35 Burst results for "Civil Rights Movement"

Robert Moses, 1960s Civil Rights, Has Died

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 5 d ago

Robert Moses, 1960s Civil Rights, Has Died

"Robert Moses a civil rights activist who adored beatings and jail while leading black voter registration drives in the south during the nineteen sixties and later helped improve minority education in math has died he was eighty six Moses work to dismantle segregation as the Mississippi field director of the student nonviolent coordinating committee during the civil rights movement and was central to the nineteen sixty four freedom summer in nineteen eighty two he founded the algebra project which included a curriculum Moses developed to help poor students succeed in math Ben morning hand with the project said he spoke with Moses's wife who confirmed her husband

Robert Moses Moses Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Mississippi BEN
How Billy Graham Stood Against Segregation

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:27 min | Last week

How Billy Graham Stood Against Segregation

"Greg laurie. You said to me before we came on the air. that billy. Graham was very very ahead of his with race relations. Talk about that because a lot of people don't know the history i mean. I've tried to write in a couple of my books. william wilberforce An amazing grace and others that when you really believe what the bible says you you cannot be racist but a lot of people didn't live that out but billy graham did at a time when it was very very divisive in difficult in the country. Talk about that. Yeah well he was. The son of the south he was from north carolina raised in charlotte. And of course we know that there was there was a lot of racial division and all of the nation but especially there but as billy begin as crusades people wanted to hold segregated meets not letting black people into the meeting until the white people were. Billy said i will not speak to in a segregated meeting. I want an immigration and our meetings and they refused any literally came down and took down the little ropes and things that were dividing the crowds and he got some people upset with him but he also when he was really at the peak of his popularity had martin. Luther king do an opening prayer at the medicine square garden that was highly controversial. A because king was was not you know. He was not popular with a lot of people in the south of for ability to allow king. That role was ignificant people have. I watched a documentary on. Pbs the other. Day about billy graham. It was just recently done. They got so many things. Wrong historically factually and one of the things they pointed out was sort of like billy missed his opportunity during the civil rights movement and that is so untrue because even he and dr king agreed that the best way that he could help is by using his influence in his crusades is. Dr king was out on the streets and they were doing their peaceful protests and marches and rosa parks. And some of the other others. Billy misery supportive of this but they built. They were more effective in their spheres of influence. And in fact. Billy was a real innovator at that time and i thought that documentary was not accurate as they reported and spent a lot of time reporting that part of his

Billy Greg Laurie Billy Graham William Wilberforce Luther King Medicine Square Garden Graham Charlotte North Carolina Martin PBS Rosa Parks
The Green Book: Traveling in the Jim Crow Era

Past Gas

02:07 min | Last week

The Green Book: Traveling in the Jim Crow Era

"All right. So i'm really excited. Do this episode. I think it's always fun. Do more like history deep. Dives like this This is more like our. it's not gonna be like one. Continuous story like somewhere out there episodes but more like in thala if you will like our eighty s and ninety supercar episodes where we'll have separate smaller stories that kind of make a bigger picture of how african americans had to essentially make their own car culture within the united states In spite of all the challenges that came up against all the all the racism that they came up against and how their own car culture flourished. I'm really get into this. Yeah i think in the entertainment world. They caught vignettes. Yes vignettes think of this as vignettes. Thank you thank you joe on instagram when you when you drag the slider over and you pull the shadows in outside right yes. Yeah de all right. Let's do it before we talk about anything else. We need to understand what led to african. Americans needs for their own car culture separate from white car culture. What is it that led to the creation of the green book. And why did black americans have such a difficult time traveling. The united states. How did oppressive laws and jim. Crow era violence lead to the rise of black automobile owners. Before the civil rights movement the united states was mostly segregated and many states had jim crow laws that had come into effect in the late eighteen hundreds after the civil war this man between eighteen ninety and nineteen sixty. It was especially dangerous for african americans to travel jim crow. Laws made it so whites could be rude and outright violent towards black travelers with little to no consequences. The fact public transportation was segregated and often dangerous for african-americans meant the invention of the car was also source of independence as it so often is across ages and cultures for black americans. The automobile represented the ultimate freedom from the harsh realities of a segregated society.

United States Jim Crow JOE JIM
Gloria Richardson, Civil Rights Pioneer, Dies at 99

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Gloria Richardson, Civil Rights Pioneer, Dies at 99

"Her by name, but you may have seen a moving photo of her during the civil rights movement in the 19 sixties. Gloria Richardson was an influential yet largely on song, civil rights pioneer who was captured in a photograph as she pushed away the bayonet of a National Guardsmen. Well, Richardson has died at the age of 99. Her granddaughter says she died in her sleep Thursday in New York City. She was the first woman to lead a prolonged grassroots civil rights movement outside the Deep South. In 1962, she helped to organize and lead the Cambridge movement on Maryland's Eastern Shore with sit ins to desegregate restaurants, bowling alleys and movie theaters.

Gloria Richardson National Guardsmen Richardson New York City Deep South Cambridge Eastern Shore Maryland Bowling
Speaking to the Senators Behind the Senate Caucus on Black-Jewish Relations

People of the Pod

02:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Speaking to the Senators Behind the Senate Caucus on Black-Jewish Relations

"Last month. Three us senators announced the launch of the bipartisan senate caucus on black jewish relations. I sat down with senators. Jackie rosen of nevada. Tim scott of south carolina and cory booker of new jersey to discuss the mission of the new caucus. Here's a portion of our conversation senators. Welcome thank you. it's good to be with you. You very very much reinvigorating. The black jewish alliance is that was at the bedrock of the civil rights movement. And it's key to combating racism rising anti-semitism both here in america and around the world. And that's why today's announcement is so critical. The three of you have joined us here on the global forum stage to announce the first ever senate caucus on black jewish relations which you share with our audience fees each of you. What you hope to accomplish. During this caucus i would suggest the wisdom to i yielding. Jackie i it sounds good. Well thank you. I appreciate that. And i want to tell you that. I'm so proud to be here with tim and corey because when i went and talked to them about this idea there wasn't a hesitation for a second and i'm just so excited to do this first time it's ever happened in the senate and i just know that we are going to have so many good conversations positive things going forward and we're going to show real leadership in this issue and just very excited to announce this those senators white. Why didn't you hesitate for me. It's been a lifelong journey in many ways. understanding appreciating the parallel tracks that the jewish community in the black community have been on if you think about it from a biblical perspective for centuries of slavery in egypt and you think about the four centuries. African americans were enslaved. There are tracks that are parallel and pain. That creates promise an opportunity. The tragedies that became triumphs. it's a story that continues on and for my life For me it seems. It's just personal in that. By some of my first mentors larry freudenberg. Who helped me become a part of his insurance agency. And then it gave me a piece of the pie and taught me not to work for someone but worked for yourself

Jackie Rosen Black Jewish Alliance Senate Tim Scott Cory Booker South Carolina United States Nevada New Jersey Jackie Corey TIM Egypt Larry Freudenberg
MLK's Right-Hand Man Wyatt Tee Walker Rejects Critical Race Theory

Mark Levin

01:49 min | Last month

MLK's Right-Hand Man Wyatt Tee Walker Rejects Critical Race Theory

"Again. I pull out my book, American Marxism. There were in our prominent critics of critical race theory who were active in the early civil rights movement, including the late Reverend Martin Luther King, Junior's chief of staff, confidant and friend. Dr Wyatt T. Walker. Walker was a legend in the civil rights movement in his own right, his friend and frequent collaborator in the school choice movement, Steve Kalinsky. Rights that Walker was King's field general in the organized resistance. Against notorious Birmingham Safety Commissioner Bulk counter. Now keep something in mind. Martin Luther King, and that entire movement. Was not anti American was not trying to overthrow a white dominant society. It was a movement demanding then under the Constitution of the United States. That black people be treated like human beings. It was not a war on society. It was not a Marxist movement. Now, Walker Compiled and named Kings the letter from Birmingham Jail He was with King for the march on Washington. That produced the I have a dream speech and in Oslo for the Nobel Peace Prize. Walker emphatically rejected critical race theory in 2015 Clint Ski, and Walker Co authored an essay in which they wrote in part Today, Too many so called remedies such as critical race theory, the increasingly fashionable post Marxist postmodernists approach. It analyzes society as institutional group power structures. Remember what Candy said. We're not talking about individuals talking about groups. Rather than on a spiritual or 1 to 1 human level. Taking us in the wrong direction, he

Walker Reverend Martin Luther King Dr Wyatt T. Walker Steve Kalinsky Birmingham Safety Commissioner White Dominant Society Martin Luther King Clint Ski Birmingham Jail Walker Co King Nobel Peace Prize Kings Oslo United States Washington Candy
Caller Uses Fallacy to Defend Critical Race Theory

Mark Levin

01:39 min | Last month

Caller Uses Fallacy to Defend Critical Race Theory

"I would like to discuss critical I would like to discuss Trooper Race theory Go for it. Let the audience know California aspect about critical race theories. It's not laws that were explode. Laws that were set up in the past have left current populations at a disadvantage. Redlining didn't allow for African Americans redlining is illegal, sir. Yes. Where there was more. Yes, I understand that. But redlining. That's that's a critical race theory goes all the way back to the Constitution. It doesn't a job where I understand that, But I'm trying to explain Is that what happened was, I said, Red lining is illegal. And if you did understand critical race theory, you would understand that Most of the theoreticians going back to even Derek Bell condemned the civil rights movement. You condemn the civil rights movement, either. I'm what I'm what I'm trying to get at is the reasons why the export? No, sir. Listen, I understand you want to go through all that You want to talk about other issues. What I'm saying to you is this Red lining is now illegal. We had court decisions that make certain other behavior illegal. And I'm telling you, that critical race theory isn't about redlining. Credible race theory argues that a colorblind society is a lie. At the civil rights movement is a lie that the civil lights removing enshrined a white dominant society do not read about critical race theory, sir. Critical race theory before identifies laws that held minorities back. I just said to you Let me try it again. Do you think the 1964 Civil Rights Act was a ruse for the white dominant society? No no in 1965 Civil Rights Act.

