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40 Burst results for "Civil Rights Movement"

Seattle Police Clear Out Capitol Hill Protest Zone

News, Traffic and Weather

01:08 min | 15 hrs ago

Seattle Police Clear Out Capitol Hill Protest Zone

"Acted swiftly early this morning to break up the Capitol Hill protest zone. Police chief Carmen Best says Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan gave the order to clear out chop this order and our police response. Comes after weeks of violence in and around the capital Hill occupied protest zone. Citizen journalist Tamari Salsbury says the eviction began and ended quickly declared illegal assembly and gave order this first. The police started moving five foot at a time. You know, like the move back, move back. Police say they arrested more than 30 protesters. So what's next for the protesters? Now? That chop has been dismantled? Cuomo's Jeff Pooja La's spoke with one of their leaders like Anthony has been there since the beginning, and he's attracted quite a few followers. We see this as a second civil rights movement. Yes, we all can united around a common cause, and that was justice. Once the Capitol Hill occupied protest was disbanded. You tried to take his message to City Hall demanding to speak to the mayor, But Anthony and his followers were locked down. He says they're planning another occupied protest zone, but declined to say Where or when.

Mayor Jenny Durkan Anthony Tamari Salsbury Carmen Best Seattle City Hall Jeff Pooja La Cuomo
Fresh update on "civil rights movement" discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

00:41 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "civil rights movement" discussed on Houston Matters

"Remember the sixties and a horrible time, and I you know my. Parents. My Mom, talking about how much worse things were. even before that. I'm so for me personally. My optimism is I'm watching changes occurs and that it's going to get better. Are we there? No, we're nowhere near there. I wish I could say we were, but we are not. nowhere near there equality doesn't exist and I agree with you. I've been teaching. American history and teaching will rights for well now more than generation bad when you've had students than you later have their children You're getting old. But I. DO BELIEVE IT gets. It has gotten better. and that it is, we are moving in that direction. It's not a straight line and I think it does take time to jump started and I hate that it takes lies, and it seems like it has to finally awaken some people. others I've been fighting for generations, but finally seems to be waking the massive amount, and by the way I agree with you about Jefferson could have anytime free to slaves. And he did not. I was just saying that had that occurred. Think of how much different hopefully how much different our country would be. I guess the one thing that I would very gently push back on. Well I totally agree with the caller's point that for many Americans this notion of being one year versus another year doesn't make any sense. It's all the time when we're talking about equality, but there are some years in our history when other things are also going on that complicate our relationship door country, whether we're talking about being at war for example, or in the case of now, and in the case of one, thousand, nine, hundred eighteen, the midst of a health pandemic. Those are also things factors, and so that's what I was getting at and sort of pointing out right complications of this this particular year compared to some other years. It's things on top of all of that. It isn't this has been an unusual year and people who also had more time at home where they can then contemplate what is going on. And you know you're sort of forced. Think about it, and that's sometimes we have people of Americans and not just a Mary human beings. We like to not think about difficult things. It's easier on us to not think about difficult things. Well, you know what? When you're at home, sometimes, you have to think about him and you're there and it's in your face so. That's partly why it is. this year has been. The same, frankly in the sixties, the civil rights movement in the south. There was A. And not just the south. I think JR was right. ku-klux-klan was strong all over the country. Racism Strong all over the country. It is not a southern issued a national issue. But one of the things in the civil rights marches in the south. Was that the White Conservative leaders who were saying Oh, this shouldn't be done the white to this council things. I got older. All the civil rights protesters are violent, but we had TV and people are like that's not violent. Violence is bull connor, opening up big fire hoses on children that's violent or shing dogs attack dogs on protesters who are marching peacefully that violence and so people had to confront. What was happening and to look at it, and that made a huge difference it was one of those that started moving people to say. Something's not right. There's a dissonance there between what I'm being told by these members of the white citizens councils are the KKK or whatever. And what I can actually see with my own eyes. Less the same thing happened. With Mr Floyd when. You know he was resisting arrest. And then you look at the video now he's not. He was.

Mr Floyd Jefferson
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:31 min | 6 d ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"It's just odd to to think about all of this every everything that we've talked about today it is. Is a strange thing to wrap your head around and do know I knew a lot of us. Listening. Today are thinking about about the book foundations of. Right this this. You know there's a lot of debate about how? Relevant or irrelevant, the author is right now. Much people are reading tea leaves here, but one of the one of the things we have to remember here. Is, this is literally a conspiracy. It is a technique. It is a tactic and it has an aim and it is continued. It has continued unabated for nearly a century, the idea this propaganda and make no mistake you regardless of where you live regardless what you believe, regardless of which social media platform is your favorite? You are the target. Also possible to say that the aims of these programs have become even more if it was even possible, even more cynical at least the Russian conspiracy of the civil rights movement was somewhat ideologically sound. They had a flavor of positive ideological spin, and they wanted to create a black state, and they wanted to empower workers and but I. Don't know man I still feel like a lot of that was. Smoking mirrors as well just like bad people into supporting their cause to destabilise Shannon. States I whatever the case may be whatever you may think about that inequality is. In theory, the enemy of the Communist revolution. And yet liked democracy in the United States, communism and practice. Fell far short from the ideas that they set out on paper. Communism in theory. We all salads pretty great. Oh, everyone gets a piece. You know you work hard. You get you know your fair share. That sounds great. Go wrong. Well I think it's the ultimate corruptibility of human beings that that goes wrong, and that's the same thing that we see with democracy sounds real great constitutions all well and good, but you can't change everybody's worst instincts as human beings and power corrupts people, and that's what we see time and time again. But I do think it's a fascinating story. Actually WanNa, thank Lauren Bright paycheck who I worked with some other shows and continue to work with She's the one who turned us onto this topic It was something that her son had been really into and told her a lot about and I'd never heard of it and We discussed as a team and decided we wanted to check it out, so thanks Lauren for the for the tip, and there's certainly more. To discuss here, but for today we're going to have to end off here. We would love to know what you think about. All of this are there..

Lauren Bright United States
Fresh update on "civil rights movement" discussed on RISE Together Podcast

RISE Together Podcast

00:48 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "civil rights movement" discussed on RISE Together Podcast

"US. In the colonies and three more sections of time after that the idea being can we identify in these times things that happened? That were. Considered to be racist and we'll, we'll get to kind of good interpretation of racist and racism a bit later, but suffice it to say those things racist in our country, and those things were anti-racist or resistant to racism, and most of us can't put a darn thing on that timeline because our history didn't teach us that. I? Worked with several clients and I would ask them. If you have ever taken a black history course in in in college, or maybe my high school, and usually no hands go up. How many have taken a white history course neither college, or and no hands go up I, said well. Every hand in the room should come up because the history that we learn like frankly written from a white dominant supermac narratives, it just is doesn't mean it was mean-spirited or mean intended. It just means that the victor writes history. Right and people of color have not been in the position of being quote. The Victor Power. And so walking Sudan, and you know we invite you okay. This is not a test. So. It's not a patrick fail. Take your cell phones get onto your favorite search, engine and Google what happened in these years and populate that and you start to see the light come on with people begin to write these events down, and and realizing that there was a lot going on that we never heard about. And, so we walk all the way up into the nineteen sixties. Or nineteen seventies, and by the time we're populating these timelines you start to see. People realize that okay. We're dealing with the historic narrative. That now were able to take a George Floyd. And place in that context and understand why the revolution is still going on. How is this movement? From the context of history, playing out differently than say the civil rights movement in fifties and sixties or anything that may have existed at any point in time. This feels different. Why do you think it's different and and if it is? Why do you think it's? Do I think actually I think? It's a lot like the civil rights movement of the sixties, not telling you why the participation across racial lines in this particular movement is staggering, the worldwide participation is movement is staggering. We'll be solved with the civil rights. Movement was The luminaries, a of the civil rights movement knew that it had to be more than a black people's movement. It had to be joined..

Google George Floyd US. Sudan Patrick
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:27 min | 6 d ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Violence in Hungary. And how it played essentially, they're saying everything bad PR. It feels like that's what they were worried about more so than. The actual hypocrisy, but also in less. We make the mistake of thinking that this this operation, the series of operations was entirely altruistic I. Think we pointed out earlier that It was A. Lot of people also don't know this doctor. Martin Luther King was the target of KGB campaign. As well. You know the FBI tried. Numerous things to intimidate to discredit the smear to power. To Kill Martin Luther turn guests. Yes, exactly exactly to turn Martin, Luther King, but the KGB wanted to exploit him as well. They wanted to turn him into a political insurgent against DC and when he refused to play ball. He found himself in a terrible situation. Both the FBI and the KGB were after they were trying to undermine him at the same time. I can't imagine being in that situation. Again go back and listen to our episode owned co Intel pro. We other numerous episodes where you can get more information just about some of that you know the FBI and other intelligence agencies involvement in the in the civil rights movement well. Yeah, then like you know this stuff is unequivocally real. These organizations are ruthless and will stop at nothing to. To exploit their quote, unquote targets, or you know their assets, or whatever and they were both like kind of jockeying for you know turning king, and making him kind of like a tool for their ends, and then as you said Matt when he wouldn't play, then he made a powerful powerful enemies on both sides and I. Just it just seems like. An absolutely. Rock and a hard place type situation. Just you know wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy, but all of this was moving. Towards a bigger picture kind of end game. And we're going to talk about what that was. An how things turned out after a quirk from our sponsor? Umberto date Thurston. I'm a writer, activist and comedian. I wrote a book called. Gave a Ted talk about white people, calling.

Martin Luther King KGB FBI Martin Luther Umberto date Thurston Hungary Intel Martin writer Ted Matt DC
Fresh update on "civil rights movement" discussed on Not Too Shabby

Not Too Shabby

00:36 sec | 18 min ago

Fresh update on "civil rights movement" discussed on Not Too Shabby

"America them? Speak of today? It certainly seems to be Corrupted by the sink offense in the GOP and President Trump This's from an album called Who Is This America On Rope A Dope. Before that We heard Earl Robinson and Julie Wilson doing free and equal blues parts one and two, which was written by Josh White. That was from songs for Political Action. Lovely 10 CV set on the German Bear Family Record label. Christian McBride. Before that, did Brother Malcolm prologue from the movement revisited a musical portrait of four icons from the civil rights movement. That's a brand new release on Mac Avenue, and it's agree CD Before that Miriam and her son, Bungie, Makeba. Do you remember Malcolm Black and proud Volume One of history.

America Brother Malcolm Malcolm Black Christian Mcbride Bungie Earl Robinson GOP Josh White Julie Wilson Miriam President Trump
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:14 min | 6 d ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Crazy. Skull this the Russian Angle. The Soviet government, then as as the as the Russian government does today excelled in what are known as couvert influence campaigns. You see when you look at the global context here. The. Beginning of the civil war coincides with the beginnings of what we refer to as the civil rights movement today, and the two became intertwined, both in how the US are sought to exploit racial strife, and how the Cold War itself propelled the cause of civil rights forward. This is this is A. Story that should should be told more often as far back as nineteen, twenty eight, the USSR Saul. The stark racial inequality and divisions in the United States as an opportunity to weaken their primary rival in in what we know of the Cold War today you have a threat as far back as nineteen twenty eight, the USSR really looked upon this divide this this racial inequality. Inequality and the struggle that led to as an opportunity to weaken our as a nation so initially like they they had a plan, and they had sort of like a I. Don't know kind of a smokescreen sort of Listrik 'cause. They were hiding behind or at least using it as bait, which was the notion of pushing for self-determination in the what they're called the black belts. In order to do this, they would recruit southern individuals of color who would be all about these aims and a lot of this work came from something known as the common tern or the Communist. which sought to spread the Communist revolution around the world? And nineteen thirty, the comintern escalated these goals, the goals of its covert mission and decided to work towards establishing an entirely separate black state in the southern United States which would kind of give them like a base camp and a base of operations. To spread that Communist revolution to North America yet excellent point. The USSR deployed a tactic that is still. Still viable today and still use today starting from an understandable point, let's create. Let's have a racially equal society. That is. Who would have a problem with that, but then take take that movement and Co opted begin to push it to become an a vehicle for the aims of the US are in the Cold War. And this is This is kind of a high level origin story, but there are notable real concrete actions that this program took. Yeah, there are things here..

USSR United States Soviet government Russian government Russian Angle comintern North America
Fresh update on "civil rights movement" discussed on News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:44 min | 40 min ago

Fresh update on "civil rights movement" discussed on News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

"In the middle of the night. You just sort of wake up and hear loud bangs. This's just a small sample of the rapid fire shots. He woke up to Monday morning. I was pretty split on whether or not I wanted them to set it down. Lauren, who lives a block away and every day has taken a run through the chop zone, said she's felt safe by day. Said the nighttime violence dictated the end of chop. She doesn't want the police back in the precinct, though, until protester demands are heard and agreed upon. Seattle City Council president Lorena Gonzalez says she's in no rush to investigate a complaint against Councilmember Shama Sawant. Mayor Jenny Durkan, sending a letter this week outlining incident she says could lead to someone being removed from the council, including her leading a group of protesters to her home and opening city Hall to demonstrators. Gonzalez says the issues the council prefers to focus on are the crises facing thousands of families and small businesses during the pandemic and the civil rights movement. The latest homeless count finds more people without housing in King County. The count carried out on a single night in January before the pandemic struck. It shows a 5% increase in homelessness. Compared to the previous year. A total of 11,751 people did not have permanent housing. 47% of the homeless were living on sheltered Boeing, completing the final re certification test flight of its grounded 737 Max. FAA pilots and engineers have been performing flight test between Seattle and Grant County over the last three days. The next hurdle is establishing pilot training requirements. The FAA is not expected to clear the Max to return to service before September. Still to come. Businesses across the state can expect some new restrictions as Corona virus cases continue rising in our state. I'm Carleen Johnson right now, at 9 30 for Cuomo traffic.

