersey. And i think when you really understand some of the details people are going to be excited to have that jersey on and come to atlanta hawks game at it's atlanta. It's mlk tim va. There's nothing that's going to be able to top that. The hawks have also brought dr king pride to their hardwood floor continuing the theme from the jerseys and adding a mosaic pattern reminiscent of stained glass motif in a church. Twenty twenty one. We went in strong because we all had a similar dream in the sense of you know collaborating with one of our in almost favorite sons of atlantic. The hawks have committed to donating profits from the mlk nike city addition jersey sales to help promote economic empowerment in the black community ensuring that these jerseys have a greater impact. Well beyond the around. It's almost transcends a person but it's really the actions that you would take towards equality and disrespecting everyone in the ways in which they should be respected this year even honoring them even more Things going to be even more special to the city in starts in a fantastic work from our spears in the end of his story. Is that the vatican which hosted several players in the off season to discuss their push for civil rights actually called the hawks and asked if they could send their mlk jerseys to rome and on friday. The pope bless them to honor their shared commitment making positive change social economic empowerment and love. We have a pope now who puts out statements that quote love. I am all for it and we now welcome in the man who has covered all of this so beautifully. Marc spears from the undefeated mark. I love that feature. We just watch. Thank you for joining us today. And look i wanna talk to you because no one has covered this better and more thoroughly than you. How has this past. Year of civil unrest in this country changed the nba. What we learned from the players as their strength in numbers. You know rachel you were with me in the bubble and and seeing those social justice jerseys and black lives matter on core seeing the three day revolution in which the players decided not to play and that allowed most of the nba arenas to be turned into polling stations. That i think definitely had an impact on the election. Certainly in georgia. I mean they certainly show that they have strength and i hope the players don't forget to use that strength whether as forget more. Gm's or or more coaches and then also you know. Now we're seeing with the with the memphis grizzlies. I think in terms of honoring. Mlk no one has done a better for them they. They've had a symposium and celebration for nineteen years now that i've been blessed to be a part of I got interview jaren jackson this time around. And he's been really really big on voting. And i expect to be in the future also during this time during those visits a chance to go to the national civil rights museum which if you have been as impactful place and the one thing that stood out to me of all things that have stood out to me is towards the entrance you see from Global impact slavery half from sixteen nineteen thousand nine hundred sixty one and a depiction of what it was like for africans to be basically squeezed to the bottom of these slave ships and brought to the americas you know think about when we watch these athletes. This day we have to remember. It's not just. Today is every day in the black community for these people to see what's going on and to recognize injustice in detroit to even play field feel sorta say and and i love the fact that these players now have the platform to speak their mind to say what they want to say because we play we wanted to say stuff but we were a little too afraid to say some could get black and you could not play and you want to provide for your family. So hey have a better future. But now these guys they're stepping up and saying we don't care we don't use that platform because now you see it. There's a magnifying glass on us. So now when you say something bad. They're going to see we say some good they're gonna see us so that means the people of the world because social media and it's such a great feeling for me to watch each and every guy. Nba step up and try to have a voice and try to say. Hey this is wrong. This is right in just to try to bring his world together because right now we have a lot of issues with social justice. The the the the Cove nineteen so. I'm just today is a proud day for me to see these people step up and i gotta say this atlanta's anywhere those jurors. I love them. There's no doubt things have changed since you were playing in the league. First of all the salaries endorsement money has gone up. So if you get quote blackballed by one sponsor or one team. That is non layton. Do you have other ways to take care of your family but also as mark pointed out strengthened numbers man. You read some of the biggest stars in the nba. When dwayne wade chris. Paul lebron james carmelo. Anthony stood up on that. Sp stage and said we challenge all athletes out there. This is a priority to stand up for the people who are not being spoken for. And i think that really unleashed an incredible sense of ownership from these young. Nba players have incredible crop of under twenty five players in the nba. Who do for their communities before they even do for themselves and really again. You have some the elite players in the lead taking a lead in it. In fact. Stephen jackson just let the cat out of the bag. That kyrie irving has bought a house for the family of george. Floyd floyd stephen. Of course close friends growing up together in south texas phys kyrie. Be a leader. You can i. There's a lot going on with kyrie irving right now but it should not escape anyone's attention. He has been a leader in this fight for social justice. And we've seen several other players step up if you were advising some of the young players in the league. What do you think comes next for them. What can they do with this power that they now know they have to continue to utilize your platform to elevate the communities issues right at really start thinking about law changing right and start getting into what is the root of the problem and the bottom line is what everybody's asking for us. Can we get to a basic set laws that everyone can live by so that no one's dying unnecessarily i mean i don't think that's a big ad when you really think about it and i think the players have to continue to keep that pressure on with the connection to the community and pushing forward and bring it using a platform to do it. You know i was in. That situation than memphis wasn't popular. And we were trying to get down statues of nathan bedford force and And jefferson davis. And i was feeling like robert say it. Should i do this right right there. I had coaching i head. Coaching job. On young black coach will will. I suffer for this cat. Was just starting to kneel and stuff like that. And i had to do it because this is the home of dr king and now you're starting to see corporate is getting behind these young people and that's was really pushing over the hump as the corporate world is supporting our basketball guys and really started to put pressure on all of these look. What happened with the redskins right. That was a corporate push. Absolute changed that name now. What you're seeing is players are starting to recognize. We got a lot of power here and they're using it the right way and they gotta keep that pressure going. Do you think is next for nba players. I hope they keep the education for what he did in memphis and what he did in new york standpoint but i remember talking to a young star player. I'll just say that last year and ask them about martin. Luther and he said you really did a lot of good things. One important american on crushed me to hear young black man. Say that so. I think there needs to. I don't depend on. The schools needs to be more education at home. All learned about was mlk rosa parks malcolm in school But i implored a players and off parents to show their kids eyes on the prize. Like my mom. Let me see american center and see the movie. Selma and read up on martin luther king and other civil rights leaders because they're just so much to learn a. I don't think we should depend on the schools. Teach education reform. You here donovan mitchell. Talking about it all the time mark. You're gonna stick with us coming up. We're gonna look at the head to the nightcap of tnt's mlk day tripleheader between the lakers warriors. Is james weisman already. Living up to the expectations for him in the bay. Stick around to find out we will discuss. Do you own or rent your home. Share you and i bet it can be hard work you know. It's easy bundling policies with geico. Geico makes it easy to bundle your homeowner's or renter's insurance along with your auto policy. It's a good thing too because you already have so much to do around your home. Go to geico dot com dente quote and see how much you could save. Its gyco easy. Visit geico dot com today. That's geico dot com foreign next segment. Here's where he came. Weisman james wisely iron rookie from state warriors. This is my diary done defeated. James is going to be our starting center before too long. Long-term starting center fielder. Bill steve kerr to introduce me as the stars because just like art our little sudafed. I love i love fresh stuff. I mean i love studying fairmont. Those great players giant robert come on in. Welcome back to the jump. I am joined by david. Robert ory and marc spears and that was a clip from james wiseman video. Diary diary with mark and the undefeated. So mark do you think. Wiseman is living up to expectations so far for the warriors. Oh most definitely certainly. These expectations are very very high. I them two years ago. He's most president high school kid i've ever talked to. He speaks mandarin He says he wants to own fast. Food restaurants any has game. I saw hoops summit practices that he was special before the draft. There was one scout told me that he was going to be a combination of david. Robinson chris boswell five rays which probably be a hall of famer and so far so good seems to getting better with every game Draymond green is in his ear and he's listening and he's an interest frappes and he's got his f one fifty coming to san francisco soon drive around instead of a ferrari. Came bit harari. When you talk about always wanna talk about expectations you know. What is the team's expectation. What is kerr's expectations. Because he needs to go out and just play his game. he's playing with three one is out with three dynamic players who've got rings who All star appearances so he just needs to sit back learn. I love the fact that he's still doing his thing. Because one of my favorite things is vernon maxwell you always used to tell me why you do what you do. Do what got you here. And that's what he's doing he's just going out and playing his game not trying to be disguised that guy just being itself and doing what comes natural. He's always here with drama. He's always going to drain. Because why dr mazar defensive player. He knows a game. He's one of the best of getting people involved. So why was limited learning from the best. These kids grow fast. Surrounded with a bunch of talent like no pressure is on him. At all. And i think i was on. The show will probably three weeks ago and we were talking about klay went down. The warriors was done. A lot of people were writing them off and a big reason why the warriors are in the playoff. Conversation is because this right here and this kid's going keep moving faster. He's bringing the ball up. He's cross over guards. he's finishing with either hand. I watched one game suit and threes. He is dynamic. You add that to the mix of what gold stay does and the championship pedigree like you said draymond player defensive player of the year steph. Mvp he's learning from the best absolutely all right mark. Thank you so much for joining us today. We will see you again soon. Everyone else stick with us because coming up. We're talking about the clippers. Their improved chemistry was on display last night and they talked about it after the win. But is that chemistry here to stay. The panel will weigh in next one. That's once white once last single bank brennan delete. Qb's resolute kenneth on t. d.'s. Crossing over step behind. Don't need to watch the cloud because you know what danger ought to push us. Bruce lee showing mercy fast five got the crew on dupree. No-one knows goes deeper. The espn download. Now all guys magic knicks kicking off the mlk day nba slate from madison square garden earlier. Today fourth quarter knicks. Up three td. Aaron gordon nailing. The three magic tying the game for the first time after being down by as many as fifteen under two minutes left magic down to here off the jump ball shot clock running down terrorists bras. Shot magic taken the firstly that the game eighty one eighty game tied at eighty one to randall episode. This gordon wrote a throws it away. J barrett taking it all the way for the labs right war and the knicks win. Ninety one eighty four to see your old student get. I want to get to the clippers. Everyone the clippers blew out the pacers last night by thirty three points. It was a balanced attack. Seven clipper scored in double figures. Here's marcus morris. And paul george on the teams improved chemistry this year. Take a listen. This is really interesting. Energy is way better this season. Thank god the by geyser. Enjoy playing a game and there's been a lot of talk about pg. I should've gone into the season. And like i said lands game. I'm excited excited to see how far he can take it. Real bond man is fine You know this is locked in where together minded best locker rooms. I've been around and been in. You know it's it's just you. Hopefully you guys see. Just how well we. We were matching in We're don't continue to build that you know we like we're add like where we're headed and we wanna see this team play. All the way through. Robert moore has also said last night he said we got in a room with the beginning of the season. And we just got it all out. Put it behind us. Do you buy that. The chemistry is as good as last night and that these issues are behind them up. Still wait no now. I'm still waiting on that because it's always easy to say that and throw it out in the universe and hope that it happens and everything's is always good when there's no adversity with symbols bercy smack in the face. How you acting. We can have this. We will have this. Come that every thirty point win and guys are saying this because they're trying to make themselves believe this in thailand there. He's gonna emphasize that lot and we. Pg start emphasizing and say. Hey i got to make up for what i did. The playoffs and with coup. Why by knee and say oh. I'm going to play back the backs. I'm going to be here for you. Guys i m as it means a lot. People don't understand when you eight nine hundred people. You need to go practice. No we all need to practice so we can get this report and play together the team. I think with these guys starting to do that. They're buying in. And maybe this can carry over and we can have a good playoff series from those guys yes a small sample size obviously And you wanna drop. Kick the fifty point out the out the window. You kicked out one now. Overall plan fantastic basketball. You gotta admit that and four. Yeah of the day. That's what i'm looking at is. How how well are they winning. An are they winning and they're doing both and so I think t lose during the heck of a job of getting guys to buy into the role. I think all the noise about paul george early on brought all those guys together. Yeah it happens that way. Well we got lebron in miami you amber to the as what what it did for us. Every buying the locker room surrounded on put their hands on so i think. That's what's happening with the clippers right now. Really interesting And let me tell you mcmorris. When he gets you to circle up in the locker room is real gobi. No bs hash it out and wants you walk out of that locker room. That's where stays and so. I do think they're on the right. Track of getting together and the big test will be when they get squeezed in the playoffs. So it'd be interesting to see but they are building. They looked great last night. Before we go. Bucks safety mike edwards had a game sealing interception. That helps send his team to the nfc championship last night. That nice sideline kick off the tip pass. We'd take a second to appreciate the jays jordan. Once every i'm so jealous these guys these guys wearing. Mj's plan football. I'm jealous 'cause we're not gonna play softball when we used to get together. I need some of those. Yeah that's that's that's those to robert and the hawks me perfect before we go blazers coach. Terry stotts said that. Cj mccollum will be valley reevaluated. In one week he's out for at least a week on that sprained left foot. So thank you everyone for joining us. Martin luther king day. Let's take a deep.

Martin luther king nba hawks memphis nets robert ory james harden national civil rights museum pacers Robert ory atlanta cavaliers grizzlies David phys dale katie kyrie jan cro atlanta hawks whoa jr James
034 - The Gift of Music: Gale Jones Murphy

Phil's Philosophies

1:10:00 hr | 1 year ago

034 - The Gift of Music: Gale Jones Murphy

"Convince someone in the very back of the crowd through a cheer. Tear-gas bomb into the crowd and the crowd from the very bad started stampeding toward the front toward the stage secret service jumped onstage surrounded correct Scott Gang and all the other dignitaries with classes now also had guns. They work on stage. Policemen were on. The side of the crowd was running and somebody looks me and said something so. I play running insert. There's a picture of that in the Civil Rights Museum methods tea and realize that Guy. Give me the gift of music for more than just playing in the four walls of my congregation. I mean I would've been satisfied it. That's all he wanted me to do but he was taking the gift giving me to be able to where it was used at each team. You're listening to Gail Jones Murphy. And African American woman. With the history of music coursing through her veins with seven hundred songs written and hopeful. Three hundred and ten more to go. Mrs Gale is still fulfilling her dreams. Next year she'll be performing at Carnegie Hall a Prophetic Dream of her father. Gifted pianist and singer Mrs Gale describes her gift of music and how her talent has put her in all sorts of different circumstances. Mrs Gale has seen it all becoming the first BLACK STUDENT TO ATTEND MEMPHIS junior academy and Highland Academy while also becoming the first female and the first black person to become student association president of Southern Adventist University. Welcome back to Phil's philosophies hosted by Philip Warfield a young adult on a life journey of self discovery. And if this is your first time here welcome welcome. This is where we kind of discovered what's going on With all kinds of different people's lives and hope to glean from their journeys so in this episode. We discuss MRS GAELS ambitions how. She became the first black student to do a lot of things. Her music her unrelenting love for God and seeking his wisdom and how she was hired from job because of her race this is a part of our covert content series. So bear with the audio on the zoom call and prepare yourself for an incredible experience as Mrs Gale. Plays the piano live just for us. Enjoy the show. Thank you so much for being on the show Mrs Gale. Thank you. I'm so glad to be here. I am that you are here. We met nearly three years ago. And when you told me who you were I lost my mind. I remember meeting you and I was very rest. Thank you will. I am thankful after our first meeting. I wanted to learn a little bit of your story. So you're from Memphis correct. I was living in methods since age three but I was born in Brooklyn New York. Okay well I had nothing to do. But that's where my parents resided at the time moved to nap is when I was three and so a lot of my history of music and my outlook on life and My culture everything was around this Tennessee. So even though you're truly from I guess Brooklyn New York. You really kind of grew up in the south you grew up in Memphis. That's kind of home. It's like I call myself a northern southern girl so absolutely. So what kind of background do you come from? You mentioned a little bit about music. We all know those of US listening know that you are pretty proficient in that regard. So what's your background? Well Dole's my parents were very musical. My father was a member of large van. Actually he added his own bed the big band musician and his claim to fame. Louis Armstrong degree. Jeff Schonberger Taught him how to sing a microphone because they were going from. Megaphones into microphones. The my dad was born in nineteen ten. Wow I have a real history of jazz music and big band music from my debts perspective. All of this prior to becoming a member of the Christian Seventy Venice Church My Mom history of music Grew up in church loving him play piano very poorly but it was really bad but he really had this beautiful soprano voice in. I know your podcast. People can't see this. I'm really excited showy. So you can see this hold on here is a pitcher aumont merits. Wow Yeah for everybody not listening or for everybody listening. Rather I'm looking at a picture of Mr and Mrs Murphy correct or Mrs Mr and Mrs Jones Jones Jones Right. Yeah that hitter. A my dad is the same pitcher. He used on his business card. The name of his band was smiling. Clot Jones in his baby. And that was the pitcher from his business card. So I'm excited. That's a big blow wonderful kids you keep as a remembrance of all the things that they poured into me. And that's why I'm here. Wow so you come from a long line then. Already of musician actually. I have to mention my sibling. Only had one my brother Claude. Joe's junior we just goes back. Claude now is the minister of music. The longview heights some of the administration geneticist For years idea by myself and then when we were young adults together we did it as a A group and then I moved to Florida and so he continued so I couldn't is. He's been doing this for thirty plus years and same for me so way. More than that really. So how did music become such a large part of your life? Of course you have your family who was all in all the time but for you. You know there's always a choice you could have been the one who I guess. The black sheep was like I'm not GonNa do this music thing. So what was it like for you? Well you know how some families have you know. The family business there bakers. They're in construction. Your engineers there. The mafia their music. Okay and it was just is natural for me is breathing. It was it just used out of our cores. Music was the way we woke up. It was the way we went to sleep There really wasn't another question in my mind as to what I do My Dad had told me when I was in first grade. You're GONNA grow up. You will be a music teacher and you will perform at Carnegie Hall. Well one of those things came true. I became a music teacher. I became a music teacher but Just last week. I was asked if I would come with a performing a national group of high school students in a company at Carnegie Hall so next year I will find we live stream for my Lord. Wow as you should be. That is a mess of milestone. That's implantable so what do you think after writing music and performing music for so long? What's your most notable piece that you've created? Oh he'll let bill. That is so hard because to date. I must have at least seven hundred songs. You're asking me to dig back into the animals of time and Okay so how about this? I'll give you the my top three sure. I'll win. I was by. I compose my first piano piece. It was called galloping horses. That's because my dad at the time worked as a blacksmith shoeing horses outside of Memphis area known as German towns in his seat famous for their walking horses while somebody has to put his shoes on the horses at my dad was one of those 'em What me on a horse when I was five and it took off on a gala and it scares me and so I wrote my first piano pieces result. Goes like this Dow and you have five years old. You thought of that. I not taken because I started like yellow three when my parents got me a little toy piano heating trouble and my very first one finger of course side of the church. Play every fourth set of at my church But my pastor's wife who was a wonderful pianos suggested to my mom make sure that. Gail learns to read these. She should take piano lessons. So I started a formal lessons at age six Bella loves classical music. fell in love with Chopin and Then I enjoy music on my own. Maybe without his about eighteen or nineteen in college. Actually I'm now it southern and my very first he's that wrote a Bolo keys call dedication and somewhere out there. There is an album yes. I stayed album made out of vinyl and it's called dedication. It was an album with Jesse Martin one of my school classmates and Myself Gail Jones ad. I just thought that Wonderful League am. He is he I hope that this podcast does that justice because I just witnessed a mini concert. Right here. We're talking about this over over zoom. This is incredible. Thank you God bless you. I had so many songs since. Then I've written a lot of choirs and They are songs out there. That people have hurt. Maybe they didn't know it was mind but it's okay I just enjoy writing so Get you one last favorite. It was because I visited the island of Jamaica and back in the ninety. I like that I like that. I know I had so many I into ballots right if you I write a ballad about tissue floating down the Walmart something but I'm just trying to listen out how what's freaks and so. My songs had changed over the years. I mentioned that one of dedication that line that says may on live ravine and that with my desire at age nineteen of always limit to live in and be used of God now my desire his shipped it I way older than nineteen and I just want to work with God. There's there for them. Not just working for him. I WanNa work with him wanting to do some wonderful things through me and and I listen out for his suggestion. Yang your little one. The other day I was putting out my recycle Bin Justice. The recycled truck was coming. And I'm excited. Because every two weeks they home in this being was pretty full and after he had mechanical army lifted up recycle over into the truck and he went on around the core. I'm moving the Ben. Back to my house and look inside and discover because a cardboard box has been waged down inside half of the recycled minister of oil. I'm going home is going to be another two weeks with all the water originating. Now betting is going to be so I just sit. We sit that truck to come back now. I know he's on a tight schedule. Yes so many people in the subdivision there is no way of everything that trump ever come back Downer street but outright I mean not have been three minutes later heard the truck of blocks away so I walked to the corner and I'd just Wade from a block away my hand and I don't know how he saw his truck. Hey Man I must not have gotten all of your recyclable and I said no you did hold up. Let me go get the stuff out the kitchen and the garage being go get the recycle being. He shook mechanical arm to make sure that everything was empty. I wish to God bless you told him to please me say thank you so much. I appreciate that and realize I at just experienced an answer to prayer. I wasn't up. Really large prayer. Distantly said GonNa need that truck to come back but and a realize I might need to start praying for bigger but I'm working with guy I mean. I think it was important for me to Allah. Just God bless you to recycle dot. Maybe it was more important. Is that that it was for me to get all my empty water bottles. Wow I love that. I love that you're working. Your music has kind of led you to God. I want to live for you now as I've grown older. I WanNa work with you and that means in everyday life for you so whenever you can you're looking for that way to continue to work with God and that shows the your music and you've written over seven hundred pieces you said over seven hundred but that's not my goal you want to know what it is absolutely though in the book of Kings Chapter Four Verses Thirty two it does record that King Solomon. Boo was the wisest man that ever lived and the richest the Bible says no one will ever be as wise up. No one will ever be as rich as but he didn't say no one whatever right as many songs as we wrote a thousand and by at sweat it's recorded and I got for five more than solid fats. Michael I gotta go back to the catalog. I probably or gotten as many as I've written but sometimes new inspiration strikes at the oddest times. And you're just trying to ride on the back of the Napkin or hager towel and try to work with me. I flatter Hammad's alley phone So many ways. But but yeah. That's where I am at this point and that's all it sounds like a lofty goal based not You know you're familiar with the hymn writer. She wrote lyrics. Banney crofty the Kim writer who wrote A. Jeez you look at her lyrics especially that second birth it talks about visions of rapture now burst on my sight here with a sightless. Warren who use the play on words like that a lot if you just have to go back and look at her song she wrote eight thousand eight yet you so I'm saying why she could do this without vision. Hey I think my little thousand. Inchon goal is doable. Yeah that's incredible. Wow so music has always been a part of your life and I want to talk a little bit more about your high school in your college career. Because of course music is it's like the back the back story for everything that you do but at the same time you were experiencing quite a few things that really really alarmed me when you were telling me a couple of years ago so i WanNa talk a little bit about some of those early memories so the earliest days in your academic life. You had some racial difficulty. Of course you're living in the south and you were in Memphis Dr King Junior. Wish Avis. Start there let's go all right so when the eighth grade My eighth grade year Dr Martin Luther King was killed in Memphis Tennessee. I was not fortunate to go here. He is last week which said I may not get the mountains with you. What my brother and my father were able to go that night. I had such a severe Colin back. My mom bought. It might have been the flu. She kept me in. It was raining. She stayed home with me and my father. My brother with the heat. They were excited. It was a a long before he be assassinated. And this is when I knew I always knew. There was racial tension in my city of using black people could not be out on the street after sunset. They were being arrested where there were riots and people were sad. I Never Seen My dad cry. Grown men cry And we knew that I my heart. I knew something happened but it something else. I knew I was here for purpose and I was going to do something but I didn't know what the next year. There was a commemorative March in Memphis to honor. Dr Martin Luther King Remember. He came to notice to fight with a sanitation worker. Who were being treated less than and they had signs up saying I am a man they were not treated you and And Rock we had this really big sanitation strike on telling you garbage. The stink but on the people were caring their own garbage to the dumpster. My parents wanted me to understand that I too As we talk about freedom from sin on this world we have We have to fight for justice and so that year in On fifteen out there was a commemorative March and they have a platform bill of Coretta Scott King. The widow was coming route. Abernethy was there. Julian bond was there Mayor Mayor Young was there on my is one of the Kennedy's was there. It was a big deal and they had everybody in place except for someone who could play piano. I Li- not my dad had gone. As far as the adventists we call them. Adra now but it was an agonised health relief service. He had the truck he had on his uniform and badge. And we're we're giving things like I stayed in water. Those kinds of things are huge crowd of people but they didn't have anyone who could play piano member. My Dad rushing home said mom get her dress she's going on stage and had a little My Dad got me a an electric worldwide search Yale which we talk and hope it up on stage and I have the honor of playing things like congregation to say well. It wasn't a congregation with crowded of people outside thousands and I it was wonderful. I was sitting on sage. They didn't have a chair for me so I sat on my little. Soom the entire time and listen to all the speeches in then someone in very very back of the crowd threw a tear tear gas bombs into the crowd and the crowd from the very bad started stampeding toward the front toward the stage. Secret SERVICE JUMPED UP ON STAGE SURROUNDED CORETTA Scott King and all the other dignitaries men with glasses now also had guns. They were standing onstage elite. Were on the sides. The crowd was running. And somebody looks at me and said something so I I. It is sort saying. There's a picture of that in the Civil Rights Museum Memphis I'll T- and I realized that Guy. Giving me the music for more than just playing in the four walls of my congregation would have been satisfied. That's all he wanted me to do but he was taking. What the gift that you're giving me to be able to be use wherever and I with us there at age fifteen nine you. My life was really something special. I remember courageous. Got Him looking at me and noddy and smile was like. Wow Yeah actually happening so when I was invited well when I left the eighth grade and I needed to go to my junior academy it was just across town. This junior academies. Oh what is it about? A hundred and three hundred and five years old at his. Wow but they had never had any African American students to come to this school so in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight my friend Melanie. I became the first African American students that were ever in that. So were ninth grade The very first assembly the principal gets up and says I understand. There's a girl here that can play piano. Her name is Gail Jones. We're going to ask her to come up and lick. I was nervous. This was my first time being insured. These up close and personal the White America Lonning I. I knew I knew we in our city. I knew when I wrote the regular city bus. I needed to sit in the back as a child. I knew that I couldn't sit in the front. Because that was not reserved for colored people. I knew about color. Water fountains restroom facilities. That were less. They end for Looks like me. I grew up not ever going to arrest shop because there was a place that would serve him. I remember growing up knowing to my doctor will People come around to the side door. Only white people come in through the front so I knew that so ran. I got a chance to go to this academy. I'm saying these are my cells. They have been to Christian friends. Shirley things will be different so I called up to play at the assembly and all my new classmates just jumped in sheer And I was like. Oh Kay wonderful. I realized then that gift of music was going to open doors and make room for me. Where something else would not so. I enjoy making wonderful friends friends. Who had blond hair and reate here and Brunette hero various shades because that was not something. I was accustomed to I remember. Running homeboy first day of school month is so how was it? How mom there's so many different shades a pair and I color or I didn't know that so I loved it and I'm adventurous. And I find found myself. D- join making friends with people and they enjoy making friends with me but I did experience some issues. I remember my tenth grade year. We had a special assignment to go out and pass out tracks And for as many tracks as you pass out you could increase your grade. Average in the Bible flat really. Yeah so I was excited at wet dot. You know. The next day was the they were driven out with school. So that I could go in. I was told by both my homeroom teacher and the principal that I could not go. They were afraid for a black girl to be in the crowd with White Students in Memphis Tennessee. And so I could not get the extra credit and the teacher says it doesn't matter because besides you have a average anyway. That's not what bothered me. What bothered me was my friend. Sitting next to me has c average and today he had a day effort that bothered me because he never studied. Didn't he didn't do the work in our realize they're always going to be inequality is always going to be injustice but I need to not let that stop me from being low us and stopped me from pursuing greatness so I would law on through it I could sit there and be angry or tried to speak out or do something so I just get rolling Left Ear Inn went to highland academy is important to the sea just above forty miles or so north of Nashville when I arrived I've witnessed because my my friends from Mrs Junior Academy we're going. There was just agile segway. I had so many wonderful phrase I wanted to continue going to school with them so while highly handy. I realized quickly I mean within the first five minutes I was. The only black student built like a chocolate chip in vanilla ice cream factory. Were you the first one and I was there. And they made up a rule in the handbook for me. They knew are coming. And there was the rule that said bow shalt not wear any outrageous hairdo such as Afros. Sure yes sir So I wore as many as I cool but I enjoyed my highland academy experience. I learned some valuable lessons. I didn't let Racial inequality stopped me from pursuing what I knew I needed to do. I was there to get my education. Most of the students were very tied in very gracious but Getting their upbringing and background literally would not fit next to me. Wouldn associate with me and talk with me because he had some know racial slurs and some derogatory words for me but I knew I could rise above that because I knew I was gonna see. My parents raised me to believe that I was no less or new better than anyone else that we all lit blue cross. And everybody's blood was the same color. Jesus die for all of us and so. I just didn't let what their ignorance. I didn't have to be direct because they understand. One particular incident was a principal of my academy calls me in for playing for Chapel. The song was Oh when the saints go marching. You allow me. Platelet yes please. It was chapel on that Thursday and the students love this song because I would lay it with all my heart so it goes anyway with weight. Well principle call me in in San Gail. The way he played today in Chapel was just not write as what was wrong about it. Did I miss any no? No he said it was too jumpy. I said what are you made? It had too much rhythm had seen much beat and is it really any said yes now. I'm sure you are used to playing it that way among your people that is he a mystic. Wow He'd been sick and he said I want you to change it otherwise you won't be able to play anymore and I said okay. So the next week the students called for you guessed it. Oh when the saints go marching you so I played it like this. No I am. Heartbroken ee calls me back into the office and he looked at me. He said I was wrong. Go back to. My principal is retired and He has gone on to come. Superintendent of Education Layer on for the North American division. Wow He is retired and still living today and tells the same story. In fact a few years ago I went to the nursing facility on senior living facility not far from where I live and very was was a sabbath afternoon. It was a worship concert and I was asked to play and he introduced me and told the story and I laughed and said well. Nothing's wrong with your memory. That was true. Yes definitely we laughed. He asked for forgiveness because he said I just didn't know any better now. That was my academy. So now auctions a southern with southern missionary college lease allow makes us sing the Southern Missionary College thinking song in your roby. Draw IN THERE DEAN LOUIS. So for all the southern students who are probably listening to this podcast me even as a former president. I had never heard of our old songs. I try to find these kinds of things because you know every heaven is school High School College. They all had one. I never heard that before. Oh yes my brother. That was it. So nineteen seventy four. When I ran for Student Government President I ran on the platform. Reykdal well you one eight. That's how I But you know I really did not hold true to that promise. I guess that's my only regret I'd never did. Writing New saw and now for college at name is changed from Southern College. Athletics College now. Southern Advocates University and Yes so I still own the school assault. 'cause they are alleged. You will be waiting. Flynn yes yes yes yeah I promise you won't know nineteen seventy four the seventies there were a lot of things going on campus Interracial dating was a hot topic there were people thought it was biblically wrong. I don't know where they got that from. There were people I could not have a white roommate unless the dean got permission from the girl's parents. Wow Sir room with a black student but no one had to get permission from the parents so at Ray. Wonderful College Roommates. Who Am I? Keep in contact with one just as early as last week just last week. my friend dawn on she's a lawyer now and we laugh about those as but talk about the racial inequities and we formed a bond that over the years. We're not happen. Had I gone somewhere else so I believe Led Me to southern for such a time. Nisa before we talk a little bit more about southern. I do want to ask you about why you as a black seventh avenue and even a musician why did you choose to go to Southern Missionary College and not to okay so I choose? I did not my mother had attended Oakwood College which is now Oakland University and due to health reasons finances. She was not able to finish her college education. She left would end the return back to Greenwood Mississippi now in the delta where she had been raised was sworn She attended a junior college. They never finished her college degree. So I'm GonNa pass for for moment mom. My mother was a wonderful sweet woman but she died very young age. She died at age forty two. I was fifteen at the time the year before that the year. I went to highland Cabbie. My mom died and made a conscious decision that I would attend Oakwood so that I could finish the degree in her name. Atkin her memory in her honor. In fact my mom was taking classes necessary university and she was in the second semester of her senior year when she died as a straight a student back her. I vividly remember these people. Were calling the house asking mom for her notes in College Saying Hey we know you best notes can you help without In here she is literally it was a couple of weeks before she died so Mom's really cheer brilliant mind and So I wanted to go to Oakwood. My Dad never had the opportunity to attend college. He had been offered a football scholarship but Just due to poverty and lack all he did not attend and that's not unusual for African American men. But he you know he became very good with his hands and he was the Jack of all trades. You hurt me say that. He was a blacksmith. He was a school bus driver. He was a barber. Bene- mortician A carpenter there wasn't anything my dad quit did but neither one of my parents had ever graduated from college so I became the first in my family to do that to honor and do for them what they could not do it so I wanted you to Oakwood and I chose whoever I call the president of the College at that time. Who was a good friend of our family? Doctor Calvin Rock had just finished a crusade. Some years ago when I was fourteen years old in Memphis and I had been one of the pianist was a crusade berry. Black was a young sneaker and was a master and young teenagers. He was eloquent in his speeches and I was the pianist. So I knew these people and I just knew I would be able to go to Oakwood Dr Rot. Just apologized and said we have no room. We have no money. We have no space in the dorm. Scholarship and I- firm believer that when God opens doors nomad can shut them but when he shuts doors no one can open them and try hard is I might. I could not get that door open to go to Oakwood on the flipside. Dr Franklin is who was the former residents of southern had seen me age fourteen again adult Bible conference it. I'm going to remember her. And I said I needed to go to college. And he heard from Highland Academy. There's a young lady who is going to skip her senior year and she needs a place to go to college and he offered me a scholarship. And that's how I ended up at southern and now and you were even able to skip your senior year of high school. Well yes a little bit of that. Brilliant so my mom passed on into my jeans but I have to say unfortunately I wondered it back freshman year at southern I major in fun and activities. I'm minor in boys and I made very good grades in both those areas and I lost my scholarship. Wow I D it ideas on academic probation. But again God's gift of music that he is allowed allowed to flow through by this time about the singing in both the corral And the choir accompanying various things that was in every talent show every program and I realized that were two things. One was the gift of music and unfortunately. I just have to haul it like it is weighted some racial diversity and I was in there. Were eight let students out of eighteen hundred. My first year at southern your first year was nineteen seventy four. My first year was nineteen seventy one. Wow and just eight yeah eight. Yes yes no yes. Eight eight three. There were five girls three young men outfits army to get one and my friend Jesse Martin and I were very good friends. Girlfriend boyfriend did a lot of singing in duets on the campus. And we're still really good friends today. We didn't get married We still remain very good friends and he still is excellent. They're just what was the last week? Console it's amazing. Those friendships and of things that we experienced in college would not have been formed head. I gone to Oakwood I wouldn't know that then but the reason I ended up in Florida as a teacher at Forest Academy is because I went to and not awkward and so God does need are. He doesn't ever give a straight line. I'm sure wish that we'd be all light. But he takes us through crooks and tar heels bally's and we learn from those things and we grow stronger and my biggest lesson learned in southern has carried Megyn life which is be comfortable in your own skin. I never had to run around and prove that I was African American. I mean I could get up in the morning and look at my face in there of course but again. I hear the words of my parents that said I know less than and I'm no better than I'm gots. Child and I had an opportunity now to rub shoulders and meet people who had misconceived ideas of African Americans whose hearts and minds were changed after having met me. And I'm grateful for that. I am so grateful for that. Always thought that my life would be one where I would be bridging the gap between races and helping to breach the divide not the only one but got continues to use me in that way even now so going to the next form was finding my Florida down in Florida at Forest Lake Academy So I was called in for the interview and I really didn't want because at this point I was on the tenure track at. She'll be state community college In Memphis Tennessee. And I was going to need tenure that year in that the president is offering me early tenure to keep me in the C Guess I told him about his job. Offer down in Florida and I really WANNA come right given up on my dream of teaching an avenue school because I've been going to adventist church school from kindergarten through college and I wanted to give back and help students. Well I get this call so come to Florida an oncoming kicking and screaming but I asked got one son Lord. I'm not sure this is where you want me to be. But if you do let the committee go in and deliberate and offer me a job within fifteen minutes and if they do it in twenty or twenty five or thirty or they don't offer me a job right now and they said we're thinking about it and we'll get back. I will know you don't WanNa come here but if you say they come out at doored say we'd like to offer his job then you want me to be here well. They came out in ten minutes and I ended up with ten years having a wonderful experience at Forest Lake Academy the principal. Was Bob Caskey at the time who hired me and he told me that he was a young principal at Mount Pisgah Kennedy and the visiting corral from southern college raw. Several students who came at hung out at his home of of afternoon they sat around and play the Piano Sang. And I was one of those fecal he said about nineteen years old and he looked at his wife instead one day. I'm going to hire her teacher and sure enough thirty years down the road. It happened in so god God knows. Ways he's doing music is one thing Loving each other is another thing that I know. God called me to do in just being a spokesperson for Algal. God is I guess if there was one last thing I've learned and M. continuing to learn is that When you're working with God he has no age limit in has no age restrictions. I began this journey of music with him at age. Three and last month in March I celebrated age sixty six and of the Lord does the lay his coming any longer. I guess I'll be doing this another forty years or so and yet I I do play on long wonderful ice and continuing to do music as long as he allows me to. How did you keep yourself from being bidder with all these different experiences? You know so. Many black seventh avenue after experiencing discrimination from their church firsthand have left. What's kept you from leaving yourself? You know I get asked the question. Why haven't left God or might search for a lot of reasons? Not just racial reasons too. But they have been a lot of racial inequalities There have been a lot of gender discrimination. I fight double woman. I'm African American now on Chirping. And now I'm old variously now I mean not. Yeah you can hold onto age twenty nine but yes. Let's people think that after you've reached a certain age you're not gonna be able to do whatever and and you're female and you can't do or you're told you shouldn't do or whatever and you're African American and you you know whatever I think it's my real deep abiding faith in my God That that is sustaining. I I've been a prayer prayer warriors since I was a kid. I mean I don't know any other way than to live a life of trust in God I just don't know another way We grew up in wasn't rich in when you didn't have anything. We didn't START LOOKING AT OUR BANK ACCOUNT. We got on our knees and asked So that has been my life and so when I see things that are not right. I Kim You flail away and waste my energy at fighting that or I can just get on my knees and say God you see that on your child you take care of this and he always does. I mean all way Sometimes I feel sorry for some like Lord. You didn't have to do with Mike at Lumber but for real is the abiding trust and faith that though man may not always have mercy injustice my God is merciful and he is a god of Justice and it is whose child I am this. This world is not my home. I mean we. We are doing all we can hear. The oems as worked for the night is coming so we do what we can while. We're live to see it but this is not my file and I'm looking forward to a bad time in a better day. So that's it. That's that's what I love that and going back to your experience you know. Back at southern in the nineteen seventies mentioning. There are only eight people who looked like you and of course. I'm sure even less for faculty and staff. So was there a constant sense of fear? Did you feel like you didn't belong? Well if you have not caught from my talk right now I didn't grow up with sincere Those early years growing up in this when we were living on the country. We grew up walking home in the dark without flashlights. I grew up playing with bugs inspires learning how to kill the snake. If needed. You know those kinds of things helped me learn. Your Life is not easy so you don't have time to be afraid you need to do something my natural inclination you know we have adrenaline. That will keep any. Don't make us either run or fight. I tend to fight. I did the fight. Maybe I should but I invite more than I tend to run so I didn't grow up with a sense of fear and so on those early years when I saw racial injustices or when people would say things that probably should put ear knee. I think I just kind of stood up with a little bit more and got a flex so the spiritual muscles with. Oh No God is on my side so no no so. I don't have time for fear that that's crazy now on. Don't have time for it so there's another story that I believe you once told me when you were seeking employment while you were at southern and you called an employer on the phone and once they I guess they hurt your voice or something like that. They didn't give you call. No no my voice did to them was not the giveaway So I have the I have the voice. That's right I have. And it's quite. It's not distinguishable as as what I'm lights. Look like so that was not at the end of my senior year which was year number five because of that first year My I have five but at the end of my kids year. A lot of the music majors were now looking for places to use their gifts and various academy for calling people. It was very difficult for someone who did not do band and choir to be called. I'll only do choir voice MPM so that was already a disadvantage because a lot of people were called to run both the ban the instrumental and the vocal. That was ideal. That way you can one person do two jobs but there was this a Cami that wanted me it whole why. I was so excited. I come hiding recommended. They needed a coral piano alloys teacher and I came highly recommended from the music department. Southern way talk over the phone they sent me the offer letter and we were so excited and I was leaving the school going home to pack my clothes to hit to Hawaii and about a week after I got home. I get a call that I'll week decided to go on a different direction and I didn't understand why so a callback to the school and they said well. They said they wanted someone who was Mary. Not Someone who is singled they knew. I was unmarried where they offered me the job. They found out in their research that out with African American and they did not want an African American to assume this job so I was on higher and I said Oh my. Wow but I- wit wit wit home to Memphis and I pursued mind. Master's degree and it was while in Memphis that I met my husband Well future husband and we've been married forty years he's talented musician and So I guess Lord knew what he was doing pat ended up in Hawaii. I wouldn't have met right. Oh Yeah Right. I wouldn't Jones Murphy Show yes. That is ridiculous. Almost hiring discrimination. It is hiring discrimination and you were hired before you were hired. That is quite the storm quite the journey. And so you at this point just have faith to keep going to be like well you know what these things they worked out for a reason and we've already heard from your story you've asked got to close certain doors open certain doors and it's happened that's right it's still does still he opens. He closes them question. I don't need to know what he's doing. I just need to know that he's gone. Trust I love that now as we get closer to the end of our time together. I want to ask you. What kind of legacy do you hope to leave? Obviously I would love if you live for the next forty years and kept producing great music and that she reached your great number of two thousand and ten songs to playfully outranking. Solomon but what kind of legacy do you want to live leave? I should say I keep asking what is it. He wants to be remembered. I taught so many students so many of them have gone on to pursue music degrees so many musicians singers gospel artists. R&b Artist and. I don't know I just Lo- let that light shine in. I don't know who's who that a dark place in needs to see the light so I'm just GonNa be a like I don't know I don't know what what that legacy to be. I don't have I don't have it figured out. You know how people that I know what I want to be when I grow up by. Don't know yet though. I'm still teaching I'm teaching currently at Forest City. Adventists school where I teach pre kindergarten through eighth grade. Music classes And after you finish this podcast will be uploading music lessons for the week I teach also at creation village preparatory which is in celebration. Florida and I have kindergarten through sixth grade students. There and I don't know I said Lord you're putting me in front of these young people. Well while the a minds or impressionable. There's a reason you have me here for them. Now because something on my say or do even a music class will change their lives. And I've had many creature who said I sang in your choir. And you're one of the reasons fly. I'm still you know preaching doing for the Lord. I'm Fred who said he had gotten kicked out over Cabbie and he said I was the only teacher that came up to him and says one mistake does not define who you are. Keep going and and that's true because our mistakes do not define this The the love of Jesus defines who we are and so I think if I wanNA leave anything to anybody is just everything I just said yes. That's incredible and while this might seem like the same question. It's slightly different. This is philosophy so I'd like to ask people with their lives. Philosophy is so if you had your own words to live by something that's kept you going in the past and something that propels you to the future. What would you say your lies? Philosophy is okay. Here's something I like to say Do whatever you can while you can because tomorrow circumstances this may take that opportunity away. Do whatever you can while you can. Because tomorrow circumstances they take that opportunity away I was just looking around at my closet this morning. I have tons of clothes that I wish I add or the Kobe. Nineteen stay at home order happen. I wanted to give away to the local thrift store. And they're just piling up in my calling and I can't say I'm GonNa do it today. I'm going to do it today. I yes okay but it takes time back up boxing up and I did so I made a promising start number one. The other thing is oftentimes people will come across your mind and that is an opportunity for either to do one or two things to reach out to then speak with them but for certain it is to just drop in pray for them. Because you don't know what it made me going through right that second that Krier I have been blessed to just stop in principle. People not knowing that at that exact moment what they were going digital they just ran across my mind And then finally appoint. My mom used to quote to me. I don't know the author if a task is one speak gun. Never quit until it's done bay the Labor great or small. Do it well or not at all. That is one that I believe. I've heard my grandmother say to me a couple of times. That's a pretty powerful one. I like that in the last question. I have for you if you're reading something or if you've started a couple of bucks whatever that might be. What would you recommend some of us? Who are listening today. All right so my favorite book about Jesus is a call the desire ages I take it out often repeated his just reading through the crucifixion in his undying love for us is just amazing That will never get old. You Me Love. Songs have been inspired from bad book. I still reading become a by a Shell Obama grim on a promise myself. Doing this stay home. Time that of finished and honestly my stay home. Time has been learning new technology Before code at Nineteen. I didn't do podcasts. In calls. Virtual teams of Microsoft teens. I I need none of that but now I do. Now I do so those those two right now I house is full of books. My husband is an avid reader. Always say book series other girlfriend but but that's okay I always know where he is at home And so they're tons of books on our shells and I may just revisit a few of them but those two for now just to get a Lotta love that well. I want to thank you so much Mrs Gale. But before you leave before you're gone. Yeah you sang a song for my good friend. Mr Rich Garcia. He became the Student Association. President right after me we handed you know you and I handed off leadership. Stick to him and you did through a beautiful video. I was wondering if you could to close us out if you would play that song. Trust in the Lord. It's very pretty rendition. Oh sure trusting May Thank you all so much for joining us on fills philosophies of this week and thank you Mrs Jones Murphy.