Derek Bell California White Dominant Society
Radical Leftists Changing Their False Marketing From Critical Race Theory to 'Anti-Racism Training'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:06 min | Last month

Radical Leftists Changing Their False Marketing From Critical Race Theory to 'Anti-Racism Training'

"So what do they do again? They're going to change the messaging Watch. You're going to get more of this Joy Reid Crap right now. Teaching critical race theory. We're teaching anti racism training. It's the same thing. You're teaching your kids how to be pro racism. America doesn't like that. We fought a civil war. And a civil rights movement. Proud Republican Patriots fighting against Democrats down South For the right of every American to live free. For every American have the same rights. Based on your citizenship, Not on your skin color. Citizen led rebellions are happening everywhere, and the Democrats are understanding right now they have a serious message problem, folks. Their message of big government is great. We can't stand. The police were going to teach your kids to be racist. They understand these messages aren't working. So they are trying to flip the switch and work on new marketing to sell the same bag of flaming dog

Joy Reid Patriots America
Obama and Other Marxists Selectively Choose Which Black People to Promote

Mark Levin

01:07 min | Last month

Obama and Other Marxists Selectively Choose Which Black People to Promote

"You see Obama chooses The black people he wants to promote. And the black people he wants to crush. Just like The White left do exactly the same thing. The whole notion of critical race theory. As I've said several times now. Is that if you do not agree with this Marxist revolution And all stray hand is down for the revolution. They're not really a black person. Oh, your skin is black. Between your ears. You've been colonized by whites. If you believe in a color Blind society and Martin Luther King You believe in the civil rights movement and all that took place. In the 64 65 civil rights acts. You've been colonized. Your mind has been Destroyed. By your white man's surroundings. This is how Sickening. This racist ideology is and it is a front a pretext for the Marxist movement behind

Barack Obama Martin Luther King
How Marijuana Reform Could Repair, Reclaim and Restore Communities

TED Talks Daily

02:24 min | Last month

How Marijuana Reform Could Repair, Reclaim and Restore Communities

"What did you want to be when you grow. Up is a question that i'm sure many of you have heard in your childhood but if your upbringing was anything like mine it is a question that you heard over and over again and it wasn't until i became an adult that i began to understand the significance of the asking the questions by our community leaders and my grandparents but it was only recently in the last two years that i get some true understanding of just how much -nificant and wait there was am the answer back then and even today you see growing up black and female in the south more than forty years ago there are some limitations to the answer to that question whether real or perceived there were limitations all the same and so what. I want you to understand that this moment as a young girl growing up with all that was happening. Right after the civil rights movement all of the advancements of the struggle things that were meant to push in advance the african american community things like the voting rights act the fair housing that and affirmative action and my generation was supposed to be taking full advantage of all of those opportunities so when they asked the question. What do you want to be when you grow up. It meant something to them. I remember hearing this question one summer at vacation. Bible school vacation bible. School is not to be confused with. Btu trainee school or sunday gotomeeting school. It is vacation bible school. I'm still trying to figure out who thought it was a good idea to put vacation bible school altogether but the first week of every summer during my childhood i was it was spent in vacation bible school and this one particular summer there was a teacher. She wasn't too much older than me. And my middle school friends. She wanted to make sure that we understood scripture and was able to connected to the real world question of what you will be when you grow up

Admiral Michael M. Gilday Defends Racist Critical Race Theory for U.S. Navy

Mark Levin

01:27 min | Last month

Admiral Michael M. Gilday Defends Racist Critical Race Theory for U.S. Navy

"Admiral Department of Defense undertook the stand down because they understand that extremism detracts from military readiness. So if sailors except Candies argument that America and the United States Navy are fundamentally racist. As you've encouraged them to do. Do you expect that to increase or decrease morale and cohesion or even recruiting into the United States? Navy? I do know this. Our strength is in our diverse Nobody said our strength is in our diversity You smell If our strength is in our diversity, Why are you proposing racist reading material? For our Navy. Candy. This is amazing. Kenny doesn't believe our strength is in our diversity. This is Marxism. They don't believe in diversity of thought. Diversity of anything If you disagree with them, whatever your race. Here is the enemy. He doesn't believe in diversity. In fact, as I've explained before it as well discuss much greater length in about three weeks. They reject Martin Luther King. They reject the civil rights movement. They reject Brown versus Board of Education. That's what Derek Bell taught. One of the more modern So called icons of critical race theory. And this admiral is pushing this pushing it.

Admiral Department Of Defense United States Navy America Kenny Brown Versus Board Of Educatio Martin Luther King Derek Bell
What the Netanyahu Family Did to Palestine

Behind the Bastards

02:21 min | 2 months ago

What the Netanyahu Family Did to Palestine

"Then when we left off a we were talking about The netanyahu boys beaten yoni They're kind of ping pong back between the new state of israel and the united states. They don't really like it in the us. They think it's shallow and you know they. They wanna be back in israel and they're also frustrated at their dad because he he didn't he didn't kill anybody so in july of nineteen sixty four newly adult yoni went back home adult At nine hundred sixty four and he joins the idea phase three years older than bb bb still back in the us student. High school shit. Yanni became a paratrooper. Which at the time was pretty much the most elite unit in the new military He subsequently went on to train as an officer And in general seems to have been pretty good. It became a soldier now. Yonis absence was devastating to his younger brother. A baby would spend almost every one of his summers in israel usually alone because his brother was in the military he worked part-time back in the us on evenings and weekends so he could afford the airfare to spend every possible moment of his time That he wasn't in school in the us back in israel he was a good student but was noted as being very detached from other teenagers. That said his years in the us did rub off on him and his friends in israel noticed that he had adopted an american swagger over the years while he was fashioned in pop culture definitely rubbed off on bb politics if his second home did not so benjamin spent his teen years in the us during the explosion of the american civil rights movement. You know martin luther king and all that that's all happening in the us while he is an adolescent and the struggle of different groups within the united states to attain equal treatment under the law seems to completely passed him by like his father. Bb disliked most american jews who were liberal intended to the democrat. In fact the only thing about the united states that he preferred to israel was capitalism. So which is interesting because israel in this point is is a quasi socialist state under mapa right like businesses and whatnot are heavily centralized run by the government. it is not very much like the united states in this period Mvp likes all of the things that are militants and austere and and a kind of aggressive in end ethno-nationalist about these release date. He hates the socialism

Israel United States Yoni Yonis Netanyahu Yanni American Civil Rights Movement Benjamin Martin Luther King Government
A Civil Rights History Lesson

In The Thick

02:14 min | 3 months ago

A Civil Rights History Lesson

"Today we have a very special guest joining us from brooklyn. New york is gene. Theo harris distinguished professor of political science at brooklyn college a historian and author of the rebellious life of mrs rosa parks. She's co editor of the new book. Julian bonds time to teach the history of the southern civil rights movement gene. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me so today. We're going to honor one of the leaders of the civil rights movement and i. I actually met julian bond. I just can't remember where it's going to say that you probably did. I did meet him. And now i'm like you know i think it was before we had cameras in our phones. I mean bond is just a hero and a giant in the civil rights movement. He was an incredible human bean with. I mean his humanity just should out. He was an activist. He was an an educator he did. Pass away in two thousand fifteen. He was a founding member of the student. Nonviolent coordinating committee snake He had a political career. He served in the georgia house of representatives. He had to fight for his seat because of his opposition to the vietnam war and he was the first african american to be nominated as vice president though he withdrew his name and julian bond was an outspoken activist who fought his entire life whether it was civil rights to beaten way out of other people on the question of lgbtq rights all the way to protesting to shut down the keystone pipeline. Let's listen to julian bond in his own words to start off this show. This is from two thousand and two interview that julian did with phyllis leffler of the explorations in black leadership project at the university of virginia. Everything my parents. I told me about responsibility to others everything. I've learned that. The george school about speaking truth to power everything i learned about daring to stand up to powerful people and say no to them. Whatever the consequences. All of that came together when lonnie king came up to me and asked me if i would join this Movement

Julian Bond Theo Harris Mrs Rosa Parks Brooklyn College Georgia House Of Representativ Brooklyn Julian New York Phyllis Leffler Vietnam University Of Virginia George School Lonnie King
Biden marks Bloody Sunday by signing voting rights order.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:39 min | 5 months ago

Biden marks Bloody Sunday by signing voting rights order.

"I'm anthony davis new executive order from president. Joe biden directs federal agencies to take a series of steps to promote voting access. A move that comes. As congressional democrats press for a sweeping voting and elections bill to counter efforts by republicans to restrict voting access. His plan was announced during a recorded address on the fifty sixth commemoration of bloody sunday. The nineteen sixty five incident in which some six hundred civil rights. Activists were viciously beaten by state troopers as they tried to march for voting rights in selma alabama. every eligible voter should be able to vote and have it counted. Biden's order includes several modest provision it directs federal agencies to expand access to voter registration and election information calls on the heads of agencies to come up with plans to give federal employees time off to vote or volunteer as nonpartisan poll workers and pushes an overhaul of the government's vote dot gov website democrats are attempting to solidify support for house resolution one which touches on virtually every aspect of the electoral process. It was approved on wednesday on a near party line. Vote two hundred twenty. Two two hundred and ten bloody sunday proved to be a turning point in the civil rights movement that led to passage of the voting rights act of nineteen sixty five similarly biden is hoping the january six attack of the us capital by a pro. Donald trump mob

Anthony Davis Joe Biden Selma Biden Alabama Government United States Donald Trump
Biden to sign voting-rights executive order Sunday

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 5 months ago

Biden to sign voting-rights executive order Sunday

"Of the executive order on election reforms during a video message. It came of the anniversary of a major event in the civil rights movement. Today marks 56 years since the marches and bloody Sunday when more than 500 demonstrators gathered on March 7th 1965, demanding the right for black people to vote and cross Selma's Edmund Pettus Bridge as protesters were met by dozens of states. Troopers and violence that was broadcast for all to see a national television, becoming a symbol of racism across the deep South that later led Martin Luther King Jr to March from Selma to the state Capitol in Montgomery and eventually led Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This year's Selma Bridge crossing Jubilee, largely virtual this year because of the Corona virus pandemic

Edmund Pettus Bridge Selma Martin Luther King Jr Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee Montgomery Congress
Bloody Sunday memorial to honor late civil rights giants

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Bloody Sunday memorial to honor late civil rights giants

"Event in the civil rights movement. Today marks 56 years since the marches and bloody Sunday when more than 500 demonstrators gathered on March 7th 1965, demanding the right for black people to vote and cross Selma's Edmund Pettus Bridge as protesters were met by dozens of state troopers and violence that was broadcast for all to see a national television. Becoming a symbol of racism across the deep south that later led Martin Luther King Jr to March from Selma to the state Capitol in Montgomery and eventually led Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This year's Selma Bridge crossing Jubilee, largely virtual this year because of the Corona virus pandemic That was Fox's Jeff