Lorena Gonzalez FAA Lauren Jenny Durkan Seattle City Council Councilmember Shama Sawant King County Carleen Johnson City Hall Boeing Seattle Cuomo President Trump Grant County
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:26 min | 6 d ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"In, it never finished its trip to New Orleans ultimately. So that's that's one group. Maybe we can talk about some of the Individuals associated with the movement where we record in Atlanta Georgia, as often kind of referred to as one of the cradles of the civil rights movement. That's largely because of Dr Martin Luther King Junior who is a Baptist minister and the first president of the Southern Leadership Conference are the C.. L. C.. And considered probably the most prominent leader There there's even discussion of her where he wouldn't have considered himself a leader like he was a jumping off of work that had been done by others as well and but he is you know history has sort of crowned him as being the leader, the civil rights movement just wanted to put that out there that there were many leaders of the civil rights movement, and he was just probably the most front and center, one but Dr King was incredibly instrumental in executing non violent protests that followed the practices of Mahatma, Gandhi and the idea of. Not Meeting Violence with violence and doing things like sit ins and peaceful marches, and and all of that, and some of the most famous events that he organized where the Montgomery bus boycott, and the nineteen sixty three march on Washington, which is where he delivered of course, his incredibly powerful, an iconic I have a dream speech. And he was in car was locked up many times. And for an extended period of time when he was incarcerated for civil disobedience in nineteen, sixty three, he wrote one of his most famous texts, which should be the letter from Birmingham jail where he included the famous quote. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. And then in nineteen, sixty five, he began to speak out against America's involvement in the Vietnam War. And then in early, nineteen, sixty eight. Martin Luther King Junior made his way to Memphis. Tennessee was. You can get into the full story of this..

Gandhi Dr King New Orleans Southern Leadership Conference Atlanta Tennessee Memphis president Montgomery Georgia Birmingham Washington America
Fresh update on "civil rights movement" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:58 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "civil rights movement" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"Acted swiftly early this morning to break up the Capitol Hill protest zone. Police chief Carmen Best says Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan gave the order to clear out chop this order and our police response. Comes after weeks of violence in and around the capital Hill occupied protest zone. Citizen journalist Tamari Salsbury says the eviction began and ended quickly declared illegal assembly and gave order this first. The police started moving five foot at a time. You know, like the move back, move back. Police say they arrested more than 30 protesters. So what's next for the protesters? Now? That chop has been dismantled? Cuomo's Jeff Pooja La's spoke with one of their leaders like Anthony has been there since the beginning, and he's attracted quite a few followers. We see this as a second civil rights movement. Yes, we all can united around a common cause, and that was justice. Once the Capitol Hill occupied protest was disbanded. You tried to take his message to City Hall demanding to speak to the mayor, But Anthony and his followers were locked down. He says they're planning another occupied protest zone, but declined to say Where or when.

Seattle Police Mayor Jenny Durkan Tamari Salsbury Seattle Carmen Best
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:51 min | 6 d ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"People in power have something to lose by some level of organization. They will do whatever they can to squash. by any means necessary, and obviously this is much more of a human rights you know like it's so much more deeply entrenched thing. It's more than just controlling money and power. There is a deep seated hatred and racism in those in power that really fueled a lot of this behavior as well not just the money, and not just the idea of controlling. And things like that, but Yeah, I don't know I just I'm. I'm inherently distrustful often of of of of any anybody that. has so much to lose by people asking for the right thing to be done, so I don't know it's. It's a little easy to get disenchanted with all this kind of stuff, but it's also incredibly inspiring to look into the history of some of the groups and the individuals. That really took this. Movement to to the next level and created this. Blueprint for where we are now at least in terms of activism, and not accepting this kind of status quo. One of the first groups you could look at were called the freedom writers. It was. A group they got together on May, fourth nineteen sixty one. Group Group of people from. Of, life different races who? Left Washington DC on a bus. They were headed towards New Orleans, and along the way their were actions taken on the bus. That seen it. You know it seems. Very strange to to talk about it today in two thousand twenty, but. Literally changing where they were sitting on the bus became a Revolutionary Act. There were white freedom writers who move to the blacks only section on that bus and black writers who moved to the whites only section on the bus and. It was It was something that angered. People who who knew that these meet these norms the were in place, and these regulations were in place, and they knew what they were doing. Violating the norms right the the. You can't really call them regulations, but the the. Rules, that were put forth on that particular bus and buses everywhere. In in especially the south. They knew what they were doing was perfectly legal. According to a recent Supreme Court case or several supreme, court cases, but they also knew that there would be people who would be so angry that this action was being taken. They were just hoping that the government or they're testing to see whether or not the government would respond to help them. just prove that these things you know. It doesn't not matter where anybody sits on the bus. Yeah Yeah because again an eloquently written. Line or two of Legalese. Feels good right? It feels good to know that's real. But how much does it matter? It matters when it is enforced, right? It matters when it is upheld so the freedom riders you know we were mentioning some groups. Notable individuals there are there are many many many more stories were just giving you a high level? Look at civil rights in the nineteen sixties. These people like you said Matthew knew. Knew what they were doing was legal, but they did not know whether it would be enforced, or whether the people who were supposed to enforce the law would indeed do their jobs. They knew their lives were on the line and they were beaten the buses were You know people were throwing stones at them. Their tires were slashed more than three hundred freedom. Riders were arrested during the trip..

Supreme Court Washington Matthew New Orleans
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:03 min | 6 d ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Then, there's the issue of course like you mentioned that school segregation specifically cases like Brown versus the Board of Education these are just a few cases. There are many many more. These are just like some of the notable incidents that children are taught about hopefully taught about in school today well not to mention things like the KU. Klux Klan we're. We're essentially just so enmeshed within these power structures like police officers in the south where often also members of the Ku, Klux Klan and their agendas. Agendas would be aligned they certainly wouldn't necessarily where their clan hoods while on duty, but then they would go carry out whatever maybe they didn't feel comfortable doing in their officer's uniforms after hours. You know they would take the law into their own hands. and I've talked about this before, but the watchmen series on HBO really does a fantastic job of. It's like you know. Sci Fi comic book based Type Series It doesn't incredible job of painting a picture of what this dynamic was like. And, of course these. Laws, the these power structures. That's what they are. They're their power structures. Right They're they're meant to. Mandate the way an individual is treated by a society a mandate. The Way an individual in a society treats other members of their own society. These these are white supremacist power structures, and they are older than this country. The white supremacist here in the US in the time of civil rights initially had a massive advantage, they controlled the media at the time. They controlled vast swaths of industry. Because originally they were the only people who own the land right, and who could own the businesses, and that naturally leads to them owning the government in impractical. Even you know even though that's not what it's supposed to be on. On paper if you read the legal documents found in this country, and these forces opposed to the push for quality during the civil rights movement, they did use all the levers of power at their disposal, legal and criminal. They wanted to squash the movement, and when possible they wanted to terrify or vilify any allied non black groups that may sympathize with people seeking equality. Mean not just talking about. Other groups that were out marching. We're talking about people who were listening to the radio or watching television at their house. They would be you know bombarded with headlines about about the dangers of unrest, right? It makes me think a little bit about like workers rights you know struggles like with union, busting and things like that and I only mention that because it's another. Of If..

Klux Klan KU Board of Education Sci Fi HBO Brown officer US
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

04:17 min | 6 d ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Yeah, it's astonishing when you think about it despite centuries of oppression. Through institutions and through physical violence more a single generation was able to influence. Crucial legislation was able to profoundly shift attitudes of prejudice, culture and win. This generation is doing it. It didn't have the Internet. They didn't have social media or any of the modern tools of communication that most people listening us every day. Yeah, we can't really overstate. How important and crucial the Internet has been in in so many modern uprisings from the Arab spring to what we're seeing now with the protests in the United States and across the world, so much sparked. And proliferated by social media twitter instagram facebook videos livestream the access to information instantly. That just wasn't the case in these days, so it's extra impressive and just really astonishing that how much. Was Accomplished without those tools. Really shows the importance of anyone who had a camera who was willing to use that camera? You know from fifty four to sixty eight people who are willing to write words and release them in a publication about what was happening. The struggles of the civil rights movement then they were going up against some intense. Issues and just some examples of those. If you look at what's known as the Jim Crow laws that existed in a lot of southern states within the US. These were laws that blatantly. Reinforced and propped up white supremacy within those southern states in particular. There's legislation that was that existed. That did things like kept schools and other public places racially segregated. Laws that tried to early attempted and effective in preventing black people from voting, there were things like pulling taxes, literacy tests and You know think about that. Illiteracy test in order for you to be able to cast your vote as a citizen of a country and by literacy tests. That's not like the quick. Red Fox jumps over the. Lazy, Brown dog, or whatever that's that's. Saying Hey. Read this Mandarin. This thing literally written a mandarin, or you can't vote, and honestly, even if it was more basic than that or something, you know not obviously completely setup for someone to fail I mean you know the folks that were being forced to take? These tests didn't have access to the same level of education that you know. People of other races did so. It was set up to fail, even if you didn't push it to. Those agree GIS levels. You know yes and. You know as as that is, there were also laws that would prevent you possibly from marrying the person that you love or that. You wanted to marry if that person was not of the same race as you. The, Singer, nation, right yes, and and it is just. It's unthinkable in these days. Those kinds of laws, but that wasn't the on the these were, and by the way these laws. Were struck down through the efforts of all of these people. or at least to the most part they laws restricting, but it doesn't mean attitudes fully changed right, and it wasn't the only thing they were up against right and there are you know? Now here in twenty twenty, we as a species are seeing the same patterns enacted again. Violence against citizens right the galvanizes, communities and organizations to push for change. Consider the case of Emmett till fourteen year old boy, a black child. He was from Chicago. Travel down to the town of Money Mississippi visit relatives. He was forcibly removed from his relatives home. He was brutally beaten. It was tortured. WHO's ultimately murdered? And when this case received national attention in the media, it galvanized the movement. It got people out into the streets and into their communities..

United States twitter twenty twenty Red Fox Jim Crow Chicago Brown Emmett Money Mississippi
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:39 min | 6 d ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Hello welcome back to the show. My name is Matt. My name is Nolan. They called me Ben. We are joined as always with our sue. Producer Paul Mission Control Dagens most importantly you are you. You are here and that makes this stuff. They don't want you to know. We're coming to you. Somewhat live from a dark stormy mid morning here in Atlanta Georgia. and. One of the things I think we've all been thinking about in our crew. Is that history is a disturbing thing, right? Some things are further away than they seem. Others are much more recent than people. Governments and institutions would like to admit I mean just think about this. You know April. Nineteen Ninety was more than thirty years ago and as recently as the nineteen sixties. Black citizens in the United States were legally prevented from voting this struggle against institutionalized discrimination. Racism oppression continues today. and. This struggle is often collectively referred to as the Civil Rights Movement, the story of amazing people struggling against massive systemic forces, hell bent on making sure the practice of the law did not measure up to the promises it made, and there is something else to this story about civil rights in the nineteen sixties. It's a twist you won't find most history books, but first things first here are the facts. Yeah, so I mean just a little bit on what the Civil Rights movement is! I think probably most people are very familiar with this. This but just to lay a little bit of groundwork in context, the civil rights movement generally referred to a series of strategies and activities taken up by many different groups in the United States between nineteen, fifty, four and nineteen, sixty eight in order to end racial segregation and discrimination in the country, while also acquiring legal recognition for the rights that are already guaranteed under the constitution, and again as we can see just by turning on the news today, we still got a ways to go before. Those things are really and truly accomplished, but. It's crazy. How between nine hundred fifty four and and sixty eight? So much work was done, and progress was made in a relatively short period of time. While aims of the movement centered on justice for the African American community. They also push for equal rights for people of all races..

Civil Rights Movement United States Nolan first things first Matt Atlanta Producer Paul Mission African American community Georgia.
Eric Ward on Racial Justice

People of the Pod

05:44 min | 6 d ago

Eric Ward on Racial Justice

"As. Our nation continues to grapple with the best ways to make progress on critical issues of racial justice. We here at people of the pod felt that we needed to hear from Eric. Award Eric is the Executive Director of the Western states center a civil. Rights Organization based in the Pacific Northwest Mountain states he is also a national voice, racial justice and a leader in the black community speaking up urgently. Urgently for the need to fight antisemitism, which he identifies as a leading driver of other forms of Bigotry Eric thank you so much for joining us I'm so glad to be here with you. All thanks for inviting me now as someone on the front lines of the Civil Rights Movement today, the first thing I want to ask is how are you? How are you doing this really busy, really crazy time. I think like everyone else I'm exhausted. I'm carrying a lot of weight. A lot of responsibility I'm not alone in that we are moving fast soaks at the community level has really mobilized around civil rights, and you know it's a responsibility to support that leadership as much as possible I think I'm both nervous and. We are watching kind of in a way, the end of one age a period of time, and the beginning of another, and we're kind of in this inbetween points, and so it feels a little chaotic can. We don't know what's next I. Don't know about the rest of folks, but that brings anxiety to me, but also joy Reid I watch folks every day across communities across religions, really coming together, trying to find one another struggling with one another and I think that bodes well so mile this chapter. The book is not ending particularly well. I think it tells us the story fact will. Yeah. We're clearly in something of a moment. Right? Historically politically. We're in a moment and I guess the question for someone like you and for anyone who wants to kind of be a part of making this elastic changes. How can we take a moment and turn it into something that really changes our society, so you know at the macro level I like wow, you know we are actually finally poised to acknowledge that everyone in our society are fully actualize human beings. That may not seem like a really kind of radical thing, but it's taken a lot of centuries for us to get to this point and I'm actually really excited to be here, right? Having a strong democracy. Means having strong participation, that participation doesn't happen if we only consider part of our society as fully human so at the macro level. I feel like. Wow you know. We are getting close to getting this right. And after ten thousand years you know or forty thousand years I think we finally earned the right to that right, so I want to own that and I. Hope folks own map for a second, and if it makes you feel good, good I so now here's what we should do. Its APP, we should get serious about some very specific things so. Twentieth Century. Policing has come to an end. It is a system that no longer works for the inclusive democracy that we are, and it is time for a twenty first century version of it that is grounded in community, safety, right, and the prosperity of our community them I think that that is exciting and I think we should be encouraging those conversations. We should be continuing to encourage folks to be dialogue with one another I. An I'll just be playing, right? We can't be a society that seals. It is okay to shoot and kill unarmed. Black people in our society are quite frankly folks were unarmed and running away. It is just not becoming a democracy so i. you know I think policing as. As a policy conversation is a topic of the day it will be the topic of the year will be the topic of next year, and we should not allow the sacrifices of those at the community level been working on these issues over the last three weeks or the last three decades to go to waste right now. So that's one. The second is look. We have to get a hold of the mission oriented hate crimes, and what I mean by mission oriented I. Don't mean the average hate crime. We experienced. You know that the random hate crime those have to be tackled, too, but untuckit about this rise of mission oriented targeting of vulnerable communities and their institutions whether we're talking about Anti Semitism. Racism. Talking about the targeted Latinos in El Paso or the targeting of Jews in Pittsburgh at a targeting a blacks in Charleston seeks in Wisconsin. It is time for our government institutions just step up and protect its citizens and its residents and A. We don't need new laws to do that. We need to actually start using the laws that are on the books. We have to bring transparency to those who seek to try to destroy democracy by terrorizing folks in our community. Those are the two things we could be right on top of right now.