Memphis president Southern Adventist University Tennessee Mrs Gale Florida principal Highland Academy Carnegie Hall Christian Seventy Venice Churc Oakwood Gail Jones Murphy Clot Jones Jesse Martin King Solomon Civil Rights Museum US Louis Armstrong MRS GAELS Bible
Invention Playlist 4: The Museum

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

1:10:48 hr | 1 year ago

Invention Playlist 4: The Museum

"Today's episode is brought to you by IBM. SMART is open open is smart. IBM's combining their industry expertise with open source leadership of Red Hat. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work. Learn more at IBM dot. com slash red hat. Guys? It's bobby bones I host the bobby bones show and I'm pretty much always sleep because I wake up with three o'clock in the morning a couple of hours later I. Get all my friends together, and we get into a room and we do a radio show. Wish you're alive. We tell our stories. We try to find as much in the world. Possibly can, and we looked through the news of the day that you'll care about also your favorite country artists are always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music, too. So wake up with a bunch of my friends on ninety eight point seven W. MC in Washington DC or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio, APP. Welcome to invention a production of iheartradio. Hey you welcome to invention. My name is Robert. Lamb and I'm Joe McCormick. Humans are are aware of history that's one of our key attributes, not always though well to varying degrees of history where we have awareness of of of what we think history to be. And not just our own personal history, but history across generations across decades centuries millennia. Even we're aware of what came before via oral traditions, and the evidence of the world around us, even as we continually change in anticipation of the future, and then of course we have recorded history as well, and we have a concept of history that goes beyond concern for literal accuracy about what happened in the past. I think about everything from ancient mythologies, in which people tried to construct a nut, not literally existent version of their past, but something to sort explain the present right all the way to the kinds of mythical histories that people still like to engage in today, ancient aliens. Aliens, and all you know, half the stuff on the history shows on TV. Oh, yeah, inevitably history ends up Melding with myth, and you really don't have to go too far back in history for that to take place for for the historical to become a legendary at least but one thing that makes clear I think is that we have a kind of craving for something that we think of as history that is not always exactly. The same thing is knowing what's actually true about what happened X. number of years ago right right so establishing from the get go that the human of contemplation of history is in itself. kind of a complex thing narrative. Becomes an essential part of it, but also a complicating aspect of it. Yeah, and then there are additional concerns were going to get into now. When we think about history, I mean one of the things about human use of history. Is that We're able to pass information on in a way. That doesn't depend on our genetics, so a big part of it is of course, just recorded history literature about the past but then. There are the artifacts of the past There are the artifacts of the the distant past the the the the relatively recent past artifacts of the present, and all these things find their way into museums. I mean think about what your feeling about ancient Egypt. Could only have read about it, and you never could have seen any of its artifacts, any of its art work never seen images of the pyramids, never seen the the ancient figurines, or the the sarcophagi or anything like that, there would be a necessary texture that would be lacking your understanding of what ancient Egypt was. Yeah, and of course today we have so many tools at our disposal to to say understand ancient to Egypt one thing we just. We have a better understanding than ever before There's still a lot of things we don't know. But we but you know we're at the The bleeding edge of our understanding, right. And and on top of that we have of photography. We have the motion picture. We have a computer imagery. We have a whole host of of inventions that have made it Ba- first of all made it easier for us to understand what agent Egypt was like animated easier for people around the world to get a grasp of it. You know you no longer have to travel to ancient Egypt. As certainly even the Romans did the ancient Romans. Concern in their contemplation of the even more ancient Egyptians in than likewise you don't even have to be able to travel to a museum that has artifacts that have been transported from Egypt. Obviously, you can go to websites. You can go to to books to films etcetera, but the museum is still important. Yeah, that's exactly right and it's important in multiple ways I mean I. I think about the two main ways. It's important number. One of course is just the preservation and display of artifacts to show you what they looked like D- give you the the physical representation, but then I think equally is important. Is the The contextualising literature of museum the? Material, because you know, this is often pointed out by archaeologists and historians that if we only form our picture of a civilization by looking at its physical artifacts, there is a necessary sort of filtering mechanism there. That's time you don't see. All the aspects of the civilization that are prone to that are biodegradable, or that are prone to erosion breaking down over time so I mean th. There's sort of this joke about like you know if you only look at. At the artifacts in you don't read about things or see sort of artists representations of what the other things surrounding these artifacts have been. You could assume that everyone in ancient Egypt Blake walked around in stone close. Yeah, yeah, or the on all the the art though the sculpture in ancient Rome was unpainted, and STOIC and grey I mean it's it's essentially, and this is since the the archaeological in the anthropological are very much like paleontology It's one thing to look at the even the reassembled and The reasonable fossils of prehistoric creature, but then there are all things that did not survive that we have to piece together. To get a full understanding of what this creature was or might have been the the skin across time that can all be represented in the interpretive. Materials of museums, those are I think equally as important as just like having an artifact in preserving it from being destroyed by the elements. Oh Yeah I. Think of the really great museums I've been to, and I've been fortunate enough to get to go to you know a number of them were fortunate enough to live in a city. That has some very nice museums as well. But but there's you know there's a journey you go on. There's there's a story that you involve yourself in when you're when you're in a really good museum or really good exhibit. And I think no part of that, too is appeals to spatial learning for instance free plug for the firm. Bank museum here in Atlanta. they have a section called the George Walk through time and It's something that you know kids that grew up in the Atlanta area. have been going to for a long time and they. They probably end up taking it for granted, but you know there's this spatial journey you do. Walk through time you get to Go through these exhibits. Get kind of a you know a walkthrough of geologic history and. I think that's important. Likewise with with fossils and and reproductions or even a taxidermy, animals, there is something about being in the physical presence of either this creature or representation of this creature that that just gives you a an understanding of it that you don't necessarily get from a book or description or a film, even some sort of You know a virtual reality. Reality Simulation Yeah. That's right, and it's later in the episode. We are going to discuss some of the the potential drawbacks and other considerations to have about museum culture, but there is certainly a thing that is great about museum culture like the the tendency to want to preserve history and explain it right, and to, and also can confusion an emotional connection like I believe it was The Field Museum I believe we were there together because we had work, thing up there, and they had a an exhibit about where they had an artistic recreation of slave ship, and you walk through the hold of it and it's. Just a really emotional experience you're just brings You know I. Remember brought tears to my eyes. You know and it was like that's an example where you know you. You have this positive. Emotional. Manipulation to a certain extent by the by the museum to give you this emotional connection with the topic and I think that's easy to overlook when we think of museums because you can think of them as as just a like a Stewart presentation of artifacts that are perhaps lacking in context or acquire a great deal of reading fine print but I think they could also help you feel the pain and passion of people who have been long dead. Dead Right the Civil Rights Museum here in Atlanta also does a tremendous job through all sorts of multimedia of the being able to like there's one exhibit where you sit at a lunch counter new wear headphones to give you the experience of of me being a protester during the civil rights movement in America and You know it's a little things like that often with with some technological bells and whistles, which if used wisely. Can just really enhance what the museum is able to do. from an educational perspective. That's exactly right and that that's a good point about how you know. Museums today are much more than just. The storage and display of physical artifacts. I mean That's the sort of Classic Museum tradition like you have an object of some kind of significance. It's a work of art or an artifact found through archaeology or something, or you know it's natural history. Maybe it's a mineral or a bone or something like that and that's on display, but yeah, meet. Museums are bigger. Bigger than that now they're. They're in many ways. A sort of just like place you can go to engage with some former other of history right, and it's in or even celebrate it. you know such as when I think of some of our our better science and technology museums. It's like a a space where we're. Science is celebrated and there will be various. Activities going on to aid in that celebration from say a science themed play room for very small children to say a lecture series for. For for older individuals who you know who need something more substantial so I guess the question is. How did human start doing this? Like? When did the museum tradition begin? When did we I? Get the idea that you would that? You would put objects on display or have some kind of a place where you go to interact with educational materials like this right and I think the important thing were kind of skipping over, and all this is that Is, that a museum ideally and in generally the better examples that we tend to focus on are going to be open for everyone, so it's it's not just a matter of oh well. This university has a store room of artifacts or this This institution or this family has some wonderful pieces set aside. You'd love it if you could see it. No Museum is ideally a place that is open to the people, and the and and everyone is allowed to venture in and engage with the materials in. Right, so just the kings of treasure room of like artifacts collected from the you know from the cities he has conquered is not necessarily a museum because that's just his treasurer. Right and you're probably not invited, and it's probably better if you're not invited, right. 'cause it sounds like a dangerous place to venture into. When I started thinking you just sort of casually at first you know about the history museums I started thinking okay well. What are what are some of the museums I've been to? And how old are they and if everyone else does his exercises well I think you'll know that most the museums that come to mind are products of fairly recent history. And, obviously this holds true for the various American museums I visited, and even the British Natural History Museum the product of colonial expansion. It wasn't founded to the nineteenth century. Spinoff from a private collection and in India and we still see that that kind of movement going on to this day. You know you'll have large private collections that are either. Donated to a museum or spun off into a museum of some sort, but the oldest museum in the UK for instance the Royal Armouries in the Tower of London only goes back to fifteen ninety, two with public access emerging in sixteen sixty. Now generally at this point in the podcast. You know we talk about what came before the invention. What was the world leading up to that? Yeah, and I think probably the best exercise here is to is to not to try and think of like a world without museums, but think of the various things in history, bitter sort of like a museum, but not quite. Okay so first of all. We already mentioned like the King's treasurer. Right you know you have conquered many cities in many great lands, and maybe you. You took artifacts that were sacred to them, and then you brought it back to your treasure room and you kept. It locked up for yourself right? Yeah, it's a it's it's. It's certainly kind of like a museum, but not a museum and we should note that many museums. I mean one of the the sort of like counterpoint to the good things about a museum. Is that lots of great museums around the world today do represent a kind of colonial plunder. Plunder yeah, I mean there there are cases. Where is their objects? You know in British museums that are of great historical significance, but that you know were taken from other peoples around the world by colonial invaders from Britain, exactly so the the king's horde of treasures is It's it's not a museum, but at the same time it does have a lot in common I think that's going to be the case with all of these not quite museum examples. We're going to touch on. It's also worth pointing out that you know. It's been long fashionable in in human culture to steal treasures art from defeated adversary. And stuff to blow your mind. We had a couple of episodes about the Ark of the Covenant and of course, the stories of the Ark of the covenant involved. It's It's captured by the Philistines. And later it's captured and possible destruction by the Babylonians and the Philistines were said to have displayed captured arc in their own temple of day on the of course. We don't what extent this you know. There's reality behind this, or if it's just a myth etcetera, but still it. It drives home that like this is. This is the sort of thing. People did. Yeah, they've. They were to crush or defeat an enemy sack. Their cities will, they would take their their treasured back with them right now. Another case from from history that that kind of lines up with a with a lot of the Roman triumphs in which the treasures our wealth into armies of defeated enemies were marched through the city as a spectacle. Along with captives, some to be executed or displayed further so sort of a you know an even more intense example of sort of the more brutal aspects of museum like enterprises seem to recall. There's a scene of this in Titus andronicus. I think like yeah. There's a parade of the enemies, yeah! They defeated some. Tribe or something right in the their their. Famous accounts of that you know, and it's kind of like this awful Roman circus of of Red Rather uncomfortable to contemplate in so we don't want that to be our museums, but then again like the shadow of that is cast over even our modern museums. And of course in the even just in the last century we we've seen museums rated looted or destroy. Do Military action so? You know it's sad. Like continues to be the case when when groups of people go to war with each other treasures, artifacts items of historical recall importance, often targeted. Now the. Rooms full of artifacts are not only created. When say you know a conquering power, colonial power or something goes and takes from one culture and brings back home. People also create rooms full of artifacts from their own culture. I mean a common way you find. This is in tombs, the ancient exactly yeah, I mean unstoppable your mind. Especially we've discussed the tombs of ancient Egypt, the tombs of ancient China in these are these are examples where generally it has to do. Do with some contemplation of the afterlife or the release the idea that if if there is not a world for the ruler to pass into, and presumably take their things, then there is still some continuation of identity in the body is preserved in there for the the items, the wealth, all the material possessions, or some form of them need to be preserved there as well. Yeah, so it's kind of like a museum, but for the most part you were not invited. To enter into. Generally it's it's looked down upon. Yeah, it's not designed to serve in educational purpose, and it doesn't have interpretive materials. These are these are just I'm taking all my loot to the next world. Right and I might put a crossbow trapped in there, just in case you try and enter. Now another we've. We touched a little bit. On, this already s bringing up day gone, but a temple is another example of something that's kind of like a museum, a place where valuable and important artifacts may will be displayed for lots of people, if not everybody, at least for a key demographic to view and admire, and in many cases, the works are instructional in nature, they no means of seeing the form of a god or Goddesses or visually contemplating complex theological concepts like one sees particularly in a Tibetan art. I mean I think about the relics in. The ways that many Catholic basilicas will preserve the remains of sainted person. Yeah, yeah, and then yeah, so we kind of have a dash of the tomb there as well right There's something kind of museum me about that is an object from the past. It's on display for people. Come look at Yeah Yeah. And then there's also the shrine which you know can be something like a tomb and something like temple, but of course they are secular versions of this as well throughout the world I. Mean You go to Washington DC? And you have all the you go to these monuments, these essentially shrines, and these often about celebrating something that is tied to cultural or national heritage, large-scale statues, as well public statues, gently a good example of this as well right now speaking of shrine, this actually brings us to the the word museum itself. So museum derives from the Latin. What is it to motion, which means precisely this shrine to the muses the news is of course where the Greek goddesses of creativity and inspiration Yeah, so so we got a shrine to the muses as the museum, and then that becomes the idea of the Museum I. Guess that Word is coined probably much later to refer to what we think of museums right for instance if we go back to the third century B C, we have the Museum of Alexandria to consider which included the famed library of Alexandria. It was founded by Ptolemy. I soter, and for being WHO's noted for being the traveling companion and Chronicler of Alexander the Great. However, the museum in this case was was not a display of collected art, but a center of learning that ultimately has more in common with a university that we might think of today. In, this was seemingly destroyed in the the late third century see! But yeah, more more like a university, a place of learning a place where learned individuals would gather and celebrate knowledge, so you've got a lot of stuff kind of like this in the ancient world, but nothing that is quite like we think of as a modern museum right? Yeah, I mean you can, you can make a case. Specific museums are museums in general. Reflect these attitudes to this day, but yeah none of these. You can't look at any of these like Oh, well, that was a museum. No, no, it was a treasure hoard. It was really more of a temple so indeed museums are. Would seem to be more of a modern venture right largely rooted in the private wonder rooms or cabinets of curiosities that individuals and families had, and then the more modern museums tend to emerge of these traditions. In fact, you know if you look around for some of the example, the oldest examples of things that are museums you know few that often pop to that often pop up our The the capitoline museums, the oldest public collections, the oldest public section of our in the world This is in Rome dates back to fourteen seventy, one and pope sixty four donation of art to the people of Rome. The Vatican museums have their origin as a public in public display in fifteen o six under Pope Julius Second. But and. We might be tempted to stop there and say oh well. Okay, well there you go this. These are some of the earliest examples but. There is a much older example we're going to get to in this episode. That certainly predates anything that happened with the Catholic Church. Yeah, and this one also I guess is a matter of interpretation because what you define as museum is going to be a matter of interpretation, but this is going to be the earliest known museum, according to Great British archaeologist Charles Leonard Woolley. So, we don't know for sure win. The first museum was created but I think there's a really reasonable chance that the earliest museum we know about was actually the first one in history so let's journey ancient Mesopotamia Oh. Yes, let's do art, so we're going to go to the city of or. Or was once one of the great power centers of Ancient Mesopotamia. and if you see photos of the sand covered ruins of the city in this partially restored Great Ziggurat today, it might be hard to imagine that this was once like a really thriving lush fertile settlement in the ancient world today it's situated in the desert of southern Iraq about sixteen kilometers, or about ten miles from the Euphrates River and and this is a rough measurement that calculated through Google maps. It's about two hundred and fifty kilometers, or about one hundred and fifty miles. From the coast of the Persian Gulf and I've read in some sources that in ancient times or was considered more like a coastal city that I guess the Persian Gulf stretched farther up in into where you would now have southern Mesopotamia now, but in ancient times the Euphrates river it took a different course, and it ran much closer to the city, making it this. This lush fertile place that was was a great place for a city, and it's a place considered the scale of history because archaeologists believe that it was founded. Founded sometime in the fourth Millennium B, C, e so that going to be many thousands of years old us in the early dynastic period of the ancient Sumerian kings, or became the capital of southern Mesopotamia, and this would have been around the fifth century BC so to do a history exercise. We've son sometimes done stuff to blow your mind before just reminding you like how much time elapsed through the part of the world history that we think of is ancient imagine you're Julius Caesar in your living in the first century B C e? To you as Julius Caesar, the Old Kingdom of Egypt, which was like two, thousand, five, hundred to twenty, one hundred BC and the ancient dynasties of Mesopotamia, which would have been roughly the same time those time periods were more ancient to you as Julius Caesar in the Roman Republic than the Roman Empire is to us, while ancient Rome is significantly more recent to us than those ancient civilizations were to the ancient Romans more time pass between Sargon of Cod, and Julius, Caesar, then between Julius, Caesar and US. That's the scale of the history of civilization. And when you think about all that time, all the relics, and remains all those thousands of years coming and going it, it's hard not to realize that the people who are ancient from our point of view, also had to contend with history and the idea of its memory, its preservation and its destruction, and so sometimes history, and even nostalgia can kind of feel like recently invented concept's. They're absolutely not and great. Example is a neo Babylonian king who lived in the city of so this is a man named Nab Anita's. Who was the last real king of Babylon for the city of Moore declined in power in the. The late sixth century BC in was subsequently abandoned over the following decades so Benito's seemed to have a great sense of historical consciousness. He wanted to revive elements of past civilizations from Mesopotamia. One of the things we were reading for. This episode is an article by a professor of languages and literature of Ancient Israel from Macquarie University named Louise's Pryke and one thing that she pointed out. Is that the the saints you king now Benitez is often referred to as sort of like ancient archaeologist king. You sort of like you know one of the first star Kiala. It's sort of an ancient Indiana Jones type here. With sort of except he's a king, so he's got all this power to command with the belongs in a museum mentality. Yes, so Yeah, so so this ancient sort of archaeologist king Apparently he conducted excavations to retrieve lost written records from past civilizations of the area it later in life he attempted to restore the ruins of the Great Sumerian Ziggurat of you're that had decayed significantly by his time. You may have seen representations. Their pictures of the CIGARROA in in what we're seeing is a restoration of NAB Anita says restoration of the Ziggurat, so it's been through several. It's got a few different coats of paint on it. And that alone brings up the question of You know the authenticity with artifacts. Like which one is the real Ziggurat I mean they're all the real Ziggurat, but but but then you know. We have to take into account like how much time has passed to, and then to what extent does that get in our way of understanding the past? Yeah, yeah, it's a weird question. to to think about if something was restored in the ancient world after having decayed for hundreds of years. Is that just as original to us? Basically I mean. I don't know it's it makes you question the concept of what an original artifact is. What is archaeological authenticity? And maybe it's some degree. to some degree undermines the concept of originality which might be a good thing and we'll talk about that later again, But yeah, so he attempted to restore the ruins of the Great Sumerian Ziggurat. If you're he and he was also, he was religious revivalist, bringing back coal traditions that had long fallen by the wayside, specifically, he revived the cult of the Moon God seen also known, and that's spelled like sin like s i. n Brown seen. Also, known to the ancient Sumerians as the God Nana now the city of or has a lot of cool stuff about it over over these you know thousands of years, but one of them is that it has some of the most awesome high priestesses in history. I know she's come up on stuff to blow your mind before, but one of my favorite ancient Mesopotamia figures is the earliest known named author of a work of poetry, so not necessarily the first poet ever, but the first poet in history whose name is recorded and known to us and this. This is the ancient Sumerian poet, princess and high priestess in head to WanNa Oh yes, yeah, in head-on lived in or long before Neb Anita she lived in. You're when it was an ancient Sumerian city stayed in the twenty third century, B C e under the rule of her father, Sargon of cod and in hidden WANNA was appointed by Sargon as the high priestess of the goddess in China and the Moon God Nana I. Know that might become a confusing the goddess in Nana and the Moon God is just Nana and then of course later became seen. So technically her title is in e, N, which is a position of religious and political significance, she refers to herself as the radiant in of Nana and one of her great works of poetry known to us is known to us. Today's the Exaltation of Nana, the Goddess which is amazing poem to look up. You should especially look a Trans Translation of the Exaltation of in Ana. If you're ever trying to like work, a real sense of defiance and righteous anger. Best stuff, Robert Wood. You indulge me to read a few lines a certainly okay. From the exultation of Nana. This is from the translation and the James, purchase tradition and nineteen seventy five. You have filled this land with venom like dragon vegetation ceases when you thunder like Ishbel Moore you bring down the flood from the mountain supreme one who are the Anonima of Heaven, and Earth, who reigned flaming fire over the land, who have been given the me by on Queen, who rides the beast okay. I got a one from later. My Queen all the unknown. Ah, the great gods fled before you like fluttering. Bats could not stand before you're awesome. Face could not approach. You're awesome for head. Who can soothe your angry heart? These hymns are amazing, and they are definitely worth looking up, so you've got in head one. She's this fireball-hurling poet the High Priestess of the Moon God Nana in or in the twenty third century BC, and then a little less than two millennia later. You've got this neo Babylonian King Nab Anita's ruling over you're looking back into the past, and in looking back into the past one thing he decides to do is revive the worship of the Moon God Nana, who they now. Now called scene and like Sargon Nab. Anita's appoints his daughter, the priestess of the Moon God consulting ancient records to get details about what this moon priestess role would be like what the the duties would be what the rituals would be This is the point that that Pryke makes in her article. Is this like looking back into the records? For what the priestesses role would be because he he's you know in a way? He's sort of trying to be the next Sargon. So who is the priestess? The daughter of NAB Anita's? who gets this role while her name is INA Goldie Nano also known as Belshaw. And unfortunately we know far too little about who a Goldie Nana was, but we do know that. In addition to a religious role inequality, Nana is recorded as having been the administrator of a school for young priestesses but so inequality Nana was more than just an educator. She was more than just princess more than just a high priestess of the moon. It's here that we come to the first museum known history, because it appears that a Goldie Nano was its curator, and this is This is fascinating to behold because we have not only you know. The the case for the museum, but for a strong case for you know why it was created what purpose it served the ruler of the day. Yeah, exactly so maybe we should take a break, and then we come back. We can have a look at this museum. This episode is brought to you by IBM Today. The world looks pretty different, but all ready new problems are being with new thinking. Researchers are using supercomputers to discover treatments faster. Retailers are turning to the cloud to restock shelves more quickly. Teachers are working with ai to rethink the classroom. It's not everything, but it's a start. Let's put smart to work. See how IBM is helping at IBM dot com slash comedy nineteen that when Lexus opened stores, one of the first dealers made an important observation. Lexus wasn't in the car business. They were in the people, business. Above all they needed to be helpful, respectful and compassionate. To treat people like guests. It's what they agreed to do from the start. And rededicate themselves to every take. Today how we all interact with each other is changing, but who we are isn't in a time of uncertainty. We are all looking for new ways to be human to connect to reach out. To respond. Now when we need each other, most lexus will continue to do what they've always done. Take care of people first then the rest will follow. visit. LEXUS DOT com slash people I to find out what Lexus is doing for their guest, their employees and for our communities. Are Back we're discussing the history of the museum as we know and understand today, and we're looking at what may well be the earliest example of something that we can reasonably call a museum. Yeah, and so we should look again at what would be the criteria that right. How would we know if we'd found the first museum in History because as we've discussed before just having a treasure room. Next isn't really museum writing so museum as understood, today has two main parts right. He's got preservation and interpretation. You've got objects or artifacts that are preserved and kept on display. This preservation aspect, and those objects are explained in contextualized by educational interpretation materials. You know like the little written placards you find next to objects at a museum exhibit today, and I think