Edmund Pettus Bridge Selma Martin Luther King Jr Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee Montgomery Congress FOX Jeff
Vernon Jordan, civil rights icon and former Clinton adviser, dies at 85

All Things Considered

00:13 sec | 5 months ago

Vernon Jordan, civil rights icon and former Clinton adviser, dies at 85

"Jordan for years and influential power broker in Washington and a close adviser to former President Bill Clinton, has died at the age of 85, Jordan. Was an American business executive and civil rights activist. He also worked for very civil rights movement organizations will

Jordan President Bill Clinton Washington
Center Receives Grant Of Nearly $700,000 For Work Preserving Legacy Of Chicago's Emmett Till

WGN Programming

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Center Receives Grant Of Nearly $700,000 For Work Preserving Legacy Of Chicago's Emmett Till

"A grant to help tell the story of Chicago's Emmett Till $700,000 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation goes to the Emmett Till Interpretive center in Sumner, Mississippi, till an African American teenager was murdered by a white group in money Mississippi and 1955 photos of his mutilated body helped spark the civil rights movement. The center will use the money to preserve tills legacy and that of his mother in Mississippi and Chicago. Dave's one WGN News today was

Emmett Till Interpretive Cente Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Mississippi Sumner Chicago Wgn News Dave
"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

03:42 min | 11 months ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Vergecast

"People up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time. Hey I'm Cleo Abra. My host answered by box on Qube, which is that new streaming for your phone along with dramas and comedies. qube actually has a ton of news content including our show answered by box, which is a daily explainer show in true vox style, and there's also sixty six by CBS News, which is really insightful in depth journalism in just a few minutes around the world by BBC news hosted by Ben. Bland that shows really great because they. Pulled from BBC's huge network of journalists that are all telling stories that really matter from all around the world. Then there's the report by NBC News, which is hard hitting news delivered every morning evening and weekend really love their work and also also.

officer Qube NBC News BBC Cleo Abra CBS News
"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 11 months ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police <hes>, , which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. . The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. . People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. . What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, , really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. . One is about a specific incidents <hes> with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, , and how they affect your perception. . What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. . So I asked verge reporter, , Steven and verge video producer, , my calf, , the two leaders of the site wide project <hes>. . To come on, , say talk to me about the project what they learned in. . Really I, keep , thinking about this, , the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. . I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. . This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, , which is something the virtuous. . Investigate. . So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. . We're very proud of it that'd be read. . Watch it here are John and Maria. . Maria Abdul. . John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. . I'm doing great another beautiful day in. . Quarantine Mario. . How are you? ? I'm good. . I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. . So now I get to. . Take back and reflect de. . So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. . Hope Everybody can see it on site. . We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. . The movement around police brutality, , and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. . So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, , a bunch of. . Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. . Let's start with where it came from. . How did this project begin in? ? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? ? That is very, very , good question because. . It was sort of such a big undertaking. . We it started in a very different direction than it ended <hes> as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. . So it started with an idea, , a sort of idea in the staff, , one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. . Which is, , which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. . Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, , but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. . Well, , I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. . Circulating around social media, , which is to say, , we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, , but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. . On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, , it never really shows up police reports. . Yeah. . One thing that caught me is <hes> I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, , we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. . George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. . But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, , the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not <hes> in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. . Easy simple. . Everyone has a camera. . It seems likely that everything will be recorded, , but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. . Yeah. . Yeah. . I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, , Samara and you pretty. . Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? ? So. . At the first video and Ben Evita's. . I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, , police brutality that had been collected, , and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, , and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. . But because it had, , it didn't happen at a protest. . It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. . Told me after he published the video, , there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. . It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, , it was just. . So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? ? So that's how we landed on that video. . So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. . It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. . It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. . So we thought it was important and imperative, , and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, , but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. . . So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. . One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, , and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. . It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. . I. . Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. . Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. . The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, , and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, , and it's changing because the. . Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. . Well, that's , the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, , King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, , think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. . I do think filmmakers understand this. . And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. . The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, , and they do get some of these editorial. . Editorial. . Control some of the stuff. . and. . I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. . Which is why I think it's very powerful that. . People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. . So let's start there. . That's the that's the big feature. . That's the piece reporters. . It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. . I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. . But the stories are actually of course, , the most powerful thing. . John, , tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? ? Yes. . And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, , came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. . Yeah. . So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. . One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us <hes> but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. . The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, , I think I mean I. Think . it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, , the same beginning middle and end and. . It's once you've see enough of them. . It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. . Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. . Home to people reading, , which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, , okay, , this is a different place. . This is a different time. . These are different people, , but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, , and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. . Somebody who is like an officer? ? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, , just beating the shit out of. . A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. . Shocked. . They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. . Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. . One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, , the the videos got was because it, , it gave back some necessary context because again, , if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. . From. . People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. . If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. . Yeah. . It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So . we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. . was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? ? Was it? ? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. . Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. . That's yeah. . That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, , like the thing about social media, , people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. . However, , it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. . By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, , right? It's ? one of these. . It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. . A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. . People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. . He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. . In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, , that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, , institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. . Mario I mean you, , you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? ? How do you take that? ? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. . I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. . He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. . They hadn't gone to protests recently, , they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. . In as the video begins, , you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. . You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, , it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. . On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, , and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. . They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. . So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. . Even. If . you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, , you now know that's an option for you. . That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. . It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. . Is that like it is a protective thing too. . You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, , okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. . You get to tell your story, , view the camera to I think. . These videos, , I. . Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. . One thing that's really interesting about this. . Again, , I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. . I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? ? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. . Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. . They're not from the participants. . How do you? ? How do you think that plays out in this larger? ? There's a lot of change in this country. . Now, , there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. . But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. . How do you think that's that's playing I. . think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, , the officer could come out for could come for him. . You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. . Even, , as him as the filmer, , so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. . Okay. If . I'm standing here, , is it okay if I'm standing here, , he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. . Might, , not like not not got published right? ? Like he might not get his phone back. . These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. . Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, , he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. . Had he not taken a step back and capture according? ? I also think. . Just. . Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. . It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. . I think <hes> which is. . Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. . At, , somebody else. . Who has has has had the same realization as as but. . I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. . CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. . I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. . In Zambia. . The was interested but his friends, , Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. . So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. . Don't I. . Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, , they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? ? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, , but it's like five minutes. . Of Not, , much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. . So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. . So I think with this specific video, , it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. . How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. . A on a different day in a different moment. . The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. . Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, , right? ? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. . Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. . How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? ? Like you catch me in a different minute. . I'm over here. . I'm over there. . Actually surveillance is good. . No, , I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. . Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, , very general terms like it's evidence, , right? ? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. . It's documentation it's like the same footage, , but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. . For, , the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? ? Because like in England, , for example, , there are cameras everywhere. . There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. . Like in London, , for example, , there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, , and that's just that's just a fact of life. . And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. . I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. . I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. . I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. . And I think the intent really matters. . So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, , but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. . It is the opposite of surveillance. . Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. . It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, , you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. . You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, , valence is this idea of challenging. . Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, , the police, , and so with surveillance, , it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, , which was coined by Steve Man, , and it's all about looking from below. . So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. . You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. . They had never recorded this officer, , but they not only knew of him. . They had previously had seen incidences of him, , and so I think by pulling out their phone, , what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. . Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. . So they see this officer, , they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, , and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, , you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, , what's the probable cause? ? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? ? and. So . I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? ? Like you can hear them. . Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. . It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. . Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. . Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. . Yeah. . The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. . It's not complete. . We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. . You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. . Right and that I think about that, , all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. . and. . Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? ? What does it mean for the state? ? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. . It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, , a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, , but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. . Yeah I mean, , the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. . Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. . In the feature, , we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. . We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, , you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. . We do hear a lot from the police, , but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street <hes>. . Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. . Some people were critical of it. . We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. . But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? ? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. . Charts to my filters I. . Guess My. . But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. . Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. . I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. . Like this, , this very, it , was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, , which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. . It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. . Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. . Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, , and we would like He. . He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, , which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, , the more you understand that like. . Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. . It puts you on extremely high alert. . And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. . One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, , and they just don't talk about it like all of these. . There were seven people department all of them were very, , very, , very clearly traumatized. . In a way that was not obvious to them, but , very obvious to me is like an outside observer. . And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, , it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. . Everybody knew them like I remember. . The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. . And he was like, , why? ? Why? ? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, , you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from <hes> we ended up having to take her to the county. . Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. . He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. . The police is fundamentally like disordered. . I will say it's like. . And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, , there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. . He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. . Yes. . So I had to respond to a call this. . This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. . So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. . That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. . But again, , like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. . There is A. . There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like , it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, , which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time. .

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"civil rights movement" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on AM Joy