Eric Civil Rights Movement Pacific Northwest Mountain Western States Center Executive Director Reid Wisconsin El Paso Charleston Pittsburgh
People march to celebrate Juneteenth in cities across the country

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:56 min | Last week

People march to celebrate Juneteenth in cities across the country

"Cross the country yesterday people gather to mark Juneteenth the day in eighteen sixty five when the last in slave people in Texas heard that they've been set free two years earlier by the Emancipation Proclamation for African Americans and others are today to commemorate reflect and ask your team is all about us as a people five reparation is celebrating our freedom and independence derailed to bias trying to rally calling for reparations in New Orleans on Friday who probably still on all of the free and independent however will also go start in my opening at a gathering in Detroit charity dean director of the city civil rights inclusion and opportunity department said Juneteenth is it time to expose her deeply ingrained racism has been an American society saying that define our country generations and never make there is because it's so hard it's hard our response to continued to celebrate and to continue to educate so that we can liberate ourselves in Birmingham Alabama Celestino hood who marched with Dr Martin Luther king junior in nineteen sixty three took the microphone at a rally against injustice sheer straight line from the civil rights movement of the twentieth century to new generations of protesters on the streets this summer yeah yeah M. A. Williams was also with why okay right you right we have celebrations and protests continue across the country

Texas New Orleans Director M. A. Williams Detroit Birmingham Alabama Dr Martin Luther
How Did Juneteenth Get Started?

BrainStuff

06:11 min | Last week

How Did Juneteenth Get Started?

"Every year on June nineteenth, millions of people across America. Come together to celebrate June eighteenth with parties parades, prayer, breakfast and golf tournaments, cookouts and music. The holiday is now officially recognized in forty seven states plus Washington DC though it hasn't been made a national holiday yet, despite having been around for more than one hundred and fifty years. We spoke with Paula Austin a professor of African American Studies and History at Boston University. She said You'd be surprised. There are many students who get to my class, and they sort of never learned about the history of enslavement. They've never learned about the civil rights movement. I think I've had students who because of where they're from, or their families know about June eighteenth, and of actually participated in the celebrations, but most students come, and they don't know. But let's go back to the beginning on June nineteenth eighteen, sixty, five more than two months after confederate general Robert e Lee surrendered to ulysses s grant at APP Maddix which all, but ended the civil war, a US army officer by the name of Major General Gordon Granger. In Huston Texas with two momentous announcements, the end of the civil war, and with it the end to slavery. Nobody is quite sure why it took so long for news of summation to reach Texas several stories have been told throughout the years though none has ever been confirmed including one of an earlier messenger who was killed on his way to Texas to tell the news of freedom. Others believe that some enslavers truth, but simply continued going about business as usual. The most likely is simply that there were not enough troops to enforce the emancipation proclamation whether enslaved people knew about it or not, so things remained status quo. That is until Major General. Grainger showed up. After granger's announcement, some of the two hundred fifty thousand freed people in Texas, immediately left for the promise of true freedom in the north, while others traveled to rejoin family members one formerly enslaved person, Molly Herrell said in the slave narratives of Texas. We all walked down the road singing shouting to beat the band. Others stayed defined pain work in the fields elsewhere. That day marks what is now often called lack independence day, or the fourth of July. It's the American celebration of freedom from slavery. June teen was first observed in Texas in eighteen, sixty six. It wasn't officially recognized as a holiday in any state until Texas did so in Nineteen, seventy nine. Since then only North Dakota South Dakota and Hawaii have declared a holiday. In recent years both the US House of Representatives and the US Senate have formally recognized June nineteenth as June, tenth Independence Day. Various movements to grant the day status is a national holiday are ongoing. US Senator Cory Booker said in two thousand eighteen. On this day we must confront ugly parts of our history and honor the slaves who suffered and died under a repressive regime. We must also pay tribute to all those who had the strength and conviction to fight to end slavery and keep our Union together. June teeth independence. Day is also an important moment to recognize how far we've come and take note of how far we have yet to go. Certainly during the original June eighteenth, there was still a lot of work to be done. It came just months after the civil war ended and two years after the emancipation proclamation was signed by President Abraham Lincoln the Thirteenth Amendment to the US Constitution, which abolished slavery, had been passed by Congress was well on its way to being ratified by the states, but the fourteenth and fifteenth guaranteeing equal protection and the right to vote to all citizens, regardless of skin color were still a couple years off. And not all enslaved people in Texas were immediately freed some held by defiant plantation owners were not emancipated until much later, some formerly enslaved people who tried to leave historical reports show were tracked down and killed. Many more stepped into a future of poverty, fear and uncertainty. Austin suggests that many Americans ignorance about June eighteenth stems from a disinclination to completely face the country's past slavery, and it's far reaching and continuing aftermath. Still? June eighteenth has persevered. Its observance has waned through the years under the oppression of Jim Crow laws and attitudes, but the festivities that began in Texas eventually spread to more states and the idea of commemorating block independence picked up through the civil rights era of the nineteen sixties, and the parties continued today. Austin, said the kinds of celebrations that I've seen and been a part of have been incredibly wonderful there about black culture there about black history there about the resistance and the resilience of the black community. Several years before grainger made his do nineteenth declaration in Galveston famed American Orator Frederick Douglass himself formerly enslaved, spoke to an abolitionist group in New York about the fourth of July. As being dave independence, and how it didn't fit for all Americans, he said what the American slave is your fourth of July I answer a day that reveals to him more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim. Opel Lee a former schoolteacher counselor in Fort Worth. Texas has been instrumental in trying to get June. Tenth recognized as a national, holiday. This year she'll walk from the Fort Worth Convention Center to the will. Rogers Coliseum, leading a caravan, urging people to sign a petition for the cause leave who is ninety three years old has been part of the Fort Worth June eighteenth festivities for more than forty years. Last year, it's as important as the fourth of July. In fact I dream some day. They celebrate from the nineteenth to the fourth like they do Mardi Gras. I haven't dreamed as large as the Rose Bowl or the macy's parade, but I'm getting there. To those who observed June eighteenth despite its shaky beginnings, and it's still unfulfilled pledge the day still holds the promise of freedom, independence, equality, ideas, and ideals always celebrating.

Texas United States Paula Austin Gordon Granger Grainger Huston Texas Washington Us House Of Representatives African American Studies And H America Fort Worth Convention Center Dave Independence Senator Cory Booker Fort Worth Robert E Lee Rogers Coliseum Mardi Gras North Dakota
Can We Change The Way We Feel About Race?

Untangle

05:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Can We Change The Way We Feel About Race?

"Ruth. It's just so great to have you on entangled today. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you. I WANNA. Tell our audience a little bit about your background. You grew up in the late sixties in south central La. It was right in the heart of the civil rights movement. Can you tell us a little bit about some of your observations and feelings during this time? Yes I grew up in south central Los Angeles. I come from a family of eight I have seven civil lanes I actually have five now, and we grew up in a working class neighborhood, and with a single mom. It was very alive in terms of civil rights activities, but it was also very alive with jazz so there was this interesting blend which I really value music a lot because I think it brings the certain creative edge and comfort to some of the struggles around race. At least that was my experience in my family, who were jazz, musicians, and percussionist as well and so there were just a lot of struggle a lot of. Of Hardship, there was a lot of physical violence in in my family. You have to keep your arms around your kids tight. Because somebody could hurt him, somebody could snatch him. Some system could be imposed on them, so I felt that tightness both in the community, but also inside my family and one of the most vivid images from me as a young person around race was watching my great grandmother pace quite a bit. She worried a lot about these black bodies at work in her life, and she couldn't protect them and I think I just saw the wear and tear and the cumulative chronic fatigue that she lived and breathed moment to moment. And I remember how hard it was that I couldn't comfort her and when she died. I think I made some of deal with myself I'm not going out like that. I think my great grandmother would be happy to know I'm doing walking meditation instead of pacing the. Floor so it was an atmosphere of fear and trepidation, not really knowing what's GonNa hit next Alon of sadness and joy what I think mostly an atmosphere of fear that we tried to make the best of. As, the little girl how did you make sensible of this well I don't know if there was any kind of intellectual way that that was happening I felt like my body absorb the lot of what I could make sensitive. So by the time I was twenty seven, I I had open heart surgery from a mitral valve prolapse, but I think it was really because the body was just absorbing so much. That felt pretty unbearable I mean I. Come from people that found a way to be resilient. My people are from slaves trying to deal with mothers having their babies taken from an so. There's been this kind of in the. Way of figuring things out this not so much in the head, and so I think that really work that heart muscle in a big way. At least for me to see, that is a really big turning point for you. Maybe it's like your heart broke. Open exactly I mean I think that it was I came to see a different from a surgical procedure to a more spiritual procedure because I often say, that was my first silent retreat when I woke up from that surgery and could feel the weight in my life. That was really. Really on the inside, sitting on the top of my chest now, and just that whole awareness of what this body was holding, and over time what relief it was to just have a procedure, if you will are an invention on the heart, where I was actually trusting white people with my heart something I didn't really have full access to I. Come from a family. That didn't trust going into. Into doctors and cause a lot of people in my family wanted to the dodgers, and didn't come back all this big story in our community, and so there was a lot of fear, so race was always wrapped around things in my life, there was always a racial way that I had to be concerned with because my body and people that look like me and dark bodies are targets of harm. Harm. I mean that's just kind of the world. We certainly growing up and to some degree we see that with the uprise right now of so much ratio hatred in boldness and rain country

Los Angeles Ruth. It Dodgers Mitral Valve
Civil rights icon John Lewis is deeply moved by todays demonstrations

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:13 min | 3 weeks ago

Civil rights icon John Lewis is deeply moved by todays demonstrations

"I'm Jonathan, Kaye part, and this is Cape Up Congressman John Lewis of Georgia has been congress for more than thirty years before that he was a leader in the civil rights movement from the citizens in Nashville to the freedom rides to the marches from Selma Montgomery. Lewis literally put his body on the line to push this nation to live up to its ideals. It's all documented in John Lewis good trouble new documentary on Lewis's live from back in the day to present day, the parallels between then and now are haunting I, talked to Louis about the film about what's going on in the country today from the demonstrations I've been deeply moved. And inspired to the deafening silence of congressional Republicans. is frightening. The people can be so silent. So Quiet In spite of everything that has taken place to whom Joe Biden should pick for his running mate vice president. Should consider. A woman. and. It should be a black woman. Sit Down with the legend the Great John Lewis Right now. Congressman John Lewis Welcome back to the podcast as good to be back. Good to be back. Thank you for having so. We're supposed to talk about the fantastic documenting. About you call John Lewis good trouble but I. have to start this conversation off. By having you talk about the demonstrations that we have seen over the low. Cost more than week. Since the the killing of of George Floyd a Terrier, I've been deeply move. And in spy. Lysine, the hundreds and thousand. Citizens. Not just citizens of America. The citizens around the world. Yet involved in peaceful non violent protests. To dramatize. The issue that we must stop. Lying people. Become the victim. Of police violence. You Know Congressman You on on bloody. Sunday that day on the Edmund Pettus. Bridge You face down. Police Violence Yourself. It was caught on camera. The Nation watched that with their own is the way they have. The the murder of George Floyd with their own eyes. How much does it bother you that more than fifty years after bloody Sunday, we are still having these same conversations. These same demonstrations whose spark is retaliatory, it makes me very sad. Made me, cry. To Watch. What happened to? This man a Aqalla. You'd have to come to the point. Is The met is going to stop. But was so moving to so. To seep people the mall of America and all over the world. Through the action I can do something. I can says something. The By Marching Speaking up. Speaking. In the in the movie. which follows you from campaign rallies in twenty eighteen right up through the present day, and there was one rally that you in Texas in two thousand eighteen. Were particularly thing you said caught my attention and you said then. We've got to save our our country. Save our democracy. That was in twenty eighteen. Would you say that your your Your Clarion Call Ben has even more urgency now. We'll ask. What in because I've felt. That, Political. Leader that we have today. Is a threat. To Democracy. And is a threat. It'd be.