it's also important that it must be cleared that this institution has some sort of public educational purpose, right? It can't just be like a private thing this just for you, right? It's about it's about sharing this information with the world and we see that in our. Our best examples of museums. Say like a really good science and Technology Museum is about. Sharing the the passing on the torch of of of of scientific inquiry, and and celebrating what it can do, for human civilization, and then on the other hand you have say Hey creationist museum, which takes a different approach but he's ultimately trying to do the same thing right it is it is it is using? Artifacts were supposed artifacts. I mean sometimes choosing actual the. Remnants of the past, but then using it to push in a different narrative I guess that's true, like even if we judge the educational purpose of a museum to be misguided and leading to incorrect conclusions I. Mean I guess still if the goal of it is, is educational, according to the people who made it. Even if that education is, you know, maybe look, make making your king look good or something right? You could consider that a form of a museum right I mean, and certainly even are better. Museums have had to evolve with the Times right to had to change the way that they present particularly things from a cultural even historical standpoint to. To either keep up with with changing norms to correct past. Errors and then you know, and also to to take into account new information about the the the cultures and time periods that are presented well. Yeah, that's exactly right. I mean one great thing about modern museums is. They can often be away. to see into other cultures that you might not encounter firsthand, but you know a lot of these exhibits. The museum has been around a long time. They may have initially been established for the kind of condescending colonialist attitude or That sort of shows other cultures in a way that might not be accurate. Maybe that looks down on them. That doesn't regard them as equally valid cultures. Right I mean I. It's important to note that like the the the basic idea, the museum. You know it can be skewed for different purposes, I mean there's a difference between the new museum in Philadelphia and say a you know a circus sideshow you know just like a display of preserved human remains with either no contact or faulty context regarding what those jars contain. There's a difference between an actual museum about say human evolution and the bigfoot museum that we have in north Georgia. which is a wonderful museum but it? It has a definite agenda different narrative that it's pushing, and hopefully a lot of people that go there are engaging with sort of tongue in cheek, or people are able to suspend disbelief enjoyable, but but yeah, it's it's a slightly different extra exercise or any roadside attraction from decades past where where something may be on display. That is You know, maybe you. You know lacking in terms of its scientific or historical believability. Right so I. Guess I'm going to try to say is. We can often think of a museum as a medium as opposed to like message right? Okay so to get back to INA Goldie. Nana throughout the Nineteen Twenties Thirties. There was a British archaeologist named Sir Charles. Leonard Woolley who worked on. On the excavation of the ancient city, of Moore and in nineteen twenty, five Willie and his colleagues were excavating a Babylonian Palace within the ancient city, and they began to uncover a very strange clustering of artifacts within this palace were artifacts from different geographical locations in different periods of ancient history, all neatly arranged together in this one building, and it appears that this collection was created. Created sometime around the year five thirty B C, E and now the earliest artifacts found, went back almost to the time of Sargon and in head, WanNa they went back about twenty, one hundred BC, e and again I was trying to find a point of comparison for historical scale, so if these people living in the sixth century BC had artifacts from twenty one hundred, BC. Like us today, having artifacts from the personal effects of Attila the Hun who invading the western Roman Empire in the middle of the fifth century CE. That's the the approximate time difference us. What was among this collection of things? Willy discovered here in this in this ancient site. One thing was the partially restored remains of a statue of the Great King Shoghi of Moore, who ruled in the first century BC and you might remember Shoghi came up in are upset about walls, actually because Shoghi is credited with creating one of the first known defensive boundary walls in history, the wall he built was known as the wall of the land or the emirate wall, or the keeper at Bay of the nomads is a little on the nose. it. It was it was designed to defend Sumer against tax from no nomadic called the rights who lived to the north of them, and she'll wall is thought to have been more than one hundred miles long stretching between the Tigris and the Euphrates River and in this this other episode. I quoted from an ancient Sumerian home, which mentioned it by recalling with Nostalgia Jay. How quote, the wall of Inaugu extended out over the desert like a bird net. Comparing it to this thing, they used to actually catch birds, and so in this poem, the Speaker is lamenting how you know. There were better days back when their civilization had been more powerful and more glorious, and it was the time of Shoghi in this wall. Bit in reality, of course, these walls did not accomplish the goal of protecting soumare, which fell to invasions from the emerites the MITES. It was not an effective strategy and And in his own autobiographical writings on the excavation of you're Charles Leonard. Woolley notes something interesting about the statue of Shoghi, so he describes it quote as a fragment of Dea, right statue, a bit of the arm of a human figure, on which was an inscription, and the fragment had been carefully trimmed so as to make it look neat and preserve the writing. So there appears to be evidence here of an ancient preservation work to keep the carvings on the statue from being damaged to keep them legible. also among the things found here was an ancient cast site boundary stone, a type of artifact known as a Khuda ru now Kuta ru or stone boundary markers used in ancient Mesopotamia and these things are pretty cool. It's kind of like if you could have a stone pillar with a written copy of the DVD, or House, noting how you got the land, and which notaries witnessed the sale of the property, and also possibly containing carvings of gods, celestial objects and monsters and definitely curses. Full of curses, the cooter in in Goldie non as museum, is from around fourteen hundred BC. Willie noted that it contained an awesome curse against anybody who displaced her destroyed the stone. So what are these curses like right? I was looking at an example of a Kuru excavated from. Tell Abu Haba so it's not the same couture, but it's curse warning. tells about what you cannot do or face the curse. So it, says win so ever in days to come among future men, an agent or a governor, or a ruler or anyone, or the son of anyone at all who shall rise up, and in respective that field shell make a claim or cause a claim to be made, or she'll say this field was not presented, or she'll change that stone from its place or show cast it into the water, or into the fire, or shall break it with stone, or because of these curses shall fear, and she'll cause a fool or a deaf man or a blind man to take it up, and said it in a place where it cannot be seen. Seen that man shall take away the field may on new the father of the gods curse him as a foe. This covers so much I'm about to get into exactly what the curse is and the second, but I love this. It's like okay. You cannot erase the record of WHO owns this field. You can't throw it in the water. He can't throw it in the fire. You can't get a blind person who can't read these mornings to pick it up for you and do it for you now. One wonders if they were say this, was simply you. They were just thinking of potential loopholes or had been a loophole that was employed right. There was there was a blind individual who often employed to muck around with people's property rights. Right? Okay, so here's what happens. If you violate this this boundary marker you, you try to move it or something Here's a little bit of the cursed play The the first line has some illusions, so it's it's mad. The Lord of the crops. been worn off, but after that it gets going may never gall in his destruction, not spare. His offspring may shoot a Muna and shoe. Maleeha pronounce evil against him male, the Gods whose names are mentioned on the stone, curse him with a curse that cannot be loosened. May they command that he not live a single day may not let him, nor his name, nor his seed endure days of drought years of famine. May they assign for his lot before God King Lord and Prince May his whining tenuous, and may he come to an evil end? That's a pretty stiff curse. Yeah, okay May as whining. Be Continuous so to. To quote from Charles Leonard, Willy's own account of the other objects they discovered apart from these two just explained a quote, then came a clay foundation cone of Lorsa king about seventeen hundred, BC, then a few clay tablets of about the same date, and a large votive stonemasons head, which was Unin inscribed, but may well have been more ancient by five hundred years. What rethink here were half a dozen diverse objects found lying on an unbroken brick pavement of the sixth century BC yet. The newest was seven hundred years older than the pavement, and the earliest, perhaps sixteen hundred, and a woolly writes that the evidence made it pretty clear. That it was impossible that all these different artifacts would have ended up arranged together like this by accident. And he notes again the trimming of the inscription on the Shoghi statue, which seems like a deliberate act of preservation. And then finally came the answer of what what they were looking for. A woolly writes quote. Then we found the key a little way apart last small drum shaped clay object, which were four columns of writing the first three columns were in the old Sumerian language, and the contents of one at least were familiar to us, for we had founded on bricks of bore sin, King of or in two two zero BC, and the other two were fairly similar. The fourth column was in late Semitic speech. These it said are copies of bricks found in the remains. Remains of you're the work of bore seen King of you're which, while searching for the ground plan of the Temple of the governor of or found, and I saw an road out for the marvel of the holders and Willy notes that the scribe who wrote this inscription overestimated the accuracy of the copies of these bricks, but nevertheless willie recognize the significance of this find quote. The Room was a museum of local antiquities maintained by the Princess Belle Shelton, and our which remember is another name for inequality Nana who took after her father a keen Kiala? And in the collection was this clay drum? The earliest museum label known drawn up one hundred years before, and kept presumably together with the original bricks as a record of the first scientific excavations, at Moore, that's incredible to to just you know, imagine these truly ancient people you know someone walking into this room, seeing a curious old object, and then potentially reading an inscription to see what it was now it factors into their own history. Yeah, yeah, it's amazing and the fact I think it's interesting that they've got. They've got copies also notes about copies of things which would be like the way that many museums today have not necessarily earn original artifact, but a reproduction or say cast of a fossil that might be the original thing the of course you know the funny irony is that many fossils are not even the original bones. Essentially geologic castings created by you know without the aid of human intervention. Yeah, and and I think that's an interesting thing. You know that we feel like we need to make this distinction. Of course it's like well. You could have the real thing here. You can have a reproduction of it, and somehow there's this sense among many people I think and I I admit that I sometimes feel this probably shouldn't, but I feel like the reproduction is not as good. Wouldn't it be better if the real original thing were there and I? I WanNa break myself this thinking by the end of the episode. Yeah. 'cause I found myself caught myself thinking a similar thing about restored works before you know like if you see. You know pictures of what the Sistine Chapel looked like before and after restoration one might be tempted to say well, it was. It looked better before they restored it. which is kind of a silly thing to to to think or to say Attached to like the sort of the historical wear and tear on a thing. We get attracted to you know to the ruins, and then we have at least mixed feelings about restoration efforts I. Mean we've we've talked about before. believably about the Parthenon the Parthenon is a great example of this, because with the original Parthenon, you have various waves of destruction. addition and then considered reconstruction and their voices on different sides. You know should, we should restore the actual parthenon to its former glory. And then if we do restored to a former glory, which former glory! And then likewise we have the Parthenon, in Nashville Tennessee, which is a restoration in a model, essentially a scale model of the Parthenon. The you could walk into and and look around. I think that's the right model. I don't I don't think they need to go messing around with the ruins of the Parthenon, but I like the idea of just like building other. Parthenon's elsewhere right but. But then also, there's simply the the effort in preserving your because all, so you don't want to say if you have say the ruined remains of some some old building that is important, you also don't want it to continue to erode, or should you be open for the to continue to erode? I mean it's it's a tough western. Yeah, yeah, and there's a we were. Were talking about this before we came in on the episode, but you know I think in a way there's almost kind of a a tacit belief in sympathetic magic that makes us like the idea of the original artifact whatever it was. We like the idea that like you know. The actual artist touched this yeah, or the actual person in history war, this and a reproduction feels. Feels less powerful to us because we buy into some strange form of sympathetic magic, where it just doesn't have that magic spark if it wasn't the real thing from the time that somebody actually touched yogi WANNA. Touch it sometimes you, WanNa Lick it and and you're not allowed to, but there's no reason that you have a lot of the besuited individuals standing around ready to. Start pointing a little too close to a particular work of art or posing for yourself, just a little bit too close to it because we we do want to interact with you know we don't always. We WanNA stand in its presence, but yeah, we also kind of want to actually physically make. With it, yeah, so concerning in a golden on as Museum of course as we know, we've been talking about, this would not be the only place where powerful people in the ancient world had collected relics of days past you know many kings of the ancient world would have understood old relics and artifacts to be a sort of John, Rav. Treasured collected display your wealth and power, but what makes these artifacts in in a golden on as museum really seem like exhibits in the museum is is what Willie notes that they were accompanied by carvings that bore interpretive data explanations of what you were looking at, and the fact that it was associated with INA Goldie. Nana School for Young priestesses. That, this building was a museum that was likely created with an educational purpose. The students who'd go in and look at this stuff and read about what it was. Yeah, and say like this is our history. This is our heritage. Look at these objects and learn just another passage I came across. There's another book where Willie discussed in a golden on his museum and commented quote that there should be collection altogether in accordance with the antiquarian piety of the age, and especially of the ruler Nab Anita's who, with whose daughter this building is probably to be associated so he's he's saying that in this age in ancient Mesopotamia the in the city of or and this would go along with everything we know about NAB Anita's trying to restore the Ziggurat and doing archaeological excavations, and all this that there was this spirit of nostalgia. You know that they were sort of unusually obsessed with the past for for people of their time in place and I wonder what what triggers that you know what causes a civilisation to suddenly take intense interest in preserving in reconstructing the past like Nab Anita send inequality Nana why I wonder if a lot of does come down to sort of like a spatial understanding of things, a need to be in the environment of the past. You know to fully comprehend it on on almost animal level. I mean part a one thing I think that's attempting. Historical interpretation is that we know that the dynasty that created the museum wouldn't last leg as I mentioned so. This museum was created around the year five thirty B. C E and the city of you're went into decline after the reign of NAB Anita's and was abandoned. Almost completely you know sometime in the following decades or centuries this is probably because of local climate change where the you frady's river The bed shifted and moved farther away from the city, and that combined with drought to basically turn this once. Fertile Power Center? Center into this abandoned desert, ghosts city, and so it's tempting I. Think for us to look at that and say Oh, you know. This was the end of a long civilization in this area Maybe maybe they since they were at the end, and this is what made them. You know so nostalgic for the past and WANNA create this first museum by this greatest hits album right, but I you know I don't know if that really makes sense because I don't know if they thought they were living toward the end of their dynasty. You know that's right. I mean I'm a museum doesn't? We can easily fall into the line of thinking that a museum of his place of dead things a things you know things. That are no longer around. That are important only historically, but we have plenty of museums today that are about you know celebrating things that are alive so rating movements that are still happening in are still unfinished. We of works of art that you know. We talked about this stuff to blame you. Blow your mind that are that are have been left unfinished either. Through the accident, accidents of human life or intentionally to make some statement about about the nature of human progress. So I think it's. It's reasonable to think that some of those elements would very much have been in play in ancient times. You know to to realize that like the I mean because we talked about it. Being uses an educational space, so it would have been you know not. Have, a would have had a spirit of. Of Renewal to it I would imagine an educational place in place of religious significance, so was part of a school. It was part of a golden on as school for priestesses right so yea, it makes you wonder about the interplay of the religious impulse, also with the desire to preserve and display elements of history. Yeah, all right well on that note. We're GONNA. Take a quick break. And when we come back, we will discuss the legacy of the museum and in some of the some current ideas about where we stand in regards to the museum. This episode is brought to you by IBM Today the world looks pretty different, but already new problems are being met with new thinking. 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Stuff like that right into. Do do what needs to be done to honor. Say you know living thriving cultures that their artifacts represent. Yeah, so they're important questions to ask about what museums represent today in how you know what role they play for us culturally, and maybe how they could be made better. Yeah, and it a lot of it comes down to questions of ownership, not only who owns a particular item you know. Does this piece of this is painting belong to a certain family, or does it belong to this museum now? Does it belong to the nation in which the museum? Is housed like he goes beyond that it gets into considerations like who owns the past and who owns the story of the past. so we were looking at a an excellent D. magazine essay on the subject titled Who Really Owns The past by American archaeologist. Michael Press and I I. Recommend Everyone. Check this out, but some of the the key points that Michael makes are really. Worth thinking about here, he points out that are currently thinking about heritage begin to take shape in the nineteenth century, both in the West, and in the Middle East We Westerners were pretty quick to disregard local emerging laws, concerning artifacts you know considering them an attempt by wrote local rulers to Lord over the dead and interfere with what they seem. To, see as this sort of natural migration of artifacts to Europe, this interpretation of. On one side of the locals might be saying well. We need some laws in place to keep these artifacts from wandering outside of our borders, and then the colonial impulse was more. Oh, no, these belong to the world where so this is everybody's heritage for the world happens to be in London the world's back in London. We're going to take right back there and also antique laws as we know them today. It really emerged out of the Post. World War. Two periods so international agreements such as the nineteen fifty four. Hey, convention and the nineteen, Seventy nine hundred seventy two UNESCO conventions. It all placed a new emphasis on national sovereignty in our national heritage, but still the question remains who owns the artifacts of the past in who owns the story of the past. Because again you can think of the museum as a medium for a story. You know there's in we. We often forget this when we really place a lot of trust in say. The met or the Natural History Museum. You know I think generally trust these institutions for good reason. To present the best interpretation of the history or the science or the or the artistry that is on display. And we see again. Various museums make an effort to change their displays to honor an evolving understanding of the past or to honor living cultures. They depict etcetera. But press points out that when nations and nationwide nation states themselves only artifacts own the past. They can use these treasures to push a nationalistic agenda. So Michael Press writes quote. Governments increasingly looked to remains of the distant past to bolster national identities and a sense of greatness, or to marginalize disfavored groups Saddam Hussein used the ruins of Babylon to spread ideas of Iraq's greatness as well as his own, even portraying himself as a modern nebuchadnezzar, China's leadership has used archaeology project national greatness onto the distance semi-legendary past today. India's prime minister. Narendra Modi's Hindu nationalist government has worked use archaeology to prove that modern Hindus. Hindus can trace their descent from the earliest inhabitants of India. So you put this sort of thing in place, and you know you, he says you actually invite looting. You actually invite that damage. Because history is made to serve the engines of nationalism, or or have you, alluding becomes a potential active resistance and we've actually seen this. He points out. In example one example would be the destruction of monuments in Syria and Iraq by ISIS. And then on the other side of the equation, you know the whole colonial movement was steeped in arguments that these were items of global heritage, and and this is used to justify removing artifacts from native Lance. Yes, so I mean I. I like the idea that there are things that are the common heritage of humankind for history. But what does that actually mean in practice Ryan you say okay in. In practice, it's the common heritage of humankind's let means we'll take it somewhere in Europe, or the United States right because yes, when you, when you look at the the movements of culture when you look at the even the early migrations of human beings, you can make a case to say well the artifacts of the part of my culture as well. They're part of my heritage as well but. It's another thing to say that means that they need to be relocated to to your city. You know your country or that you know your nation has can lay claim to it, but then again is points out in this article. It gets. This is still a very complicated scenario you bring in. You know the fact that you have you know in our day and age you have people from various nations that are spread over the world, and and so it's not always as simple as this cultural group stole this cultural groups belongings. Though sometimes it is well. Yeah, I mean it's weird because it's hard to say who owns the past, but then again something definitely feels wrong. About just say colonial power taking artifacts from one country, and then taking them back to the homeboy -absolutely. Another side of the city points out that I hadn't really thought about is that in some cases you have designated UNESCO World Heritage sites that you know these are places where the it is a place of of and very important historical significance the needs to be preserved, but then also ends up being kind of thing. People want to visit, and that can actually impact local communities, forcing the removal of people, either to you know to to allow the study of this location, or to make way for development associated with the sites new historical significance, so yeah and And then you throw various other. Political factors into the mix, and it gets even more complicated points out that in the case of Syria multiple parties have used heritage as a weapon of war, obviously Isis but also. Brings up Russia and even the United States using Celebrations of of archaeological materials as being sort of part of the overall messaging associated with whatever side of the political scenario the player happens to be on. He does drive home that it is. It's messy. All these different factors playing into the. Past and these artifacts of the past, but he points out that cultural heritage experts proposed several ideas for a better future of museums, so just to to run through them really quickly. the three main points are number one give more control to local communities, not national interests, the sort of on the ground with people rather than with national governments right the second one is to reduce the importance of the original which we talked about a little earlier. This this one is a tricky one to to think about and one of the reasons is that he points out that you know in There's this high western priority placed on the original item, the original work of art original carvings et Cetera, but he says we you know we have long seen a different approach in eastern cultures, which were more about just you know preserving and recreating the thing itself the work itself like it was more about the the message in the work. But it, but it it. It is someone who loves museums. You know it is hard to get past that. There is something really awesome about standing in the presence of the actual work or the you know? The actual remains that have been transported here but then when you take into account all these other factors we've been discussing you do have to ask yourself well. Would it really make it? You know any less impressive if it was just a really a fantastic recreation of a particular work or a particular carving I. Mean certainly when you get into sculptures, it's a it's a lot easier guy. I can easily see that being the case like do I. Really need the actual. Let's say it's The statue of David Do I need that transported over here to look at or what if it was just a? A perfect copy I think I would be happy with that and if I'm happy with that wouldn't that apply to various other museum artifacts as well especially, if the context is really good, if the narrative is really good, yeah, I mean I. think that is something that you know people who are the audiences for museums should try to adapt themselves to be more. More satisfied with high quality re-creations and you know casts, and you know it. All kinds of things don't necessarily involve having the physical original there yeah, especially now when you can have all this additional information, you can have pictures of the original videos of the original additional technological interactions with with media about the original piece, but then you also have this physical. Recreation you can enjoy as well. Yeah exactly Oh. The third point that he makes though is that we should rethink the idea of heritage as property at all that we should have something along the lines of access heritage again in a very interesting, but also. Challenging Way to think about it. Like forces us to turn some of our experiences with museums on their head. But but I could. I could see that working though. Because certainly some of the the trickier parts of all of this is just the treating heritage as something that is, that is property and their property rights tied up with it and say a museum just cannot return particular artifact to the the the culture it came from because of some sort of a property issue. Oh, I hadn't even thought about that, but yes I guess sometimes things are probably on loan to museums from people who supposedly own them right, but like. Why does that person own them? It might be because you know somebody way down the line stole it and then left Yahoo. Them gave it to you know yeah, or they just acquired it, if not through like like outright obvious. Military or colonial treachery than perhaps through. Economic pressures that would not have been there. Had it not been for the colonial influence to begin with? Yeah, this is a difficult issue. The definitely worth giving thought to especially if you're a person who frequents museum and really we only, we only scratched the surface here. On this issue because they're also additional layers to consider with. With the archaeological artifacts such as What Lynn Mesko calls negative heritage. What do you do about a an? Historical artifact that's tied up with. You know a lot of negative aspects of society you know. Maybe it's tied to say you know. Racist ideologies are something. What do you do with those artifacts? How do you treat them? I think one possible answer there is that you you have you make sure that the context of the museum that is presenting them is taking all that into account. But anyway as as as Michael Dry something like this is still another complicated area whom we We try to to got exactly where the museum is headed in the future. All Right? No, we're going to close this one out, but obviously we'd love to hear from everybody we know y'all have favorite museums. You would like to mention on the two to. Perhaps we've been to them as well or maybe you'll point out some new smaller museum that we've never even heard of it and we'll be able to put that on our radar for a future travels. As always if you want to support the show, the best thing you can do is rate and review us. Wherever you have the power to do, so make sure you have subscribed to invention as well and this. Tell your friends about it the next time somebody's asking around. Hey, what are some good podcast? Listen to throw her name into the mix. Ultimately it's that it's that word of mouth that really makes all the difference huge. Thanks as always to are excellent audio, producer, Tory Harrison and our guest producer today Maya Coal. If you'd like to get in touch with us with feedback on this episode or any other suggested topic for the future to let us know about your favorite museum, or just to say hi, you can email us that contact at invention pod dot com. Invention is production of iheartradio for more podcasts from my heart. Radio is iheartradio APP apple, podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Classic Twenty Twenty. We know things have been kind of out of the ordinary lately. You're not going to get a graduation ceremony. So iheartradio found some people to write commencement speeches just for John Legend. He's Hillary. Clinton then to over twenty of your favorites from Dj. College to coach K. Abby Wambach to halls listen to iheartradio new podcast commencement speeches dropped may fifteenth, iheartradio and Sunday may seventeenth across all IHEART radio stations. Draw to you buy Doritos taking the class of twenty twenty Valedictorians to another.