"Things about John Lewis. It is the highest prophecy it is. Insulting to those of us that common the generation after the John. Lewis and that are coming behind us now because they are trying to shook coat their own blasphemy, as far as I'm concerned, is blasphemous and it you may. John Newell's was on that bridge. Trying just to get the right to vote were taxed paid. We fought in the wars and just get right and quote being beat him down, and we are trying to preserve that as you know. Vomit came to having the march on Washington on anniversary. Twenty eight John Lewis was the only one left, that spoke in sixty three, and when we did it a few years ago, he came in March. Third in that and we wanted so much indepedence this year. We're going to March and make sure that John Lewis and CT dream is not turn back with vitamin. Mitch McConnell than others so they can give all the the empty praises. They want to date. This movement is going to continue to fight to hold up going rights and police reform two and things that we saw John Lewis do in his last years. Is that his mass civil disobedience is? He sat in the well at the house. House around gun reform Yep. He's sat in his last civilised regions. Was He'd led his sitting in the house, and as we're looking at violence in Chicago and violence New York. We got to continue that fight on gun. Control any for the right, the most and the last thing he did last public appearances, he went to black live matter plaza, standing up police reform. We can not just get words. We've got to continue with John Lewis. Did Cossio continue with Dr King movements about continuity not about. I have two more quick questions before I. Let you go first of all, you know the president. You've known him for a long time. You know what he's like. Does it surprise you that? He's golfing this morning and I don't know if you agree with me that probably golfing best because he's disparaged. John Lewis in such a vicious way in the past. has been so cruel to him in the way that he's spoken about him. I'm actually relieved that he's not saying anything. I think he should just not say anything. But am I do you think I'm wrong can think he should say. I certainly agree. He disparaged Jimmy called them out of his name. He tweeted on and he's probably doing the best thing. That, he could go and golf because that's where he is. And that's hideous. If he had any kind of respect and regard for the American people, he would go to the King Memorial, and get on his knees, and repent for the things that he's done against Dr, King, and against John Lewis, but he does not have that we all made mistakes. He's made them and continues to make them, and he has institutionalized them, and I just wish that John Lewis had lived to see. The voters that he fought for Razz an answer Mr Trump in November. And I should note that somebody on the staff in the white. House has decided to have the staff have the flags lowered to half mast on federal building? So at least someone there understands optics, and so that's been done my final question to you, reverend, Sharpton. If you could please take to speak about CT Vivian. I don't want him to get left out of this narrative as we are eulogizing. John Lewis so Vivienne. Billion started protesting Jim Crow in the boys, and by the time of the Montgomery bus boycott in fifty five. He was already a veteran, the thing though the power the magic of Ct.. Is that cat? Vivian was one of the few leaders that could lead from the Middle Audubon on the other end of the crowd. He didn't need to be out front. He was not one that wanted to be the keynote he was organized. He was the one that will put it together, and he had the humility that match John Lewis. That, you would always see CT.. Kind of like making sure everything was all right. He never ever said. Where am I on the program? What am I going to do? I brought him to national network several times, and he was like you want me to do what how and last two two years ago two thousand eighteen gave an award, and he want to give it back. He was the one that stood up to Jim Crop Sheriff, Clarke voting-rights he was the one that taught Ghandian nonviolence to the movement, and he was the one that would take time with all of us of another generation and another geopolitics. He like John Do that and I. Think you know as a menace that was saying I had. Oh, congressman I feel. Jamal Brandon with us this running at said the action rally, and I was saying in my speech today that the preaching me wants to say that since they have been the first to Saint Twenty four hours. Maybe they had a practice. Join and go see Dr King Together. I love that I love that as an image to take with us for the day. Reverend Al Sharpton. Thank you very much. We'll see you on politics nation later. Thank you very much really appreciate your time and you're. Okay we're going to go now. To Michael beschloss historian, and a friend of this show Michael Beschloss your thoughts on the passing of John Lewis and of. And I'm just going to give you the floor. So. Day In both cases and you know I, love everything you've been saying about John. Lewis this morning. He was such a sweet man, and he was such a gentleman, but I think this is a more morning that people and The historians line of work should say we're going to have to start rewriting history because we think of civil rights in the nineteen sixty S. there's much of a tendency to then say. Let's talk about John Kennedy. Let's talk about Lyndon Johnson which is fine. They should be admired for the bills that they suggested in sixty three and sixty five, but none of that would have happened without John Lewis People like. Reverend Vivian and others who fought alongside because enemy in the nineteen sixties. He was worried that if he was pushed too far on civil rights, he by dot get elected in nineteen, sixty four. He was elected with a lot of the south, the biggest state for Kennedy in one, thousand, nine, hundred sixty was Georgia. Something like sixty three percent, and those were not voters who were demanding that Kennedy beep or civil rights and be for integration and so Kennedy's immediately reaction when he heard about the march on Washington or about the freedom writers, or about what was happening in Birmingham in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three was. These people are going to cause me trouble political trouble put pressure on me to go further. I want to go John Lewis? Lewis was saying that's exactly what I have. In mind. I WANNA pressure the president when Kennedy March on Washington, nine, hundred and sixty three. He was worried John Lewis would make a radical speech that might cause Kennedy problems and it turns out. We've now got access to the draft of the speech that John Lewis wanted to give on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and what he wanted to say was listen Mr Kennedy which. Is The federal government on entity was very apprehensive that he'd say about. The result was that there was a lawyer and the justice. John Riley was put in charge of a record player so that if John Lewis got to radical. John Riley could press a button and drown out John Lewis with a recording of Malian. Jackson thing being he's got the whole world in his hands as it turned out John. Lewis toned down, but even when they went to the White House later that day. Andy was a little bit cool or John Lewis. Wow, Michael Beschloss as always bringing a piece of information I had never heard that story before. You've always got the goods Michael Beschloss, thank you so much. Really appreciate your time. Wow, that is story. Thank you, cheers, and now joining Revenue Mark Thompson host of the podcast. Make It plain with mark, Thompson, mark. I short on time, but I wanNA make sure that everyone gets a chance to reflect on on John Lewis on TV and so the floor is yours..

John Lewis John Kennedy John Newell John Reverend Vivian John Riley CT John Do Dr King Michael Beschloss Reverend Al Sharpton Kennedy Washington president Mitch McConnell golf Mr Kennedy Mark Thompson House
"civil rights movement" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on AM Joy

"He believed that if we opened our hearts, if we heated the words of the old scriptures, the love one another as we love ourselves that that would bring about a more just more perfect union. And that would overcome the question. You're asking the photo the forces that. Keep, US captive the forces that bind us to an imperfect, selfish greedy. UNJUST REALITY And those forces I believe are about fear and self. I have something that I don't want you to have. And what Lewis called us to do again you may, and you one may look different than me, and so therefore I steer you. You are the other. The trope of John Lewis's life was that love has to be the motive force. Because love will liberate us from that fear. From that. otherness and remind us that. In fact we are all children, of God. That's why I go back again and again to this theological understanding of the. E is not explicable. If you! Try to separate him from his religious faith. I I'm his picture was ever a newspaper was in the Montgomery advertiser when he had delivered a trial sermon as a teenager, and they called him the boy preacher from Troy. And when he first met Dr King. In Montgomery with Ralph Abernathy in Fred Gray, he walked in. Said I want to meet the boy from Troy. And what he meant was the boy preacher. And write sermons come and go. Here's why we're talking about him. Right now is for him. Is Life was a sermon? Is Life was witness, and he was willing to die to liberate us from the forces that you articulated so well. They're a fear of the other. The anxiety that someone may get what I have unjustly. And so therefore you draw up the bridge. Is All about crossing that bridge, not drawing it up. So, well said Jon Meacham. Put the book up for Producers Please, so that we can talk about this book that I would love to interview on the book at another time. Jon Meacham Great. Thank you very much. We're going to put the book up before we let you go so there. It is it is called. His truth is marching on John Lewis and the power of hope Jon Meacham always. Thank you so much really appreciate you. Joining me now I do believe we have back Aaron Hanes editor at large for the nineteenth. audio now Aaron to have you. Yes I believe that joy. Back through the power of the telephone, okay, so let's go back and I'll re ask you to talk about what stood out the most to you in writing an obituary for John Lewis. Well you know. I'm daughter of Atlanta is as you know, and I didn't just grow up learning about Dr King I. Being I mean at Congressman. Lewis Andrew Young Reverend. Lowery Jose Williams James Orange Coretta. Scott King Zenana Clayton Juanita abernathy around town, all of the time and the impact of that experience, really immeasurable because it, it just makes the notion of equality, the importance of voting the idea that you work to make this country live up to his ideals. That's just the air that we breathe and the water that we drink. in Atlanta, and my approach to journalism frankly has been shaped by the lives of people like these You know. In the loss of Congressman Lewis I. DO believe that this country has lost its Northstar John. Lewis grew up idolizing Dr. King is so many people upset, and then got to speak alongside. His idol is one of the big six at the march on Washington, and he leaves us earth now as an island icon to millions of people around the country, and really around the world and just. Really struck by what a life and what a legacy this Manley's behind, because at eighty years old he really left it all on the battlefield You know I talked to ambassador young last night. And he shared with me. that he visited with John Lewis last week. And and and what investor young said struck me, and it really stayed with me all night and I've been thinking about it a lot this morning. He said if he had to try to John. Lewis into one sentence. He would say that in his life. John Lewis demonstrated that there's real power in genuine humility. And I think that Jon meacham which is saying about You know John Lewis wasn't. A preacher in the sense of of of Dr King or Reverend Jackson, or or Reverend, lowery or reverend shuttles were, but but but you know. He lived his value. He lived his faith and his Light because a civil rights icon, and later congressman was a direct extension of that. And I think that's what we saw in these eight years lipped. And you know you mentioned. Revenue Joe. Lowery ribbon shuttles worth. CT Vivian, who who pass at just hours before. John Lewis you know it strikes me that we are losing this generation. This creates generation this greatest generation. Of activists of leaders of American heroes what will that mean? When this generation has passed because they're only a few, there is obviously. A small number of people left, but What does that mean? The it does mean something you know we had this time. with like you, said this greatest generation, and and some others have said I absolutely agree for many black Americans, but really for for the country people should be thought of as among our founding mothers and fathers, and Indefinitely Patriots and professors of this democracy, and and you know. I think that that is part of why we selfishly try to hold onto the people right We want them to live forever because there's a feeling that we need them to. As a country that we shudder at what the law of the people really means for our democracy, ambassador young with saying his first wife, Jean died of cancer. But. She lingered on for three years after her diagnosis. And we know what a fighter Congressman Lewis was, and certainly he fought. Very bravely against patriotic cancer, which we know can be devastating, but but he is somebody that that we expected to to to live on forever and we hoped would would would be this because we do not I mean these people are the guardrails. Their physical presence on this earth has has really in so many ways just reminded people not only of. The Games of the civil rights movement hard, Bokor wins that I spent a lot of my early.