Congressman John Lewis George Floyd Joe Biden America Edmund Pettus Congressman Congress Selma Montgomery Vice President Nashville Jonathan Louis Georgia Murder Kaye Texas Aqalla BEN
Bayard Rustin

Making Gay History

05:20 min | 3 weeks ago

Bayard Rustin

"It's been a week of anger, anguish and heartbreak here in New York City. And across the country. Massive protests over George Loyd's murder under the knee of a police officer. had been met with repeated widespread violence by militarized police. The threat of active duty military being deployed to control citizens exercising their constitutional rights. The ongoing drumbeat of white supremacy coming from the White House. The People's House now, an embattled presidency fortress peaceful protesters described as terrorists. From day to day and hour to hour, I've been alternately sickened and heartened. Filled with despair, and then lifted up by the voices of people across the country, demanding revolutionary change because black lives matter. And making a history, we're proud and humbled to stand with them. All black lives matter. LGBTQ black lives matter. On Wednesday afternoon I was sitting at my desk and heard noise I couldn't identify coming through my open window. My partner born and I went outside to see what was going on. Thousands of protesters marching of Ninth Avenue as far as the I could see wearing masks, carrying signs and chanting. They were heading north, and in a few blocks be passing the apartment complex where fired Rushton once lived. He was a principal architect of the march on Washington for jobs and freedom. In August nine hundred and sixty three, a quarter of a million Americans massed in Washington D. C. at the foot of the Lincoln memorial to demand an end to state sanctioned racism. In this revisiting the archive episode, you'll hear buyers Rushton in his own words. In, addition to coordinating the nineteen sixty three march on Washington, fired was one of the organizers of the very first freedom ride through the American south in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty seven. And was mentor to Dr. Martin Luther, King Junior from the time of the Montgomery bus boycott. Barred Rushton was a proud black gay man who paid a high price for proclaiming who he was long before. It was remotely safe to do so. He put himself in harm's way over and over again subjected to attacks by white supremacists who uses race and sexuality to try to destroy him. But not only resisted triumphed. You're about to hear. An interview fired rust and gave on February fifth nineteen, eighty, six a year and a half before he died. The reporter was young peg Byron who was freelancing for DC based GAY newspaper? The, Washington, Blade. Pay conducted the interview in buyers, office and Lower Park Avenue New, York City just across town from where he lived in Chelsea with his partner Walter Naegle. Walter was also buyers assistant, and you can hear the sound of him in the next room through much of the interview. It's thanks to Walter who recorded the conversation and save it for decades in a box under their bed that we're able to hear Byron speak in this rare interview about the impact of his sexuality on his work in the civil rights movement. So, let's join peg Byron admired rusting desk and listen to history from a man who changed its course. To know mind now, let's play all right. Walters doing some research. On me. Therefore, he tapes Manipur. Anybody else does that check on. Wall. With this shows is that. Stop now this is still going. has there ever been Some projects are involved. We're. Not, that being gay was necessarily an issue, but did you ever feel frustration about? I. You know I was an associate adopt live. Luther King's for a number of years. And actually I the person who drew up plans for his southern Christian leadership conference. Given. It was so much pressure on Dr. King's about my game. And particularly I would not be denied. That he set up a committee to explore whether you'd be changes, but To you working again? After eight years, that committee came decision would be dangerous. The Q. Midi seems eight years now. After I had worked for him. He's year. The! J. Edgar Hoover. Began to circulate all kinds of stories about Luther King. One which was? that he wants a friend of mine, hinting that somehow there might be some homosexual relationship going on between us.

Walter Naegle Luther King Principal Architect Washington Byron White House New York City George Loyd Partner Dr. Martin Luther J. Edgar Hoover Murder Lincoln Memorial Officer. Montgomery Manipur Reporter York City
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Truth Be Told

Truth Be Told

05:29 min | Last month

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Truth Be Told

"Wonderful. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> That's Eddie. Glad <Speech_Music_Female> he's the chair of <Speech_Music_Female> African American studies <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at Princeton, <Speech_Female> and his book is <Speech_Female> begin again <Speech_Female> James. Baldwin's America <Speech_Female> and it's <Speech_Female> urgent lessons <Speech_Female> for our own. <Silence> It comes out in August. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Let's go now <Speech_Female> to more from <Speech_Female> those protesters. <Speech_Female> We're going to hear. <Speech_Female> From two MEKA <Speech_Female> Mallory ianna <Speech_Female> Woodward <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and <SpeakerChange> missed a FAB. <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <Advertisement> And, so young people <Laughter> <Advertisement> are responding <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> today. They <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> are enrage, and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> there's an easy way <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to stop it. <Speech_Female> <Laughter> Charged the <Speech_Music_Female> cops <Laughter> charge all the <Laughter> cast. Not <Laughter> just some of them, <Laughter> not just here <Laughter> in Minne- Minneapolis <Laughter> <Advertisement> charge them <Laughter> <Advertisement> in every <Laughter> <Advertisement> city across <Laughter> <Advertisement> America <Laughter> where our people <Laughter> are being murdered, <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> charged them everywhere. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> That's the bottom line <Speech_Female> charge. The <Speech_Female> cats <Speech_Female> do your job. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Do what you say. <Speech_Female> This country <Speech_Female> is supposed to be <Speech_Female> about the land of <Speech_Female> the free for all. <Speech_Female> It has not <Speech_Female> been free for black <Speech_Female> people and we <Speech_Female> are tired. Don't <Speech_Female> talk to us about <Speech_Music_Female> looting y'all are <Speech_Female> the losers. America <Laughter> has alluded <Laughter> Black <Speech_Female> People American <Laughter> noted <Laughter> the native Americans <Laughter> when they are staying <Laughter> here. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Is. What you <Speech_Female> do, we learned it <Speech_Female> from you. <Speech_Female> We learn violence <Speech_Music_Female> from you. <Speech_Female> <Laughter> <Speech_Female> Learn violence <Speech_Female> from you, <Laughter> the violence was <Speech_Female> what we learned <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> from you. <Laughter> So <Laughter> if you want us <Speech_Female> to do better than <Speech_Female> dammit, <SpeakerChange> you do <Speech_Music_Female> better. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> To see <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the seats of probably. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Able to <Speech_Music_Male> enrich <Speech_Music_Male> nobody mentioned. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> That enough. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> We Fed we have <Speech_Music_Male> reached. <Speech_Music_Female> A <Speech_Music_Male> meal. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We want <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a better relationships <Speech_Music_Male> with the police. <Speech_Music_Male> That's number one. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Laughter> <Laughter> We want <Laughter> you to be within <Laughter> the school district. <SpeakerChange> <Laughter> That's number two. <Speech_Music_Male> <Laughter> <Laughter> <Laughter> You, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Don Dailey and <Laughter> <Advertisement> all the generations <Laughter> were sitting. We cannot <Laughter> do this all <Speech_Music_Female> all generation <Speech_Male> elders. <Speech_Male> <Laughter> <Laughter> Dictate, <Laughter> US. <Laughter> To learn. <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <Advertisement> <Laughter> Everything <Laughter> we. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> The <Speech_Music_Female> conversation. <Laughter> <Laughter> Red Table. <Laughter> Talk <Speech_Male> about how <Speech_Male> these goals full <Laughter> circle. <Speech_Music_Female> Stop worrying, about <Speech_Music_Female> thin. <Speech_Female> Worry <Speech_Male> about us. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> All we got in <Speech_Female> is. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> A <Speech_Music_Female> young.

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Truth Be Told

Truth Be Told

06:28 min | Last month

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Truth Be Told

"I. Am Carville Wallace and I'm about to read to an excerpt from an article. I wrote in June twenty seventeen called. If you're black. In America, riots are spiritual impulse, not a political strategy. The summer of Nineteen, sixty seven, the city of Detroit burnt. Milwaukee Buffalo Cincinnati Newark were all engulfed in flames. Even forgotten towns like Kiro, Illinois and Cambridge Maryland descended for some nights in that tortured summer into anarchy. The havoc seemed to be catching. The fire in one town sparked the fire in the next. America's seemed to be coming undone. Yet for most Americans, the riots that summer were viewed from afar through the lens of the Evening News in front page headlines, they were not seeing their own homes burned their own streets applied by uniformed troops from this safe distance, the uprisings looked like senseless violence, the reckless and shortsighted actions of a damaged people people with no strategy, no hope. But the truth of riots is something entirely different something entirely more sacred. America is unsettled land. And it remains so because it was founded on white supremacy and white supremacy is by nature and settling force. The centuries long attempt to subdue the continent by nakedly ransacking its resources, only for the benefit of some creates. Eighty of vast army of angry people who will forever for the sake of themselves for the sake of their children be forced to resist. Far from ugly side effect of our nation's character, white supremacy is a core American principal. This country didn't just end up this way. It was made this way. To be black in the country like this is to forge your entire life in the Dank valley between America's ideals and its actions. We are told we have been created equally, but we are treated as a separate class. We are told that we live in a nation of laws, but we watch as violence is visited upon our families with no hope of legal recourse to be black in America, and survive is to be of dual consciousness on the one hand. You must believe what all humans must believe in order to survive that you have a future that your children will be safe and cared for that things. Will somehow some way get better, but on the other hand you're very survival depends on never trusting on seeing the ugly truth for what it is on remaining ever vigilant for where and how precisely you are being conned. To keep safe, you must expect to be attacked. To be black and live is to constantly expect to die. For Black People in America the psychic toll of having to tie your fate, the fate of your family to a world designed to subjugate can only be withstood for so long eventually inevitably, a truer more direct action calls, and often that action is abrupt. It is violent and it is loud. It is sparked by anything that underscores the maddening discrepancy between what we deserve as human beings, and what we experience as black human beings. Buildings Crumble and fires burn and glass rains down upon everyone, even the children why it is asked with these people burned down their own neighborhoods. Someone more sympathetic, but still removed might argue that a riot is the only way for a desperate people to gain the attention. Their plight deserves the problem with both of these readings is that they assume the spontaneous uprisings to be tactical. A coordinated strategic attempt to bring about a particular, social or political change. It is not. It is. A LITURGY A spiritual grasping for emotional justice for an assertion of self. It is an attempt to bring back into wholeness that which has been split. It is meant to refi the dual senses of life and death, hope and fury that circumscribe the black experience. To Be White in America. is to be innocent. Not of the crime, but of the knowledge of the crime. James Baldwin said quote. People who shut their eyes to reality simply invite their own destruction. And anyone who insists on remaining in a state of innocence long after that innocence is dead, turned himself into a monster. And Yet On the horizon. Visible from the whittled down lawns and decks of consciously chosen would there is an amber glow. A blanket of thick and accurate smoke, the smell of burning plastic and gasoline. Bodies Lay UNMOVING on the asphalt. Your government has said its troops. The clack of gunfire echoes from the ACACIA trees. The people wish for the lights of the fires to illuminate your monstrosity to usher, and the end of your innocence. The. People wish for you to see them. Made. Complete. The people have made the demand. Thousands of US have taken to the streets. We're in the midst of a rebellion. And the demand is simple. Justice. We'll. Be Right back..

America Carville Wallace principal Detroit James Baldwin US Evening News Milwaukee Dank valley Kiro Cambridge Maryland Newark Illinois
Mayor de Blasio says no need for National Guard in New York City

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

01:03 min | Last month

Mayor de Blasio says no need for National Guard in New York City

"And Philly CBS reporter rich lamb was with mayor bill de Blasio to check on how much policing he thinks the city needs right now when I asked mayor de Blasio whether he believes the National Guard will be activated and whether the city needs their numbers he left absolutely no room for doubt declaring we do not need nor do we think it's wise for the National Guard to be in New York City the mayor argues went outside armed forces go into communities no good comes of it we have seen this for decades go back to that if the sixties with the civil rights movement on through all the way up to the day people who are not trained for the conditions of your say they're they're public servants I appreciate them deeply but they're not trained for the circumstance has the Blasi put it the officers of the NYPD have been trained incessantly to act with restraint but says a member of the National Guard called up from any part of the state doesn't have that particular training doesn't know our environment but is carrying a loaded weapon the mayor concluded that is a bad

Rich Lamb Bill De Blasio National Guard New York City Blasi Nypd CBS Reporter Mayor De Blasio
Atlanta Mayor Bottoms extends nighttime curfew

Chris Burns

00:36 sec | Last month

Atlanta Mayor Bottoms extends nighttime curfew

"Atlanta's mayor extends the city's curfew to tonight nine o'clock until sunrise hours after taking her message national mayor bottoms a guest on CNN's state of the union Sunday morning host Jake tapper asking her about the protests sparked by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and the riots that have followed there is a history lesson that we find right here in Atlanta from the civil rights movement on how you effectuate change and what I saw happening and what we've seen happening over the past few days that in America is not the way that that things will change in this country

Atlanta CNN Jake Tapper George Floyd Minneapolis America
Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms tells protesters: "Go home"

Broncos Country Tonight

00:34 sec | Last month

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms tells protesters: "Go home"

"And buildings in downtown Atlanta have been significantly damage tonight in a police car in the city torched dozens of cities are struggling to maintain peace on our streets amid growing anger over the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis Atlanta mayor Keisha lance bottoms tells protesters if they care about the city they should go home you're not honoring the legacy of Martin Luther king junior and the civil rights movement you're not protesting anything running out with brown liquor in your hands breaking windows in the

Atlanta George Floyd Keisha Lance Bottoms Minneapolis Martin Luther
Sit, Listen and Dismantle