No Museum BC Nab Anita Egypt Nana British Natural History Museum Charles Leonard Woolley Ishbel Moore WanNa Willie Washington IBM The Field Museum Classic Museum Robert Wood Willy word museum Goldie Nana Bank museum Civil Rights Museum
Atheist Experience 23.01 2019-01-06 with Matt Dillahunty & Phil Session

The Atheist Experience

2:17:11 hr | 2 years ago

Atheist Experience 23.01 2019-01-06 with Matt Dillahunty & Phil Session

"And now an ad from dad, right? Save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive guy. Take these off, right? What is this? Wow. Where did you get this? I'm talking to you with the hair. Yeah. Where did you get this? Good stuff. Solid. That's not veneer that solid stuff. Progressive can't save you from becoming your parents, but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto. Progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations. Our? Packed house on the the gas. Welcome to two thousand nineteen the experience. I'm your host. Mattdoyle any joining me this week, Phil session the greatest human being. I know. Well, it was a big shoes. Give me two feet. So yeah, we we've got a few announcements in a couple of things to muddle through and then we will get to live calls. The lines are already full for anybody. Who's not aware? This is a live program live from the eighth community free thought library sponsored by the community of Austin. You can find out more information at the websites and stuff you'll see scrolling along the bottom of the screen at various times. And unlike early last year, I suppose when we would all go out to dinner after the show now people just come down the library and hang out, and we have a good time. And so any atheists or atheist friendly person is welcome to come down. And hang out. They'll be I don't know some sort of festivities, and or food and whatever's going on. So you don't need a script anymore. You just kinda. Yeah. I haven't either descript for like thirteen and a half years. I I refuse to use a script most the time. Because even if I'm doing lectures, or I'm doing one of the debates, but they're not scripted because I worked better if there's a rough outline, and then I just talk. Okay. Okay. Script to me feels like reading to somebody. And I know how many people are just like. As done rating yet as as oh, did he say, no he didn't say anything better than before it's reading. So I try not to do that. Because I know how to fix me. Yeah. Definitely seems more natural just add living. So how was your twenty eighteen? Very busy. Very busy. It's been it was a credible. You so much happened during that you're for sure. But for me, most of my activism comes at form of volunteering including doing this show. But for the for those that don't know on the volunteer coordinator here at the community Boston. And so in two thousand eighteen I I was just getting some numbers to ready before I came in here today, the hit some of those but just in the year two thousand eighteen we served on two thousand eight hundred twenty three people here in the Austin area through the awesome atheist of the homeless. So that was pretty awesome. It's so many people out there, including we actually did that just this morning as a matter of fact, and I want to give a shout out to Tracy for her in the fundraiser. They she put together to get blankets in stuff like that. We had a forty volunteers show up. It was the largest amount that we've ever had was just people everywhere, but we needed all the help. Because we had thermal underwear, for example, which was amazing thermal, socks gloves. Knitting crochet. Hats those blankets as well. We just we have people spread out all over the place the hot chocolate and coffee were flowing out of it. Ten gallons gone. If it was in within thirty minutes is a it was out of there. Yeah. I remember some people who are like, wait, you're an Austin, you have an incredibly large homeless population in part because the weather's nicer so people find their way kind of you know, if you're gonna be homeless you'd rather be homeless in Austin, then let's say North Dakota sheer, but they're like, why would you need blankets? And then I was reminded just a minute ago because it's ridiculously warm today. If I had to guess haven't looked, but I'd say, it's at least like sixty five out, and it's January six and I'm wearing short sleeve shirt. No jacket. But yeah, there were actually people on the back porch building already snuggled up in a blanket. So some people get cold, and it's even colder. If you are stuck living on the street. So all of those both eighth helping homeless human at work in the various other. Organizations that are out there doing this. They need everything you need Thermo. And where you need socks. You need personal hygiene products, blankets, hats, food, everything. And it doesn't matter. It's and the fact is I talked to somebody yesterday about, you know, it's it's kind of warm outside, but think about those evening times when it jumps down into your forties into your thirties. And if you had no way to get away from that, you had no way to escape the co that was just going to be like most of us here. Even if we're coal momentarily while we're walking somewhere, we know that we're going to be in a car driving home or coming into a building and can't get away from that coldness that's outside. Because even I as long as I am I'm very hot natured, but even I'll get Kohner wanna put a jacket on and even I don't wanna be out there for too long. But staying there the entire night. I couldn't even imagine that fortunate. So you they're very much want to really give special shout out to Tracy for Panetta your for awesome there. But we also we built several ramps. This year we helped to plant seven hundred and fifty trees with off. Awesome tree folks here, and we help to move thirty one almost thirty two thousand pounds of food at the central Texas food Bank, including just yesterday, which was I volunteer of two thousand nineteen over there. So six people were out there, making stew bags of potatoes and carrots in IN, so so it's a fun way. It's just in case somebody didn't processing the in their head. We've just entered two thousand nineteen yesterday your central Texas food Bank, packing up dinners and stuff for people this morning. You were atheist helping the homeless doing a giveaway, including blankets and everything else. Now, you're on the show today. I'm going to bet you have a volunteer thing scheduled for tomorrow. If not later this evening. Not quite this evening, but next Saturday, I'll be sending Tonio food Bank. Disappointing. You're gonna wait a whole week before you go help people again sorry about that. No. It's it's it's amazing. I love what you do with these organization doing like the fact that it's gaining popularity now where there are people who have this perception that secularisation secular groups atheist. Individuals aren't particularly charitable. That's that's the purview of churches, the churches run the charities and the truth is that in reality, churches and religious organizations have held a privileged status, especially the United States, the defacto tax free status. They don't have to open their books. They have people who are coming in who feel compelled to donate as part of you know, they religious instruction. And then they have this massive network already built in right secular organizations. Have started a little behind in the game. But I would say are building far more rapidly than than religious organizations are what I've seen from foundation beyond belief and individual groups popping up everywhere. I would bet that in five years if they do another. Polling study about the charitable nature of different groups that you will find that atheists are in there with everybody else if not growing faster than others as I like the like the exposure actually actually being out there. You know, the foundation belief home are fun. Awesome. Eighty s hope in the homeless on the bad kind of spreading that awareness that it's out that, but that's that's kind of like a passive benefit to what we're actively doing out there. But it helps to I'm hoping helping to change minds about what are what they believe. What we actually do what we you know, what we believe in. How do we contribute to the world or whatever else? And so I'm really looking forward to the change that's been making from what I've seen and hopefully that will continue going for. It's it's a really awesome thing to be a part of. And I had no idea if you would ask me several years ago that I would be this involved in it. I didn't I did not foresee this now, I was I was not miss Cleo on that. So it was it's been amazing thing. But it turns out doing good feels good. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. And it's one of the things where I have a laundry list of fifty three projects that I know the overwhelming majority of them are not going to get done. It just you know, there's not enough time and everything else. And it's one of the things I talked about before where when I finally bought my own house. Even though I despised mowing the lawn as a kid, I now mow my lawn. Pretty meticulous about it. And not because I'm a homeowner because I'm older. It's because that's one thing on my to do list that I can get done that is obvious to me. And to anyone else who is that. Oh, this guy gets shit done. The truth is way more things than I'll ever to. And so the the charity efforts like that. I got to say they were some of the most rewarding things that I participate in and I'm not out there with you guys regularly. So sure, but at a at a Pennsylvania convention, we had everybody the convention who would stay after the final speech went back into a big room and set up an assembly line, where we boxed up, I don't know how many hundreds of meals, you know, here's the beans. Here's the flavoring and everything else and you wearing I had to wear hairnet. So not everything in life makes sense. But yeah, but we had a great time. I really think that much the same way that you don't think you could have predicted that you'd be doing this. I think if people especially in this era, where we're were more tied to social media and interactions online than we are person to person, I think everybody just picked Saturday pick to Sunday gave it a shot you'd find a lot more people are like I actually liked doing this. It gives me something different from the normal. I know I'm doing good for people. So yeah, contact Phil. And or any of the organizations in your area and see what you can do to help out all by the way that doesn't just apply to charitable efforts atheist communities like the commute of Austin. I mean, we're growing leaps and bounds. The the library's open seven days a week from ten to nine. There are people up here all the time playing game visiting we're producing what. Nine or ten shows now eighth experience tall key. The nonprofits. Godless bitches preaching him and his eighth roundtable atheist. Interviews secular sexuality truth wanted parenting bomb believe and there's more and there's more coming. So one of things I've mentioned many times is that if you don't think you have something to contribute to group. You know? Oh, I can't do the public speaking. Or I would not be able to take phone calls or I don't know anything about auto. No, audio or whatever. Okay. Set aside all the podcast, he stuff and everything else all these organizations need volunteers to setup and take down chairs to greet people at the door financial experts because one of these days, some of these organizations are gonna end up with the money and having a treasure that doesn't everything up is a good idea and so shot onto John for being awesome. You know that night. I know Kim new imagine. But all right. What have we got coming up? Yeah. The near future for twenty nineteen out hit this real quick. So on next not now Nick Saturday, but the Saturday after the third Saturday of the month the nineteenth they will be. The Austin's women's March will be here and our own gutless bitches are planning to go down there. And do a live stream type of thing. We'll see how it all comes together. But they will be down there in attendance. I actually attending that rally. And so that'll be that'll be fun. So we just talked about it on. Godless bitches we recorded a show yesterday and another it was just that one show for January, and then the show that they actually do at the March itself. So that'll be the second show that happens. And so I'm excited for that. But on that same day, actually in San Antonio, Mandy, so Thomas will be giving talk down there hosted by the free thinkers association of central Texas. So that'll be around that same time. But then on that following Sunday the twentieth this MLK weekend. She'll be here in studio. Co hosting guests co hosting on this show and also talk then that's on September. Sorry, january. Twentieth. That sunday. It's funny. You mention MLK weekends coming up. S? So every year for Christmas. I do this massive road trip. It was a little shorter this year because I was on my own. So I didn't go out and see my ex wife, family and stuff like that. But there was some weirdness, which I won't talk about in any specifics family discussions about religion, which was surprising and strange, and then, but after it was over I went to Memphis, where I had probably my favorite day in the last nine ten months, or so, but we friend of mine started out antique shopping, and then we went to the civil rights museum and. I have been to Memphis before. But I had not been to the civil rights museum. And checking that out was. I don't know. Everybody should go. It's going to impact different people in different ways. There's a part of me. I mean, it's like an intellectual level. I knew that this happened in this happened. And this is the way things were in the way things were but going there, and seeing, you know, the pictures of of African American men marching with placards that say, I am a man there's something in my head that would how would never even occur to me like even in the depths of slavery. I would've still thought that, you know, of course, people viewed that way, but that's not true. There was this terrible and not just bigotry, but rampant ignorance of us in them that took on a flavor. It was it was a humbling experience, and it was pretty cool. It was it was cool to see that. They they continue to add to it. And it's not just like, oh, this is the way it was back in the sixties. This is still going on. So they're adding new things of what's going on. That's different in Henderson, and they're not just focused properly of rights museum. Because a lot of it has to do with this over rights movement in the sixties. They're also, including, you know, here's the first native American person who was involved in this particular activity and stuff, and they're showing all of it. So it's a good stop. I hate that. I didn't get a chance to go. Visit when I went to Memphis for the my first aid convention, which was American eight that was held are few years ago. But was as four years ago. Yeah. Is that was my first one I didn't have to. I knew that it was there. But I was busy ripping running back and forth. I never actually got a chance to go over there and see but have to keep that in mind. The next time I'm there because especially if they have an ongoing type of exhibition with our adding more pieces to that as it's little things that they add. I mean, it's still primarily focused on the civil rights movement. But it was nice to see the time line. And it does not the time does not stop. So it's here's the first, you know. You know, the the course they go back prior to the movement the sixties where like having McDaniel got her Oscar for gone with the wind and then move forward after that to show. Hey, here's what was happening in the seventies and the eighties in the nineties and all the way up to within a couple of years ago. There's some stuff up there about Ferguson, and okay, it it's really humbling, and by the way, Alex, and I went and had a great time so high, but I don't think you'll ever see white people more humble and polite than when they're walking through the civil rights museum. Because that that was that'll put you in your place that is something else. Why? Yes. Most of your family was terrible. In some regard. So I don't think I have any of the Nestle except to say that Shelly goal will actually be coming into town in February. So keep your eyes peeled for more details as we get those things aren't up, but she'll be in San Antonio for. Sure. And I think up here in Austin as well. So we'll get those details as those come out. We'll let you know. I'm sure we will. But the song that you hear when the show comes on is just her song. As a matter of fact, she's an awesome person so down to earth and just an amazing musician. So I'm looking forward to that as well. I got a couple of other quick things to hit on. And then we'll jump right into calls. An additional the other activities we are putting together. Once again, we are kind of restarting atheist gaming night, which we used to do years ago. And now we've got a good group of people who are interested. So some of it be taking place up here at the building in some of it will be taking place at my house, maybe possibly some newbie nights movie nights as well. A lot of other things going on. But in the near future. I'm on this week. I'm also on next week. So, you know, if you're if you're like, hey, I thought the schedules said. Tracy. You're right 'cause I'm going to be gone for a while afterwards next week on the twelfth Saturday the twelfth in Dallas godawful movies. We'll be doing a live events air. Right. I'm gonna go up and visit with ally. Noah and heath guys and have a good time. And then on the thirteenth the which is next Sunday. No allusions will be here on the show with me. I think he's also talkie than somebody can not real quick to to verify that. But usually when we get somebody down for the day. We'll put them on both shows. Sure. So that'll be happening next week. And then I've got a debate in February. But I'll tell you about that a little later, and then the free thought cruise if you just Google free thought cruise you will find it. This is happening in March. I'm going to be it's the free flow organization. The Florida free thought organization, I will be the guest speaker doing a special and little bit different version of my magic skepticism show on the cruise. So if you wanna go to. Havana. Ooh, donna. Kuba and the Bahamas with a bunch of godless heathens and hang out with me and other people, by the way, you don't have to hang out with me. You can avoid me if you want and just have a good time. You know? But yeah, I'll be doing that. It's mid-march. I think the websites like free thought cruise dot WordPress. But if you just Google free thought crews, you'll find it, and there's a picture of me as hey, Matt's doing this awesome. I had no idea. That's pretty cool. That'd be thought cruise. Okay. All right. Are we ready to try some calls? Yeah. Jump in. Sure. Oh, we've got Jimmy in San Antonio. Thanks for waiting. You're on with Matt. And phil. Jimmy Jimmy there. Yeah. I didn't think you're gonna take me call. Hey, guys. I folks okay bonding year ago? I don't know if you remember my call both of you actually don't be don't be disappointed. But I don't remember. But it's possible. Remember two minute. Yeah. Well, I mean, I'm had mentioned that he's going in Baltimore Maryland. With suicide been do would scientists quoting mystical experience. And anyway, we got in. I think you're talking about how you're dressing with Jordan. Peterson was saying during that call that. That's all. That wouldn't have been a year ago. But. Lesson ear probably, but I and then I said, well have you looked into the research and before the call, and he told me that you would look into it. And I just wondered if you ever bothered looking into that research, probably not to the extent that I should. But what I did. Discover after both your call and the international Jordan is that. The the label mystic experience is not well defined and it is a self reported label. So basically somebody's describing the experiences mystical, and it's more. I I had corrected that last time we had that same conception last time. I none of the volunteers in the study describing experiences mystical, you know, this is a term then what's the justification for saying somebody took drugs, and how to mystical experience if they didn't say they had a mystical experience. I don't know if you ever look into like near dodgy, for instance, they're trying to say or the performance of this era. Science are trying to say that there's no logical evolutionary basis for subjective. Experience traditionally categorized as virtual religious. So that's where we have pas. Okay. And so that's where we have to pose sure traditionally classified as mystical or spiritual. Yeah. That still doesn't give any any edification to what it means. And by the way, that would be self reported. Well, another words they're trying to describe it as it's not necessarily something induced by this. I like they see it as a feature of consciousness, so it's something that's an unfortunate viable proposition. If you take drugs and have an experience, you cannot say I see this is something not induced by the drugs. You can't demonstrate that it wasn't in these. That's what these issues I claim that the induced for this. I've been intense virtually identical to naturally terrain reported mystical experience. And I'm so glad that you said reported mystical experience after we spent several minutes arguing about whether or not it was reported missed go. I wanna know what I don't know if we went through this last time, but somebody says I had an experience either they are someone else labels it as mystical, and I still don't know what that means or why or how they determined that. It wasn't drug induced. That's what I recall about the call that caused as far as why use that turn like. Mystical? What does that actually mean? What shows signifying the conversations somebody has an expert. So hang on hang on one second. Somebody has an experience some of them are on drugs. And they haven't experience some of them are not on drugs and ABN experience. This is this is I fully accept this. When I was in church. I would feel an experience that I would describe at the time as the Holy Spirit. I came later to understand that I had no justification for calling it that it was just that everybody around me had seemed to have similar experiences, and they all called it an experience the Holy Spirit. And then I found out there's no justification for that. So now when people tell me, they have spiritual or mystical experience, I want to know what it is that they're talking about. And what's the justification for using that line? It's been defying all the way back to the early work of William James. And I think there's your to find it. I don't need a history lesson. Okay. So I'm going to look into the research is pretty elaborately defined. It's pretty much a scientific concept at this point. No fucking no mind sharing that actual definition that like that start there. The very least I can tell you what I can tell you what happened people reported having experienced that they described as mystical and scientists went in and said, hey, let's try and figure out what this is. No, not like, I said, none of the volunteers describe there. Oh my gosh. Oh my gosh. Let me let me try again. Jimmy. Okay. Four Molyneaux people had experiences that they would describe as mystical or supernatural. And at some point some scientists said, hey, there's a lot of people reporting these sorts of experiences. Let's investigate to figure out what they are. You don't think that's how how else would scientists begin investigate? Yeah. Okay. Phenomenon. No. So that's that's the problem. There are people who think they are recognizing phenomenon and they may be but what they're really going with. They're really doing is is is investigating a reported phenomenon. Hoping to put it that way. If you have I think a bit. I could try to buy because I've been asking for a definition and description and all I get is going back to William James. So the way described by fix features of the manifesto and would been called in and and. I pol. Jimmy, your phone is breaking up very badly. Nobody can understand it. So you might want to try one more time. Let me see if I can go inside a big see. So there are there are six six criteria that have been defined as a complete miss DeVos experienced defined by whom. Yes. The regional business was laid down by William jam and it's been refined since then throughout decades stream biter is that was that from extrordinary popular delusions and the madness of crowds. For eating William James. I think it's the varieties of varieties religious experience. Okay. Cool. I got I got those cats. Yep. Thanks, okay. And till the where they're at now is the six Syria the first one, I was mentioning the unity. They described his internet connected. Miss of people in all things always one or pure consciousness. But this is like the the collapse of the subject object duality in our in our experience, the the next one is a fake greatness, reverence towards them off majesty that takes also experience that they're willing to go buy into wedded quantity, a sense of copying. What would they describe any studies ultimate reality? Of course, you're the limitation. This is where the mutations of the measures the descriptions of the volunteers experience, not even the measures could really gauge what you're trying to express. That's why it's not science. But boy, I mean, we can still we somebody can somebody can go somebody can say, I'm experienced spiriting pain. And if you're going to try and go through and create a good methodology for that. You're going to talk to them about describe the type of pain that you're feeling is that burning pain stabbing paint, a throbbing pain that cetera. Then you're also going to try to give them to give an approximation of the intensity of that. And with a single individual you get nothing you have reached no conclusions. So you begin expanding. That problem is what I may think is nine in pain film. I'd only think is a four, and so you have to find a way to normalize for those things. Now when it comes to I'm on. I think that's what they're doing. I'm not okay. But Oklahoma point. So you've got these six categories that create a complete mystical experience. I've got two of them so far. But the thing is what if somebody only has what are some of the only has like two or three of them is that still missile extremes. Just not a complete. Yeah. So yeah, they think that's scary. Viewed quick mythical time because they do occur in a bedroom. And yes, not everyone has the we've got unity and sacredness. What are the other for? No, Ed equality is the one I mentioned that was third one. I don't know what that is. No, no. I I had already mentioned is the one where people have a say, I'm saying, I don't know what my first word was. Oh wetted quarterly. I William James this because he is he's a experience how to certain intuition about them that were people. They they presented. So as ultimate true. Still don't know what the first word is. On the wetted NO, not okay. For some reason. I was hearing. No attic as if we are under the no of covenant. And I was like, surely, they didn't go religious Pacific. Okay. No at equality. What's fun? All right. And then and then he still positive mood expensive, universal pieces. Little and Russian of unconditional love with an temporary, you know, state of consciousness, the fifth thing speaking time. To the present moment, and you know, people will say things like they felt like they've transcend space I've been high. I get it. What what's what's the six one? And that's a video per Dr. Kennedy one of the first things people say well coming out of this experience, I can't possibly put them into. Then. Of course, you know, leasers follow along these volunteers for months and months, and eventually they do get to a point where they can say something about it. They can't get somewhat of a description. See? So it doesn't what's a six hundred going back. I'm sorry. What's the six? I've got five. Okay. Well, no, I I think that was it the unity sacred quality Vicky positive blue transcendent space ability, and then what? Kennedy. I okay, we pause pause Jimmy because we're just talking after transcending space and time what was the next one. And that's been impaired the Kennedy, I said one of the F ability. Okay. Okay. Yeah. Inability to express what they experienced one of the persons. Thank your you have no word. I can summarize all this people have experiences that they don't understand. And can't explain. No, I think the are beginning to thank the science is beginning to understanding of experiences. And you know, they I mean, the search is ready on seventeen year John Hopkins, and it's prompted macer it's all over the world. And you know, of course, they go beyond this this measure that I've just used you know, that you have multiple questionnaires. They have other ways to fest with to attempt to assess what's going on. They also this with s Marai I get it. But at the end of the day, the only thing that science can conclude is that people had experiences, and now we have some language to describe them. Science cannot confirm that the experiences are in any way supernatural. There. I I wouldn't necessarily if you mean by by supernatural. Here for clarity. Jimmy, there is currently no path to confirm in any way, the existence of the supernatural or that the supernatural cannon fact impact reality. And anyway, so at best and tell there's a path to to be able to identify confirm and explain it, what a supernatural causes the best that science can ever do the best the best that science can ever do is say, hey, a bunch of people are having these experiences, and this is the language that they typically use to describe it, and these of this kind of feelings that they have. But you can't go further than that. You can't say, whoa. These are coming from. Oh my God. Yeah. Because even looking at the actual six looking at the six pieces here when you saying that of the all the time pass fusion president is collapsing. The one I'm not sure exactly how he would even go about trying to measure that in the first place, especially if you're only relying on the experiences of what people say that they have. If universal reported aspect, I. Jimmy, everybody who has smoked weed has felt time dilation. No, we're not talking about time violation. We're talking about a literal impression and consciousness where there is no time. Okay. Jimmy, let me if I have an impression in my consciousness that there is no space and time am I right? Whether you're right or wrong is relevant to the fact that this is university imported, you know, I okay, then I guess we've entered an area where I literally do not give a fuck about people reporting things that they can't describe where we have no way to tell whether or not it's true or what's true about it. Don't know. I think there there is ways. But I think you're asking questions especially by eventually supernatural supernatural the way I hear mostly defense. Nachos that which defies the laws of physics. I dunno. You buy buy that gift mission. I don't know what supernatural is because nobody's ever demonstrated. But it seems to be an assertion that something is not natural in origin. I mean, these researchers have concluded that these experiences are indeed biologically normal. There's nothing they occur about them. Okay. So why are we talking about it at all? I mean, why are we talking about? So they they also they consider these experiences evidence of I don't know if you've heard of party philosophy. So they find them in accordance with the printing philosophy. In other words, they can be recognized all the major religion each each of the major religions have two words to describe the experience. What is the point that you're getting to that science by investigating? This is just proving all religions that that appeal to the super no I'm saying that they're recognizing that phenomenon which is MRs on schools, and guess. Is that the root of all the major religion? No, first of all, it's not the root of all all the major religions, but. When we when you say, they're recognizing that this mysticism it since you say that they recognize that this mysticism is natural. Then that eliminates all of the religions that claim that it supernatural, right? Sure. But I don't know of any religion that doesn't that you know, that came any supernatural defense of, you know, hitting me, you don't think you don't think God in the Holy Spirit or supernatural. You don't think laws Hooper natural? You don't think that not looking to original meetings of these terms the regional Etta Mogae? No, okay. Then we are at a fundamental disagreement about the history of religion. And what people have believed about it. Because if you walk into churches, and synagogues and mosques around the world and say, hey, all of you, people your religion was never originally about anything supernatural at all. They're going to laugh you out of there because I'm not God. God as a creator must by definition exists outside of space and time. No, I think that's a misconception. I think by people reading the writings of mystics who had this experience of being outside of space and time attributed to a crater that's outside of time. So what you're saying this go ahead. After it's an actor from surviving of the the writing mistakes, in other words, they misinterpreted. He's scriptures. That were originally visited by people who had these type of which means all religions, all all modern religions that that appeal. The supernatural are are wrong is what you're saying that their origins didn't start there. These guys added onto it in a way that shows that it's not true. I think you're sending them supernatural has to be intrinsically type religion. I'm saying, I don't think Jimmy. I. Do people actively engaged in modern religions believe that those religions have supernatural causes at their foundation. Not all of them. No, okay. Crew. Correct. We can find the couple of people who don't. But by and large do not most people just stick with the Abraham acc- religions to start by large cardington, mostly for and dumb. Like, there's a lot of Nike. You don't have to say f and on the show. You can just say fuck. Yeah. But I don't care. What George I Jimmy? This is this is my numbing frustrating. Oh, my God majority. What neither are the pins of the people that are that are having this experience. All it is is even if they do test to actually see the biological markers to actually study, the brain as experiences are happening as met said before all that they can confirm is that these experiences are having that they're having some type of experience, but that has no indication onto what causes that gives no evidence as to what that caused might be except for it. We can tell it's about logical primarily we can measure Jimmy desperately want to know what your point is. Like, I said this research Johnston on the eighteenth year. But it's building on early search that or Jimmy I desperately want to know what your point is. Here's my point bed. There's been, you know, very thorough exegetes judicial work and her nukes on the scriptures of the major religions that have found they're using the same measures that they're using these studies and base fit to the scriptures to find what they're calling the reported mystical. So basically the reported mystical experiences identical virtually identical to what they're inducing them. There's bottom peers, they you know, they find distinction there. And and so they're they're recognizing it as a phenomenon unconscious that has been happening on the Linea all of philosophy. So, you know, it's I that's the researchers inching that. And and and eat some of the professionals involved will sat out just called mystical experience some very evident for the philosophy. Yeah. I still don't know what your point is. How about would you ever consider under like they could bake talked about the possibility of recruiting firm, the easiest to find out at Johns Hopkins for for the study's Jameh considerate now, of course, and so have others, and none of that fucking matters. That's the point. Here's here's the thing. Jimmy, you're saying people reported having these -periences that they described as mystical, but the scientists have investigated, and they've checked out people who are on hallucinogens and other drugs, and they'll have similar experiences to okay? This is something that I talked about decades ago or a decade and a half ago on the show talking about how I would experience all of these things that I would have called the Holy Spirit. And then after I left my religion, I found that I could have similar quality of experiences through music art drugs at cetera. And so all my God, interrupt me one more time. Jimmy, I swear we're done. Go ahead. So I got to this realization that if I can't tell the difference between a mystical experience that is caused by a drug or art or whatever and mystical experiences caused by God, then I have no justification for believing that there is a God causing a mystical experience. This was a no brainer. That I didn't have to eighteen year study on at the end of this study at the end of this study at most they're gonna say, hey, there's a bunch of people having experiences. We seem to be unable to distinguish between people who are having experiences in a religious contests. People who are having experienced a drug context on any meaningful ground, and it appears that the best we can conclude that there that this is natural in origin. It's about the human brain, the human brain response to chemicals and the human brain response to group think and conformity and all of those things. But at the end of the day, you have not disproved religion. Because you can't rule out the possibility that there is a God who also gives mystical experiences that are indistinguishable from the other. And you also haven't proven religion. So this is why you end up going down. This thing of all the. Okay. I don't know. What that was. But you could on this rotor saying, oh, well, the exit genetical Hermano looking at scripture have concluded that, you know, hey that remix reporting these experiences and they were misunderstood, and that's the origin of religion. And I will put it to you that of the people, I know who have actively studied the history and origin of religions that is a gross oversimplification. It is certainly one possibility of many of how different religions arose. But to say that that is the origin of religions is simply something that you can't demonstrate because we have to go back all the way to mysticism and animism we have to go back to. Here's a various leader who is giving a set of instructions with no mysticism attack attached. And then later something mystical comes into it. But the thing is when we look at for example, the bible. In the beginning. God created the heaven and the earth that's the very first purse. It it began at all. And it is clearly a statement. And unless you want to write it off as metaphor of a supernatural event. I believe all their early mystics. Did write it off as a g and metaphors of the Irving. Interpretive prove it. I don't care. What you I don't care. What you believe the ancient mystics did you need to comparative religion. Yes. I study compared to as a hobby, and yeah, I mean look into the Capito chain fathers the hypoc Jimmy FedEx, I mean, the all interpret religion by metaphor and energy. I'm glad you have an opinion. Thank you. All right, man. Well, I just had said you look into that Jesus Christ. Jimmy. I have spent the bulk of my life in detail studying religion, you know, what else I've studied how about you know, what else I've studied. What else I've studied it pissed Amal betting. How about considering having experiences? Then really judge. Hey, did you not hear me tell you that while I was in church? I had those experiences, and then then are also had them outside a church is your gun. Night. Here's a thought why don't you try having one of those experiences? Okay. Here's a thought call another show. That's that's and don't get me wrong. By the way, this this'll be good time to to bring up something. Yes, I got on Jimmy about interrupting and people will point out that I ended up more than anybody. And you're probably right. And I'll be doing video at some point that that kind of talks about the how and the why but it comes from fourteen and a half years of this show where if you let somebody talk for five minutes, and then you try to challenge the first thing they said what you get is. That's not what he said or that's not what he meant. And then you get another five minute rabbit trail. Which is why I wanted to point wh- Jimmy's point was he trying to say that science is effectively disproving the supernatural Nasr because here's the thing about supernatural. Not only can you not prove it, currently user can't disprove it. It's an unfold Safai proposition. There's no way to test or investigate when I say that not only have I studied comparative religions, and I've also studied a piss Tamala. Gee, that's where we get into the science. That's where we get into. How do we know what we know? And so you can make reasonable inferences. You can you can have really good abducted arguments that go arguing towards the. Best explanation, and all of scientists positions are tentative and should be weighted proportionally to the evidence. That's it. So when you say, you should have one of those experiences Jimmy, you just showed me that you don't have a clue what you're talking about. Because not only have I had those experiences but going out and having one of those experiences tells me nothing at all about what that experience was if I'd never had anything that. I just grabbed the presence of the Holy Spirit. If I'd never felt that and tomorrow, I went out and had that experience. I don't know how I would do that since. At least according to some religious family members. God will choose when and where he reveals himself to you. But even if I don't have that tomorrow. I can't tell you what it is. And I would be prone as most human beings are to saying. Wow. That seems like it might be supernatural. I would then acknowledge that I have no way of knowing that no way to investigate it cetera. But that's the reason that most people in most religions by into the supernatural. But if you tell me, why don't you have that experience? Okay. I