John Lewis Jon Meacham Congressman Lewis Lowery Jose Williams Lewis Andrew Dr. King Scott King Zenana Clayton Juan US Montgomery Atlanta Congressman Ralph Abernathy Aaron Hanes Troy Patriots congressman Jean Washington
"civil rights movement" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

11:03 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on AM Joy

"Yeah, he was, the baby was seventeen years old when he wrote that letter to Martin Luther King, wanting his help to. To Stop Discrimination that he was experiencing. Listen all I know is that? John Lewis is one of a kind, but we have others who are coming behind him to do the work now revenue. Barber. He talks about that. This is the third reconstruction, and we can see now a hard line and has been drawn from John Lewis passing. To, the future and twenty, twenty is the year of perfect vision. It's rip the band aid off truly festering. Ugly, mood, and told people that you must fix this in order to go on. You have to fix it so I. Can still him say you're saying when you get into trouble, you have to do something. Speak up in trouble into good trouble. And that drowns out the sadness in my heart, because I truly believe that he was here to show us that we would have to run a long race, and for whatever reason. He. Did it with a happy fates, and he did it with love in his heart so i? WanNa sit all my love to Michael Collins Chief of Staff Rachel. Only a WHO helped us. Was Our conduit to the congressman, and to of course his family, who took us in our in their home, and their hearts, and they helped this made in dawn porter, who was heartbroken last night. and. She's a very strong woman, but she had gotten very close to him like a daughter and my love heart goes out all of them and especially John Miles round up and truly is a wonderful. Man and we should talk. See what he's up to make sure he's okay. Yeah, absolutely, when we will share those condolences and send our love as well from the show to the family Eric Alexander, it's always a pleasure. Thank you so much for taking the time. The the film is called. Good trouble. I've seen it. It's brilliant. You should watch it. It's a chance for you to revel in the greatness of this very good good man, and we need heroes in this moment so. You can see it on on demand, I, believe is where you can get it, so please check it out. Thank you Erica. And I wanna now also bring in Jon Meacham I. WanNa thank you. Eric and I want to bring Jon meacham MSNBC political analyst and author of his truth is marching on. Give us some perspective on. On on hope and John Lewis. That is a fortuitous moment. This is the book that I. You're coming out with now. That is on his life. Get some perspective. Please John. Well he's a biblical figure. He believed in the efficacy and the possibility of bringing the Kingdom of Heaven to Earth. and. It's a remarkable -ly radical and mystic vision of life. It's not one that's widely share. In American history now most religious folks through the years from jared and times forward at believed that the rewards of life that peace and justice really only existed on the other side of paradise on the other side of the grave. John Lewis believed the opposite e believed that if we got our hearts and minds in the right place, if we actually acted on what so many Christians in particular say they believe, but so rarely actually put into action. That we could, in fact, create that world where justice comes down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream. And for him, it wasn't rhetoric. It wasn't a sermon. It was reality. Right he believed fundamentally in what he in Dr King, called the beloved community. But which is really the Kingdom of Heaven? It's the reign of God's Justice and some secular folks may think this is Gauzy or sentimental. He was in. He was on that bridge on those buses. He was in those bus stations in that house chamber. Because of the Gospel. And never waver from that faith, and I think one of the most important lessons for. Today is that there are so many people look a lot like me. Who say they are religious? Who say they follow the Lord, as it has come down to us in the Hebrew scriptures and the Greek New Testament. And yet. Managed to sort of overlook the sermon on the Mount because folks are more worried about the Supreme Court. And One of the things that I think the congressman I know. He believed to the very end. was that there is a power to a religious vision of the world. That can open our hearts as opposed to leading us to clinch our fists. Yeah, and you know one of the acerbic hot means between king and John. Lewis is that I cannot imagine even had he been allowed to live beyond age thirty nine, Dr King ever running for office over involving himself directly in politics seemed to really push that. Really stay in the Lane of activism. Whereas John Lewis. He literally took it from protest to politics and tried to engage the country from the Congress from the political podium. As well as from the moral podium. That isn't that usual for civil rights? Leaders talk about that just for a moment in his power as a political leader. It's a great point and one of the things about Rosa, parks and Dr King Ella, Baker and Septa Clark and. So so many Cat Vivian, of course, and we're also mourning Bernard Lafayette. Diane Nash so many people. Who? The great cloud of witnesses. Who have led us not far enough yet, but certainly to more just country than we were when John Lewis came out of troy and went up to Nashville. On a on a bus in order to go to the American, Baptist theological seminary with James bevill and others on a hilltop. Tennessee where he would go across the Cumberland River and sit in and stand up and speak out in the beginning. What they were they all made each other possible night, so some were great strategists. Some were great marchers. Some were both, but it is. It took an entire symphony of people. To. Help overcome. The remarkable. Remarkably stubborn legacies of systemic racism and injustice in this country. and. Your adds a fascinating point about what Dr King. Dr King survived. Memphis what would happen as you know joy he was. He was kind of gloomy at the end. Jesse Jackson talking about how before he went to emphasize that last time, he was trying to preach himself out of it. He reflected on maybe I should become the president of morehouse. The poor people's campaign was unfolding here in Memphis. Not for segregation, but for economic justice. is his focus was that a can't just take in Italy live with this now? He and Congressman Lewis were about not simply taking down segregation signs, but actually creating opportunity and that if you have the right to vote, and you have the right to go someplace. To buy a hamburger as Ella Baker once said you have to have the money to buy that hamburger right so you have to have opportunity and I think it's right and to me what Congressman Lewis? Always was acting on is. Is as six eight, and the voice of the Lord said whom shall I send, and who show go for us and I, said here am I send me. and. One element of this hasn't gotten. A lot of attention is also when you think about. By the late one thousand nine hundred sixty s there'd been so much death. There been so much so many victories to but but. John Kennedy. Medgar Evers. The freedom summer martyrs. Dr Jane Robert, Kennedy Congressman Lewis tells the story of having been up. I think it was the fifth floor suite of the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, when Senator Kennedy is shot to death in the kitchen in June of sixty eight. and. He just fell to the floor. Who is dead saying in rocked back and forth saying why? Why why? And one of the things I think led him into politics and kept him in the arena was she believed that she had been spared to press forward with this sense of justice, when other men and women had fallen to the Forces of Eight. That is. An amazing point I have one final question for you John. Before I, let you go, you know it strikes me that when you take a people captive and decide that they're not quite people, so you can hold them captive you take yourself captive to write and American culture has been captive to the hatred of black people and the misuse and abuse of them. Indigenous people as well, but the misuse and abuse of other people takes the whole country captive. What do you make of the fact that we haven't been able as a country to fully rectify that? Even with so many heroes so much loss so many martyrs so many good men like John Lewis so many good women in heroes who who tried to drag this country Ford morally that we keep sliding back. What is what is that? What is that about? Just asked the central question of American history and of life. And in many ways of human history and of life. And this is where I have A. More pessimistic vision than Congressman Lewis did..

John Lewis Congressman Lewis Martin Luther King congressman Eric Alexander Memphis Senator Kennedy Jon Meacham Kennedy Congressman Lewis John Miles Barber John Forces of Eight dawn porter Ella Baker Diane Nash Medgar Evers Dr King Ella MSNBC
"civil rights movement" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on AM Joy

"So important to remember that history I mean there were four attempts to pass a voting. Rights Act to allow Black Americans to vote eighteen, sixty, six, nine, hundred, Fifty, seven, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, four, it was John Lewis is beating on that bridge along with those other brave young people, college students just above college. Students Twenty Year olds. Who Bled on that bridge? John Lewis Blood paid for that. Nineteen sixty five rights act so for those who were praising John, Lewis and standing in the way of restoring that act think about that for a moment. His blood paid for it so if you want to honor him, there's a pretty pretty direct way for you to do that rather than give out a statement. FYI just a thought Erin. Hanes joins me now. She's the editor at large for the nineteenth Aaron. You wrote. If I understand it. The AP's biography of our obituary of John Lewis, what struck you the most about his biography? Off. To. PREP! Much. Attention on stuff by this morning. It's just. Impossible. I'm going to hold you. I'm going to hold you for just one moment, Aaron Year. There's something going on with your audio, so we're GONNA. We're GONNA. Fix Your audio because we really want. Hear from errands. I'm going to hold Aaron for just a moment. I'm going to flip over instead to. Eric Alexander my friend and the producer of the documentary John Lewis good trouble. So I'M GONNA. Go to you Erica. Let's make sure that we have your have your audience Erica. Yes hello, can you hear me? Yes! I can hear you good Morning Erica. This documentary that you. Produced. This project that really just came out. It really came in good time. Right? Good trouble came in good time talk about the process of making this documentary. Jonathan talked a little bit about being interviewed in it or interviewing. John Lewis for it. Talk about the process of making this documentary about this great man. Well. First of all. When I heard he had passed. All I could think about was peace be? As he was such A. Beautiful. He was a good man. and. We were making a film. About someone who had already made his life, so we just needed to get out of the way. I give all. Thanks and to. Dawn quarter. who directed the documentary so? Put Him in the spotlight because for so long John Lewis as been the supporting player and other people's story. And good trouble is his show. It allows the audience to finally focused. Learn about him. He gets the opportunity to tell us about his life and his own words. We learn about John Miles. Send my love to. That's his son. Is Beautiful Wife, Leeann, his brothers and sisters. They were all there. And we get to learn about not only. How he went over that bridge. And got his head bashed in on that fateful day that nearly killed him, but also the fact that he was so young when he was in the Jim Crow South as a freedom rider, and what those teenagers who were the black lives matter of their time, did we also it to see is walk as a roan man and you were right to say that we didn't get to see the rest of them. Grow Up. We see him grow up. And get old. Older. And not only show us that he had skin in the game, and that he shed tears and blood keepers. The votes say which is so important. What he also was willing to maintain the conditions for freedom. For Justice. And we all have to take that blueprint is now our mega the race. and. We're grateful that we got to see that. Yeah I mean it's such a blessing that you got to work on this project because as you said. I almost feel like the most subversive thing he did was to grow old. Because a lot of people I. Think Forget how violent. The opposition to civil rights and voting rights I mean people were waving, Nazi signs at black people who just want to go to school. Let alone wanted to vote. We're lynching people for daring to try to register to vote. With these young young men and women were enduring. Wasn't just the clan was ordinary citizens who behaved exactly like the clan, or who were members of the clan at night, and it was, it was terrifying had to have been terrifying. Did He talk about? Overcoming that fear. We're watching the videos now of them being overrun. By storm troopers in Selma he talk a little bit about how he came the fear to do what he did. Deaths joy he did. He said that he lost his fear. And he said when you don't have fear anymore your free. He said that just as plain and simple as. And You know I think John. Lewis as an urgent care doctor. Really. When you see those pictures you. He was a wartime. Medic that had correctly diagnosed. What was going on in America, but he wasn't just talking about what was wrong with it. He was willing to give us the remedy, and he talked about the vote, and he was there to show us that you have to nurture and protect. That democracy is a moving target. We're sending up here and we think. Oh, we vote Indie, one election, or to that'll do it or or not at all, and and being so cavalier about it, but he said no nurture or to go away, and that's what we have to do. We have to pin it down. and. Right now I think everybody's realizing not only our duty. We must do it or are lose everything. That people like him bought for, and I called him one of the founding fathers of this country. Absolutely was that generation was so great. I think of them as the greatest generation in terms of civil rights, I mean there were so many great men and women all in that generation of the freight shuttles worth the Vivians the the Malcolm's the Martin's the the Medgar there were so many people. In I mean, how is it that John Lewis stood up and apart from this incredible crowd of people, he was really one of the youngest to he wasn't. Even you know sort of the old greybeard in the group. He was the baby..