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

09:06 min | Last month

Sit, Listen and Dismantle

"First of all can like. I do every single time that I chat with fantastic folks like you. Thank you for your time. That is the one thing that you cannot get back and it is extremely valuable so thank you so much for taking some time out with us today. Thank you for taking the time and inviting me. The second thing I'd like to do is to ask you to tell us about yourself now when I say that what I mean is feel free to go all the way back to win it all started or you can start more current day. Tell us about sure. Well I guess going back to. When it all started I grew up in the nineteen sixties and was very much a part of all of the various political movements of that time and student movement in the Civil Rights Movement. I worked in the south as a civil rights worker in Selma and Montgomery in southern Alabama and south Georgia and then became very involved in social conflict and was actually at what you can think of as a professional conflict creator. And what then happened is I realized that if you wanted to achieve something like the right to sit in the lunch counter and be served demonstrations. Were a very good way of doing that. But if you wanted to change people's hearts and minds you had to dig deeper. And you had to have a different set of techniques you would adopt and so I had become a lawyer and was practicing constitutional law civil rights civil liberties law and then became a law professor. And after that I became a judge for the state of California in a couple of different administrative agencies and realize that what I was doing wasn't really very effective or very satisfying and discovered in nineteen eighty mediation conflict resolution and have been practicing full-time ever since now so I have now for the last. Forty Years Bene- fulltime mediator working with everything from divorcing couples families community disputes cross cultural disputes. Through litigated cases organizational disputes workplace disputes. I read several books on those and mediated hundreds and hundreds even thousands of those disputes. I also work internationally. I created an organization called mediators beyond borders. And we're working in a number of different countries right now so this has been an amazing journey. And what I've realized is that things that I believed in when I began are very much. A part of the process treating everybody with respect and dignity creating kind of equality in terms of who has the right to say what issues need to be addressed creating dialogues between people doing problem solving working together creating collaborative approaches to difficulties that people phase. That's the basic idea of conflict resolution. And what I basically do every day now came. We're GONNA take a step back a little bit and learn a little bit more about you. What's your favorite thing to do? My favorite thing to do is to work with people who are completely at odds with each other and find ways for them to discover something that is really quite wonderful about the other person something interesting something that they hadn't been able to realize before him some ability to appreciate the other person actually is to create conversations between people who haven't been able to talk to each other now going back to your background. You mentioned that you were involved in student rights and then civil rights does not normal. What made you want to be involved in that type of work? Well it isn't really normal. It wasn't normal at the time. It's a little difficult to describe today but we kind of can have a bit of a sense of it. Came from a rural place from a place that said that we are all human beings and nobody deserves to be treated this way. It came from a kind of fundamental belief in democracy that everybody should have the right to vote. Everybody should have the right to participate in deciding what is going to happen regarding the issues that impact their lives. Once I got started and became quite clear. The more that you read the more that you heard about what was happening in the world it became obvious that if you didn't act you were really retreating from a fundamental moral issue of our times and that even though it was scary to work in these environments we were attacked and had to face dogs and police officers in Ku Klux Klan and a lot of violence. The alternative of running away to me was scarier than the one facing up to a major challenge that everybody as We knew that if we didn't stand up to it something really important would be lost. I'm not sure exactly whether that answers your question. But that's kind of close to what I think. Most of us were feeling. That's really good. One thing that I wrote down was the alternative was scarier than the danger a lot of times when people even in business right you think about what if it doesn't work or what if it fails in? I know in my own journey. It was just that it was the thought the idea or the chance that I don't give this. A try is scarier to me than doing it in failing so I definitely get that obviously is not on her level of the work that you guys did but definitely get that principle. Do you see any parallels in today's culture to in the sixties or has. The conversation of the narrative been changed such that. We just don't talk about it as much because the issues are different. But it's not a lot different. Yeah the same meaning what these specific form of it was. You have the right to ride on a bus in an integrated group. Do you have the right to sit at a lunch counter? In order a meal you have the right to use a water fountain that says whites only on it. Those are the specific ways in which this would show. But the general the underlying issue was the issue of recognizing the value and importance of diversity recognizing value of importance of coming to terms with people and cultures and even personalities and political views. That are different from those that you have for yourself. And so that continues to this day and is a very fundamental. Almost I would say again a moral like question about how we treat each other and this is one of the reasons why we are divided really as a nation because we haven't yet gotten to the point that we are all in this together but that point is being made right now very powerful a by the corona virus. We are in fact all in this together. Everybody can get this disease. Everybody can die from it. Everybody is being impacted by all of the various measures that are taking place. And so there's a kind of a way in which we are being brought to realize that the little divisions that we create between them and US between if you're mailed with people who are female pure white people who are black Anglo Latino whatever. It might happen to be whoever you are. The entire world is basing this issue and we are stronger if we face it together and I think what we have to then realize is that this is only one of a number of global issues that no longer respect national boundaries. You can't deal with corona virus in one nation. Only art modern system of transportation means that it can go around the world in a matter of hours and if some group of people come down with it in one place other people are gonNA come down with it somewhere else. So we're being forced to look at this and I think there are other issues like that that we're being forced to look at by circumstance but the reality owes goes a deeper understanding that we can come to and my way of saying that in in all the conflicts that take place between them and us we have to realize there is no them. There's just us and the creation of the idea of a dam is something that has taken place inside of our heads out of fear out of frustration out of our own inner needs. It haven't been mad out of Hanker over some way that we've been treated but it's just a construct that we've created and it's one that isn't particularly useful and it's one that is incredibly damaging both to others and to ourselves

Civil Rights Movement Ku Klux Klan United States California Selma Professor Alabama South Georgia Montgomery
Jackie Robinson broke Major League Baseball's color barrier on this day in 1947

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Jackie Robinson broke Major League Baseball's color barrier on this day in 1947

"Ballpark sit empty on the seventy third anniversary of Jackie Robinson's first game as a Dodger but his contributions to the game in the civil rights movement remain vivid he was the first player to win both the rookie of the year and MVP awards doing it within his first three seasons just forty three when he was elected to the baseball hall of fame Robert to continue to fight the battle of racial justice until his death in nineteen seventy two in his final speech he said he looked forward to the day when you see a black man managing in the majors something that wouldn't occur until two and a half years after he passed away I'm Dave Ferrie

Jackie Robinson Robert Dave Ferrie MVP
Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

In Black America

06:27 min | 3 months ago

Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

"On this week's program historically black colleges and universities and the NFL with Doctor Derrick white in black America in their celebration of the hundred year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the for better for worse college football who celebrate the One hundred fiftieth year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries. That kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of talking about the early game when the Ivy Leagues Dominated College Football. Right you get that kind of Astaldi. Nfl is not so much right. In their part of Wigan's law says that the integration the reintegration of the. Nfl in part is done. Because you know teams WanNa move to the West Coast Right. They WanNa play in Los Angeles And that the black community the La said no in particular forced the L. A. Don's to say if you WANNA come in you. GotTa you gotTa desegregate Your Team. So woody strode gets an opportunity to play and Kenny Washington gets a chance to try out for these teams and they make these teams in the NFL so we were talking about the kind of reintegration of of professional football as the National Football League celebrated. Its first one hundred seasons unbeknownst to many sports fans the NFL didn't have any African American players for decade from Nineteen thirty four to nineteen forty-six. There was an unspoken agreement between owners to ban African American players today. They are two African American general managers for minority head coaches and one chief operating officer for the first time the crew for sue both fifty four had a record number of minority officials of the seven on the field five for African Americans the contribution of historical black colleges and universities. Acc use to the NFL has changed the game forever undrafted by an NFL team. Paul tank younger was the first African American player from grambling State University to play in the NFL when he signed with the Los Angeles Rams in nineteen forty nine the first African American drafted in the NFL draft was jaws rooks. I running back out of Morgan state in the Eleventh Round. One hundred and twenty fifth overall by the Green Bay packers in nineteen fifty one doing super bowl fifty four week in south Florida Group of area high school athletes had an opportunity to learn about the rich history of black college football and his contributions to the NFL and Black America spoke with doctor. Derrick wide associate professor at the University of Kentucky. When I was teaching a class on sports history I found that the students knew nothing about historically black college role. They were as part of their assignment. They had researched The histories of sports history at various institutions and students had cookman in Florida. And I knew that those are really successful. Athletic programs and students came back with nothing. And so I've you know I just thought chalked up. Initially students being students that they just didn't do enough but when we both begin system. I realized there was a huge gap in the scholarship. And there's a Lotta work on sports. History is a lot of work on college sports especially college football but there was very little nearly nothing on historically black colleges And so at the time I was at Florida Atlantic in so I was like Bam. You is like right up the road. Well you know eight hours away from my house but I and I knew Jay. Gator was dominant. I'd heard these stories from my uncles and I knew he was a fantastic program so I did a research trip and I went up there and they have the archivists there. And the the library's at up in Florida were amazing and they gave me these materials in there. All these letters documents and so I had budgets and letters of professional teams and I begin to understand how he organized his football program because the issue is discussed our Pamela Day. That there wasn't a lot of research money. A lot of research recruiting money not money budgets. Within Coach Gate. There was the ad coach basketball at one point. And those things. I thought those kinds of stories and that the greatness that the success that he was able to produce was Willie Gallimore Kim. Rowley Bob Hayes. I wanted to understand how that was done. I didn't WANNA chalk it up to that. These were just natural athletes that there was something being done happening on these institutions in some coaches Were better than others and so I wanted to tell that story talk about. Integration Immigration had a positive effect but it also had a devastating effect on also African Americans going to the NFL right so an integration was boom for professional football. Right then you know one of the reasons that Jake was so able to be so successful especially early on in the forties and early fifties that many of his former players gather degrees and became teachers in the high schools. All across the State of Florida and North Georgia. And so he would. They would just send him letters. Like hey coach gay. Got This really. Good kid this Willie Gallimore guys pretty good right. Like this is how he got recruiting information was from his former players but those players were talented but there was no professional football opportunities and so when those opportunities really begin to open up a specially after nineteen sixty when the AFL comes in then professional football now creates a new opportunity for black colleges in small colleges in general and so that becomes this boom and on the backside that the course the civil rights movement is happening at this exact same time right so brown. V Board of Education. This is entire push to desegregate schools Whether the high school level colleges etc and so so many ways why colleges Kinda caught between their own. Their success right. They're producing these great players in the NFL. Minium all pros as we talked about earlier. Thirty two or in the NFL Hall of fame at the same time. There are new opportunities at Florida. Miami or Georgia and that these schools especially in the deep south are slowly trying to recruit them when you look back at the history of ACC using his contribution to to the NFL. I found it amazing and the one hundred year the League. There's very little that has been articulated about a SPEC- US or the early African American players and they and their celebration of the hundredth year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the you know for better for Worse College Football who celebrated his Hundred Fiftieth Year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries that kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of documentaries talking about the early game when the Ivy League dominated college football. Right you get that kind of Nfl is not so much

National Football League Football Florida Ivy Leagues Dominated College Derrick White Espn Astaldi Los Angeles Willie Gallimore Kim Ivy League Woody Strode America United States Rowley Bob Hayes League Willie Gallimore ACC Green Bay Packers
Joseph Lowery, civil rights leader and MLK aide, has died at 98

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

Joseph Lowery, civil rights leader and MLK aide, has died at 98

"Francisco civil rights leader the Reverend Joseph Lowery is dead and peers to be Elliot reports Larry passed away late last night at the age of ninety eight the Reverend Joseph Lowery was known as the dean of the civil rights movement he was part of pivotal moments in the nation's history from early civil rights struggles to the swearing in of the country's first black president he gave this benediction at president Obama's inauguration in two thousand nine hundred over a new beginning we ask you to help us work for the navy when black would not be asked to give that when bridal could stick around we will be minimal when the red band can get ahead man and when right William Bruce what is right Larry was a co founder of the southern Christian leadership conference and led the civil rights organization for

Francisco Joseph Lowery Larry President Trump Barack Obama Navy William Bruce Co Founder Elliot
Civil rights leader Joseph Lowery, who served with King and gave Obama’s inaugural benediction, has died at 98

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:26 sec | 3 months ago

Civil rights leader Joseph Lowery, who served with King and gave Obama’s inaugural benediction, has died at 98

"A major leader of the civil rights movement has died Joseph Lowery was always fearless and outspoken from the earliest days of the civil rights movement to the year two thousand nine when he gave the benediction at president Obama's inauguration standing on the steps of the U. S. capitol Lowry pronounced we ask you to help push record date when black would not be asked to give back

Joseph Lowery President Trump Barack Obama S. Capitol Lowry
Bryant Terry: Vegetable Kingdom

Chewing the Fat

08:46 min | 3 months ago

Bryant Terry: Vegetable Kingdom

"Welcome to chewing the fat. The Yale sustainable food programs podcasts. At looks at people making change in a complex world of Food and agriculture. I'm your host Irwin. Lee for final episode from our cooking across the Black Diaspora series. We host Bryant Terry Chef in residence at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco. When Bryant was on campus in February? He spoke about recipes in the ways. They offer a reclamation resistance but he also shared about how in food justice work we can often forget. Recipes are about enjoyment to. That's why his newest cookbook. Vegetable Kingdom has song recommendations for what to listen to while you make each dish through his activism award-winning Cookbooks. And love for the history of black. Africa communities. Brian Wonderful guest to close our series. I'm also excited to say that. This episode was collaborative. Take an angle hosts the podcasts the table underground which features stories of food radical love and creative social justice she interviews Bryant in this episode at a time where physical distancing means. Were often staying indoors. Their conversation assured offer something special for all of us. It could be more excitement as you cook. A new dish and jam with friends or family or maybe. It's a feeling that you're connected to something larger to a people to a story that even in these messed up times where people across the food system and society at large are facing extreme pressures never before we can still find ways to come together. Hi Brian Hagan how are you? I'm good how you doing really well. Thanks for making time in your busy schedule for people who don't know you and your story. Can You tell folks? How did you get into eating a plant based Diet? How did you become Vegan? Well is interesting because you said how do I get into a plant based Diet and then you ask how to become Vegan? F- elect those two separate questions. And I don't know if it was necessarily a plant based I but I like to think that the Diet egg I grew up eating was Largely Vegetable base or you could say vegetable forward. It's because I spent Well it's because that was just something family valued I come from a family of farmers and my grandparents Migrated from the rule south to Memphis where I grew up and they brought with them. Those traditions of growing food and they're very knowledge and you know just the understanding that it's important that you be in charge of producing the food for yourself and your family and so you know that was something that my grandparents passed on most of their kids and they had gardens and spent a lot of time in my paternal grandfather's garden when I was growing up. And I call it a garden but it's more like urban farm because he literally used every bit of available space to grow food and he had chickens he at hogs and this is a neighborhood adjacent to downtown Memphis where you knows very productive and I That's what we ate from. You know I always say that the food that we was local as our backyard garden it was always in season. And we literally will go harvest food right before making it but in terms of me moving more towards a compassionate and healthful diet in in the way that we think about them kind of like labeling it as a Vegan diet that happened when I was in high school after I heard that The song beef by Boogie down productions and Karras when the MC of that group and it was really just this wakeup call for me. And I just had no idea about the violent way that are industrialized food. System can treat animals and the impact that can have you know obviously on the animals but also on human health and the environment and I just couldn't turn back so after hearing that Song. I really move towards More plant based Diet. And you know. I think it's important for me to always recognize. It wasn't a linear journey. It wasn't like a hurt that and I'd just stop eating meat. Never gone back. You know There were moments where I've eaten animal products again. I mean you know. Case in point how strict Vegan and then went to study abroad and France's and Undergrad and in the mid nineties it was hard to be a Vegan in France House yeah stain. What the host family. And they were feeding me what they ate. And so I I feel like important to note that because a lot of people have these purity tests and I certainly would fail any of those purity tests and I also think it's important for me to be transparent so that other people can just feel human and know that you don't have to be perfect and know that you know you do the best you can and sometimes you might do something differently and it's all about just waking up the next day and trying your best day right yeah totally Philly on that I know that history really informs your work a lot in particular the history of the Black Panther Party for self defense. And I'm wondering if you can explain a little bit about how both that history and other history really informs the way that you work in food. Yeah Wow always talk about the Black Panther Party for self defense being one of the major or learning about the work that they were doing in the sixties seventies Was really the major impetus for me deciding to do this. Work and particularly their survival programs. There were aimed at meeting. The basic needs of people living in communities and at a range of programs from you know free clinics to ambulance service to sickle cell. Anemia testing The programs that address this intersection of poverty malnutrition and institutional racism that grocery giveaways and Free Breakfast for Children Program where the ones that inspired me to start doing Food Systems working to become a quote unquote food justice activist But I think more than the programs especially after having conversations with many former black panthers. It's really the spirit of seeing the need in the community and then just jumping into action you know and I really understood that. We had to train a generation of young people who were equipped to make change their communities around food systems and lead the change in fact and I always talk about how you think about many of the most powerful social movements in the twentieth century and it was young people their energy. They're brilliant Fearlessness that helped these movements Pushed forward you know. We can look at the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa the Civil Rights movement in the American south. And you know if we imagine that food justice will be one of the most hopeful movements of the twenty first century. I feel like we need to make sure that we're quickly young people to be the ones who are taking the lead in the movement. What was it about food that made you really feel like that was the need that you wanted to take action on wall it was missing these parallels with where things were in the sixties and the panthers addressing you know. I think nutritional Apartheid and understanding that hunger and poverty were issues that had to be addressed and they start to breakfast. Well I mean they had the grocery giveaway because people are hungry. He wouldn't know where their next meal was gonNA come from and they started the free breakfast for children program because children were going to school hungry and they knew that they couldn't focus on what they're learning. They were having hunger pains and they didn't need any pure reviewed studies that prove the connection between like nutrition and educational and Behavioral. Outcomes is just like intuitive people need to. I mean like if I don't eat I feel grumpy and can't think straight and so imagine being a child having to go to school without being fed. And so when I I I. I tell this story about being on the subway Going from Brooklyn to Manhattan to go to campus. And you know teeing class and seeing these young people on the subway at seven o'clock in the morning eating candy bars and Red Hot Cheetos and drinking sodas and sugary juices and energy drinks and just realizing that these young people like that's the worst way to start their day and I know that that was just just that day you know this is this is probably the way they're eating often and so I jumped into action and started an organization called be healthy that used cooking as a way to empower them and give them skills that they could take another adult lives and help them feel more equipped to make real food but also as a way to help them be more politicized about the food issues that directly impact them their families.