already had. But let's find somebody who never has. Let's let's pick two people to atheist to go. Do this study to a was it firmed, a this or whatever? Oh, was it. Was your was snarky bullshit. So let's pick to let's pick somebody who's never been both have never been religious in their tire life. They've never had these experiences and you put them both in the study. And one of them has an experienced that is of the qualities that are described. And the other one doesn't what do, you know? Now. That people have experiences. Oh, they can't explain, hey, let's imagine that neither of them having experience what you know. Now. What if they both have an experience? What do you know? Now, the test methodology is flawed for you to say just go have the experience. Why study piss Tamala G? Why study the science why study the methods by which we go about and determine whether or not release a reasonable. Just go have the experience experience is the thing unexamined that is most likely to lead you astray because while we are great machines inferring today is pretty much like yesterday, and what I know about the world is probably gonna change very little day today. I'm good at getting by in that context. But I like everybody else and bad at saying. Here's what the truth is with no investigation, just an experience. If if if you used that methodology of go have the experience, you would believe every optical illusion every audio illusion every thing that piers sept- of the Mirage out in the desert. You would just I had this experience. I know what I saw. No, you don't know. What you saw you know, that you saw something, you know, that you experience something you don't know what it was until you investigate and confirm it, and the fact that people are having experienced they describe as MS let's go let's go through the six. Yeah. Unity. The the notion that everything is one that we are all one I have never actually had that specific experience. Have you know, thought I'm aware of I know people who have now the notion of the the sacred. I've certainly felt that something was sacred in in in probably this complete mystical context. No, edit quality. Possibly. I don't know. How specific. A positive feeling of love unconditional love I think he's I think the notion of unconditional love is a big fat lie. I I recognize that there are people it to me. It's it's kind of in the same ballpark as like soulmates. First of all, I don't think there's any reason there's a soul, but it's I I find it patently ridiculous that there's one person out there, whose your everything, and I know people who've been married for sixty seventy years, you know, and it's great cool. Good for them. But it's really convenient. And this is actually an argument people have used for God's. It's really convenient that most people find their soulmate where they work or in their town or through a friend. So God is manipulating your friends and your work to find your soul mate. But then somebody else finds their soulmate in Bangladesh. And they started something online. So basically got his manipulating the internet and directing you to the right searches to find your soulmate. And then fifty percent of the people who find their soulmate and up, divorced. Now that means they found the wrong person. They follow the past. So could be wrong about who. Your soulmate was the first time in the second time. And I mean, Liz Taylor was wrong. A lot. It's it seems far more plausible to me that we have the capacity to love a great many people and to connect and have different people in our lives. Sure. And that it's going to happen to different extents. You know, there are people that I care about more than others. Because they're close to me because they have value and then there's carrying for humanity at large. So this feeling of unconditional love I would say, I would I would be kind of opposed to to anybody claiming that was in any way true. But I can't can't rule that out. Maybe some people do feel that. But this transcending space and time not just not just the time dilation of weeds. Sorry, but you have to think that you're completely out of space and time, I think that is an obvious lie and deception as well because you have to have that thought and that thought takes time. Just saying or experiencing it is necessarily temporal. So you should know the second you feel that you are no longer connected to space and time, you should know that you are wrong. And if it's such an obvious thing to because we put put fill in this study, and we give him a bunch of drugs, and we got him in a room. And now, Phil highs a kite, and he's sitting in the room, and he's like off ill completely transcendent of all space and time and everybody observing this is clear that that's not true. Yeah. We got a camera on you. And just saying I feel I transit since base and time takes time and has to occur in space or we couldn't hear you. Not not in you know, in space. Nobody can hear your scream. Yes. Yes. Anyway. And then the NF ability in Avila to explain yeah. I get that. I understand that. We all have experiences that we can't explain. And that's why we go out and look for an explanation. The problem comes when somebody says, here's something that's unexplainable. And I have explained it. It's got if you can't explain it. Then you can't explain it. But if your explanation is God than you are claiming that you have explained it if you're claiming that it's supernatural if you're claiming that it's chemical induced all of those are assertions about what the experience is. And now you've adopted a burden of proof. So if you think you both call something unexplained at offer an explanation. And the study I I can't imagine that. I I don't know what the actual outcome of the study is what they're trying to look if they're looking for people that have experienced that's something that you can measure, and that's on the I can see them doing this that it to see those. But I don't understand. We're Jimmy was trying to go with all these experiences occur. Cool. Now, I think Jimmy was going. What's the next? The all religions are justified or belief in Suva is justified based on that these experiences actually do happen. Even though you haven't establish the cause just the fact that they do occur. I saw Jimmy was listed as at the. And we still haven't talked about that at some point if Jimmy calls back, and you're welcome to you know, I think I've a better understanding of where he was going because it could be that he was trying to show that sciences just the mystical aspects of religion. But if you just prove that what's left, and so he has this particular notion, and I'm gonna stop quickly here because he's not on and I don't want to be unfair. But he has a notion which I've heard before which is. The mystical and supernatural aspects of religion. We have no reason to think that any os exist. But they're still some compelling truth in there. So people took these truths and did their best at explaining them. Because we have this commonality of experience. But that doesn't mean it supernatural, and then I get to okay, how are you with east which next time Jimmy calls? We'll do that right anyway. So that was fifty some odd minutes of of the show. And honestly, I'm sure there's people in the chat room and all my God. Why don't you on this? On this. Why are you interrupting each other while you talking over each other? I get it. All we can ever do is drive to do better. But I think we did get some things out of that call. It's just incredibly frustrating too. Not even know like what direction somebody's going. Yeah. I called you all go to talk about this study. Have you looked into it? No. And even brought up one of the main issues that we have was the definition of mysticism and actually using it. How's it being defining? Why is it even worth using? If it's not well, yeah. That's that's been my objection to both mysticism and supernatural as words in that. I think it's largely the case that those words are used in so many ways by so many different people that they are effectively meaningless as communication tools. If I say to you fill out, a supernatural experience, you probably don't have any idea. What I'm referring to all? And that Taylor swift song earlier. Yes. Shake it off. All right. We'll go to John and hunting beach, Huntington Beach, California. Thanks for waiting. You're done by my friend Ray. Oh is that Ray comfort? Yeah. Okay. Yeah. Well, grieving firm southern California. Thank you put me on the on the air. Sure. Welcome. I won't ask you to comment on the last caller. But if you segue that direction, you're still, okay. Okay. Well, thank you. Appreciate listen. I'm gonna actually try and keep this away from all this restraining word salad that I hear. But I guess my first question is is do you believe that there is no evidence for God. Or do you think there is some evidence for God? However, it's not sufficient to believe for you to believe that that God exists. So it completely depends on how you want to count evidence. Because certainly there we we tend to identify things as anecdotal evidence. Testimonial evidence and those things count as evidence. But only to the extent that the. That they're that. They are believable that they are verifiable etcetera. So I have I have at times in the past. There's no evidence for the existence of God. And what I mean by that is I'm not aware of any good evidence that should be considered as evidence for the proposition because the anecdotal and testimonial things that people present when I evaluate them independently I find that they there's they're not necessarily evidence for God. They are in kind of like the last call evidence for people having experiences that they are tributing to a God. But there's no justification for that attribution. So, but by and large I tend to say that there's insufficient evidence to reach the conclusion that a God likely exists. Okay. I if I may be given example of what I this is just my opinion third to be some evidence for God. Although I totally recognizable. Who had a lot of people would not be. But we're all very familiar with the sun. We kinda see it every day. Not that there were sitting there looking at the sun, but we're very aware of its presence on than we're aware of how it moves. You know, I'm fifty six years old. It's quite clear to me that son is always starting to appear in the eastern sky, and it's always disappeared in the western sky, and, you know, a little lower in the horizon in the winter, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, and I've seen the moon thousands of times in my life. And I know that you know, we live on earth you get an airplane. And you see how big is. And and just everybody knows that there's this very consistent pattern of the sun. And the moon's movements around the earth, and when you get into astrophysics, they they they're so good at this predict exactly when the moon is going to block the sun out for a couple of minutes. I think in two thousand. And seventeen. I, you know, kind of lived close enough to the total lunar eclipse that you've got a pretty good view of it. So and I'm not saying this is convincing evidence that people should be leaving gone in this. But it does appear to me that there is some real predictable patterns here. Maybe I hate to use this word intelligent design because it it's kind of platitude. But it does look like this whole thing was designed just in these this one little example that that a high school student could kind of figure out on their own. And would you say that might be a little bit of evidence that there's diviner crater somebody gather the way the way that I look at that is okay, we we have observances we can see what the sun does. We have if mission about what a star is how how it combust how creates that. He'd how that electromagnetic energy travels through space when it's going to affect us. And how. Sounds like that. However, my question within would be if you're saying, how do we differentiate was design, and what is it? We have an observation. We see what the sun is doing see what the month moon is doing we see the we have that pattern down because we can observe that pattern hadn't. But what how do we differentiate something that's designed from just the way that things are and how we observe in experienced them. How do we differentiate those two the case you're making if you if you really kinda dig on it? Okay. We understand from physics and from gravity. We can make really good predictions. These things are moving. And of course, they seem orderly from our perspective and even potentially beneficial from our perspective. But what your argument has to be when you dig in on? It is okay. These things are obeying the physical laws of the universe. And so now you have to move a step back and say in order for this to be. For god. You have to think that God intentionally set up this particular set of physical laws for things to obey. Because and I don't know what the what the reason is for that. So we have we have observations we have a we understand to great extent, the physical laws that are dictating the movements of bodies in space with gravity and motion and everything else. And what you're doing is looking at it. And like everybody else. I mean, we are we we are patterned seekers. We we see intention -ality and design and you're saying when I look at that, it seems so orderly that it seems to me to be at least somewhat convincing evidence for God. But in order for that to be the case what you'd have to be saying is. I'm convinced that because there's order God must have defined that order. It was intelligently decided that this would be the order. So you're essentially arguing that the order we perceive could not have come about by natural means or it was incredibly unlikely. Come about by natural means and the problem with that many problems with it when we look around at the whole universe. We see this order these physical laws applying as far as we can tell largely universally and with no intention. No purpose. There's nothing on, you know, alpha centauri that was designed with us in mind or the affects us in any way. And when you look at the universe. We're only a tiny tiny portion of the universe is even habitable by human beings. So it's a very, and I'm not trying to accuse you despair Jew. We everybody's done it. But it's a very arrogant notion that begins with my life is important to me. And my life's important to me to stir for everybody, and it is kind of convenient that I live on this planet where I can live on this planet, and they just seems unlikely that that could have happened by chance, and so there must have been some God in there somewhere. And the problem is there's no evidence. For that proposition. It's it is a fallacy on two fronts at least one because it's an argument from personal incredulity that I just can't imagine that this could have natural explanation. So I think supernatural explanation is at least plausible the other one is cherry picking because whenever we look at that. We tend to look at the things that directly affect us and ignore all of the other things, you know, the black holes that are gonna consume things and and all this. So we pick out the things that worked to our benefit and say, wow, this all looks like it was designed for me or us, and we ignore the things, you know, the fact that we would die in the vacuum space, and we can't live underwater without, you know, equipment and gear and that a good chunk of the planet is inhospitable, and that there are things out to kill us and cancers, and blah, blah, blah. It's it's a very narrow look that says, hey, we need an explanation for the earth's moon and how they move in such a way. That has allowed us to flourish. And to me the best explanation is that we are the thing that volved to flourish in this environment. So in some other environment, something else may have evolved. And is looking around doing the same thing. We're doing gosh. The universe was created. Specifically for me is that make sense as to why I don't really count it as evidence forgotten. Eater. I kinda wanted to maybe respond to this, you know, human era Gance. Absolutely. I don't believe that. You know, we sit there and we look at an eagle soaring through the sky, and we're jealous 'cause we can't do that. And we know that that that I on that eagles vastly superior to the either I have in my head, and you know, there is ten times stronger than any human is. So I really I don't see any evidence that that were that shows that human beings are the chosen thing because many creatures in the animal kingdom are far more capable than we are. I mean, jump into the ocean, you're not gonna last very long, but a whale will waft his whole entire life with Bill problems whatsoever. And then this is kind of thing about how do you tell I'm taking the sun, the moon, the earth is clearly not manmade, we agree anything churn with that the issue. Because we are they made. Yes, I agree with you that is was it made or well it was made. But was it made by God? Or was it made by the the natural forces of nature. Okay. We know the answer to that to that. Unless God has influence over the natural enforces of after now, we are exactly where I predicted. We'd be. Yeah. That's a starting like so what evidence. So this is why was saying I understand how you got there. I'm just saying what I would need is evidence that God intentionally set up the laws of nature or as manipulating lows in nature. The the the fact the observation itself is not evidence you have to you have to establish some kind of causal connection between the God. The proposed explanation you have and the observation and so that would require evidence that God either set up the fiscal manipulates them. That's where the evidence would be. Yeah. Okay. I if if they're career God exists. He's giving us that evidence that we can say, oh, there's a God. There's the evidence for it. Okay. Evidence is circumstantial it's circumstantial evidence, which I don't think you can call circumstantial evidence, no evidence at all it, even when you're when you're looking at the evidence relooking something like that like you saying to look at the world around you look at the eagle in the way that everything works. But the fact is you have a sample size of one. And you have no other conditions of the premise, you have no other such. We don't have another university study to see that. This is how universe actually looks. When it doesn't have a designer, you know, things outta whack things. We don't have another comparison to make. And so saying that the world that we observe around us is sufficient evidence to say that a d designed it means you have to have some kind of criteria to. Say why adidi would not have designed this? You have to have some kind of juxtaposition. There's some way to differentiate the way those two universes would be if it wasn't designed the sun would be doing this. It wouldn't be doing this. You would have to establish those things because we only have one sample size of this study so to speak, which is our observable universe. We don't have the evidence to say that this wasn't designed because this is what it should be based on our studies of these other universes. We only have the one. And so that was always a very unconvincing argument to me to say that look at the trees around and look at everything as around you. That's how you know that was there. And it's like, this is all we've got this is the only option we have we have no way to say that that sand over there was intelligent design. But if the sand looked like this. Oh, that's not. Yeah. You don't have that. It's even worse than that too. Because I in and I'll ask you this John. So you're listed as theorist on the call. Cream thing show. I'm assuming you believe in God. Yes. I do do you would you. Do you think that the God? You don't believe in our real. Okay. So yeah, you would probably agree with me that throughout human history. People have invented gods that served his explanations for things we didn't know. Right. Absolutely. And so, and so if we live in a world where people are inventing gods to specifically serve as explanations that we for things, we don't know. Then we know that most of those proposed explanations are false. But it shouldn't be surprising that if somebody invents an explanation for the order in the universe that their explanation would actually be sufficient to explain that order. So it's like saying, hey, how did this phone end up on the table? We'll let me come up with a list of proposed wins everything that I'm gonna propose should be sufficient last night pixies came in and set the phone on the table in this position. I have no reason to think the pixies are real. But that's certainly given the definitions something pixies could potentially do. So it's not surprising that when we find a God being proposed as an explanation that it's sufficient that it would serve as an explanation. The problem is we have no demonstration that it is both necessary and sufficient that our one proposed God out of the mini. Gods out of our this this God out of all those gods and all those gods out of all the potential explanations. How do we determine that this Pacific? God is the best explanation, especially when we have no way to confirm supernatural causation and all of the evidence shows that the universe operates in an orderly fashion and doesn't give a rat's ass about us. Yeah. I lot of agreement here. However, I wanted to respond to Phil's thing. We have another universe to kind of compare ourselves to we don't have another at least not one that we can observe. But we do have a lot of other planets that were now able to desert observe and kind of look at and so we have that examples we seem to be for what we can observe with you know, telescopes and infrared light all the things that the astrophysicist Mook at your it. We're the only planet that we know of out of all of the stuff out there. And I'm not saying this is evidence straight from God. But it does seem to be circumstantial evidence to me that that for whatever reason we got picked to have life and not necessarily human life. Maybe maybe God likes polar bears and he wanted to create environment for polar bears. I don't ruined we're in because we're era that well. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, we might be the bad guys in this whole thing could be I guess they have. Here's the thing. Here's okay. What percentage of the universe? Have. We explored to the extent that we can rule out life. Oh, yeah. I mean. Credibly small. I mean, there's so much that we don't let say let's say less than one percent. Let's say less than one percent wingless than one too. I think it's vanishingly small and so in what what other lake you can't put a number on it and one other area. Would you recognize that you have a vanishingly small set of data? And then still extrapolate to we know enough that clearly we were picked. Okay. So do we have vanishing small? We there's so much that we don't know. But that doesn't mean that we don't know what we do know we do a lot. We have a lot of data. We aware that we you're aware that we've found the building blocks of life. On other things other than earth rape. Carbon and all these kinds of things. Yes. I think that I'm aware of that. If that's what you're talking about. We don't fully understand how life arose, but not just the elements. I mean, I'm talking about finding basically the essential building blocks of the things that we suspect would be involved in bowel. Genesis elsewhere on asteroids and things like that. But here's the other thing. We could be the only one in the whole universe. And that would be remarkable. It could be that. I don't think we are actually I think there's because of the odds there's somebody else out there. Whether we'll ever find them is. You know, I don't know. Okay. Now. Now, I mean more confused a little bit 'cause minute ago we were chosen picked. And now you're saying that we're the only thing. Yeah. Okay. I created confusion. Let me see if I can explain it for what we know we're in. And I think we have a lot of information from thousands of potential planets out there that we're able to determine that don't have any life on them. How there's all right way, we cannot. There are things where we could determine that given facts we have there's probably not life as we know it or understand it on a particular planet, but we haven't even confirmed whether or not there's life or the building blocks of life on any other planet in our solar system, and it's kind of era Ghent to presume that we already know about all the potential types of life that are out there. You know, that you know, you could onto. Good on the bottom of the ocean. Where there are things feeding in sulfuric acid around vents. That's not life. Anything like us. I mean. Yeah. Okay. It's still carbon is still DNA. But this is this is not life as we would how much weird or could something be on another planet. So we're in this position where we don't really know. Yeah. We don't really know a lot you're convinced so many final question because you guys are very generous with your time with me. But this is my opinion, my belief. I'm not trying to put it on anyone else. But I look at everything and I go, oh, man. This is just to be to be by pure cancer in the forces of nature answer A K Mia aids. Yeah. No, I get it. I get it. I get it. Maybe we're not the maybe we're not God's favorite people. Maybe he likes to maybe God's my level. And who knows I mean, I'm not saying maybe there isn't one bowling green? And all this. Maybe there isn't one and some people look around and see it as amazing and some people look around as as crap. Yeah. I look I see both ways, you know. I how ever I guess. My question was is is it totally unrealistic basically thing I'm being completely nonsensical by looking at all this, and deciding no this was created by some type of intelligence zainur that there is some some God out there that did this and caused this to happen that life would survive for whatever purposes that God there may not have. I don't know. Only nut though for me or is your some basis for that. I mean based on what you said when you're I mean, most of kind of what you're talking about revolves around in credulity looking just around you and coming coming to that conclusion you because you can't come up with another explanation as to how what we observe around us could've come into form. But that has nothing to do with how it actually did come into foam. It's just it's very interesting. And I that's not something that I haven't heard before. But to say that because of what we see around is that justifies, my believe and will not only a deity with this specific deity that did these specific actions like that it so unfounded based on you know, the what you presented here. Just I'm I'm not sure I I wouldn't say that you're you know, wacko or a nuts. So whatever you said to believe it because there are some people that do the data should have found that convincing. The data shows that you are normal. The overwhelming majority of people, but I'm not, but the overwhelming majority of people through history and currently have reached the same conclusion, you have for pretty much the same reason that tells us nothing about whether or not you're actually correct to actually it tells us about whether or not you have good reason because you don't but not recognizing that doesn't mean that. You're you're not that doesn't mean you're completely out there on a limb. It doesn't this is what we normally do. And it's we've even classified the air is what you're what you're committing as far as I can tell is a type one mistake. And that's where you see a predator in the Bush, even when there's not a type two mistake because when you don't see the predator in the Bush win there is type two mistakes are an I'm assuming I'm assuming I got that right now. Somebody correct me, but the type two mistakes are the ones that are deadly. So the person who thinks they see a predator in the Bush runs away. Even if it's not there. So they are more likely survive and pass on their genes. The person who doesn't see the printer in the Bush dies. And so the the type of area you're making it gets into Pascal's wager, even of I look around, and I see all this amazing stuff for us. And it just seems like a plausible explanation for that. Is that some being intentionally created all this and set it up? So that it's beneficial does if you're wrong. That's unlikely to have any dramatic effect on your life for just that simple leaf. If in fact, I'm wrong. Well, we're back on Pasco's wager where if depending on the God, I could suffer all kinds of whatever. But. It's not true that Bill that type one error is without consequences. So you could believe hey, I think there's a God. But I don't know much about it. Cool. I probably don't have much of a problem without other than I don't agree. The problem is is that once you're convinced that there probably is some kind of being who's got your best interests at heart, and who potentially created all of this for you that leads down to. All of the different religious views. We have right down to this guy cares who you're sleeping with no free. But sex, you know, no, you can't love somebody like this. These people should have rights. These people are inferior. We are it leads to an awesome thing. Because as soon as you think that that the universe was in some way put together for you. There's no guarantee that you'll stop it. The universe was put together for life on earth or humans on earth or white humans on earth or white male humans on earth or white male humans on earth who like pickles. You can spin this into anything. And that's how we get the religious sexed. So I think the thing here is I'm not convinced you are wrong about a God. I'm just not convinced that you are right. And the reasons that you offer I can I can show you why I don't find them convincing. And it's because if there are twenty different potential explanations that we know of. Of we need a way to differentiate between them to figure out which ones most likely, but we also need to recognize that we might not know all the potential explanations. The fact that we've got a list of twenty. Now, you go back a few hundred years, maybe they only have a list of fifteen you back thousand years, maybe they have to five you go back to win. Many of these religions reformed, maybe it was just patently obvious. This shit can happen on its own. Of course, there's a God. And then in the intervening time while we're going out and exploring and understanding physics and Astra physics and how these bodies move, and we're coming up with the best explanations that we have such that we can predict lunar eclipses forever. We are still struggling with the baggage of people ancient ignorant, goat hurting marauders who were convinced by someone themselves or someone else that they were getting messages from the one true God in that. They're the special ones. And that's that's of course, where my biggest problem lies. But I don't want anyone to believe anything. Yeah. One second. I'm done. I don't want anyone to believe things for bad reasons. You should always have a good reason for what you believe. But go ahead. Okay. So I did make the point. I don't think humans are special in this whole thing. So I could never really argue that they for instance, because I know God. And God telling me this that you know, we ought to eat cows or something I don't necessarily think we're that special. I'm not shutting and get the evidence is directly opposed to you. Because as religion that says, we specifically shouldn't eat cows. And another one that says, we're to subdue the earth. So the evidence is that people not you. But people are definitely like this and have been for a long time. I agree. But because I believe in God does not make me religious. It's that there's a creator here that doesn't mean that religion is got nothing to do with God. I mean, in my opinion, it's a it's a manmade thing. I thought I thought I'd already guys who made the sun. I thought I'd already acknowledged that your particular thing is not something that I have a great objection to except for where can lead so believing anything for bad reasons slippery slope deal. No, no, I wanna I wanna throw this that. But if you if you believed in God, couldn't you argue you're wrong because you're religious, man. Made in the universe was made. By God in the universe is is organized in this way. I guess I let's pick a a thing gay marriage. I imagined that that this is a topic. People are been discussing won't gay people are here. God put them on there. How dare you saying that that that gave people are somehow evil or an abomination in? An ancient book written by people who we don't even know of evidence that would just be because God put them here. See this is the probably didn't God. This is the problem. You believe there's a God as a complete inference. But how do you know what God wants? I don't k- because other people are saying they do we can tell other people are saying tell print wait where we'll stop. You said you don't. And now you're saying sometimes you can't tell what God wants I want to hear about that. Okay. Now, I do miss speak, sometimes and change my mind too. I answered the question to but I could let. I do that to go ahead. Right. Yeah. Okay. Listen, what I was gonna say was look, I think sometimes we get some evidence. What God doesn't like? And what God does like France in this whole thing don't have sex before. Marriage doesn't seem to really doesn't sit with me. But don't be promiscuous don't have sex a whole bunch of different partners that does resonate with the gun because the hell are you to tell other people who they can and can't have sex with right? I'm not I'm saying that God sometimes gives gives us evidence that we could look for that. He would like based on people have John multiple partners. John, I'm gonna do I'm gonna do you big favor because you just completely shot yourself in the foot and undermined everything you were saying before because you're now convinced that God doesn't want people to be promiscuous. That's how religions start. You said that your God thing was complete separate religion. You said that you don't know what God wants, and you believe it for this. But if the second you went to I don't think odds opposed to sex before marriage, but God's opposed to promiscuous promiscuity, congratulations. You have now demonstrated. The point that I was making the entire time is that even that type one belief that may not necessarily be bad can lead to other things. It's not a slippery slope argument to say it's necessarily going to be there is a database argument that shows that it does. In fact, go there and thank you for demonstrating, and is your God have happily or lease intend things that just happen to comport with what you believe the world should be. Yeah. And how many people can I have sex with before? I'm promiscuous. And I mean both at one time and in sequence. Because ultimately like what what you said about gay Mary sand. I o will you look at that as we put them here. So how can they be evil something like that? That may be your that. Maybe what you believe. But to assert that a deity naturalistic fallacy. It's just I don't understand like how you even come into that conclusion how you're figuring out. What things I just happened to comport with what you believe that. I really God. God put me here. And gave me a particular barely hear you. Yeah. God put me here and gave me a particular sex drive's that that caused me to have sex with almost nobody. And he put somebody else here that has the sex drive the cause them to have sex with college people. How is that any different from your argument that God put them here? So this whole thing is a demonstration you you've taken step one towards turning your personal God belief into a religion. And it's not because you have any evidence that God doesn't want people to be promiscuous. It's because you have a problem with people who are promiscuous under your definition, associate we lost them. But that's. Seems like. I was I was going to do him a favor and let him go. And so he could go think about that. Because I I just. I don't know. Maybe I'm the only one, but. If you say that you don't know what God wants. But sometimes you do that's a problem. Yeah. And then when you show how religions can start from one idea to another. There's nothing about the notion that God created the the solar system the laws of physics the universe it cetera. That tells us anything about what God says about sex, and yet that's exactly where he went right off the bat, and it's probably the most pernicious of all religious things that have been brought up. Oh, you shouldn't. You know? A man lies with another man as he lies with a woman, that's an abomination and as capable Jensen is pointed out, maybe that's not with passage mean. Maybe it's advice on position like you need to raise up a little bit. If you try and do it the same way, you do it with a woman. It's pro. But also this thing, you know, the Bible's against man on man sex. It's only sometimes in matter of convenience clearly opposed to women on women of house. But because there's some lesbians in the bible like, but the other thing is I want to know. And I I think John would agree. And maybe if he thinks about it's more he'll recognizes everybody has a different notion of what they consider promiscuous. And at the end of the day. It's not that promiscuous. Promiscuity is a thing sitting out there that is necessarily bad. Promiscuous is the label that we use as a pejorative for people having more sex than we are. Or that we think they should have I well, I don't feel like having sex with more than one partner for the next forty years. Congratulations who I think that's a perfectly valid way deliver your life. I don't I don't know that you're necessarily going to be fulfilled as the person who has more partners, maybe less. Oh, well, what about disease is the more partners? You have more. Hey, I'm talking about responsible consensual enthusiastic informed consent responsible sex between adults. I'll tell you what everybody. We should almost like by promiscuity dot org. And then just let the pretentious people who think they know how much sex God wants us to have go over and say, okay, you can't have sex with more than one partner to time and no more than ten partners in a twenty five year period, or it's promiscuity, and then as we get more and more of them. We don't have to get involved at all we can just let them argue with each other. And we'll go out and fuck. It's John as just I do appreciate John. Oh, yeah. I I hope he does think about that. And call back because you know, what I was going to start getting to is how how do you define like, you said with promiscuity specifically, or I how do you start establishing those standards about these people are here. So they're not evil. How do you come to that conclusion? How'd you get that from the God? That was I almost the is to get. I was just oak created everything around us, and then started getting into my new show about who you share your genitals with. Yeah. I don't wanna be mean to John because it's very clear that John was honest, sincere polite. He thinking I would love to keep talking to him. But it was all also almost cartoonish. There's a God I'm convinced. There's probably a God because the order in the universe make sense. And he really doesn't want to have sex with too many people. I it's it's a parody almost. And I understand how that thinking goes. And I don't think I don't John news remotely abnormal. That's how a great many people thinking have. And it could be the case thing there could actually be data driven case that particular level of promiscuity does in fact damage Sidoti, there can also be data that a lack of participating in those events could damage society, but bring the damn data. Don't tell me that you think you've sussed out what God thinks about sex. Don't tell me you think you sussed out what God thinks about gender equality or whether or not we should have health care or whether or not the poor people in the streets are just lazy and God is punishing them, by the way because seems that pretty much everything bad that happens in my life. Seems to be punishment from God by the people who disagree with me about a God some of them and when bad things happen in their life. It's not punishing them. But at the end of the day, if you're just running around punishing people, I I don't know if that's a very worthwhile gun. We only have a couple of minutes left. But I want to get to one more call before we do we got Maria North Carolina. And by the way, if you're still on the line, Adele, Alexander and Sagan, I think fills up for it once shows over we'll go ahead and stay on for an after show incur, the queues wait for the studio, but Maria North Carolina. Thank you so much for waiting. We're happy here. Hey, I'm good though. They will get on. I got an from the studio that we're not going to do the the patriot thing afterwards, but we are going to continue to clear out the queue, so. I mean, I'm. Ex then because they'll Christian I've been an atheist four since last August and. But I had a question about. Have an when you were Christian. Did you like the idea of having? Yeah. I loved what I thought having was until I thought about it a lot more. And I ask was because I never liked that idea personally, even a preteen teenager. I hated the idea because two reasons one of the reasons was it's on an incredibly boring. And other reason was I did not believe I would get into heaven. I couldn't really trick myself to believe it. But if I did somehow end up there, I also did not believe that my family would get there. So I wouldn't want to be there on knowing that my family wasn't how interesting a number of problems with the hell thing, and some of them are more jokey like, you know, hey, I could have cheesecake, and it's awesome. But if you're gonna feed cheesecake every day for the rest of eternity I'm gonna get sick of it. I get that. I stand it. They'll be for me. Okay. Is there lactose intolerant? I think you think about it. I love cheesecake. But if all I could eat cheesecake all the time everyday forever. I probably end up painting myself. Yes. My my question was when you became an atheist, the that you still have lingering fear of how I mean, I remember going up, and I guess the concept of heaven it was kind of touched on inch here and there, but not usually it was in the context of funeral. That's usually way was kind of heavily push through. So it was you know, somebody that went