John Lewis John Lewis Blood Aaron Year Erica John John Miles Hanes Erin editor AP Leeann Jonathan Eric Alexander Jim Crow South Selma Dawn America producer
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Violence in Hungary. And how it played essentially, they're saying everything bad PR. It feels like that's what they were worried about more so than. The actual hypocrisy, but also in less. We make the mistake of thinking that this this operation, the series of operations was entirely altruistic I. Think we pointed out earlier that It was A. Lot of people also don't know this doctor. Martin Luther King was the target of KGB campaign. As well. You know the FBI tried. Numerous things to intimidate to discredit the smear to power. To Kill Martin Luther turn guests. Yes, exactly exactly to turn Martin, Luther King, but the KGB wanted to exploit him as well. They wanted to turn him into a political insurgent against DC and when he refused to play ball. He found himself in a terrible situation. Both the FBI and the KGB were after they were trying to undermine him at the same time. I can't imagine being in that situation. Again go back and listen to our episode owned co Intel pro. We other numerous episodes where you can get more information just about some of that you know the FBI and other intelligence agencies involvement in the in the civil rights movement well. Yeah, then like you know this stuff is unequivocally real. These organizations are ruthless and will stop at nothing to. To exploit their quote, unquote targets, or you know their assets, or whatever and they were both like kind of jockeying for you know turning king, and making him kind of like a tool for their ends, and then as you said Matt when he wouldn't play, then he made a powerful powerful enemies on both sides and I. Just it just seems like. An absolutely. Rock and a hard place type situation. Just you know wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy, but all of this was moving. Towards a bigger picture kind of end game. And we're going to talk about what that was. An how things turned out after a quirk from our sponsor? Umberto date Thurston. I'm a writer, activist and comedian. I wrote a book called. Gave a Ted talk about white people, calling.

Martin Luther King KGB FBI Martin Luther Umberto date Thurston Hungary Intel Martin writer Ted Matt DC
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Crazy. Skull this the Russian Angle. The Soviet government, then as as the as the Russian government does today excelled in what are known as couvert influence campaigns. You see when you look at the global context here. The. Beginning of the civil war coincides with the beginnings of what we refer to as the civil rights movement today, and the two became intertwined, both in how the US are sought to exploit racial strife, and how the Cold War itself propelled the cause of civil rights forward. This is this is A. Story that should should be told more often as far back as nineteen, twenty eight, the USSR Saul. The stark racial inequality and divisions in the United States as an opportunity to weaken their primary rival in in what we know of the Cold War today you have a threat as far back as nineteen twenty eight, the USSR really looked upon this divide this this racial inequality. Inequality and the struggle that led to as an opportunity to weaken our as a nation so initially like they they had a plan, and they had sort of like a I. Don't know kind of a smokescreen sort of Listrik 'cause. They were hiding behind or at least using it as bait, which was the notion of pushing for self-determination in the what they're called the black belts. In order to do this, they would recruit southern individuals of color who would be all about these aims and a lot of this work came from something known as the common tern or the Communist. which sought to spread the Communist revolution around the world? And nineteen thirty, the comintern escalated these goals, the goals of its covert mission and decided to work towards establishing an entirely separate black state in the southern United States which would kind of give them like a base camp and a base of operations. To spread that Communist revolution to North America yet excellent point. The USSR deployed a tactic that is still. Still viable today and still use today starting from an understandable point, let's create. Let's have a racially equal society. That is. Who would have a problem with that, but then take take that movement and Co opted begin to push it to become an a vehicle for the aims of the US are in the Cold War. And this is This is kind of a high level origin story, but there are notable real concrete actions that this program took. Yeah, there are things here..

USSR United States Soviet government Russian government Russian Angle comintern North America
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"In, it never finished its trip to New Orleans ultimately. So that's that's one group. Maybe we can talk about some of the Individuals associated with the movement where we record in Atlanta Georgia, as often kind of referred to as one of the cradles of the civil rights movement. That's largely because of Dr Martin Luther King Junior who is a Baptist minister and the first president of the Southern Leadership Conference are the C.. L. C.. And considered probably the most prominent leader There there's even discussion of her where he wouldn't have considered himself a leader like he was a jumping off of work that had been done by others as well and but he is you know history has sort of crowned him as being the leader, the civil rights movement just wanted to put that out there that there were many leaders of the civil rights movement, and he was just probably the most front and center, one but Dr King was incredibly instrumental in executing non violent protests that followed the practices of Mahatma, Gandhi and the idea of. Not Meeting Violence with violence and doing things like sit ins and peaceful marches, and and all of that, and some of the most famous events that he organized where the Montgomery bus boycott, and the nineteen sixty three march on Washington, which is where he delivered of course, his incredibly powerful, an iconic I have a dream speech. And he was in car was locked up many times. And for an extended period of time when he was incarcerated for civil disobedience in nineteen, sixty three, he wrote one of his most famous texts, which should be the letter from Birmingham jail where he included the famous quote. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. And then in nineteen, sixty five, he began to speak out against America's involvement in the Vietnam War. And then in early, nineteen, sixty eight. Martin Luther King Junior made his way to Memphis. Tennessee was. You can get into the full story of this..

Gandhi Dr King New Orleans Southern Leadership Conference Atlanta Tennessee Memphis president Montgomery Georgia Birmingham Washington America
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"People in power have something to lose by some level of organization. They will do whatever they can to squash. by any means necessary, and obviously this is much more of a human rights you know like it's so much more deeply entrenched thing. It's more than just controlling money and power. There is a deep seated hatred and racism in those in power that really fueled a lot of this behavior as well not just the money, and not just the idea of controlling. And things like that, but Yeah, I don't know I just I'm. I'm inherently distrustful often of of of of any anybody that. has so much to lose by people asking for the right thing to be done, so I don't know it's. It's a little easy to get disenchanted with all this kind of stuff, but it's also incredibly inspiring to look into the history of some of the groups and the individuals. That really took this. Movement to to the next level and created this. Blueprint for where we are now at least in terms of activism, and not accepting this kind of status quo. One of the first groups you could look at were called the freedom writers. It was. A group they got together on May, fourth nineteen sixty one. Group Group of people from. Of, life different races who? Left Washington DC on a bus. They were headed towards New Orleans, and along the way their were actions taken on the bus. That seen it. You know it seems. Very strange to to talk about it today in two thousand twenty, but. Literally changing where they were sitting on the bus became a Revolutionary Act. There were white freedom writers who move to the blacks only section on that bus and black writers who moved to the whites only section on the bus and. It was It was something that angered. People who who knew that these meet these norms the were in place, and these regulations were in place, and they knew what they were doing. Violating the norms right the the. You can't really call them regulations, but the the. Rules, that were put forth on that particular bus and buses everywhere. In in especially the south. They knew what they were doing was perfectly legal. According to a recent Supreme Court case or several supreme, court cases, but they also knew that there would be people who would be so angry that this action was being taken. They were just hoping that the government or they're testing to see whether or not the government would respond to help them. just prove that these things you know. It doesn't not matter where anybody sits on the bus. Yeah Yeah because again an eloquently written. Line or two of Legalese. Feels good right? It feels good to know that's real. But how much does it matter? It matters when it is enforced, right? It matters when it is upheld so the freedom riders you know we were mentioning some groups. Notable individuals there are there are many many many more stories were just giving you a high level? Look at civil rights in the nineteen sixties. These people like you said Matthew knew. Knew what they were doing was legal, but they did not know whether it would be enforced, or whether the people who were supposed to enforce the law would indeed do their jobs. They knew their lives were on the line and they were beaten the buses were You know people were throwing stones at them. Their tires were slashed more than three hundred freedom. Riders were arrested during the trip..

Supreme Court Washington Matthew New Orleans
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Then, there's the issue of course like you mentioned that school segregation specifically cases like Brown versus the Board of Education these are just a few cases. There are many many more. These are just like some of the notable incidents that children are taught about hopefully taught about in school today well not to mention things like the KU. Klux Klan we're. We're essentially just so enmeshed within these power structures like police officers in the south where often also members of the Ku, Klux Klan and their agendas. Agendas would be aligned they certainly wouldn't necessarily where their clan hoods while on duty, but then they would go carry out whatever maybe they didn't feel comfortable doing in their officer's uniforms after hours. You know they would take the law into their own hands. and I've talked about this before, but the watchmen series on HBO really does a fantastic job of. It's like you know. Sci Fi comic book based Type Series It doesn't incredible job of painting a picture of what this dynamic was like. And, of course these. Laws, the these power structures. That's what they are. They're their power structures. Right They're they're meant to. Mandate the way an individual is treated by a society a mandate. The Way an individual in a society treats other members of their own society. These these are white supremacist power structures, and they are older than this country. The white supremacist here in the US in the time of civil rights initially had a massive advantage, they controlled the media at the time. They controlled vast swaths of industry. Because originally they were the only people who own the land right, and who could own the businesses, and that naturally leads to them owning the government in impractical. Even you know even though that's not what it's supposed to be on. On paper if you read the legal documents found in this country, and these forces opposed to the push for quality during the civil rights movement, they did use all the levers of power at their disposal, legal and criminal. They wanted to squash the movement, and when possible they wanted to terrify or vilify any allied non black groups that may sympathize with people seeking equality. Mean not just talking about. Other groups that were out marching. We're talking about people who were listening to the radio or watching television at their house. They would be you know bombarded with headlines about about the dangers of unrest, right? It makes me think a little bit about like workers rights you know struggles like with union, busting and things like that and I only mention that because it's another. Of If..

Klux Klan KU Board of Education Sci Fi HBO Brown officer US
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Hello welcome back to the show. My name is Matt. My name is Nolan. They called me Ben. We are joined as always with our sue. Producer Paul Mission Control Dagens most importantly you are you. You are here and that makes this stuff. They don't want you to know. We're coming to you. Somewhat live from a dark stormy mid morning here in Atlanta Georgia. and. One of the things I think we've all been thinking about in our crew. Is that history is a disturbing thing, right? Some things are further away than they seem. Others are much more recent than people. Governments and institutions would like to admit I mean just think about this. You know April. Nineteen Ninety was more than thirty years ago and as recently as the nineteen sixties. Black citizens in the United States were legally prevented from voting this struggle against institutionalized discrimination. Racism oppression continues today. and. This struggle is often collectively referred to as the Civil Rights Movement, the story of amazing people struggling against massive systemic forces, hell bent on making sure the practice of the law did not measure up to the promises it made, and there is something else to this story about civil rights in the nineteen sixties. It's a twist you won't find most history books, but first things first here are the facts. Yeah, so I mean just a little bit on what the Civil Rights movement is! I think probably most people are very familiar with this. This but just to lay a little bit of groundwork in context, the civil rights movement generally referred to a series of strategies and activities taken up by many different groups in the United States between nineteen, fifty, four and nineteen, sixty eight in order to end racial segregation and discrimination in the country, while also acquiring legal recognition for the rights that are already guaranteed under the constitution, and again as we can see just by turning on the news today, we still got a ways to go before. Those things are really and truly accomplished, but. It's crazy. How between nine hundred fifty four and and sixty eight? So much work was done, and progress was made in a relatively short period of time. While aims of the movement centered on justice for the African American community. They also push for equal rights for people of all races..