Bryant Terry Chef Black Panther Party Food Systems Memphis Africa Brian Hagan Irwin San Francisco LEE Panthers France Museum Of The African Diaspora Karras South Africa Philly Brooklyn
An insight into Kamala Harris, a potential VP for Biden

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:58 min | 3 months ago

An insight into Kamala Harris, a potential VP for Biden

"I am Jonathan Kaye. Part AND WELCOME TO CAPE UP. Long before people started swooning over Congressman. Val demings of Florida as a possible vice president. Joe Biden folks. We're talking about senator. Kamla Harris California back in January twenty nineteen few weeks before Harris announced her own since disbanded presidential campaign. I sat with her in front of a live audience at George Washington University for the kickoff tour. For her the truth we hold because Harris's book is a memoir. Our conversation was heavy on stories about parents upbringing and her career. There's no better way to get to know this possible vice president than listening right now. Senator Harris thank you very much for for being here for choosing Washington to be the kickoff of your book tour and or actually to be correct books tour and as we see the truths we hold an American journey and then also superheroes are everywhere. I'm going to focus on the truths we hold k. And I'm going to focus on something that happens before even page one and I want to clear it up. Okay for anyone who might have done this or still doing this. Despite hearing it said correctly the first time pronounce your name Carmela so just think of like the punctuation Mark Comma and that Adalah and there you got and so then what does communism mean then. So it's a very traditional classic Indian name and it derives from Sanskrit and it's it means the lotus flower and so it's very prevalent and a lot of Asian cultures and the idea the symbolism. Is that the Lotus flowers sits on water but it never really gets wet. The water beats off of it and so the idea being that one can be in the midst of chaos or be in the midst of something happening and and be there and should be there and it doesn't necessarily need to penetrate you but one should be there and equally important Its roots are in the mud meaning. It is grounded and and one must always know where they come from and can still be this thing now. I need you to pronounce another name for me for the life of me. I just I couldn't do it. And that is the name of your mother Shammala. So the why is silent Shama Sharmila what was really Shamlan? Go Gopala tell us about your mom. Caller Mommy Mommy. We always called her. Mommy I am not embarrassed to say she is mommy and She is in many ways. The reason I wrote the book my sister my is here My Mother's one of her best friends from college is here. Lenore POMERANZ I write about in the book and my mother was a force of nature. A drill force of nature. She is someone who all five feet of her. If you met her after you walked away you would have thought she was seven Tom. My mother was a truth teller. She spoke the truth. She was probably the smartest toughest and most loving person I've ever known. She raised her daughters with a belief that we could do and be anything. She taught us that. Don't let people tell you who you are and you tell them who you are. She was a scientist. Breast cancer researcher should goals in her life to end breast cancer and raise her two daughters and she would take us to the lab with her at go after school on the weekends and being around scientists one of the things that I realize now early in my life I learned was that one should see what can be unburdened by what has been because that is science is about. It's the pursuit of those things that will improve the condition of life. That will solve problems. That will make things better. And that's why I'm naturally attracted to also anything that is about innovation understanding that innovation. We do it not because we're bored with things the way they've been but because we should always be in pursuit of being more efficient more effective more relevant and and that's what she is and was your father. Donald Harris also an immigrant born born in Jamaica. Yeah an economics professor at Stanford. And let's David. Mind comes from some BRAINIAC parents. Your mom got her. He H D. The year you were born does put that out there so now your dad comes to the United States from Jamaica. Yeah my father was equally brilliant. And is he was a national scholar and Jamaica. He earned his way and up in out and came to the United States into Berkeley to study economics and My parents met when they were active in the civil rights movement. And it's an interesting story because as you know my mother graduated college when she was nineteen and did and so she so she said to my grandfather who was one of the freedom fighters in India for India's independence and my mother was the eldest of four children. She was the oldest at at a girl obviously and she said to my grandparents. She wanted to study science and she wanted to go to what was considered to be one of the best schools and that was UC Berkeley and my grandparents looked at her and said okay. We will put you on a plane and you can go to a place. You've never been at nineteen years old. This was in nineteen fifty nine. So this young this girl. This young woman got on a plane encouraged by her parents to go and pursue her dream now. The back story is also that it was fully expected she would get that degree and go back and have a good arranged marriage but of course my mother having been raised and being who she was just naturally she when she got to Berkeley was immediately attracted to the civil rights movement. Why do you defend? That's where she met. My father was and but I want to say she met my father and decided to have a love marriage and a marriage based on love which I believe is the ultimate act of optimism. The the question that I interrupted. You're you're Satan with. Why do you think she was so attracted to the civil rights movement she was raised growing up? Would go back to India like every other year and And so I know the family from that that that raised her because they helped raise us and it was always about fighting for independence was about finding justice. It was about fighting to make sure that all people had a say in their future in their government an equal say and that was that was in her blood and of course that's what the civil rights movement was about and the free speech movement and and there are some funny stories. I was just sharing with something backstage. You know so I witness I right about in the book you know from my strollers. I view and there's a a funny family story about how some mothers marching with the extended family. I talk about like aunt Mary and Uncle Freddie and the book and she would tell the story about. How DO THEY MARTIN? And this is back when strollers didn't really have armrest seatbelts. Martin Away and you know shouting and and all of that and then I think Mongol Freddie a look down in the stroller which was empty followed up. My mother tells funny story like one day. She was fussing and and you know so much cuter when she would tell the story but she'd say so then she would look down at me and come on. What do you want? What do you want and I look back up in a said fleet on so glad that story. I wanted to hear you safe. We how I wanted to talk about your your father economics professor Stanford they meet atmospherically. Had you and my And you love going to the park and your mom would correct me. If I'm wrong would put limits on you in terms of how far you go. Whatever and your dad would say to you. Run RUN COM run. That's right he would say. Do not be afraid. Let her go let her go. Let her run. You run as fast as you. Can you run as far as you want and I believe that his whole purpose was to say. Do not be afraid and be

Senator Harris Vice President India Kamla Harris California United States Stanford Berkeley Professor Jonathan Kaye Joe Biden George Washington University Senator Florida Congressman Val Demings Jamaica Shama Sharmila
Revisiting the Archive: Frank Kameny

Making Gay History

03:55 min | 3 months ago

Revisiting the Archive: Frank Kameny

"Mattachine Society of Washington was formed around my personality. We characterized ourselve- within ourselves within the movement as an activist militant organization. Well those were very dirty. Words in those days was sixty one in sixty two. No one else was except for the civil rights movement was just beginning. But I mean even within the game movement even more so you weren't supposed to be overall goal plan that you stated what you're going to do as an organization that was sort of set up an statement of purposes which I could dig out generally. What was it generally to work for? Gay Rights Solo. Gay Rights has such wasn't necessarily the phrase of choice of those days but to to achieve equality for homosexuals and homosexuality against heterosexuals and heterosexuality that was equality. I guess primarily wasn't born in sixty nine or those I certainly Nhar. The sixty nine have happened if we hadn't come along for years you well. No that's not how it wrong. They would not. We started to digress before I get back We started picketing in here in sixty five which I created the mindset which allowed for gays doing openly public things by way of demonstration ask gays there would not have been stonewall if they hadn't already gotten the mindset had already been established for that by us in sixty five with subsequent demonstrations year by year. Widely publicized in New York at Independence Hall every Fourth of July. Each year after sixty five. And which was being publicized in sixty nine and prepared preparation for that one when Walker and it would have never have a card. Gay People do anything publicly if we had already started it. What happened to your case. My case was dead with the Supreme Court that ended that permanent. The commission changed. Its rule is seventy five Yash. You must recall what I hearing about that. They they called me up. They knew by that time I was on. I speak with obvious. Hyperbole and figuratively on virtually daily communication. With general counsel. This Service Commission cases. You knew other things that come along. He people were coming. Oh yes. He had informed the eighteen months before and seventy-three that they will beginning the process of changing their policy but there were a lot of minds that had to be changed inside the commission and he informed me that it was going to come out on July fourth except for the July Fourth Holiday. So we're going to have to be July third very appropriately. And that's when they issued a news release and the former change in policy seventy five. Yes of course in seventy eight under Carter Administration. The Civil Service Reform Act went through Congress and that abolished the Civil Service Commissioner under that name. It's the office of Personnel Management. The Oh pm chains all the laws. So that's one battle one book that has nicely been closed and put on the shelf as a complete success at this point. I'm sort of I don't know people call me a living ledger. And you're like being called a living legend. It doesn't bother me No excuse complementary or the humorous. The world's oldest living homosexual or the grandfather or the great grandfather of the game which was not which is not technically as you well know live takes turnings and you don't foresee them but ultimately I think. In retrospect life has been more exciting and stimulating and interesting and satisfying and rewarding and fulfilling the night possibly have dreamed it would have been.

Walker Mattachine Society Of Washingt Service Commission Independence Hall Civil Service Commissioner Office Of Personnel Management Supreme Court New York General Counsel Carter Administration Congress
"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