went home the glory or an angel got called home. And so that was the comfort mechanism that was employed for the congregation everyone that was there to say that you're gonna see this person. Again, you know, they're, you know, being received by the Lord, and they're happy and be happy for them. And and my f- Koch. Church. It was more music. What happened? And so they'll be dancing and some joys. There's of course, tears, but it was that supposed to be that celebration that they went home to the Lord. Therefore, you're gonna see him again. Once once you get that. Will you all be reunited, even necessarily like anybody with me? I got over the hell problem relatively quickly by saying first of all how much time if I spent worrying about the hell of other religions that I didn't grow up with right? Yeah. The other thing is is there anything I can do about it. And the third was do. I haven't a reason to think it's real and all three of those failing to meet the test meant that any concern. I had about hell just vapid. But I'm I'm an agreement with you. I've talked before about how for example, my mom is not going to happen. Even though she thinks she is because in heaven, there can be no suffering. There's no way my mom could be in heaven with me in hell, and she wouldn't suffer. Now, I've talked to her about it, and somehow or another God makes us work. But the reality is. It's basically a affect simile of my mom and altered one is something that's changed about her mind such that she's not going to be saying. Yes. And she's there to praise and worship and everything will be good. There would be no evil the problem with all of that is what makes life. Interesting invaluable is a couple of things number one. It ends. I think if we could teach people appreciate the ending of life is a part of life. And it's what gives the value to it. I think that would go a long way towards dealing with a lot of people's grief. But the other aspect of life is the variety and the pain now. Yes, there is excessive pain and suffering in the world. But that doesn't mean that everything that causes some suffering or pain is necessarily a bad thing. Because you learn from it you learn how to overcome adversity you. Learn more about the facts of reality. So that you can void that it would seem to me that any perfect heaven. There's nothing to learn and I live my life to learn. So I don't wanna go there. Anyway. But I think one of the things it's appealing to people as they think when they get their God's gonna explain it all to you're going to get to like rewind history and see what happened here, and the everything will make sense and all the stuff, you didn't know, you know, like, you know, for months less theorem, you'll you'll just get you'll be just you'll know everything I'm not aware of cer-, certainly nothing in the bible supports the notion that when you get to heaven God's far Gina when you get to heaven causing tell you nothing it's going to be like, there's your place to Neil. There's your mansion your mansion over there. I have was doing get the see God when you got the heaven because no one can see God even in heaven. You can't see them in physical form on earth. Although you can wrestle with him and other stuff, but. Weird things about the help. Art, when I became an atheist, the very same day that fear was instantly gone. It's amazing. Never had. I haven't had any of hell ever since that day. I can tell you. That is great. And I I know people have been eight Theus for many many years who still wake up in the middle of the night from fear of the hell that they were indoctrinated to so count yourself fortunate. And I think that you know, I think you'll be fine. Yeah. I feel very lucky that I don't have any of by do have a lot of siblings and be all except for tubes. And believe in God. And both of them believe in some sort of supernatural things ones that don't believe in God. So I'm the only one who believes in does not believe in God at all or any gods or. That very same day. I decide if I'm not going to believe in Christian wash. I believe in any other God. And that's the thing is if there is some moving from one religion to another there is some God out there. I'm open to the ovens for it. Sure. I think some of them are more obviously false than others. But anyway, Marie I appreciate the call. Lots interesting some of them much more interesting than the Christian God true like LOKI. But anyway, I I the call Mary we're going to wrap rapid show up and then go into some after show calls real quick. But yeah, enjoy no longer fearing hell or wanting heaven. Yeah. That's right. That's I mean, it it can definitely linger there, but that that same type of mentality that you were saying if I'd how long have I feared the the, quote, unquote, hells of others of other religions, all my life. And it's like if I'm not hearing them, but why in the world, should I still fear this one, especially if I don't have a belief in a d or having don't have any evidence that an afterlife exist at all I place like why in the world what I live that way. It seems a lot of the arguments presented about this problem. They're gonna seem cartoonish, and the only reason they seem pretentious because most people are indoctrinated into a particular religious mindset. So as soon as you hear, you know, like when I say that mysticism spirituality, so over used that, they're useless. There are people who think they know what they're talking about. I mean, quite often they're not talking about the same thing. We're talking past it. But when I when I look at it, the examples that I give people think our Tunisian like, okay, if you really loved, you know, your kids, would you? You build a torture chamber in the basement, and then never directly engage with them. But leave them notes on the refrigerator that they have no evidence. These notes are actually from you. And those notes say you'd better do this this this this and this or I'm gonna send you down to the basement for being tortured. None of that seems realistic. None of that seems loving. And if if it's not going to happen in in the real scale. The notion that there's some extra supernatural scale where it somehow justified bizarre to me, but ho you can't compare God's Santa Claus. Yes. I can Santa Claus has more evidence. That's just a fact because there are kids wake up with presence labeled from Santa. There are kids who go to the mall and see Santa. They're wrong. And that's the thing is you can be wrong and yet still be reasonable. If the evidence that you have leads to a conclusion, you are reasonable irrespective of whether or not you are ultimately, correct? And that's the reason why we have to keep pursuing more information. So that we have a better pool to pull from to figure out what we think and actually critical of the things that have convinced us in the first place that looking at the piss them out of what led you to that belief in the first place in evaluating that evidence along the way. There's there's three more calls. I I'm going to try to get to since we're not doing the after show. So we'll do we can we have Adele in Oakland. Thanks for waiting. Hey. Are you? Good. How are you guys? I talk to you about three months ago. I don't know if you remember. I just. I just wanted to get to the idea where there's God's will. And then versus coming pre. Well, which we could you know, argue that we don't even have all the different discussion. But I just wanted to talk about that. And even though with obviously logically fallacious, how do you are you with the on this topic? Because it doesn't seem like it just kind of phase into their idea of well one thing that they agree with is God will if they disagree with it like they up as wealthy they say, oh, well that you re will and you're not doing God's will. So I will set aside the discussion about whether or not we have free will because my answer is. Yes, or no, depending on how people wanted to find it. But the notion within particularly Christianity, and I'll just take there because I think it applies to a good many others that we have free will is clearly false and. The way I point this out is this did God create the universe. They'll say, yes. Could God have created a different universe? Some of them will say, yes. Some of them will say, no if got couldn't create a different universe than everything is deterministic in. God was stuck with his universe. Put if they're willing to say, yes. So God intentionally created this universe. Does. God know what's going to happen in each of the potential universes that he created? Yes. Because nothing can happen that doesn't go to Cording to God's plan. That means that God intentionally created universe in which I become an atheist and go to hell instead of the universe in which I remain a Christian. So while I would agree with you that from the internal perspective or I would agree with the Christian from the internal perspective. I am thinking agent who takes actions with the appearance of will. I can never do anything that God didn't already know about and specifically pick because he could have created different universe and didn't. And when you put those three elements together. You cannot have a God and free. Will you have to either remove? Hey, God knows what's going to happen. Because he's watching it like a movie we exercised our. Yeah. Or God created the universe, but didn't have any option in which case, it's all deterministic and God's relevant to it. Or god. Crazy inverse could created a different one. But doesn't know what's going to happen and under that when you get it. But when you put all three of them together, which is the foundation of Christianity that there are prophecies and God's knows what's going to happen. God knows what God knows when the end is. He knows who's going to have any news not. And he knows knows the number of hairs on your head, which for me is not as hard as it is for other people when you put all those things together, you can't have free will under under any model. Then how adopt point what is the reasoning for, you know, being made thick, and then, you know, being commanded to be well, how do they justify? How could anybody be wrong? What they do. Because they don't agree with me. And they say that you still have free will they just don't understand that that try Lemba. And so their argument is basically the whole argument for free will everywhere within the without is it feels like I have free will therefore I do that's as close as anybody can get to definition of free will to to to defining that we in fact have free will because feels like we do. But if in fact, we don't, and it's just the case that we feel like we do then even feeling like we do isn't evidence that we do. Okay. So okay. So they would argue that. We feel like we have role. We don't. But then how could they get offended if we do things that are considered sin? If we don't have well God's offended. They're offended on God's behalf. Okay. But how could God be offended if God didn't create us with free will cause Godse dick. Okay. Like this whole thing. Punny the parallel of narcissist and codependent that's what the relationship kinda seems like. You are not wrong. And I can't really tell you what we'll say is go out and ask them, go out and have the conversation. I do this is having the station with you. This has become had these conversations. And it's I don't know how to get past that cognitive business. I I don't know what to do other than this to in my, you know, participated discussion like this, and how, you know, join a base in other areas. So that people who are searching, we'll see these conversations. That's like the best thing. I feel like I can do the people who actually care about truth and are willing to acknowledge honestly when the path that they've chosen that they think Leeson the truth doesn't because I have I know people that have interacted with recently who don't care at all about data because the data could be wrong. How do you? How do you know? How do you trust that data? And I was like, okay, I've got data. What if you got, oh, I got personal testimony from people, and I. Kidding? I know people who value personal testimony and experience valuable data bring up your own personal testimony. Yeah. They don't value mind so much, right? Because because it's not the right 'cause mine is my personal my personal testimony, which brings up data. Got I've had a similar discussion when we talk about God's will. And even the good things and bad things. It's all part of God's plan had even though you lost your job. You lost your cost? All it was stronger. It's gonna work out according to God's plan. And you know, I when I talk about like our own actions like the actions that we take when someone hurt someone else. And I'm like, what was that was that also part of God's plan. God's plan was is everything everything that we see and everything that we do is a part of his plan. Then that person that murdered another was that a part of the plan I've gotten I remember conversation, worry, it was that was the devil. Tempting you. Oh that was that was a demon. That was tempting your actions that wasn't God, though, wasn't got that happened. But I'm like well power over God. And that right, right. And and that's this kind of worry kind of goes out like what isn't everything supposed to happen? According to God's will God's plan. So the plan was for the double too. Tantrum of this person. Just like with Joe to this. Bruce bag. I don't know what to say they worked together they were together to screw over job. They were together and a number points, actually, Satan is the accuser who works for God, this notion that Saint Louis for bills above devil are independent is one notion from scripture, then there's one that Klum Gombe altogether is different names for the same being, and that's not actually evident, which is a reason why both Jesus and Lucifer are referred to as MorningStar. I mean, it's it's weird. Now, I've I've had this discussion. Andrea gates the woman who drowned her kids, so they would go to heaven. I had a discussion recently with with somebody about this. They agreed those kids went to heaven that you know, kids who are below the age reason or whatever they go, boom. Do not pass go go straight up to Jesus. I heard that they nobody knows if they go to have it or not God judges that just depending on feels like, but if you agree that those kids went to heaven, then she did the best thing she could possibly do for her kids, even potentially damn Demi God. Well, yeah. And so the person I was talking to was like, no, no, no. She was his crazier evil interests. I okay, I agree with you that that that what she did was awful. But if you look at it from within the doctrine, she did the best at what what greater love could you have than to kill your kids and guarantees that they go to have if your doctors if you're talking is, correct. But here's the thing here respect of the doctrine that had to be part of God's plan. God's plan was for a woman to get famous for intentionally drowning her kids. So that they would go to heaven. Now, I don't know. I think that if there is a God, he's an idiot. But if I was God, and I didn't want people to drown their kids. I would make it clear that draw near kids is not going to get you to heaven that it's not within my will. Instead this God seems to have said I'm really not gonna tell them very clearly about how this whole getting to heaven thing works, and I'm gonna make sure that this one woman gets famous for doing the exact thing that I don't want people to do. And then I'm not going to clarify on it at all that God is either in editor dick or both. There's nothing better. There's only one thing better than going heaven, and that's taking somebody with you. So maybe she read that. And that was her interpretation of scripture could be. It's just also goes into then what's the point of crane because I heard well, you didn't pray correctly. When things don't get answer the way that they need to. But what's the point of praying? If when you pray God's will is already determined. So what will the planet will God's plan change based on your George Carlin? There is there is a way around that. That's as far as I can tell doctrinal prayer is not to get things. Purrs just you sucking up to God. It is you. And so the prayer is the I will be done. You're just sitting here saying yes, God, I am. In fact, a play thing in your grand cosmic show, and I'm happy for your will be done as if God would care whether or not you're happy about it. Matter of fact, it means that it was God's will for you to be happy that his will be done. Well that sounds like a narcissist. We're saying, hey narcissist. Tell me how to stroke your eagles that you'll treat me better. Except in this case, the narcissist his made it so that you want to stroke his ego or not don't want to stroke his ego based on his whim. You know, I really like, Phil. So I want a destroyed my ego. But I don't like Joe over there. So I'm gonna make sure Joe doesn't stroke my goal. So so that I can send him to heaven or to hell. Anyway, we're running out of time. I anyway, I appreciate the call. Thank you. All right. We are running into overtime now. Alexander and Oklahoma. What have you got Forrest? Welcome to the show. Oh, wow. Okay. Cool. Interesting. Cool. I'm surprised that actually talking to to you Matt I've seen all over you to hear on time. Wow. Okay. This is really never done this before. Sorry. I'm sorry. I'm still like amazement. And I'm I didn't think I was going to be nervous when I was talking to you. But now that I'm talking to you actually freaking I can fix this off for you real quick. Short on time. Because it says here that you were gonna ask about what purpose means for an atheist. Yeah. So that's where I wanna start my friend. Chris Johnson did a book where he interviewed a bunch of atheist giving their thoughts on meaning purpose in a life without God. And so it's a collection of essays and photographs, but he also turned that into a documentary. So if you go to the book dot com. You can find the book and or the documentary which include my answer as well. As the answer of many other people because I'm not the ultimate authority on anything. But me, and maybe not even that. But it will give you a lot of different perspectives on purpose and meaning from a secular, eight theistic perspective. And if you don't want to buy the book or the movie, send me an Email, and I'll send you a copy of the movie. All right. I I guess I'm gonna ask to I know are you is there a certain time. Limit we got right now. We're we're technically in overtime. But you're one of the last year we're going to try to get to. So we don't wanna go onto long. But I definitely wanted to give you some time. So go ahead. Okay. Thank you. Thank you for shit that I guess one question I asked Chelsea she was the person that, but me, and you guys just like 'cause I'm still in the sense. Right. You know, I've I grew up in Christianity. You know, whatever. My mom's a Christian, and she's actually been super awesome with with me. And then trying to figure this out on my own and stuff like that. And I. I didn't start. I guess Christianity. Is you know, she and she can address this question. Chelsea did Christianity is the you know the face in God. And I kind of thought to myself I could be wrong. This is an ABC's and kind of the face and no, no, no. I'm just not convinced that there's a God. None of my positions are based on faith faith is excuse people. Give when they don't have a good reason. If you have good reasons, you believe for good reasons. And if you don't yet have good reasons, you don't believe it's not I'm not necessarily position where I'm saying. There is no God, I'm saying I am not convinced. There is a God. And in some cases, I'll say there is no God, depending on that, you know, definition, but it's it's not a faith based position anymore. Then you know, if. Believe the moans made a grain cheese. I mean, no like is that is that is that a faith based position. I can look at the moon. It's not green. I mean. I mean, it's why sometimes we wouldn't said green cheese, but. Yes. So the fact that there's a difference between having a positive. I believe the moon is not made green cheese and having an not accepting a different, positively. Which is I am not convinced the mood may green cheese. Now, I think there's ample evidence considering we walked on it that the moon is not made agreeing. Jeez, some evidence none of finish. Oh, but like at some of it instead like Christianity does exist, and I'm not like, you know, trying to go like what Christianity exists in Christianity exists clarify that a little bit. Well, you know, for instance, Jesus, right? Like, I mean, it was like a could be using this completely wrong. When I say this. But I think it was an archaeologist than something about Jesus was in fact, the real person. But there was no like evidence of him being a spiritual being guys like that. So there are people who think Jesus exist or something we don't know. I I would think that that would be a question where the answer had to obviously be. Yes, if it were to be true. And now the answer is we don't know. But it doesn't matter because our doesn't matter that we don't know it does matter whether or not he existed for for the religion self. But let's assume that Jesus existed that we have a fairly accurate record of things that he may have said, but we have no way to demonstrate that he was divine or supernatural or had powers or was God. Okay. Cool. Now, we're talking about a person that that that doesn't in any way. Support the truth of Christianity. And what's worse is we can't even demonstrate that Jesus existed? And we have a good record of his words. So we're in worse shape than not being not having any evidence that Jesus was God. I mean, one of the things I guess, I guess just trying to figure out like is like like, I guess. Ask yourself this way, you're going to. Why are you focused on whether or not Jesus existed? Why aren't you focused on whether or not allow was the prophet of God? Good point. You bet your asset is. I've done this for a while. And it's one of those things that bugs me, it's like, how did you decide that God was how did you decide that God was a good one in Saint was evil. These are we are focused on the it's like, I said earlier, my fear of hell went away because I realized how many other religions afterlife I've been worried about and the answer was none. And if I was only going to be focused on the the afterlife, the religion, I was indoctrinated in that seems to me just absurd. So what I did in my journey was to say, okay. I clearly don't believe in Christianity anymore. But let me find out what kind of God could exist in explore this at the level of philosophy of let's define you know, what kind of God might exist. What would God be like and all those things, and I found out that there's no good reason to think that anything that would qualify as God as ever been demonstrated to even be plausible. So I had to give it up. A weird way. And I'm not trying to like disagree with you or anything like that weird way. Like. Love it. When people are. Well, I'm not really disagreeing with go ahead asleep phone up with you. But but take it kinda takes a little bit of face to like to be like, okay. There's something. There's something wrong here. You know? No, that's called logic. So when you understand how how we go about being reasonable, and with the value of logic is and understand that Fallas win win a lot. When a syllogism is fallacious that doesn't mean the conclusions way. What? All right. A syllogism is a logic ARD. Yeah. Dumb. It down for me. Good because I'm getting ready to a whole series of goes on this. And it's good that I know wearing need to start. So let's say we wanna be reasonable. We care about truth. We'd like to be as correct as we can be and avoid being wrong one of the methods that we've found and it's derived from mathematics one plus one he goes to his or actually mathematics is derived from it. But. A logical argument is in its simple form of syllogism premise one premise to and conclusion, and so you take facts or things that you accept and you plug them in. And if if the syllogism is of a valid structure, I'm using too much jargon. Good there. Are there are arguments? That are what we call sound, which means there, a proper structure, and we accept the premises. There are fallacies we can demonstrate this particular arguments truck -ture. We cannot be reliably convinced that the conclusion is true. So when you find an argument, that's fallacious that does not mean the conclusion is wrong. It just means. You have no reason to believe the conclusion is true. So there's a process of learning about Syllogisms and fallacies, but at the end of the day, here's the key thing. I wanna be reasonable. I accept that an argument that is unreasonable cannot lead me reliably truth. So you could say Socrates demand all mental mortal, therefore, the grass is wet. That's a fully argument because the conclusion doesn't match up with anything in the premises. But the grass might still be wet. It's just the reason you're offering for the grasping. Wet is not one that can guarantee that the grass is wet. That's it. And so if you accept things that's the power of of a reason to argument is that you're recognizing we have a mechanism to make sure that if we are diligent. We don't accept something is true. Without good reason. That doesn't mean we think it's false. Just means we reject the argument reject the conclusion and by rejecting conclusion that just means we don't accept it. Doesn't mean we think it's false. Once you understand that. Then. It takes work to go through the things you believe and say did I have a good reason for this? And if somebody can point out to you when you put your thing in an argument form, here's your fallacy. Then the reasonable person says you're correct, I may still in fact believe there's a God. But that argument isn't going to do it. So now, I need a better one. Now, I know most people on the planet are not going to do this at the level that others will. But here's the thing. There are some diligent intelligent individuals who have spent over the course of millennia their entire lives addressing these. And here we are in twenty nineteen with not one to monster ably sound argument that would serve to conclude that God exists not Brian with you on that. So why is it still a problem all the years because people keep believing ser and they're made to propagate? You can the problem is because people are just too frayed to admit that they don't know 'cause that's a hard for me to swallow. There's I think there are a number of reasons, I think people believe for different reasons, they will give it up for different reasons. I think that some some maintain that belief out of fear a lot of fears a lot of fears that religions exploit like the fear of being alone. The fear of not knowing the fear of an afterlife, the fear of hell all of these things. Also, I think that there's certainly comforting aspects to religion that I'm gonna go. I'm gonna go see grandpa again in the future that the child that I lost a cholera is waiting for me in heaven all of these things. We value them. And it keeps us from recognizing that we are being unreasonable. Because these things feel good to us. And that's not in any way, saying that people are stupid or people are lazy even though some people are stupid. Some people are lazy. This is what it is to be human aired. When the reality is, you don't have time to become an expert in everything. And so you are prone as his everybody to just take people's words for real everybody around me believes in Jesus we're all standing in church were singing feel goosebumps. They all tell me. It's the Holy Spirit. Of course gonna believe it is. Yeah. Yeah. Why would I have anything else? It's like talking about the notion forever for ages that the earth went around or the sun went around the earth. 'cause that's what it looks like. It looks like the sun goes around the earth. So it would not the people were stupider boneheaded or anything to think that was it. It was obvious all of the available evidence. They had led to that conclusion. And then when we got more evidence that changed, but there's nothing about the notion that this son goes around the earth that people take into their core and say, wow, the sun is going around the earth because it really cares about me. And it wants to reunite me with my loved ones and it wants to have a good life. And so that idea is easy to change when we get new evidence. But the notion that there's a God, no matter how many times you point out the foul sees. The fact that there isn't good evidence for the proposition, that's not enough to disprove it. And what people fundamentally do all of us and some strive harder than others to not do. It is say this. I am convinced of X, and I will remain convinced of X and tell you prove me wrong. But the problem is that God proposition is unfolding Faial. Meaning there is no way you can prove it wrong. And so people will keep believing you can think of it like a nursing an object an object believing continues to believe unless acted on by force, right? Because even my experience. I mean, I didn't it wasn't something that I wanted to give up that wasn't what I had in mind when I first started examining those things, but it was guess being willing to be honest with myself about my beliefs and actually looking at the book that I grew up with and seeing how much it changed over time depending on which version you. Had who's written by etc? Etc. And then accepting the fact that I grew up with this bug. But this may not actually be the correct word. Therefore, I won't be a Christian anymore. I'll just be religious. You know, I still had a godly because I didn't want to give that up. But then it started like those that was okay for several months before more questions kind of creeping up saying, why am I holding onto this while my believing in this specific deity this, you know, father figure type of deity that I was entered as I still had this belief out did not didn't fi Christian. But why I'm holding onto this? Why not any of these others that were out here and how I couldn't justify to myself as to why I'm sticking with this one. Besides the fact that I grew up with it. Yeah. It's very I mean process, there are certainly people who are incredibly intelligent who are incredibly knowledgeable about. Let's just stick with the bible who are believers, but the overwhelming majority of people who identifies Christian don't really know all that much about what? They believe don't really know all that much about why don't really know all that much about fallacies, or what is or isn't reasonable. They don't know all that much about the history of the book that they praise. Most of them have not even read the book that they raise. That's that's the way it is. Because as far as I can tell the truth of what most religious experience and activity is on planet earth. Is about we are social creatures and this social group because we're not nearly as naturally tribal as we were when we were spread out all over the place. Here's a southern Baptist church in this town. Here's a southern Baptist church and the other town if you move from time to time you've got a ready made community that already shares your beliefs without having to do any work, and they'll bring you potluck, while you're moving in they'll watch the kids when you have to go turn your trinity on, you know. Let me ask you this. Let's assume that I was a full devoted Christian. You know? I wanted question to me is what's so liberating about being Agius because it's just like, you know, what difference of not even though I might be alive. I don't care what. I don't care. What's liberating? It's like I feel better. I feel better knowing that. I would see, you know. Okay. One of my relatives. You know, something I feel bell feel better thinking that minutes over. So I don't care whether it's liberating care whether it's true. And guess it would be comforting to me to think that oh, I'm going to get to the afterlife and see all these people that haven't seen. But if it's not true. Then what I've done is. I've set up a system that does not encourage me to treat people. Right. The first time if I get a do over for a turn ity, am I going to treat people going to focus as much on treating the people I care about better or worse. I guess it'd be like it's not as important we're area. I guess. I'm I'm convinced that when I'm dead, I'm dead. I think the notion of a soul is the most obviously false idea in any religion now. Because when I think I because I think when I'm dead it's over that changes the way I live my life under a notion where I'm gonna live forever all of human existence. All however, many years, I'm here every great meal, I've had every sexual encounter every bit of art every bit of music, all of that means nothing. This is a place to wipe your feet before the real life begins. I find that to be just a repugnant idea anyway. But if I'm convinced that I get one shot at this it fundamentally changes, how are live my life had fundamentally changes whether how how focused on me, I'm going to be or how big it I'm going to be or what types of things I'm going to engage in whether I'm gonna leave leave his place, if you think you're dying, and you go rent a house, and you think you're going to die. You're not gonna be concerned about cleaning it up for the next person. But if you think that this is your one and only life how you Lee things for other people is something that is likely to be concerned when you think about things like climate change. I remember years ago listening to Rush Limbaugh who was pointing out that everything's going cartoon God's plan. God is ultimately supreme man could not possibly destroy the earth, and therefore we don't need to give a rat's ass about climate change because God will come back and rapture people wind up in the tribulation. And they'll be a new heaven newer it fundamentally changes. What things you're going to do? And if I thought that I was going to you know, if let's say I was estranged from my father. I'm not and I thought we were going to each other in heaven. I'm less motivated to make things right now than I am if I think at any minute either could die, and that would be the end of all of it. That's a pretty strong motivator to let's fix this bullshit between really powerful. And that for a lot of the the volunteer work that I do in other non believers do because you look at the life and the people around us and the situations that people are are involved in. And if you don't have a belief in an afterlife, you're looking at that like this is their only shot that they have what can I do to make their life a little shitty? What can I do to make things a little better for them? And it's really incentivizes you to actually start doing something to start going out and volunteering, and it's why do a lot of the stuff that I do is. Because not only do I recognize that their lives assured the people whose lives I can affect. But also relies mine short. And so the impact that I can have is also limited by the small amount of time that I have here. So let's do something with this mall amount versus just kicking back. I can just kicking back at the house chilling now not worrying about anybody. Because you know, we got other places to go. But if this is it if. If you've got this sixty seventy years, you need to do something. I I mean, that's that's my view. Not everyone has that view. But that's the way I look at it and says becoming atheist and not having a belief in the afterlife that has really been one of the biggest changes of my life, and how I approach my interactions with the rest of the world, and what I wanna do with my life. Let me tie this. Let me tie this back to what you said. And then I'll give you the last word, and then we'll we'll finish up the show you call. You originally we talking about meaning and purpose in life. And I think we've kind of touched on that a little bit. But if so I think the example that of us many times that would you wanna live in a world where your parents and the government decided what your job was going to be. Oh, asking me that. Yeah. No, no. I would not most of us wouldn't most of which would revolt against that. And yet when we talk about meaning and purpose from the perspective of religion. Everything is an externally imposed purpose God has some meaning and purpose for your life. I don't know why anyone would rejoice in that. When they would rebel against any other thority imposing their will over their life. But irrespective of which one is more appealing. There's no reason to think that there is in fact, any externally imposed life, and that is in fact liberating, although that's not my criteria care about. What's true? But it turns out not having a God belief is incredibly liberating. I mean, this isn't even controversial that's one of the biggest arguments against atheism because they will say without God anything is permissible. And they think that you're just engaged in debauchery and destroying everything. But the truth is without God. You don't have this notion that everything about you is wrong that everything you do is wrong. That somebody's watching over your shoulder that somebody cares about who you sleep with. Or how you love people to somebody cares about whether or not you're on your knees, or whether you pray five times a day that there's not somebody who says that you know, if you rape, a young woman, you have to actually marry her all of these notions that. Come from different religions, go way, and what we're left with is the recognition that we're human beings. Stuck on a rock in the middle of space. We have to share space, we know enough about game theory and cooperation to know what's in our best interest. We have the benefit of thousands of years of human history to teach us how to be more moral how to care more about other people, and I can do all of it without even a passing thought about an afterlife about whether or not some God is going to think that I'm worthy. When most religions are not about how good you are. It's about how much you love God. And then they tried to find God is good. But if there's a God who says that it's okay to enslave people that men are better than women. Fuck him. He doesn't understand anything about morality or humanism. He's a thug. He's the narcissist. Somebody else was talking about. So. Yeah, I think that a rejection of the notion that there is a God is not only the most reasonable position. But is in fact, incredibly liberating and any an incredibly positive. W-we? But check out the book check out the movie. It will be calling in the eighth east book dot com. It's book and a movie by Chris Johnson, a better life and all the parts are that don't have me in. It are outstanding. Do this is just so like it's so complex, but my mind around 'cause like I maintain right now. I'm like this. You know, the living in this religion for all my life. I bet there's people, you know, some religious people watching the show right now. They're like this dry like oh, God eighteen year old coming out of religion. I I'm honestly like terrified. But I'm so glad that I'm kinda like recognizing is because I've been asking myself a lot of questions about religion. I have question a lot of the things that I've that I do the has been the hardest thing for me keep going keep questioning, nobody's oh, I call the experience in in twenty minutes. I was in Asia's no final folks to hang out with some find some folks that are similar minded find a local organization keep asking questions there are people sitting in the audience today here at the studio who aren't eightieths. I appreciate the fact that they made it through the show an incredibly long show. And I'm hoping that they're all minded my my condition for life is not oh, let me fix everybody to be like me. It's let's have the conversations and see if we can all be more reasonable because I need to and I care about it. And I'm hoping that other people do too. But on that note. Good luck to you contact us again. Let's know how things are going. Sure, we appreciate the call Levy guys because also take but just keep it up and be honest with yourself in your own beliefs, as you go through absolute on that note, we're done extra facet, which we just we like doing this stuff is awesome. We're starting to new year. I don't care New Year's Eve came. I sat at home. It's just just another day. That's not me being a commotion. I would also been happy. If there were people that I you know, if I was in the mood wanna go hang out with celebrate the new year. Let's celebrate whatever I always said celebrate whenever you want. But twenty nineteen is I'm looking forward to what the ACA is doing both with the new programs new events here. The patriot project that they've got up there. The people watching on YouTube, the comments feedbacks the blog, the volunteer efforts, the community service efforts all of those things that go to address something more than just, hey, we're going to call in and argue about God, I will do that probably for the rest of my life. I think I've got pretty good job security giving the number of people who believe, but there's so much more life, and so much more to me and uh this and the community and you should come over. And check it out fifteen seven west caning lane. You any as friendly person come down to see us off? And if you're not in Austin, first of all what the hell's wrong with you. But second of all finding organization in your area and participate ask questions discover the world because if in fact, it's all over when you're dead, and all you did was pray and hope and wish and think you're right. I think you failed see an time Bye-bye. With the Capital One quicksilver Kagyu earn unlimited one point five percent cashback on every purchase every way. It's easy. That's just the way. I like. That's. That's the way. The quicksilver card from Capital One. What's in your? Capital? One Bank USA. Outline help my family's New Year's resolutions to be more active, but we use styles for motivation run into old navy old navy. Yup, right now all navy act of styles for the family. Fifty percent off kick it into gear with leggings mesh teasing. More fifty percent off who I'm feeling motivated already. Top started to seven bucks for adults six kids with compression leggings active pants from fifteen dollars for adults twelve dollars for kids kids. Get a move on. We're going old navy. Hurry up fifty percent of old navy active right now, it will be an old navy dot com. Valid one through one excludes clearance.