Civil Rights Movement United States Nolan first things first Matt Atlanta Producer Paul Mission African American community Georgia.
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Truth Be Told

Truth Be Told

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Truth Be Told

"Wonderful. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> That's Eddie. Glad <Speech_Music_Female> he's the chair of <Speech_Music_Female> African American studies <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at Princeton, <Speech_Female> and his book is <Speech_Female> begin again <Speech_Female> James. Baldwin's America <Speech_Female> and it's <Speech_Female> urgent lessons <Speech_Female> for our own. <Silence> It comes out in August. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Let's go now <Speech_Female> to more from <Speech_Female> those protesters. <Speech_Female> We're going to hear. <Speech_Female> From two MEKA <Speech_Female> Mallory ianna <Speech_Female> Woodward <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and <SpeakerChange> missed a FAB. <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <Advertisement> And, so young people <Laughter> <Advertisement> are responding <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> today. They <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> are enrage, and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> there's an easy way <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to stop it. <Speech_Female> <Laughter> Charged the <Speech_Music_Female> cops <Laughter> charge all the <Laughter> cast. Not <Laughter> just some of them, <Laughter> not just here <Laughter> in Minne- Minneapolis <Laughter> <Advertisement> charge them <Laughter> <Advertisement> in every <Laughter> <Advertisement> city across <Laughter> <Advertisement> America <Laughter> where our people <Laughter> are being murdered, <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> charged them everywhere. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> That's the bottom line <Speech_Female> charge. The <Speech_Female> cats <Speech_Female> do your job. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Do what you say. <Speech_Female> This country <Speech_Female> is supposed to be <Speech_Female> about the land of <Speech_Female> the free for all. <Speech_Female> It has not <Speech_Female> been free for black <Speech_Female> people and we <Speech_Female> are tired. Don't <Speech_Female> talk to us about <Speech_Music_Female> looting y'all are <Speech_Female> the losers. America <Laughter> has alluded <Laughter> Black <Speech_Female> People American <Laughter> noted <Laughter> the native Americans <Laughter> when they are staying <Laughter> here. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Is. What you <Speech_Female> do, we learned it <Speech_Female> from you. <Speech_Female> We learn violence <Speech_Music_Female> from you. <Speech_Female> <Laughter> <Speech_Female> Learn violence <Speech_Female> from you, <Laughter> the violence was <Speech_Female> what we learned <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> from you. <Laughter> So <Laughter> if you want us <Speech_Female> to do better than <Speech_Female> dammit, <SpeakerChange> you do <Speech_Music_Female> better. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> To see <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the seats of probably. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Able to <Speech_Music_Male> enrich <Speech_Music_Male> nobody mentioned. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> That enough. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> We Fed we have <Speech_Music_Male> reached. <Speech_Music_Female> A <Speech_Music_Male> meal. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We want <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a better relationships <Speech_Music_Male> with the police. <Speech_Music_Male> That's number one. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Laughter> <Laughter> We want <Laughter> you to be within <Laughter> the school district. <SpeakerChange> <Laughter> That's number two. <Speech_Music_Male> <Laughter> <Laughter> <Laughter> You, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Don Dailey and <Laughter> <Advertisement> all the generations <Laughter> were sitting. We cannot <Laughter> do this all <Speech_Music_Female> all generation <Speech_Male> elders. <Speech_Male> <Laughter> <Laughter> Dictate, <Laughter> US. <Laughter> To learn. <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Laughter> Everything <Laughter> we. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> The <Speech_Music_Female> conversation. <Laughter> <Laughter> Red Table. <Laughter> Talk <Speech_Male> about how <Speech_Male> these goals full <Laughter> circle. <Speech_Music_Female> Stop worrying, about <Speech_Music_Female> thin. <Speech_Female> Worry <Speech_Male> about us. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> All we got in <Speech_Female> is. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> A <Speech_Music_Female> young.

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Truth Be Told

Truth Be Told

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Truth Be Told

"I. Am Carville Wallace and I'm about to read to an excerpt from an article. I wrote in June twenty seventeen called. If you're black. In America, riots are spiritual impulse, not a political strategy. The summer of Nineteen, sixty seven, the city of Detroit burnt. Milwaukee Buffalo Cincinnati Newark were all engulfed in flames. Even forgotten towns like Kiro, Illinois and Cambridge Maryland descended for some nights in that tortured summer into anarchy. The havoc seemed to be catching. The fire in one town sparked the fire in the next. America's seemed to be coming undone. Yet for most Americans, the riots that summer were viewed from afar through the lens of the Evening News in front page headlines, they were not seeing their own homes burned their own streets applied by uniformed troops from this safe distance, the uprisings looked like senseless violence, the reckless and shortsighted actions of a damaged people people with no strategy, no hope. But the truth of riots is something entirely different something entirely more sacred. America is unsettled land. And it remains so because it was founded on white supremacy and white supremacy is by nature and settling force. The centuries long attempt to subdue the continent by nakedly ransacking its resources, only for the benefit of some creates. Eighty of vast army of angry people who will forever for the sake of themselves for the sake of their children be forced to resist. Far from ugly side effect of our nation's character, white supremacy is a core American principal. This country didn't just end up this way. It was made this way. To be black in the country like this is to forge your entire life in the Dank valley between America's ideals and its actions. We are told we have been created equally, but we are treated as a separate class. We are told that we live in a nation of laws, but we watch as violence is visited upon our families with no hope of legal recourse to be black in America, and survive is to be of dual consciousness on the one hand. You must believe what all humans must believe in order to survive that you have a future that your children will be safe and cared for that things. Will somehow some way get better, but on the other hand you're very survival depends on never trusting on seeing the ugly truth for what it is on remaining ever vigilant for where and how precisely you are being conned. To keep safe, you must expect to be attacked. To be black and live is to constantly expect to die. For Black People in America the psychic toll of having to tie your fate, the fate of your family to a world designed to subjugate can only be withstood for so long eventually inevitably, a truer more direct action calls, and often that action is abrupt. It is violent and it is loud. It is sparked by anything that underscores the maddening discrepancy between what we deserve as human beings, and what we experience as black human beings. Buildings Crumble and fires burn and glass rains down upon everyone, even the children why it is asked with these people burned down their own neighborhoods. Someone more sympathetic, but still removed might argue that a riot is the only way for a desperate people to gain the attention. Their plight deserves the problem with both of these readings is that they assume the spontaneous uprisings to be tactical. A coordinated strategic attempt to bring about a particular, social or political change. It is not. It is. A LITURGY A spiritual grasping for emotional justice for an assertion of self. It is an attempt to bring back into wholeness that which has been split. It is meant to refi the dual senses of life and death, hope and fury that circumscribe the black experience. To Be White in America. is to be innocent. Not of the crime, but of the knowledge of the crime. James Baldwin said quote. People who shut their eyes to reality simply invite their own destruction. And anyone who insists on remaining in a state of innocence long after that innocence is dead, turned himself into a monster. And Yet On the horizon. Visible from the whittled down lawns and decks of consciously chosen would there is an amber glow. A blanket of thick and accurate smoke, the smell of burning plastic and gasoline. Bodies Lay UNMOVING on the asphalt. Your government has said its troops. The clack of gunfire echoes from the ACACIA trees. The people wish for the lights of the fires to illuminate your monstrosity to usher, and the end of your innocence. The. People wish for you to see them. Made. Complete. The people have made the demand. Thousands of US have taken to the streets. We're in the midst of a rebellion. And the demand is simple. Justice. We'll. Be Right back..

America Carville Wallace principal Detroit James Baldwin US Evening News Milwaukee Dank valley Kiro Cambridge Maryland Newark Illinois
"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