09:17 min | 5 months ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"Soon after Joe Biden was elected to the United States. Senate he began working with life. Long bigots in White Supremacists to pass and block all types of of anti integration legislation and in the Washington Post from nineteen seventy seventy five. We see Joe Biden claiming that he was a part of the civil rights movement. It says this is the nineteen seventy five article in the Washington. Post is says Joe Biden has accumulated some very credible civil rights credential credentials since adolescence participating in a high school restaurant Toront- boycott and then sins along. US forty those things never happened. So nineteen seventy five in one of the largest is leading newspapers in the country. These lies are being reported about Joe Biden never corrects them. It's my understanding that he told Eric Wentworth of the Washington. Post these these lies. These are outright fabrications and they were painfully debunked not only by his lone black high school classmate in the case of that restaurant boycott but by historians by civil rights leaders. It by Joe Biden's own time line because here's the thing the citizens along on. US forty that biding claim to participate in happened long after him being a high school student at age. Seventeen by the time time Biden started running for president in one thousand nine hundred seven. He had promoted lies about his work in the Civil Rights Movement for the entire previous generation ration- in the morning news in Delaware also in September of nineteen seventy five. They have an article where they repeat the same claim about buying and saying being as a young man he took part in sit ins to desegregate restaurants along. US Forty in Delaware. It never happened happened. Joe Biden never participated in a sit in along. US forty in Delaware first off. Joe Biden said the only a year he participated in the civil rights movement was in nineteen sixty when he was seventeen years old and when Joe Biden was caught in his lying scandal in nineteen eighty seven again biden himself said none of this ever happened in his spokesperson reduced it to the lone incident at the charcoal grill and something at a movie theater the sit ins and protests along route forty and Delaware did not even take place until nineteen sixty one and nineteen sixty two when Biden was off to college. He said they happened when he was in high school. At the age of seventeen secondly those protests along route forty in Delaware. They were organized organized primarily by core the Congress for racial equality and they were primarily Organiz with adults who drove into Delaware and bussed thin to Delaware from states all over the country. These were trained experienced activists and organizers. In fact in Joe Biden's Haydn's autobiography Biden says at great length that one of the primary reasons he decided to take a summer job away from college at a segregated swimming women pool in Wilmington in nineteen sixty two was so that he could finally get to know black people in black life personally had biden as he now now says been mentor and Black Churches and protested and set in with black people all over Wilmington in nineteen sixty. He was doing all of those things things you said last week in South Carolina. Se said two weeks ago in Delaware last month in Iowa. Joe Biden saying that at the age of seventeen he went to black churches in was loved on and trained by their pastors and leaders if that happened in nineteen sixty. Why do you and your autobiography say you took the job at a pool in Wilmington because you had no direct experience with Black Act people in this would give you that experience and doesn't add up now? I spoke directly with Dr Raymond Arsenal. He is an expert in the civil rights movement as well as a history professor at the University of South Florida. Dr Arsenal wrote one of the most important in text on the civil rights movement is entitled Freedom. Riders Nineteen Sixty. One is the single most source book ever written on Freedom Riders in the struggle for racial justice in nineteen sixty one in Dr Arsenal confirmed for me that out of hundreds of interviews and source documents. He has never seen a shred of evidence that Joe Biden ever participated in a single. We'll sit in along route forty in Delaware because those primary activists and organizers of those actions including Wayne Nicholls who kept meticulous records the route forty protests and Betsy Marston who managed much of the work at the University of Delaware who. They've also come forward word to say. That Biden was not part of their circles and that no records ever suggest that he ever participated in these things but without fail. When I I asked elected officials or legendary activists who I should speak with in Wilmington they eat said that I should speak directly to the first first black mayor of Wilmington Jayme seals who moved to Wilmington at the age of twenty five in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and has called Delaware home for the past ask sixty one years and activist and organizer himself he participated in the actual pickets at the reality show which did not what happened in nineteen sixty s Joe Biden said when he said he was a seventeen year old high school student? They happened in one thousand. Nine hundred sixty two and sixty three and Jim Seals confirm mayor. Jim Soon confirmed that they weren't sittings. He participated in and was arrested in sit ins at segregated restaurants but what was happening at the aalto movie theater. They weren't since they were pickets. Outside of the theater sometimes they called them stand ins and like almost every other young activists in the area area. Listen Mayor Jim Seals in nineteen sixty went to hear Dr King for the only time. Hi Dr King ever came to Delaware. Now you have to understand. Joe Biden says that in nineteen sixty. He's a seventeen year role during sit INS and trainings black churches in that he loved Dr King but when King came to Delaware Biden did did not go now. Biden says that nineteen sixty was his heyday of activism. But he's strangely didn't go here king. When he came to town mayor seals in fact back said that the first time he ever remembered meeting Joe Biden was around nineteen seventy? When Biden was running for office I spoke spoke to Larry Morris another veteran of the civil rights movement in Wilmington? He said he had no personal recollection of Biden. Ever being a part of the work in all of this leads me to a man name mouse. Let me break it down by bringing Yeah all of this leads me to a man named in fact. His name is Richard Mouse Smith and he. I met Joe Biden in the summer of nineteen sixty two. When Biden was a lifeguard at the segregated gatiss swimming pool in town Biden was nineteen and mouse was just thirteen years old back in July? Listen to this something weird. You're just happened okay. Back in July of Twenty nineteen in the weeks after Joe Biden and Comma Harris had a public disagreement. Do you remember were that that. They fell out in one of the democratic debates over the issue of busing an integration and segregation and Joe Biden's team began going on the defense and they began shopping story to news outlets. Let's all over the country and a couple of outlets picked it up so in July of two thousand nineteen Joe Biden. UNCOMMONLY Harris fallout publicly. You over Biden's record on bussing school integration and the Biden campaign. They begin floating mouse out to news outlets as someone interesting they could interview. That would vouch for Biden's character and a few places picked it up like blabbity and the Washington Post. They took the bait now. Here's the thing. Are you trying to tell me that mouse that he has an open letter in blabbity..

Joe Biden Delaware Civil Rights Movement Wilmington United States Washington Post Dr Raymond Arsenal Washington Dr King Black Churches University of Delaware Senate White Supremacists Jim Seals South Carolina Eric Wentworth Congress Richard Mouse Smith blabbity
"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

10:34 min | 5 months ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"And the Audio them about the play for you. Joe Again rekindles the lie that he participated in sit ins at restaurants and movie theaters. It never happened. Here's what he says he says when I was seventeen years old. That's one thousand nine hundred sixty. I participated in sit ins to desegregate restaurants and movie theaters of Wilmington Delaware except except Biden never once participated in a sit in demonstration in his entire life. Not In Wilmington or anywhere else. Let me play the clip for I share with many of you in this room. The distinction of being part of the post war generation. It's the largest in our history when I was seventeen years old. Like many of you participated in sit ins to desegregate the restaurants and movie houses of Wilmington Delaware when I was eighteen years old. Oh my spirit's soaring on that freezing January day when I heard a young president call us to greatness and when I was twenty years old my heart was full as I listened to that eloquent courageous black man shares dream for racial equality with all when I was twenty five I stood by the railroad tracks with my sister Valerie in openly wept. The hundreds of other. Delaware's his Robert Kennedy's funeral train. Pass Slowly Levi many of you share these and other experience speaking to a group of reporters quarters in one thousand nine hundred seven Biden again falsely claimed to have both Marcin participated in sit ins during the civil rights movement again. He did neither in his campaign admitted that he did none of these things. In September of eighty seven but again he continued this video about to play for. You is from Iowa. In in May of eighty-seven Biden. This is the crescendo of his speech again. Falsely claims to have marched in the civil rights movement and the Antiwar Movement against Vietnam. He never did that. Ladies and gentlemen I like many of Eunice Room share cheer the distinction being well that so called baby boom generation. I like many of you in this country that generation that is the largest in our history. We changed America. We change really by our ideas as well as our ideal. When we march the fourteen point program we march to Change Attitudes Ladies and gentlemen whether or not of a civil civil rights? The Women's movement preserving the environment or any of the war in Vietnam. We profoundly altered the face of this country centric. I want to pay particular attention in the in the audio play. View to the flip it they of how Joe Biden describes what he did in the civil rights movement in one thousand nine hundred sixty. He is speaking to a group of reporters here. Oh and here's what he says he says. Yeah I came out of the civil rights movement. I was one of those guys that sat in and marched and all that stuff all all that stuff but like he says it that way super vague in kind of flipping. It almost disrespectful. Yeah I was one of those guys that set that in and marched and all that stuff he says it that way because it never happened. This is not how one who actually did anything anything. In the civil rights movement would describe the courageous work of activism. People lost their lives people who actually set in one one in Delaware they were widely arrested. Sometimes assaulted Joe. Biden doesn't describe it never gives details or color just says yeah came out of the civil rights movement. I was one of those guys this set in and Marston. All that stuff because he never did it in. Listen this says not even how Joe Biden himself tell stories about his own life. Listen to this. I'm GONNA play the clip for you. He's vague in irreverent. Because he did not it actually do these things by the way. I know everyone in my generation supposedly only interested in BMW's NBA's and they don't care about anything so we're the toll. Every reminds some of the nineteen sixty. They said the same thing. There was no great movement on campuses in Nineteen fifty nine nine fifty eight and sixty I come out of the civil rights movement. I was one of those guys that Saturn and March and all that stuff but no one was moving in Somebody came along and struck the match the kindle the bonfire now when pressed further on this Joe Biden and his nineteen eighty-eight campaign team eventually admitted that he never wants marched in the civil rights movement and that he never wants participated any citizens in any restaurants in Wilmington or along route forty anywhere else in Delaware when his campaign was finally over his spokesperson. Larry Very Rask is said. That Biden may have helped in some non sit in kind of way at just one movie theater and one restaurant but Biden over the course of his life has named and claimed countless movie theaters countless restaurants. All over Wilmington up and down route forty and the restaurant that Joe Biden most. I need you to understand what I'm about to tell you this one. I'm about to tell you should should have tanked his life in politics. The restaurant that Joe Biden most often told people for decades that he helped desegregate segregate as a seventeen year. Old Boy in nineteen. Sixty is a restaurant in Wilmington called the charcoal grill in Joe has I don't abuse and deeply problematic story about how he helped desegregate that now. This is way before the campaign and on December twenty six of nineteen eighty two nowhere near running for president in eighty seven eighty eight shit on December twenty six of nineteen teenage to in a story about the history of the charcoal pit in the Sunday News Journal. The leading newspaper there in Wilmington Joe Biden said he loved the charcoal pit. And it's the articles about the charcoal pit. He loved it and he said he only had one negative memory there and it was from his senior year in high high school in nineteen sixty. He said I organized a civil rights boycott because they wouldn't serve black kids. One of our our football players was black literally only one. There was only one black student there in his entire class and we went there to the charcoal pit and they said they they wouldn't serve him and I said to the others. Hey we can't go in there so we all left. It was very brief and not nasty but my clear intent. It was to boycott. That's that's the quote from Joe Biden. But here's the thing that loan black student in the class. Nice is now a doctor. Dr Francis Hutchins the lone black student who was on that football team. He said that's not what what happened at all. Joe Biden says they went to the charcoal pit salt. They weren't serving black students and said Hey. We can't go here even if you did that. That's not a boycott but Francis Hutchings Dr Francis such and said no old. That never happened. Five years after Joe Biden gave that an interview about the charcoal pit that I just told you about in September of nineteen eighty seven as Joe Biden's campaign is in major trouble. He's been caught lying lying about his grades. In Law School. He plagiarized four different speeches from from from Labor Party leader. Neil Kinnock from Robert Kennedy from John F. Kennedy from a Humphrey and others and so the Philadelphia Inquirer tracks down that loan black student Doctor Francis Hutchings and as investigative reporters begin digging into all of Biden's lies. They found that even his loan story about out desegregating the charcoal grill charcoal pit that that was a lie. Here's their report. This is a quote from the Philadelphia inquirer in nineteen eighty seven. Even that student who is now a Philadelphia physician says that Biden's group was not even aware of what was going on because when Dr Francis Hutchings was ejected from the restaurant it happened out of their vision. It was only later after after all of the white students had eaten and left the restaurant that they even found out from the black student what happened. This is a quote from Dr Francis Hutchings. They weren't even aware of what happened. I was only sixteen. Then he said it was my problem my battle for me to work out. He says they were oblivious oblivious to it until later on now Joe Biden tells it that they get to the charcoal pit. And he's saying we can't go. Oh here they can serve Francis and they all left. That never happened. Francis said no actually they all ate their meal and left when they we're done and didn't even know what happened to me. He says quote they were oblivious to it and it wasn't that just that Joe Biden made these things up one one time. These things have been written about. Joe Biden hundreds of times in the leading newspapers all over the country. I have found statements in the Washington. Post The New York Times. All of Delaware's newspapers all the way back to as early as nineteen seventy five in. September of Nineteen Ching.

Joe Biden Delaware Wilmington Doctor Francis Hutchings Dr Francis president desegregate Robert Kennedy football Dr Francis Hutchins Francis Hutchings Eunice Room BMW Vietnam America Washington Larry Very Rask Iowa NBA
"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

11:10 min | 5 months ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"In one thousand nine hundred eighty seven. Joe Biden made a huge leap from being a younger forty year. Old Senator in New Hampshire. He decided he was going to go ahead and run for president and as he began Dan delivering speeches across the country. He started saying that he did things in the civil rights movement that he never did sit ins. Marches protests demonstrations and on February. Twenty six of nineteen eighty-seven Joe Biden began. Giving speeches is in New Hampshire super close to Delaware and his idea was. I need to shore up my base in this region in Delaware New Hampshire area so he began giving speeches in New Hampshire as he was preparing to run for president and in a speech. That I'm about to play you. He begins making multiple audible false claims about marching in the civil rights movement saying quote when I marched in the civil rights movement. I did not March with a twelve twelve point program. I'm mark with tens of thousands of others to change attitudes and we changed attitudes. Let me play this clip for you. When I marched in the Civil Rights Movement I'm Mark Penza thousands of others to change attitudes except Joe Biden never marched I in the civil rights movement? I don't mean he marched some he never marketed all. He did March with or without a twelve point program that was a complete fabrication now seven months after this Joe Biden explicitly admitted as much when his campaign crashed rashed in Bern. What's doubly disturbing about this though? Is that multiple staffers on his campaign. Begged Egged him to stop telling this lie. They knew everybody in his campaign knew that he had never marched in the civil rights movement but he he continued to tell the lie anyway now. I spoke directly to Matt flagging Heimer of the New York Times. Who really broke that that audio clip that I just played who really broke that audio clip where it was first on earth that in nineteen eighty eight nine nineteen eighty-seven Joe Biden's campaign staffers? Were telling him that you. You can't say these things and I asked Matt flagging Heimer The New York Times Matt like where did you get that information. And here's what he told me. Said Sean is all in a book that you've gotTa get. It's a book by Richard. Ben Kramer Aamer. He said man is a massive book. It's called what it takes the way to the White House and it's all about the nineteen eighty eight presidential race so I bought the book as soon as matinee hung up the phone. and Richard. Ben Kramer who won the Pulitzer Prize was a brilliant writer in the book. As the book is amazing. It has over a thousand interviews in the book which is seen by the mini as the single best book ever written on modern presidential politics. It's exhaustive in right there plain as day A. R. Joe Biden staffers. Talking about how desperately they want it Biden to stop telling the lies about working in the civil rights movement. He acknowledged to them that they were right that he should stop but he kept on telling the lies anyway. And and Kramer in Chapter Twenty Five. This is what I'm about to read to you as a section in Chapter Twenty five from Richard Ben Kramer speaking to campaign staff how he started in the civil rights movement remember the marches. You remember how that felt. This is imperilling Joe. Bovine in the people are nodding in the crowd. And Biden's got them. Trouble is Joe never marched. He was in high school playing playing football and Gurus shake their heads. Joe That's not marching in. Joe would say I know but then a week later. Another another crowd and Joe would do it again. This is a quote from Joe in Richard Ben Kramer's book folks. When I started in public life in the civil rights movement we march to change attitudes? I remember what galvanized me Bull Connor and his dogs. I'm serious in Salma and Joe's voice drops to an urgent whisper absolutely made my blood run cold remember but Joe Biden had never seen such things with his own eyes and he continued to suggest all over the campaign trail not only that he had marks but that he he had gone down to Salman Birmingham in protested almost as a freedom rider. Turns out though that Joe Biden didn't just tell these lies on the campaign trail he had been telling those lies for years in nineteen ninety-three. Joe Biden was was a keynote speaker at the Democratic Conference in Maine in falsely claiming there that he participated in sit ins and movie theaters and restaurants to desegregate when he was seventeen years old in nineteen sixty. But listen to me. Joe Biden did no such thing in fact nobody body in Wilmington Delaware or anywhere in Delaware did sit ins at movie theaters or restaurants in nineteen sixty in fact sit ins at segregated. It at restaurants did not begin in Delaware and sit ins never happened at the segregated movie theaters like the reality. Show that Joe Biden. Sometimes sometimes falsely claimed to help desegregate in nineteen sixty citizens did not begin in Delaware until nineteen sixty one when Joe Biden was off to college and they never and I talked to people who participated in these events that were no sit ins at movie theaters. Let me explain it to get into into those movie theaters to sit in them. You would have to be white. I off and you would purchase a ticket so African Americans never sat in in movie theaters and the only way that whites could sit in is if they bought a ticket so Joe Biden over and over and over again for decades. Hates was saying that he did sit as those theaters in every time. He says that he foolishly exposed the reality that he was never there but protesters were there though. I spoke to them. Not a single protest or organizer who demonstrated raided in Wilmington or anywhere else in Delaware for that matter has even won faint memory of ever seeing Joe Biden at any such event in nineteen eighteen sixty. When Biden said was the year he did it or in sixty one when he was off to college or sixty two or sixty three? And here's the thing. The efforts so these protesters and demonstrators were chronicled almost daily in local papers and in the new book. There is a a new book called historic movie theaters of Delaware. I've read the book. That book is seen as the leading book on the topic in the form of protests that took took place at those theaters. It was not sit ins but they had relentless picket lines. Outside of the theatre in those picket lines did not start in nineteen sixty when Joe Biden says and when I say Biden says if you listen to the previous episode Biden says he did all of this when he was seventeen gene in high school in nineteen sixty. The picket lines did not begin at the theater until November of nineteen sixty two and they carried worried all the way through until nineteen sixty. Three Joe Biden is off to college when the theatres were finally desegregated I. They were desegregated by choice. The the theatre finally broke down and desegregated in May of nineteen sixty three and then by law in December of nineteen sixty three. Let me play this clip for you. This is Joe Biden. He says when I was seventeen. That's nineteen sixty. I participated in sins to desegregate restaurants in movie theaters and my stomach turned upon hearing the voices of Faubus. That's the Democratic governor of Arkansas and Wallace. That's the Democratic governor of Alabama. My soul raged upon seeing bull conor in his dogs. Let me play this clip for you. When I was seventeen years old I participated in sit ins to desegregate restaurants and movie houses in my state and my stomach turned on hearing the voices of Faubus and Barnett and my soul raged upon seeing the dogs bull connor? When I was twenty five years of age I stood beside a railroad track Wilmington Delaware with my sister Valerie and openly wept as Robert F? Kennedy's funeral you'll train pass by. But now the age of forty as a Democratic leader Judiciary Committee you as the leader of that committee. I had to be reminded that Mississippi still has a dual registration system for voting. Here I became involved in politics because of civil rights and now I'm a forest in politics in spite of mounting civil wrongs well they hate the voices in our party who say much progress has been made we must now wait for the Reagan Revolution to play itself out to those voices. I say we cannot wait. Our soul will be corrupted by our silence as you you will notice there. That is Joe Biden in nineteen eighty three and he's also hinting again at actually being in the deep of south during the civil rights movement. That's why when he finally broke down and apologized in nineteen eighty seven. He said No. I confess I was not in Selma. And then he said I was not anywhere else. I was a suburbanite kid and I did not March. I was not an activist but in February of nineteen eighteen eighty seven. Joe Biden served as a keynote speaker at the California Democratic.