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The legacy of the 1963 Childrens Crusade

Post Reports

24:10 min | 2 months ago

The legacy of the 1963 Childrens Crusade

"From the newsroom of the washington post this is post reports martine powers. It's monday may third not one time. Five thousand black kids went to jail in birmingham ewing hair. So the first time. I heard about the children's crusade was back in february on favorite app. Tiktok and do you know that. Is your favorite app. Tiktok ambassador on our team thence jordan. Marie smith she is a producer with post reports. I was scrolling on talk for like an hour as one does and i came across this one video that caught my attention because it immediately started out with this claim that all of these kids. That kids protested in birmingham alabama. And we're like attacked by dogs. She shows images. This creator lin. Bogues of like german shepherds attacking these kids. These black teenagers in elementary school kids health and the dog. Yeah those were all kids. This week is the fiftieth anniversary of the children's crusade a week. Nine hundred sixty three when over a thousand black heads were attacked while marching for civil rights. The video itself. That lena bogues posted it guy over one million views and comments with people who felt the exact same way. I did where they were. Just like. Just as shocked as i was all the comments under this video may jordan murphy realize that this was a history that a lot of people didn't know and so she decided to try to learn more about this overlooked part of the story of the civil rights movement. There were a couple that were like top of the of the list and there was one woman's comment that actually earned about seventy three thousand lakes and it just said oh. My father was one of those kids. It was shocking. A thank when you are a genetic sir you don't necessarily look at social platforms for educational insight. My head had not heard anyone talk about that. You've been in a long time erica. Timmons is a forty nine year old black woman and she lives in san antonio texas and unfortunately her father away recently but he was in the children's march in nineteen sixty three and. She told me that when she saw lemay bogues video on tick tock she was really moved initially. I started crying because it reminded me of my father who is now deceased and in think about it anymore honestly and i will. I will tell you every since then. I think that was back in february adult. Go a day without someone either. Liking that my comment or reply to me about that comment every day since then so tell me what is the children's crusade so the children's crusade was a week long march and peaceful protest that began on may second nineteen sixty three wear young black boys and girls in birmingham alabama took to the streets of the very racist and segregated town. It was in the name civil rights but even though they were peaceful they were met with a lot of german shepherds who attacked them and were trained to attack them fire hoses and fire hydrants. Were just let loose on these kids. The children's crusade slash march of nineteen sixty three was a pivotal moment in the modern civil rights movement. I reached out to the national civil rights museum. Which is at lorraine motel where doctor martin luther king junior was killed and i spoke with this historian named ryan jones and he kinda filled me in on all of the things. I really need to know about what the children's march was at. Its core birmingham in nineteen sixty. Three was the most segregated city in the united states of america. Birmingham was known as bombing him. As a matter of fact the predominantly african american section of the city was nicknamed dynamite hill because of so many homes businesses owned by african americans. Black churches were victims of bombs by dynamite. Committed by the birmingham ku klux klan known as the united clans of america. Would i find so striking about that. Era of history is that i don't know if people realize how much that violence and frankly those forms of terrorism were essentially state-sanctioned raid. That you had governor. George wallace who did his whole like segregation now segregation tomorrow is taking forever thing mara arrogation. You had bull connor. The very famous police commissioner who in many ways like basically supported this violence against black people. You got to white in about separate. It's important to understand that and to understand like how terrifying it would be to be not only a black person living in birmingham during that time but a black person who is actively advocating for civil rights who is marching or protesting or out in the streets. I mean it's like there was no form of protection there really wasn't i mean malcolm x. was becoming popular From the nation of islam at this time and of course he was in favour of black people defending themselves against white agitators white racists but there was another side to that coin in that other side to the coin was mlk junior and he had a completely different plan abou how he would start. Something called the birmingham campaign of nineteen sixty three which was basically his philosophy. That if you can desegregate the most segregated town in america then you can desegregate the rest of the nation. We can break in birmingham. Really break down the walls of segregation. It will demonstrate to the whole south. At least a hardcore south it can no longer resist region so he decided and worked with other leaders and people close to him to come up with this plan which was called the children's crusade of course and there was a man named reverend james bubble and he decided that it would be a good idea to form a protest around the kids. More of dr king's close associates. Who had a great relationship with the young people. He was the one who was going around. The streets of birmingham and the and the high schools of birmingham to encourage young people to get involved in the movement and it was his leadership. The reverend james bevill who stated that. Let's have our children participate in these demonstrations as well because if you were an adult and you were participating and civil rights demonstrations. You're liability you putting your family's livelihood in jeopardy you could lose your job. you can have your your loans. Greek card from the bank. The ku klux klan which was very heavy in birmingham at that time could have burned a crosser even worse but surely they would not treat the children the same way so i get the strategy of that but was was there any pushback against this idea of. We should basically use these kids as shields to try to continue this movement ryan historian at the national civil rights museum. He told me that there is definitely a split between black adults and parents who saw kids getting involved in the movement and on the front lines is like the only way that they would actually understand. The need for civil rights would actually understand what their parents and what. The adults that they knew were fighting four on the other side there were definitely many public officials both locally and nationally who criticized dr king who criticized reverend james bubble and his aides for involving children in like such a potentially dangerous situation. I mean this was bombing ham yet again. I feel like. I have to say and it kind of floors that all of these leaders thought it was a really good idea to put seven to seventeen year olds right in the face of hate. Did you talk to anyone who was a kid who participated in this. I did i did. I talked to a wonderful woman who still lives in birmingham today and we had a really nice conversation about what it was like for her to make this decision. High am janice wesley kelsey. And i am currently seventy three in in two more weeks. I'll have a birthday in albi. Seventy four so it has in fact been two weeks since i talked agendas. So she's like now seventy four. But in the seventy four years i would say janice has lived quite a life. She was sixteen years old in nineteen sixty three and she basically about what was going on through friends and they invited her to these. Things called mass meetings. How i became aware. I heard about the mass meetings and i knew they will hailed in different places around birmingham in different churches in that what i learned about it i got from a girlfriend and she told me about the music. And how how great it was and that the people were clapping and rockin and she say it a lot of cute boys come bills meetings. Well that certainly sparked my interest and so that's why i wanted to go to the first mass meeting. She really not only fell in love with the boys of the movement but she fell in love with the movement itself. I remember the big crowds. The great speakers. I remember dr king being among them. Free shuttles worth being among them other local ministers whom i recognized but one minister. Whose name was james davel when he took the podium key is the one who educated me as to what this was really all about i joined the movement that night eight years ago. Journalists austin thais was abducted in syria while covering that country's ongoing conflict. It's time for the united states government to bring him home. Help bring attention to austin's case by wearing a free austin thais bracelet from the washington post press freedom partnership available free at walpole dot s. t. slash tastes so janus wesley kelsey with pretty fired. Up after hearing. Reverend james bible speak at this mass meeting what happened after that so after that it became closer and closer to may second which was the first day of the children's crusade march. She basically started her day like she usually did but it was a little bit different that day. She was really focused on one thing and one thing only well. That morning was thursday morning. And i woke up with my mind on freedom. I was so excited looking forward to what was going to happen. I remember packing my purse. I remember taking a long time in the bathroom. My brothers knocking on the door. Trying to hurt me out. But i wanted to make sure i had to pay toothbrush everything that i needed. My mother at didn't discuss with her. What my plans were adding won't be discouraged. She sent something was going on so she cautioned me before i left and said janice and send you to school. Don't you go anywhere and get yourself in trouble. I don't have money to get you out. Asset yes ma'am. That's what she needed to hear. And i was going to school. I just wanna stay so out. Walk out with math purse with things packed with my sisters leather jacket. Because they told us it might be cold. If you go to jail s. I walked out of the door was joined by other friends. Who will walk into school. We saint some freedom songs on our way and s others would join us as we walked to school. We were asking each other. You going to do it. Yes you got your staff. Yes and and we got to school just in an air of excitement that that's what i said to be just excited. After janice and her friends had left the school they walked to the sixteen th street baptist church and at that church was reverend james bovill and he was instructing all the kids to come inside the church so they could have a prayer moment in kind of still themselves for what they needed to do that day and whatever may come after they were done with the prayers and some of the freedom songs. They left the church and began walking not far about a block before they were stopped. The police officer who stopped us told us that we were in violation of a city. Ordinance that we cannot parade without a permit in this white man had a gun on his hip. He had a stick in his hand and he was telling me. Get out of this line. Somebody started seeing. We're not afraid. And that gave me the courage that i needed to remain in that line and to be arrested that next day may third more kids join the movement bull. Connor gave the order for police to turn the dogs loose on the kids. They were german shepherd dogs and of course they were trained to attack. And that's what they were doing snatching close by people on the other side of the street. That was some businesses and kids will land up on the side walking in the street and the fire department was given the command to turn the water hoses on them. It was so forceful it was tearing clothes and skin cows and people to tumble over girls with addresses up blouses tone. One one friend told me some of our hair was sheared off her head with a force of the water but there was a turn. Once national news crews came to birmingham alabama. This wasn't just local outlets. You know saying oh these people down the street or doing this one thing it was. Cbs news who literally were saying arrests were made in math watts. Everyone charged with the same offence. Parading without a permit. Negroes have asked for permits and had been denied city. Police were carrying out their pledge to fill their jails to capacity at necessary. They are acting according to the wishes of bull. Connor the police commissioner. Who has set the segregationist tone of the city. For many years it was all over the country and honestly wants a news. Crews came to birmingham. Almost everyone had something to say about the issues that we're on the ground there and one very important person had something to say. It ought to be possible for american consumers of any color to receive equal service in phases of public accommodation such as hotels and restaurants and theaters retail stores without being forced to resort demonstrations the street because of the events in birmingham president kennedy proposed a civil rights bill to the united states congress to end racial segregation in all public facilities. This particular speech is where the birth of the civil rights act of nineteen. Sixty four was born which was signed by president. Kennedy's successor president lyndon johnson nineteen sixty. Four you cannot understand the role of accomplishments in achievements with out acknowledging the heavy highly success of the children's crusade march of nineteen sixty three. So join marine. What was your reaction to hearing this history in the detail that you've heard it and the fact that so many children specifically were victims of this violence. It kind of took me back to. When i first saw that tiktok from linney boobs i was upset yet again. That this wonderful impact that this march had wasn't really taught to me and i wondered why exactly it wasn't taught to me and i i actually asked janice wesley kelsey the exact same thing. So i never actually learned about the children's march or the children's crusade in school. And i wonder does that. Surprise you actually. It does not at think some people maybe people in positions of authority may have been embarrassed by how they handle the children. But the president john f. kennedy got on national television and criticize our city officials in how they handle the children who apiece for they protested. I think the other thing about is that these kids who put their lives on the line had this incredible impact on the public opinion of the civil rights movement. This was a key moment where more whites and nineteen sixty three started paying attention to black lives and it reminds me of the outpouring of outrage in the streets. After george floyd was murdered. More people who weren't black started taking notice of what was happening and began saying that black lives actually matter but those protests of twenty twenty wouldn't have been possible without a minor danila frazier and nella was the young woman who was basically holding the camera that she took the footage of george floyd steph and basically changed the world by doing that. She was only seventeen years old when she saw. George floyd die and it's affected her greatly. it's been makes. I stayed up apologizing and pilots. To george floyd for not doing more and not physically interacting in not same. Life is not absolute. When you look at the children's crusade in the murder of george floyd these are clear examples that kids can be powerful agents of change but as adults we should be asking if they should even be the ones on the frontlines in the first place. This story was reported and produced by jordan. Marie smith it was edited by alexis de out. And that's it for post reports. Thanks for listening. Today's show was mixed by rennie's for not ski. If you wanna learn more about the children's crusade of nineteen sixty three we will share some links including photos from the movement. Find that in today's show notes and at post reports dot com. I'm martin powers will be back tomorrow with more stories from the washington post. Creating great journalism isn't free. Which is why we're so grateful for subscribers who support are important work if you haven't already please consider subscribing to the washington post you can get a whole year of unlimited access for just one dollar a week get this offer at washingtonpost dot com slash subscribe.

birmingham Tiktok national civil rights museum martin luther king lena bogues jordan murphy lemay bogues birmingham ku united clans of america alabama mara arrogation reverend james janice wesley kelsey Marie smith james bevill washington post janice reverend james bubble ryan jones Timmons
NPR News: 01-25-2019 1PM ET

NPR News Now

04:52 min | 2 years ago

NPR News: 01-25-2019 1PM ET

"NPR podcasts are now available on every major platform checkout all our shows at NPR dot org slash podcasts. That's NPR dot org slash podcasts. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. President Trump's longtime associate an informal adviser. Roger stone says he will fight the charges brought against him by special counsel. Robert muller. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. Stone says he plans to plead not guilty. Stone was arrested by the FBI early in the morning at his home in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. A federal indictment against him contained seven counts including obstruction of official preceding making false statements and witness tampering. Stone made his initial appearance before a judge in Florida afterwards. He told a crowd of reporters on the courthouse steps that he will plead not guilty to the charges. He accused Muller's investigation of being politically motivated, and he vowed that he will not testify against the president and quote bear false witness some onlookers in the crowd jeered stone as he spoke chanting lock him up stones next court appearance is scheduled to take place in Washington DC, Ryan, Lucas, NPR news, Washington. And from what we could tell from television images there were. People there who both supported and criticized Roger stone. White House press secretary, Sarah Sanders. Meanwhile, says the case against own has nothing to do with President Trump. Roger stone's somebody who's been a consultant for dozens of Republican presidents and candidates and members of congress, but conversations between those individuals have nothing to do with the fact of what these charges are about. And that's about whether or not he made false statements. We'll let the courts make that decision that Sanders speaking to CNN in other news, the FAA says a staffing shortage in the air. Traffic control system is resulting in flight delays and New York's LaGuardia and some other airports delays running roughly an hour at LaGuardia this taking place against the backdrop of a partial government shutdown. The White House says it is monitoring the situation. NPR's David Schaper has more with the news saying it's just an increase in in people using sick leave. They're not spec. Specifying whether or not the staffing shortages. Do specifically because of financial limitations. But that's what the TSA is actually saying now that their employees who are who are using Aleve and not reporting for their shifts are calling in to say, I can't work because of the financial limitations facing. That's NPR's. David Schaper reporting there, roughly eight hundred thousand federal workers their families as well affected by this partial government, shutdown and Alabama. Civil rights museum reportedly is reinstating its plan to honor political activist Angela Davis after coming under heavy public criticism for rescinding the Associated Press reporting, the Birmingham, civil rights institute has issued a statement saying it's board has voted to reaffirm Davis as the recipient of the human rights award. The board had previously uninvited Davis. After a local holocaust education group asked the institute to reconsider Davis is an outspoken critic of Israel's treatment of Palestinians. This is NPR news. Pressure is mounting on Venezuela's President Nicolas Ma Ludo the UN's human rights organization says it has reports that at least twenty people have been killed in Venezuela. This week more from NPR's Philip breeze in Venezuela. And so is the level of violence. We shall it. Basha the U N High Commissioner for human rights once the situation may rapidly spiral out of control with catastrophic consequences Basham says reliable local sources report multiple deaths. They also say that more than three hundred fifty people have been detained all this since Wednesday when position leader when Guas declared himself interim president in a challenge to president Niklas Peduto, but dodo says a US-backed conspiracy to oust him from power. And that he's going ahead with his decision to expel you. As diplomats something Washington's rejected as it no longer recognizes him as president. But Braves NPR news Kodak is the leader of Italy's populist. Coalition government is lashing out at France and Germany for their attempt to seek a permanent UN Security Council seat. For Germany more on this from NPR, Sylvia. Pohjola in a long rambling interview with coda. They let's say prime minister Giuseppe to said, certainly our allies can't believe we'll sit silently at the table to approve decisions taken by others. He was referring to the reason French German treaty that calls for giving Germany a seat alongside world superpowers at the Security Council. Condescend Italy has long sought to get a seat on the council for the European Union. As a whole not just for one member. He said France and Germany are trying to isolate Italy, but we caught them with their hands in the cookie jar. That's NPR, Sylvia. Pohjola reporting. The Dow is up one hundred seventy one points. This is NPR.