09:17 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"Soon after Joe Biden was elected to the United States. Senate he began working with life. Long bigots in White Supremacists to pass and block all types of of anti integration legislation and in the Washington Post from nineteen seventy seventy five. We see Joe Biden claiming that he was a part of the civil rights movement. It says this is the nineteen seventy five article in the Washington. Post is says Joe Biden has accumulated some very credible civil rights credential credentials since adolescence participating in a high school restaurant Toront- boycott and then sins along. US forty those things never happened. So nineteen seventy five in one of the largest is leading newspapers in the country. These lies are being reported about Joe Biden never corrects them. It's my understanding that he told Eric Wentworth of the Washington. Post these these lies. These are outright fabrications and they were painfully debunked not only by his lone black high school classmate in the case of that restaurant boycott but by historians by civil rights leaders. It by Joe Biden's own time line because here's the thing the citizens along on. US forty that biding claim to participate in happened long after him being a high school student at age. Seventeen by the time time Biden started running for president in one thousand nine hundred seven. He had promoted lies about his work in the Civil Rights Movement for the entire previous generation ration- in the morning news in Delaware also in September of nineteen seventy five. They have an article where they repeat the same claim about buying and saying being as a young man he took part in sit ins to desegregate restaurants along. US Forty in Delaware. It never happened happened. Joe Biden never participated in a sit in along. US forty in Delaware first off. Joe Biden said the only a year he participated in the civil rights movement was in nineteen sixty when he was seventeen years old and when Joe Biden was caught in his lying scandal in nineteen eighty seven again biden himself said none of this ever happened in his spokesperson reduced it to the lone incident at the charcoal grill and something at a movie theater the sit ins and protests along route forty and Delaware did not even take place until nineteen sixty one and nineteen sixty two when Biden was off to college. He said they happened when he was in high school. At the age of seventeen secondly those protests along route forty in Delaware. They were organized organized primarily by core the Congress for racial equality and they were primarily Organiz with adults who drove into Delaware and bussed thin to Delaware from states all over the country. These were trained experienced activists and organizers. In fact in Joe Biden's Haydn's autobiography Biden says at great length that one of the primary reasons he decided to take a summer job away from college at a segregated swimming women pool in Wilmington in nineteen sixty two was so that he could finally get to know black people in black life personally had biden as he now now says been mentor and Black Churches and protested and set in with black people all over Wilmington in nineteen sixty. He was doing all of those things things you said last week in South Carolina. Se said two weeks ago in Delaware last month in Iowa. Joe Biden saying that at the age of seventeen he went to black churches in was loved on and trained by their pastors and leaders if that happened in nineteen sixty. Why do you and your autobiography say you took the job at a pool in Wilmington because you had no direct experience with Black Act people in this would give you that experience and doesn't add up now? I spoke directly with Dr Raymond Arsenal. He is an expert in the civil rights movement as well as a history professor at the University of South Florida. Dr Arsenal wrote one of the most important in text on the civil rights movement is entitled Freedom. Riders Nineteen Sixty. One is the single most source book ever written on Freedom Riders in the struggle for racial justice in nineteen sixty one in Dr Arsenal confirmed for me that out of hundreds of interviews and source documents. He has never seen a shred of evidence that Joe Biden ever participated in a single. We'll sit in along route forty in Delaware because those primary activists and organizers of those actions including Wayne Nicholls who kept meticulous records the route forty protests and Betsy Marston who managed much of the work at the University of Delaware who. They've also come forward word to say. That Biden was not part of their circles and that no records ever suggest that he ever participated in these things but without fail. When I I asked elected officials or legendary activists who I should speak with in Wilmington they eat said that I should speak directly to the first first black mayor of Wilmington Jayme seals who moved to Wilmington at the age of twenty five in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and has called Delaware home for the past ask sixty one years and activist and organizer himself he participated in the actual pickets at the reality show which did not what happened in nineteen sixty s Joe Biden said when he said he was a seventeen year old high school student? They happened in one thousand. Nine hundred sixty two and sixty three and Jim Seals confirm mayor. Jim Soon confirmed that they weren't sittings. He participated in and was arrested in sit ins at segregated restaurants but what was happening at the aalto movie theater. They weren't since they were pickets. Outside of the theater sometimes they called them stand ins and like almost every other young activists in the area area. Listen Mayor Jim Seals in nineteen sixty went to hear Dr King for the only time. Hi Dr King ever came to Delaware. Now you have to understand. Joe Biden says that in nineteen sixty. He's a seventeen year role during sit INS and trainings black churches in that he loved Dr King but when King came to Delaware Biden did did not go now. Biden says that nineteen sixty was his heyday of activism. But he's strangely didn't go here king. When he came to town mayor seals in fact back said that the first time he ever remembered meeting Joe Biden was around nineteen seventy? When Biden was running for office I spoke spoke to Larry Morris another veteran of the civil rights movement in Wilmington? He said he had no personal recollection of Biden. Ever being a part of the work in all of this leads me to a man name mouse. Let me break it down by bringing Yeah all of this leads me to a man named in fact. His name is Richard Mouse Smith and he. I met Joe Biden in the summer of nineteen sixty two. When Biden was a lifeguard at the segregated gatiss swimming pool in town Biden was nineteen and mouse was just thirteen years old back in July? Listen to this something weird. You're just happened okay. Back in July of Twenty nineteen in the weeks after Joe Biden and Comma Harris had a public disagreement. Do you remember were that that. They fell out in one of the democratic debates over the issue of busing an integration and segregation and Joe Biden's team began going on the defense and they began shopping story to news outlets. Let's all over the country and a couple of outlets picked it up so in July of two thousand nineteen Joe Biden. UNCOMMONLY Harris fallout publicly. You over Biden's record on bussing school integration and the Biden campaign. They begin floating mouse out to news outlets as someone interesting they could interview. That would vouch for Biden's character and a few places picked it up like blabbity and the Washington Post. They took the bait now. Here's the thing. Are you trying to tell me that mouse that he has an open letter in blabbity..

Joe Biden Delaware Civil Rights Movement Wilmington United States Washington Post Dr Raymond Arsenal Washington Dr King Black Churches University of Delaware Senate White Supremacists Jim Seals South Carolina Eric Wentworth Congress Richard Mouse Smith blabbity
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

08:00 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"The role of women in the civil rights movement is extremely important and actually women were central to the civil rights movement. That's congresswoman Barbara Lee of California herself a veteran of the civil rights movement expressing a core truth that the movement was powered by women. And because of the time they lived in the kind of work. They did their stories are rarely memorialize in the same way. The stories of men like the Reverend Martin Luther King junior Ralph Abernathy John Lewis and Andrew Young. Are. There will strong women throughout this movement that nobody knows. The men had a hard time getting along with each other because they were all young and each head of different approach to civil rights. They were very high strung, and brilliant and competitive young men, and it was Dorothy height of the national council of negro women that basically kept the peace amongst the six civil rights organizations and set in on all the meetings, but they didn't let her speak at the March on Washington. And she was a great speaker. Dr. They height would go on to live to be ninety eight years old still fighting for Justice until the end in his eulogy, then President Barack Obama paid tribute to her commitment by recounting an episode that took place just two months before she died in two thousand ten last February I was scheduled to see her and other civil rights leaders to discuss the pressing problems of unemployment Reverend Sharpton, Ben jealous the end of Lacey pe-, Mark morale of the national urban league. Then we discovered the Washington was about to be blanketed by the worst blizzard in record two feet of snow. So I suggested to one of my age, we should call. Dr heightened say, we're happy to reschedule the meeting. Certainly if the others come she should not feel obliged to to form, Dr Hite insisted on common, despite the blizzard never mind that she was in a wheelchair. She was not about to let just a bunch of men. In this me. Hi, I'm Jonathan Kaye part in this is voices of the movement a series from my podcast Cape up sharing the stories and lessons of some of the leaders of the civil rights movement and using them to figure out where we go from here. During the civil rights retreat in January at sunny lands in California, we all sat down for remembrance dinner, various leaders stood up and told us about those. They worked with who are no longer with us. Andrew Young kings, chief strategist was assigned to memorialize start the height, and he used that moment to herald other women who contributed so much to the success of the movement who are no longer around to share their own stories at a time when the world seems ready to recognize them that could not have been a civil rights movement without the sacrifice the vision, the support and the hard work of the thousands of women. One of those women was start the cotton as the director of the citizenship education program. She was the only woman with an executive position in the southern Christian leadership conference in Atlanta with the civil. Rights move. But Dorothy cotton came down to work with us in voter registration and citizenship education, and we joined her with septum Clark, a teacher schoolteacher from Charleston. There Reverend Martin Luther King junior used to call septum Clarke, the mother of the movement Clark believed that literacy means liberation. So she worked with the Highlander folk school to set up citizenship schools, which were designed to educate disenfranchised voters and empower black communities and shoot taught. Literacy on the ferry boats going back and forth between Johns island and Charleston. Every morning and every night every afternoon, she was there to teach people to read and write to register to vote, and it was about an hour and fifteen minute ferry ride. And she was a every morning making sure that the longshoremen got their reading lesson in everyday eventually Clark combined her efforts with Dorothy cotton citizenship education program, but the SEC and together we recruited and trained six thousand our leaders from Virginia all the way over to east, Texas, the names, you heard about most than Louima, Amelia Boynton. So almost all these people came over to Dorchester center and are the cotton. And septa Clark. Basically kept them for a week. And we help them to know how to read and we didn't teach him to read like we taught children read because we assume that everybody can read something and our job was to convince them that they could read. And so we started with us have a Coca Cola sign you hold it up. What does that say they can all read Coca Cola? And then you spell out the syllables with them. They knew them, but we taught them the sounds of the reading that they knew and then they conducted classes in their homes, and that churches and Abune Paulos. And we we trained a generation of leaders between nineteen sixty one and nineteen sixty six that was Dorothy cotton's work. Well, we we had somebody from just about every county and South Carolina about half of the counties in Georgia and about half an Alabama read across the black belts from east, Texas, all the way up to Virginia. That was the foundation. Of the civil rights movement upon which when Martin Luther King moved in and started a movement. They're already people that we trained the people trained by Dorothy, cotton and septum Clarke went back to their communities and helped educate and train more potential voters. Those people included women like a million Amelia Boynton from so Alabama went there went to Selma as a nineteen year old girl in nineteen twenty nine and she worked in voter registration and community organizing throughout her life. And she actually lead a get out. The vote caravan across the black belt of Alabama for Obama's his reelection to his second term. And so from nineteen twenty nine to two thousand eight she was an active voice, and nobody really. As much about. But that's what we name. My recent mine newest granddaughter Amelia after Amelia, boys.

Martin Luther King Dorothy cotton Amelia Boynton President Barack Obama Andrew Young septum Clarke California Clark Barbara Lee septum Clark Washington Jonathan Kaye Dr Hite Highlander folk school Abune Paulos Virginia Texas Ralph Abernathy
"civil rights movement" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"There was also no housing, no jobs being offered to to Catholics at the at the time in the north of Ireland. This gave rise to a civil rights movement at cetera, looking for the one man one vote, but the kind of the efforts of of Martin Luther King here in America and how that civil rights movement as a peaceful movement, how would articulated south both in words and how would I took related south on the streets and as a peaceful movement is wash, gave rise to an was, it was it was very, very important part of up the Irish civil rights movement. I believe in in Northern Ireland and this was before my time, but it's something that. In hindsight, as I grew older and learn about history is is very, very interesting, very, very important in the video for for Nina cried power. There's two two activists saying than the con- imprinted concert or Bernadette Devlin, who was a wasn't organizer, epic leader in that civil rights movement. So it's it's very, very interesting time for for Northern Ireland. I, even though I, I grew up in the privileged kind of 'em in the Republic violent where the difficulty of that tension just was not. It was not a reality for me growing up in Arnold as you as you learn about Arlyn's very troubled history in a lot of ways it is. It is a history of people who were stripped of their language. The faith was the legal language was illegal people who were denied the right to own property and then and persecuted for being poor. When I hear music by people like Nina, Simone, people leave connection. Yeah, it's just something I've such respect for and such admirations for. Yeah, play part of the song where Mavis Staples. Comes in because they're such a part and then I'll like play their music. That's important. You and my. Those strong than me strayed into the phase that. Chains. Being free..

Northern Ireland Mavis Staples Nina America Ireland Bernadette Devlin Martin Luther King Arlyn Arnold Simone