Joe Biden A. R. Joe Biden Delaware Joe That Ben Kramer Delaware New Hampshire New Hampshire Bull Connor Ben Kramer Aamer Richard Wilmington New York Times desegregate Senator president Pulitzer Prize Dan Matt Democratic leader Judiciary Co
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"As little black child in the south, I think fifty songs, and that was the way in which I was connected with my elders with my ancestors, ruby sales, the longtime civil rights activists going as far back as the Selma to Montgomery marches in nineteen sixty five during the pilgrimage sales eloquently spoke of the history and the place of music, not only during the movement. But also in the lives of African Americans starting in slavery during slave -ment it was a capital punishment for African Americans to read. We could be put to death for reading it was a law to write. It was a ghost law to engage in the public discourse. In the only thing that we had left was cultured. And now the coaster we created Soames and so became away in which black people express ourselves in a society that tried to reduce the property. And said that we were not significant enough to speak. It was our in associate was the essence of we are as a people. It was a repository hopes repository about dreams repository victors in the repository of our defeats. It was the essence of people who were not meant to survive. It's hold the world. How we have survived in slave -ment. It told the world how important it was love everybody. It told the world that we've got a right to the tree of democracy, told the world that everybody I've got shoes you got shoes. All goes shown got shoes when you start off seeing this on and at the end of the song something changes inside of you and you're not who you were when you first started singing. So I think that songs are very important to without sons. We couldn't have had a movement Johnson. We could not have have movement.

Johnson Selma Soames Montgomery
"civil rights movement" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

"The role of women in the civil rights movement is extremely important and actually women were central to the civil rights movement. That's congresswoman Barbara Lee of California herself a veteran of the civil rights movement expressing a core truth that the movement was powered by women. And because of the time they lived in the kind of work. They did their stories are rarely memorialize in the same way. The stories of men like the Reverend Martin Luther King junior Ralph Abernathy John Lewis and Andrew Young. Are. There will strong women throughout this movement that nobody knows. The men had a hard time getting along with each other because they were all young and each head of different approach to civil rights. They were very high strung, and brilliant and competitive young men, and it was Dorothy height of the national council of negro women that basically kept the peace amongst the six civil rights organizations and set in on all the meetings, but they didn't let her speak at the March on Washington. And she was a great speaker. Dr. They height would go on to live to be ninety eight years old still fighting for Justice until the end in his eulogy, then President Barack Obama paid tribute to her commitment by recounting an episode that took place just two months before she died in two thousand ten last February I was scheduled to see her and other civil rights leaders to discuss the pressing problems of unemployment Reverend Sharpton, Ben jealous the end of Lacey pe-, Mark morale of the national urban league. Then we discovered the Washington was about to be blanketed by the worst blizzard in record two feet of snow. So I suggested to one of my age, we should call. Dr heightened say, we're happy to reschedule the meeting. Certainly if the others come she should not feel obliged to to form, Dr Hite insisted on common, despite the blizzard never mind that she was in a wheelchair. She was not about to let just a bunch of men. In this me. Hi, I'm Jonathan Kaye part in this is voices of the movement a series from my podcast Cape up sharing the stories and lessons of some of the leaders of the civil rights movement and using them to figure out where we go from here. During the civil rights retreat in January at sunny lands in California, we all sat down for remembrance dinner, various leaders stood up and told us about those. They worked with who are no longer with us. Andrew Young kings, chief strategist was assigned to memorialize start the height, and he used that moment to herald other women who contributed so much to the success of the movement who are no longer around to share their own stories at a time when the world seems ready to recognize them that could not have been a civil rights movement without the sacrifice the vision, the support and the hard work of the thousands of women. One of those women was start the cotton as the director of the citizenship education program. She was the only woman with an executive position in the southern Christian leadership conference in Atlanta with the civil. Rights move. But Dorothy cotton came down to work with us in voter registration and citizenship education, and we joined her with septum Clark, a teacher schoolteacher from Charleston. There Reverend Martin Luther King junior used to call septum Clarke, the mother of the movement Clark believed that literacy means liberation. So she worked with the Highlander folk school to set up citizenship schools, which were designed to educate disenfranchised voters and empower black communities and shoot taught. Literacy on the ferry boats going back and forth between Johns island and Charleston. Every morning and every night every afternoon, she was there to teach people to read and write to register to vote, and it was about an hour and fifteen minute ferry ride. And she was a every morning making sure that the longshoremen got their reading lesson in everyday eventually Clark combined her efforts with Dorothy cotton citizenship education program, but the SEC and together we recruited and trained six thousand our leaders from Virginia all the way over to east, Texas, the names, you heard about most than Louima, Amelia Boynton. So almost all these people came over to Dorchester center and are the cotton. And septa Clark. Basically kept them for a week. And we help them to know how to read and we didn't teach him to read like we taught children read because we assume that everybody can read something and our job was to convince them that they could read. And so we started with us have a Coca Cola sign you hold it up. What does that say they can all read Coca Cola? And then you spell out the syllables with them. They knew them, but we taught them the sounds of the reading that they knew and then they conducted classes in their homes, and that churches and Abune Paulos. And we we trained a generation of leaders between nineteen sixty one and nineteen sixty six that was Dorothy cotton's work. Well, we we had somebody from just about every county and South Carolina about half of the counties in Georgia and about half an Alabama read across the black belts from east, Texas, all the way up to Virginia. That was the foundation. Of the civil rights movement upon which when Martin Luther King moved in and started a movement. They're already people that we trained the people trained by Dorothy, cotton and septum Clarke went back to their communities and helped educate and train more potential voters. Those people included women like a million Amelia Boynton from so Alabama went there went to Selma as a nineteen year old girl in nineteen twenty nine and she worked in voter registration and community organizing throughout her life. And she actually lead a get out. The vote caravan across the black belt of Alabama for Obama's his reelection to his second term. And so from nineteen twenty nine to two thousand eight she was an active voice, and nobody really. As much about. But that's what we name. My recent mine newest granddaughter Amelia after Amelia, boys.

Martin Luther King Dorothy cotton Amelia Boynton President Barack Obama Andrew Young septum Clarke California Clark Barbara Lee septum Clark Washington Jonathan Kaye Dr Hite Highlander folk school Abune Paulos Virginia Texas Ralph Abernathy
"civil rights movement" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"There was also no housing, no jobs being offered to to Catholics at the at the time in the north of Ireland. This gave rise to a civil rights movement at cetera, looking for the one man one vote, but the kind of the efforts of of Martin Luther King here in America and how that civil rights movement as a peaceful movement, how would articulated south both in words and how would I took related south on the streets and as a peaceful movement is wash, gave rise to an was, it was it was very, very important part of up the Irish civil rights movement. I believe in in Northern Ireland and this was before my time, but it's something that. In hindsight, as I grew older and learn about history is is very, very interesting, very, very important in the video for for Nina cried power. There's two two activists saying than the con- imprinted concert or Bernadette Devlin, who was a wasn't organizer, epic leader in that civil rights movement. So it's it's very, very interesting time for for Northern Ireland. I, even though I, I grew up in the privileged kind of 'em in the Republic violent where the difficulty of that tension just was not. It was not a reality for me growing up in Arnold as you as you learn about Arlyn's very troubled history in a lot of ways it is. It is a history of people who were stripped of their language. The faith was the legal language was illegal people who were denied the right to own property and then and persecuted for being poor. When I hear music by people like Nina, Simone, people leave connection. Yeah, it's just something I've such respect for and such admirations for. Yeah, play part of the song where Mavis Staples. Comes in because they're such a part and then I'll like play their music. That's important. You and my. Those strong than me strayed into the phase that. Chains. Being free..

Northern Ireland Mavis Staples Nina America Ireland Bernadette Devlin Martin Luther King Arlyn Arnold Simone
"civil rights movement" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights movement" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"Could. So for those who hadn't heard the song yet. I think on the Billie holiday Curtis Mayfield you mentioned, I think all of the are. Fifteen, maybe maybe fifteen. Yeah. In the album version, which is. Okay. And all American with the exception of John Lennon released here, if any? Yeah. What was happening back home and and what because something has to. I would think you tell me if I'm wrong, but I would think something has to resonate with you to feel the feeling of them cry for something. Is. I would think not knowing. How you grew up? I would think foreign to you. Yeah, no, absolutely. You could. You could say that I suppose all of my a great deal. My music an influence is a huge amount of them stem from of an American tradition. And I mean, blues was the first music I listened to his child, and that's what you get. Blues musician. He played in blues bands and his entire record record collection was John Lee Hooker, muddy waters, Howlin wolf. Otis Redding, James Brown. So you know, like stacks and chess records and Motown cetera from me that that was just the beginning of kind of my experience of what music was blues music and a lot of ways. I'm glad of that because the older I get, again, seeing blues as the the kind of seed and root of rock and roll, and and that being really everything that all all of the acts, the shape popular music as we see it in the kind of canon of twentieth century popular music, whether it's Rolling Stones and the Beatles cetera did a huge amount to shape the writing of popular music in the twentieth century, all their musical education, although they're cutting their teeth to blues music and to the blues tradition and such a view it as kind of the home of the kind of the common language of popular music. What about the politics here? The politics is tricky. I suppose when it comes to black artistry and most of my influences come from the artistic and musical achievements of black artistry. And let's say, Nina, Simone of John Lennon is mentioned in that song is, you know, Pete Seeger Bob Dylan. It's it's, but I suppose Nina's central Mavis in particular. Obviously, Staples is very central to to that song for a few reasons. One, I suppose because I heard a voice that I used to listen to as a child before going to sleep. I'm one that kind of haunted me. I have to say in the best way possible as a child because I'd never heard music is kind of weighted down with a voice that was so so raw in its in its expression of feelings of kind of of sorrow and grief and anger at times. And and so for me, it was it was such a kind of a changing experience as a kid and and discovering, centreman cetera. You know, that's one of the reason. I need so central nave is also because you're dealing with an artist who's music and whose work was so central to an incredibly important and redeeming moments of twentieth century political history in the west, which is the civil rights movement here in in America. The civil rights movement here, which is this incredible linchpin moment for politics in just the west in the twentieth century, that is what gave rise to and was the leading factor of about the civil rights movement in Orland also helped me there because me and many others won't make that it's a hard thing to explain. I can. I can only like we writing some like this comes from at of shared appreciation and kind of an and respect and it's why it was so important for me to get involved. So I grew up in Wicklow, so I very, very far moved from the tension that would have been in in the at north of Ireland that the civil rights movement took place in nineteen. Sixty eight nine hundred sixty nine and and kind of was central to in particular to Derry Londonderry in in Ireland. At the time, there was a great deal of gerrymandering. Certain people were able to vote based on the rates that they paid to the council at cetera. So if you lived in poverty, if you did not have a job, you did not have a vote and and that was that was his late as the seventies..

John Lennon Nina Curtis Mayfield John Lee Hooker Ireland Beatles Otis Redding Derry Londonderry Pete Seeger Bob Dylan Staples Motown Wicklow James Brown America Orland