NPR Roger stone NPR President Trump interim president Washington Robert muller Angela Davis David Schaper Ryan Lucas civil rights institute Germany Italy Security Council Florida Lakshmi Singh France dodo Sylvia
The Worst Thing We've Ever Done

On The Media

50:03 min | 1 year ago

The Worst Thing We've Ever Done

"On this week's on the media how to tell our real history and make people believe it. I want to go to that legacy museum because it said something about the lynchings that happened after the abolition of. And I'm like what most people can't tell you. Anything about slavery because they don't know that there were four million enslaved people living in this country when the civil war began Jeez. Sleepless Sneaker blockchain's. COPS. There's no point in which we can say. Okay, we're done now. This is always going to be what happened. Look at the feet. Look at the hands. Look at the. The creases in the have a much larger vocabulary but I still so overwhelmed. I think a lot of people realize something bad really did happen, and they don't want to acknowledge it because they're afraid. They're going to be punished for it. I have no interest in punishing this nation for history I want to liberate us. From WNYC in New York. This is on the media. Bob Garfield is out this week. I'm Brooke Gladstone. This episode is about the national stories we embrace, and those we refuse to hear because getting history right is pretty much the most important thing. Citizens can do in a nation at war with itself as ours was and is. They say that the North won the war, but the south one the narrative. That's why the battle still rages instill takes casualties every single day. On the media producer Alana Casanova Burgess, and I went to Montgomery the first capital of the confederacy to chronicle the opening of a momentous new front in the war over the civil war, and not far from our hotel. We saw assigned. The start of the civil war, the city had a larger slave population than mobile new. Orleans or notches, Mississippi Slave, traders offices were located primarily along commerce street and market street. Now Dexter Avenue Yeah. Overtime Montgomery became one of the most important and conspicuous slave trading communities in the United States. After the Alabama legislature banned free black people from residing in the state in eighteen, thirty, three enslavement was the only legally authorized status for African Americans in Montgomery. Not Sign was put up by the equal justice initiative. And there it is right next to the Hank Williams right next to the Hank Williams museum look at that equal. Justice Initiative it's painted as if it had been there forever. You know. It seems almost to be etched in the brick as if it had as long a legacy as the slave trade. But it doesn't the Susan. Effort I guess. To design, it has if it were permanent. This is a community that prides itself it being the cradle of the confederacy public interest lawyer Bryan. Stevenson has sprung well over a hundred innocent prisoners from death row. He won a historic case ending mandatory life without parole for children under eighteen, and he founded the equal justice initiative in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine to help provide legal services to men and women on death row in Alabama now EJ I is not only defending marginalized people, but marginalized history it. It built a civil rights museum and a Lynching Memorial, attracting headlines across the nation spotlight on Montgomery. When we began our work, we bought this building, but we didn't know it was the site of a former warehouse where enslaved people were held, no one had actually documented the primacy of slavery. In this community I went to Berlin. You can't really go. One hundred meters without seeing markers and stones have been placed next to the homes of Jewish families that were abducted. German seemed to want you to go to the Holocaust memorial. They were intent on changing. The narrative they didn't want to be thought of as Nazis and fascists forever and I just don't think we've created cultural spaces in this country that motivate people to say never again to this history of enslavement and lynching and segregation in the absence of that commitment I think has left as vulnerable. And, not only do we not do that. We actually ROMANTICIZE era. And, we tell stories about how glorious wonderful the architects and defenders are slavery are. In Alabama confederate Memorial Day is a State Holiday Jefferson Davis is birthday is a state holiday. We do not have Martin Luther King Day in Alabama. We Martin Luther King Slash Robert E Lee. Day Stevenson has made Montgomery. His Laboratory and avast experiment to shift the narrative on American racism is roots and legacy, and he's taken as his models similar efforts in South Africa Rwanda Germany and especially its capital Berlin, where stolpa Steiner literally stumbling blocks bear the names of Holocaust. Victims swept up from nearby apartments with. There's a vast Holocaust memorial just south of the Brandenburg Gate acres of concrete slabs of various. Is that you? You cannot avoid in Berlin. History comes you around every corner, but the Nazi viewpoint has no presence there in the spirit of never again. The street names replace to what they used to be before an audience power historian Sir Richard Evans, is author of the Third Reich in history and memory. We asked him to trace Germany's path to reckoning the concrete source because an eagles were taken down, some smaller buildings were blown up to raise the immediate memory of phonology period of course, all those millions of people who had Nazi uniforms from the youth or the National Socialists, stormtroopers, but more buried them or throw them away. The allies had a huge program of Diaz vacations. Old Nazis will fired. There were thousands of trials, not just in Germany, but in Poland and France and other places for Dino Certification Program involved sending out question as to millions and millions of Germans, even very far and very deep. What you think about the D- Not Sophistication films and newsreels. The allies made. Your were made by known directors. Billy, wilder, or Alfred, Hitchcock Mills of death was one of them with archive footage of the concentration camps Germans were forced to go and see them in local cinemas had been beaten down to live like animals, far worse or few animals had lived in the Tara hunger and filth of these victims. A load of Germans simply refuse to believe what they'd seen in these films because they've been fed a diet of Nazi propaganda lies for twelve years and most Germans to in the immediate aftermath of the war was simply trying to survive I mean there was mass malnutrition. Economic conditions are really terrible, so they didn't really want to know, and then it took a long time. Time after that for the Germans to accept the idea of democracy after all democracy in the twenty in Germany. The Weimar Republic had led to Nazis coming to power, and it was an economic disaster first of all hyper inflation, and then a huge depression, much deeper than the slump in America, but that was related to the first World War yeah. I was falling on that, but I mean as a result of that of course Germans mistrust democracy. They didn't think it deliver. Prosperity was Hitler's realm into delivered something of a boom, so it wasn't until the Germans cooled in West Germany the economic miracle in the sixties. When the German economy recovered, they began think well. Maybe democracy can actually deliver prosperity. There was a television series called Holocaust in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Seventy, eight, starring Meryl Streep. That was really influential. was shown in. Germany, and you follow a number of fictionalized characters Jewish family and a young man who joins the SS, and becomes bit by bit vicious. Thug. finished. Jew Free Europe. So perhaps the camps and the machinery could soon be obliterated. Forgive me X.. What did not be more failing to let them stand as monuments to our great service to mankind? We have merely followed. The logic of European history. A case can be made for Auschwitz. Germany, but it's not really till the nineteen ninety s the those a further step towards erecting, when but they will fell a lot of west Germans, who lost their property to the communist regime in East Germany from nineteen forty nine onwards they claimed for the return of their property, and there were a couple of million of these lawsuits, and then that sparked former slave. Labor analyses from Poland and. Europe to put in their claims, and then there's a whole process of restitution of looted art works began in the mid to late nineties. In Germany today only unhinged would reminisce about the virtues of the Third Reich or defined. It's defeat as a lost cause, if there are trunks bearing the mouldering remnants of Nazi Regalia, they aren't brought out for fun filled reenactments of the battle of Belgium. There are no high schools named for Adolf Eichmann no statues of Heinrich Himmler. There is one controversial monument in Hamburg. It commemorates a world. War One battle, but it was erected by the Nazis and was fascist in its execution. This presented a problem. That's right. The Hamburg regimens in world one. They lost a number of people on the battlefront, and in nineteen thirty six in the Nazi period they put up a big stone block with relief for the soldiers in their helmets and rifles, marching around it, and above in Gothic lettering Germany must live, even if we must die at isn't necessarily what the soldiers thought at all, and this was thought to be a monument in the terms of national socialist. Nazi audiology so a lot of protests. Protests but then of course, understandably, the relatives and descendants of men who been killed who memorialized in this block, said no, you mustn't take it down. You mustn't forget them, so the idea came of constructing a anti monument next to it. The biggest and most damaging air raid of the entire World War Two was in Hamburg in ninety, forty, three and forty thousand civilians were killed, and it makes you think well in that's what happens in a war than the more perhaps isn't as glorious as the monument employs to Evans an ideal solution. If there's a reason to keep a problematic monument, build another one next to it for context to balance the narrative. Evans. That the Germans will never return to fascism, 'cause they're always coming across literally stumbling over these memorials to the victims of the Nazis, but there is a difference between the West and the east. The West was made to feel responsible. The east was not yours is. Controlled by the Soviet Communist Party from nineteen, forty five until nineteen nineteen, and the East German puppet regime tried to do is to tell East Germans that communists resisted the Nazis they should identify with the Communist, and so they didn't have to confront any sense of involvement in the crimes of Nazism and then on top of that. Political Culture which was rooted in West Germany by nine, hundred ninety had very shallow roots in East Germany. They lived under Soviet dictatorship communist dictatorship, and before that under the Nazi teddy ship, so you'll find an east Germany the votes for the Anti Immigrant Party. The alternative for Germany are much much shorter than they are in West Germany. They're still any about a fifth of the electorate. Police say the Germans Phil to guilty about the not policy. It's time to stop feeling guilty, but as I said, most of Germany's a very small minority remember the rise of authoritarian anti right-wing leaders who are undermining democracy, and all kinds of ways is mostly confined to form a communist state so. Poland Hungary for example. Which Republic. Having come to power. Gaining strength, but then very strong I. mean that's the point, so everyone gets terribly worried when the alternative for Germany, schools is a fifteen percent of the vote, but they forget the virtually every other political party, in Germany, support Angela Merkel's policy on letting immigrants into the country, not just the Christian Democrats which is on, but the Social Democrats and the Greens for example as I, say it's where democratic values are strongly anchored in political culture that the memory of what happens when you have a far right dictatorship for most Germans is more than enough to put them off. So let's recap the lessons of Germany. Extra patient of Nazi symbols and ideology much of it imposed by the allies, bearing gifts, prosperity, generational shift, and yes, responsibility finally internalized in the form of reparations in America, still marked by slavery's legacy. That seems like a very uphill climb. Brian Stevenson's EJ. I started with signs and even those met with resistance. Now he has a museum and a memorial testaments to an ugly past that we can no longer afford to ignore and a challenge to the nation designed to shame communities the turn away. All. That's coming up in the next segment. But first we presented a challenge to our listeners to look at your streets, your monuments to see who was being memorialized and to let us know all I live here in Austin Texas and recently people decided to change the name of some streets that might have been named after Robert e Lee, and I think he's very funny, because if there's a move to get rid of. Of confederate names in Austin and in Texas then they're going to need to get rid of all the Texas history names including Austin named after Stephen F. Austin who was a slave holder, travis named Travis County named after Travis. WHO's a slave owner, and and Houston of course, also named after Sam Houston. Who was a slave owner? So what's funny? This is on the media. This is on the media I'm Brooke Gladstone Montgomery. Marks, history, and the most of the sign edge in granite, has devoted to the confederacy. More recent events increasingly intrude. Take the intersection of. Court and Commerce. There's telegraph office where in eighteen, sixty one general P beauregard was authorized to attack Fort Sumter and launch the civil war across from that. Is The bus stop where Rosa Parks at her bus and took the fateful seat, she refused to surrender in nineteen, fifty five at the intersections. Heart is the Artesian Basin Fountain sight of a slave market marked with sign. Slaves of all ages were auctioned along with land and livestock standing in line to be inspected. Public posters advertised sales and included gender proximate age first name slaves didn't have last names, skill, price, complexion and owner's name, and the eighteen fifties able field hands brought fifteen hundred dollars skilled artisans three thousand. That's Lee straight over there. Of course our ultimate destination is the equal justice initiatives legacy museum from layment to mass incarceration. On the way. We need another museum goer. or where are you from right now I'm from Georgia. My husband is air force and he's teaching out the air first base right now. So I'm. tooling around I was going to this Rosa Parks Museum this morning walked around the corner and the security guard they're. Looking at the building and she said did you see the poem on the side of building? History despite its wrenching pain cannot be lived, but if faced with courage, not need be lived again. My Angelo So then she took my picture in front of the Legacy Museum Nestle. When you're talking about, I WANNA go to. That I gotta do that at least because it said something about Oh the injustice in the lynchings that happened after the abolition of slavery and I'm like. What. Up until nineteen fifty. I'm a skeptical person that feels. I can't believe everything that I. Read see here. But, you know you can hear it at least. I mean you can take in. The history lessons? You know and that's where each person has to weigh the evidence that they see and. And it's not like I'm looking to be persuaded or not be persuaded. Injustice happened for sure. That's where I took a picture of that poem. For sure, we don't need to relive it. I was surprised her skepticism about the persistence of lynching. Since photographs are easily found in the one of Emmett till's body in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, five, historic, having galvanized the civil rights movement. But Bryan Stevenson wasn't surprised. That's not an uncommon perspective. Most people can't tell you. Anything about slavery because they don't know that they were four million enslaved people living in this country when the civil war began, they certainly don't understand that. The Great Evil of American slavery wasn't involuntary servitude and forced labor. It was this ideology of white supremacy, this narrative of racial difference and for me. That's the narrative that we haven't actually come to grips with this notion that black people aren't fully human. That was the true toxin. That poisoned our nation. He wants the legacy museum to connect the dots to show how the evolution of the slave market made slaves, even more vulnerable, and emboldened the owner who dependent on them to treat them less and less as human beings, and to convey the humanity of the slave, the anguish. You'd think anyone could imagine. But why would we really we banned the international slave trade in eighteen o eight, which was actually before Alabama was estate before Mississippi was a state before Louisiana was estate before the deep South had actually formed. A million sleep people were moved from the north to the south where people were losing their value with increasing calls for abolition slave on didn't want to be caught owning property that they could not get a return on, and so they want it to trade that to a region where there were people still willing to buy, and that created the domestically trading became so especially brutal. That's what separated children from from mothers and families were broken up at Sarah, and it was harder labor once in the Museum Alana and I were struck immediately by holographic images of people and sells slaves, glowing with their own light and speaking of loss. Seems like a him I. Can't hunt and we want to have a first person narrative. Long to his. Intriguing. As well as We employ this technology that shows you the slave pants where people are held, and then the ghosts of these enslaved people emerging we use actual slave narratives that people recite. SNAKE BLOW CHAINS COPS Take us out on the flock. Ourselves. Don't be selling. Yourself you're to be beaten. Know, we've heard spirituals you can go to the most were nate concert halls. These songs has become part of the Canon, but it's only when you hear a spiritual being sung by enslaved verson in chained in the slave, and it's only when you hear someone singing in that setting you begin to understand the grief and anguish that produced this music. then. We want them to see the slave catalogs which we blow up on banners to see books that are titled Negroes Mules Carts Wagons to see the descriptions of people children. Their prices. And then to hear the expression of grief from enslaved people for me. That was really critical. One woman says selling his worse than flogging. She said my back has been beaten many times, but has always healed. They sold my husband away. My heart is not right yet until you have. A Perspective on what it means to be ripped from the only thing you get as an enslaved person, which is the opportunity to love someone your child, your spouse, your parent. Then, you're going to appreciate the devastation. And then when you see that, instead of remedying two hundred and fifty years of enslavement, we actually aggravated by terrorizing people through lynching, and we try to make that tangible. When you go into our museum, you see jars of soil. The community groups have gone to lynching sites and collected soil and put it in jars with the names and places of these lynchings. Because we've made that history invisible, we WANNA make tangible. It's Robert Louis Import turn this New York. June second eighteen two. Mary Jackson Harrison County Texas for Thirteenth Newton Twelve. Georgia. Colorado Kentucky. At Jabba to watch his choice Hartfield was. Tree as he swallowed with his fingers, amputated a pass around as souvenirs while he screamed in pain screaming. In shock over thousand and took his body until a final bullet. Dropping his vice his route when he was bird spots. Proceedings were so twenty cents to those wishing to come in today. I have argued that slavery didn't end in eighteen sixty five. All. It turned into decades of terrorism and violence. Where black people were pulled out of their homes. They were drowned. They were hanging. They were beaten and everybody was complicit. The courts law enforcement elected officials churches, teachers schools with all come out and celebrate these acts of torture. And it was so traumatizing that six million black people fled the American south that was one of the largest mass migrations in world history and we haven't talked about that because I don't think that the black people in Cleveland in Chicago and Detroit in La and Oakland went. There is immigrants looking for opportunities. They went there as refugees and exiles from terror. And the generational poverty we see in those communities, the the consequences of being displaced from land, and the opportunity to develop is still evident. and rather than acknowledged this role of terror and lynching and creating this reality. We blame these communities. I mean you had at the end of the nineteenth century hundreds of thousands of formerly enslaved black people who had skills and trades and had the ability. To create wealth through agriculture through industry, but they weren't allowed to do that because their lives were menaced whenever they became too successful, and so this wealth gap that we talk about and America can't be understood until you understand the way in which we use terror and violence to prevent wealth accumulation in the African American community, and then displacement aggravated that. Then then we blocked black veterans and others from entering the middle class through redlining and denying them loans economic opportunities, and I think the galling part for many people. Is that they here folks now saying that we're dealing with domestic terrorism for the first time in our nation's history after nine eleven, and for older people have collard. That's an insult. It's an added injury because they grew up with tear. and. That's why these narratives of lynching become so important people weren't lynched. Just because they were accused of some violent crime, they were lynched because they were successful in business. They were lynched because they insisted on being treated. Fairly when they ask for better wages, the sharecroppers they would be lynch. When ask for better conditions as coal miners would be lynched. When a black man got too close to a white woman, he would be lynched when a black woman complained about her husband being lynched as being unjust, she would be lynched, and this violence was intended to sustain racial hierarchy, and our complete absence of awareness contributes to this. New this false understanding of who we are. Changing that for me is key. If we understood that we did horrific things to enslave black people. We tortured them. We rape them. We have children taken from their parents, and we promised freedom after emancipation, and what we gave instead was terrorism. It's a short walk from the museum to Ej. Is National Memorial for Peace and justice the Lynching Memorial. Every lynching when it is known every county every date, every name is engraved on copper columns suspended from poles higher hires you proceed through the site so many. This is very much like the memorial in Berlin I mean. It's different because it looks like in Berlin. A bunch of tombstones, tall and short and short tall on a hill down. That's seemed over at present. Men Women and children and And here. They're suspended on Poles. And so it definitely gives you the. Impression of hanging. TAP No. Your Georgia. The first date is eighteen, ninety four, and then the next four. All have the same last name paget. Dossier Sam Soula and Wilford and they all. Were lynched on the same day. May Twenty First Nineteen. O Seven I think that tells you. As much a story as as anything here. And that these people were killed as a group, this family was exterminated. Smith's seventeen links to Paris techs. Keto pairs. Almond is that where you're from. Your white nearby pharmacy, a wild bill like. I nothing. From, this angle, right. We have to stretch our next up. Puts you under their bodies in the same way that a mop would be. I wonder if you WANNA create a sense of. Complicity Yeah I. Don't think there's any question. I mean when you go to Brandenburg. Gate and you see the Holocaust memorial. You are trusted to bring into that space and understanding of the Holocaust that will allow you to have a meaningful interaction. With those wordless structures. In. America we could not create a memorial with no words because people don't have an understanding of this history, and so when you walk into armour, you walk down a path where we narrate this past, and we have to remind people about the enslavement that precedes, and that's why we have that slavery sculpture. By kwami, a Koto Banff oh in for many people. It's the first time they've ever seen a sculpture with human beings about slavery. That's how silently have been. It depicts human suffering, exquisite detail as one view observed. Look at the feet. Look at the hands. Look at the the creases and I have a much larger vocabulary, but I have still so. The figures are in change. You see a mother holding a baby, and you see an empty pair of shackles lying on the ground, and their story is told that reflects the two million kidnap people who died during that a slave trade, but but we also presents with these figures that are streaked copper streaks down them. You see their anguish and pain, but you also see their humanity. Their dignity, the name of that insulation is called Unshaven, which is from African proverb that talks about resilience and resistance to oppression. Then you walk into the monuments. Our country has been largely silent. And so it hangs over us. It is a cloud, a shadow that continues to haunt us as. Those. Columns begin to rise are lifted up. One because that's what racial terror lynchings were about. They wanted to lift up these bodies because they wanted to torment communities of Color Net. Terror! Can't be understood without replicating those dynamics, and so we lift them up because unlike the nation state of Germany. We have not been willing to talk about this history. We are small private organization creating a space for this story to be told, and until that story is acknowledged, and institutions and people reckon with this history, it will continue to haunt us, and we give people the opportunity. We have a replica for each one of those monuments in the park. And we are asking people in communities to have these conversations to claim their monument. How many counties across the nation about eight hundred forty? How many states about twenty nine states? What you're asking is for counties to own their histories basically. Put this replica of what you have in the museum. In the location where the lynching took place right I do think there's something about sites of conscience about places where horrific things happen. There's a reason why people go to an frank's house. There's a reason why we have a nine eleven memorial less than fifteen years after nine eleven. We wanted to create something to make future Jenin rations understand the agony of that moment we do believe memorials. We just haven't been willing to memorialize the most tragic and devastating aspects of our history that relate to lynching and slavery and segregation, and so yes, I think the monuments create an opportunity for communities. To begin a process of recovery of reconciliation of restoration, but they will be there and the communities don't engage. The minute comes to sort of report card, which communities have claimed their history, and which ones haven't that whole section? Where the replicas lay you hope one day we'll be empty. That's the hope and they'll be information about every county in this country that did something in response to that sense of dread and menace that people experience when they walk through the memorial. The memorial is the experience. I'll take home with me the one I'll never forget. It felt elemental and real. The columns had names and places so may forced me to look up and up and up the replicas, the twin columns, which all those counties are called upon to claim long their dark history and acknowledgement of the annihilated including in my state of New York. I hope they are claimed. They must be claimed. This is the media. This is on the media I'm Brooke Gladstone reporting from Montgomery Alabama. It's often been noted with hope that the arc of history is long, but it bends towards justice. I wondered how attorney Brian Stevenson who pursued justice. His whole life found his arc bending towards history. I asked him to trace it. I grew up in a community were black children had to go to colored schools. This was in southern Delaware on the eastern shore. There no highschools for black kids. When my dad was a teenager, he couldn't go the high school in our county, and I remembered when lawyers came into the community and made them open up the public schools. and. It was so powerful because I don't think you could persuade the majority of people in that community to integrate on their own. It took the rule of law. And that a seed in my head that maybe the law could protect his favorite people in ways that the political process. So let me ask you this. You've described redressing injustice. Then you undertook to redress history. Can you tell me how you got from? There to here. While I was really proud of a lot that we had achieved. It became clear to me that there were constraints I'm a product of Brown versus board of Education, but in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, when we challenged racial bias in the death penalty with the court held was that these disparities based on race are inevitable. It's almost as if they gave up on this commitment to equal justice under law. What's there a particular decision? A particular moment when you just said I can keep bashing my head against the law and see the horizon retreat in front of me. Or I can take on this audacious task of American history. I think it did begin with that case, mcklusky versus camp in one, thousand, nine, hundred seven, when the Supreme Court upheld the death penalty, despite overwhelming evidence that race of the victimless, the greatest predictor of who got the death penalty. In case after case we were challenging the exclusion of African Americans from juries. The court just continue to shrug its shoulders, and it was sort of a gradual awareness that we're going to have to change the environment outside the courts, and that's when we decided that we were going to have to talk more honestly about the history of racial inequality that I think has made us in different I went to Johannesburg and spent time in the Apartheid Museum was very moved by a cultural institution that was intent on making sure people do not forget apartheid. I researched the genocide museum in Rwanda and you can't go to Rwanda without being forced to hear about what happened I. Go to the Holocaust. Museum here in the United States, and when I get to the end of it I, am motivated to say along with many others never again. What is the false narrative. That to. The extent that slavery was a problem. It was a problem because people were forced to labor against their will. But. People were well treated. People weren't that unhappy to be enslaved. Slave owners were generous and kind. Is that what people think in Alabama? It's what people think all over America Michelle Obama gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention where she talked about living in a house built by slaves, and she was attack. I wake up every morning in a house that was built by slaves. and. My daughter's. Sued, beautiful intelligent black young women. Playing with their dogs when the White House long slaves at work there we're well-fed and had decent lodgings provided by the government, which it is preposterous to believe that you are so on slavery, like in the Holocaust can only speak about it in unequivocal, damnation can't stop talking about slavery, and largely in a context of. Hey, you know what it isn't settled yet. Hey, we haven't fixed it yet and I. think that's a No win situation. I hear people talking about the civil rights movement, and it's starting to sound like a three day carnival on day one Rosa Parks. On a bus on day to Dr King led a march on Washington and on day three, we passed these laws and racism was over, and I wish that were our history, but there was tremendous resistance to civil rights. Our elected officials said segregation forever, and they've never repudiated that narrative. We created an educational system that now is every bit as segregated as it was in the nineteen sixties, and so we haven't done a very good job of confronting. And I knew we were in trouble when I saw state tourism agencies, taking out ADS and civil rights memorial books, saying things like in one, thousand, nine, hundred eighty three Dr Martin Luther. King partnered with the people of Alabama to create a better future. Literally the language that is used if you think polio is like a cold then you not committed to creating polio vaccination. Most Americans would say if they were alive. During the nineteenth century, they would, of course be trying to end. Slavery would say that if they were alive in the nineteen twenties and thirties, they would do whatever they can to stop lynching everybody would claim to be on the side of the civil rights marchers in wanting to end segregation, and I don't think you can clain to have been an abolitionist or an anti lynching, crusader or civil rights protester. If you're living in a society, where evidence of horrific racial bias characterizes our criminal justice system, and you say nothing, you do nothing. And that legacy is part of what we want people to confront. We want them to wrestle with the fact that the state of Alabama still prohibits black and white kids from going to school together in our state constitution, and we can't get it out because a majority of people keep voting to keep it in. We want them to wrestle with the fact that we throw children away that we don't seem to respond to constraint on voting rights for African Americans, and then we want to pose the question. Are we willing to say again? Are. We sufficiently moved by an understanding of this history that we're now prepared to make that commitment because if we make that commitment. A lot of things will have to change. We're not going to be able to accept the police shootings of unarmed black people that we've accepted. We're not going to be able to tolerate restrictions on voting. Rights and communities of color were not going to be able to ignore these disparities in suspension and expulsion rates in schools. We're going to have to think differently about confronting the legacy of the history. So what happens when a nation does commit itself to the task of confronting its history. Brian returns again and again to the German experience, but what's the impact on Germans, who have no personal memory of the Nazis or or even of the? Berlin Wall. Peter Weisenberger is thirty years old editor for the society in Media Section with tops newspaper in Berlin. He seemed to be someone I could ask. Do, you think that exposure to lease monuments growing up changed you. I mean as I grew up in the countryside I didn't see a lot of monuments. What I saw was television productions movies about what happened documentaries. There are also monuments right. Did it change me. Definitely I mean it was ever present. For me. Being German is mostly about that. Right wing. People tend to say that there's this like originality to what Germans are. That's not true. Most of what defines being German is to deal with our history and not to forget. There are a lot of people who say that until we deal with. Slavery and its legacy, which may be our defining feature. Will never progress. Possibly, The controversial things about it that once you start, you're never going to be done, so there's no such thing as dealing with it, and then finally having dealt with it and I think this what makes people so afraid to start dealing with history at all? There's no point in which we can say. Okay, we're done now. This is always gonna be what happened. There's always going. Going to have been millions of people that were killed in a fascist racist killing machinery and a whole society of bystanders, and it's much easier to sort of compartmentalize it and be outraged S. somebody puts a large monument right in the middle of your capital. I mean right wing people now are addressing it as a wound of shame that's in the middle of our capital Holocaust. Holocaust memorial because they won history especially history of Germany to be something where there's this thing that happened. But that's in the past. We strayed off our path there, but I believe It's more important to acknowledge that this part of your history makes up the. Of Your Society and something that is always going to be tearing on you, and this is what a lot of people feel like can't be asked them to always feel like there. Something internally wrong with the way that their society was created. What do you think? I mean what are you going to do? This is our starting point. This is the starting point of the way that our constitution is written. It wouldn't have been written that way if it wasn't for fascism, the way that our media work the way that our parliamentary system works, and it's the way that now. A lot of people are looking at immigration and racism and refugees positioning themselves when it comes to those issues. Has To do with the past. And how are you going to compartmentalize? Oh you gonNa say this has nothing to do with what we are now. In terms of slavery, certainly, the founding documents were made in such a way, so that slavery could continue in order to create a unified. Nation or a nation that could live with itself. Of course it just put off the problem for. Eight years I mean to be fair Germany had the allies who came there, and who decided what the narrative was going to be the kind of consensus quote, unquote that we have now that this is a horrible thing to happen, and this is the way we have to deal with it. That did not emerge organically. There were outside forces I'm not saying that you can't have that, but I don't think we have the illusion that this is something that can come out of society without any conflict. There's going to be people that are emotionally invested in the narrative that they have now at the civil war was fought over states' rights. Yeah, and that's ancestor died in the civil war for what he thought was right, and you don't want anybody to come and tell you that he died for the wrong idea. That's a pretty harsh thing to wrap your head around to. I'm not saying that you can't and you shouldn't. There's other parts of the site is saying we have to deal with it. You can just like make excuses because there's some great great grandfather who died there. This is a right to have. This kind of injustice addressed. There's going to be a lot of fighting around this and so it has been to ever resolve it. I'm sending an outside power. Probably easiest to do away with the idea of resolution in the case of the United States at least. To deal with it constantly and to try and make progress and institute mechanisms make it possible for a future generations to engage with the issue in a new way, but not to believe that everybody can come to the conclusion that we now have a consensus on what happened and how we have to go from here. Well thanks, Peter. You're. You've said many times that no person is the worst thing that they've ever done. And yet it seems that we as a country cannot get past the worst thing that we have done. I don't think our nation. Believes that the genocide of native peoples. The worst thing we've ever done or slavery is the worst thing we've ever done or lynchings the worst thing we've ever done. We've segregation I. Think we've actually created a narrative. Those things weren't that bad and not only. Do we not need to recover from that? We don't even need to be remorseful about that. There is no Shane, but it is the worst thing we've ever done. It is in fact and I want the nation to have the courage to own up to that. With the knowledge that if they own up to that, they won't be condemned by at. There is something on the other side of it. Which is why we do this work. I represent a lot of people done terrible things. and. It's in that context that I've come to understand that we are all more than the worst thing we've ever done. We are more than a country that perpetrated the genocide. Than a slave society, we're more than society. We're more than a segregation society. But we cannot ignore that bad thing we did. And there is redemption waiting. There is recovery waiting. There is reconciliation waiting. There's something that feels more like justice than what we have experienced in America. There is something better waiting for us without this burden, this history of racial inequality holding us down, but we can't get there through silence by pretending that the history doesn't exist. We've done our own up to it. My name is Marshall is in Marshall County in northeast Alabama where I grew up. Our County was incorporated in Eighteen, thirty, eight and nine for Chief Justice John Marshall. Who Defied President Andrew Jackson and tried to the Cherokee People's legal right. To stay in their homeland. that. County was named for a defender of people whose removal made Said County legally possible. Has always struck me as upside down counterintuitive. The naming of the neighboring county, Jackson seems far more appropriate. Only explanation I can conjure. Someone in that council had a rock solid conviction as to the injustice at all and determined to leave us on. For Future Generations to contemplate. In Ohio I would like to have been a file on the wall during that naming. On the media was produced this week by Alana Casanova Burgess, and edited by executive producer Cattier Rogers on the media is produced by WNYC studios I'm Brooke Gladstone.

Germany Brian Stevenson America Alabama Berlin Holocaust memorial Brooke Gladstone Brooke Gladstone Montgomery United States Alabama Montgomery Alabama Ej Robert e Lee New York Georgia East Germany West Germany