31 Burst results for "Civil Rights Division"

Man accused of killing Houston PD sergeant part of 'The Sauce Factory' gang

Sean Hannity

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Man accused of killing Houston PD sergeant part of 'The Sauce Factory' gang

"Against against the the 24 24 year year old old accused accused of of killing killing Ah Ah Houston Houston police police sergeant sergeant here here is is county county prosecutors prosecutors say say Robert's Robert's police police used used a a gun gun to to threaten threaten people. people. In In separate separate cases cases in January in October. They also say he's a member of the sauce factory gang. So Lisa's being held on a $700,000 bond in connection with Monday's shooting death of Sergeant Sean Rios. Now. Houston police chief Art US A. Veda was responding to Seles. His attorneys call for an independent investigation. There's already an independent investigation being conducted by the civil rights division of Harris County. District attorney's office attorneys for Robert's least one. An outside investigation into Sergeant Rios is death, claiming HPD is too close to the case. HPD escorted the body of Sergeant Rios from the medical examiner's office to the funeral home this morning. Funeral plans have not yet been announced.

Houston Robert Sean Rios Art Us A. Veda Seles Lisa Sergeant Rios Harris County HPD Rios
Attorney General Barr considered criminal charges against Seattle Mayor Durkan over handling of CHOP, New York Times reports

News, Traffic and Weather

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Attorney General Barr considered criminal charges against Seattle Mayor Durkan over handling of CHOP, New York Times reports

"That the Department of Justice maybe considering charges against Seattle's mayor over recent protests. Combos Charlie Harder has more. This is a developing story out of The New York Times in which Attorney General Bill Bar according to their reporting, is asking federal prosecutor Eater's to consider charges against Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan. This over the establishment of the Capitol Hill occupied protests that took over several Seattle blocks in May and June. Bar wants them to consider charges through the civil rights division Charlie Harder, camo new murder can cause the report chilling in the latest abuse of power from the Trump administration.

Charlie Harder Seattle Bill Bar Jenny Durkan Department Of Justice Trump Administration The New York Times Murder Attorney
DOJ seeks data on care home deaths in 4 Democrat-led states

WBZ Midday News

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

DOJ seeks data on care home deaths in 4 Democrat-led states

"The DOJ is ordering several Democratic controlled states to hand over Copan 19 data from nursing homes. The DOJ has sent letters to the governor of New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Michigan, asking about orders which may have resulted in the deaths of thousands of nursing home residents. The department's civil rights division is trying to decide whether to launch investigations under a federal law that protects the rights of people in state run nursing homes and other facilities. Prosecutors want to know what orders requiring admission of covert 19 patients could have led to deaths. Alison Keys. CBS NEWS Washington A

DOJ Alison Keys Copan New Jersey New York CBS Pennsylvania Washington Michigan
DOJ probing states that admitted COVID patients to nursing homes

WBZ Afternoon News

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

DOJ probing states that admitted COVID patients to nursing homes

"19 data. From the governors of states that issue orders that may have led to the deaths of nursing home residents. We get more details from CBS is Alison Keys. In a statement, the D O J says New Jersey, Michigan, Pennsylvania and New York required nursing homes to admit called it 19 patients to the vulnerable populations, often without adequate testing. It says it's civil rights division is evaluating whether to initiate investigations. And wants to determine whether the state orders are responsible for the deaths of nursing home residents. In April, DOJ announced it was also investigating the soldiers Home and Holyoke, Massachusetts, where 76 residents have died of covert. 19. Alison Keys. CBS NEWS Washington

Alison Keys CBS DOJ New Jersey Holyoke New York Washington Massachusetts Pennsylvania Michigan D O
Lack of Accountability for Police Violence is Solvable

Solvable

05:09 min | 5 months ago

Lack of Accountability for Police Violence is Solvable

"This is solvable. I'm Jacob Weisberg. There is a lack of accountability for police, violence and one part of. Solving that is to give federal prosecutors more tools, so they can actually prosecute this cases. Approximately a thousand people killed during police encounters in the United States every year. And in fact, that number is held steady for nearly twenty years. Around half of those killed or white. Black Americans are more than twice as likely to die at the hands of police. They are killed disproportionately to their overall representation in the population. I'm thinking about. Say The shooting of Philander Castille. CAPLESS Tamir Rice twelve year, old boy, who was shot and killed by an officer when playing in a park in Cleveland. How do we achieve racial justice while protecting public safety? Lawyer Cheer Baynes believes the federal. Government has a key role to play. What exactly would you like to see? Happen there for Congress to lower the intense standard from willfulness recklessness, so that it would be a federal crime recklessly deprive someone of their rights under color of law to recklessly use excessive force for all the Americans who died during police encounters in less than two percent of cases, does an officer end up being charged with a crime? When you were at Doj how many times did specific language of willful thwart possible prosecution of of an officer? You think you felt a done something wrong. Routinely, that was the biggest barrier. It was always the central concern. Kira. Who's devoted his career to ending impunity for officers who commit crimes against citizens thinks we can fix this. The problem of lack of accountability for police violence is solvable. Cheering Baines is the director of Legal Strategies de Moth a racial justice organization before that he worked at the US Department of Justice, serving a senior counsel to the head the civil. Rights Division, that's the division that investigated. Ferguson Missouri and sued the city for unconstitutional policing and court practices. Baynes Co wrote the Ferguson report. Malcolm Bradwell spoke to Baynes about what needs to be done to solve the persistent problem of police impunity at the national level. To critical components are lowering the intense standard for the federal government to prosecute active excessive force criminally and using federal consent decrees to address systemic misconduct. You've been working on this question of how to make police better for quite some time right? Yes, actually. It's been an issue that's been. An issue that I've been distressed by want to do something about since I was a young kid. Actually the Rodney King case happened in the beating of Rodney King. One thousand, nine, hundred, one I was ten years old, and there are a lot of high profile incidents in the hundred ninety s with I'm dirty, yellow Louima and many other high profile cases of police violence police killings. Finish cared about as a high schooler for sure I can remember that were you in high school Chelmsford High School? It's a small town in Massachusetts next to the city of Lowell, maybe about thirty thousand thirty five thousand people. It wasn't like you were. LIVING IN LA or living in the Bronx where Ahmadou was shot, it was you were these were instance miles away. That nonetheless caught your attention. Absolutely these are national stories and I was very interested in. Civil Rights history even civil rights law. The role of lawyers in the civil rights movement. I think maybe juxtaposed that history and the principles underlying that movement with what I was seeing. Play out in terms of police violence in the country. At that time, and actually can remember. An organization called the stolen lives project that would collect information about the people who have been killed by police, disproportionately young black man. That is something that I recall, so. It's something I've. been working on for a long time ended up working on that some more in law school, focusing on it, and then it on my first job after clerking for a federal judge was to actually prosecute police misconduct cases including police violence. How early on you decide that? You wanted to become a lawyer depressingly early? Han actually I think I thought in high school. That would become a lawyer. What did you think of that decision? Well I'm an Indian kid and the child immigrants and so. I think a lot of people in that boat might relate. My mother wanted me to be a doctor. That would million other Indian children. Yeah Yeah. It's a common refrain and. Short of being a doctor, a lawyer was pretty good, so. But you know my family wasn't focused on these issues. These weren't the issues that they confronted him and they cared about it. In the sense research, generally aware my grandmother used to describe all this work as a community service or volunteer work and I'd have to actually get paid to do this job.

Officer Chelmsford High School Cheer Baynes DOJ Rodney King Jacob Weisberg Rights Division United States Baynes Co Philander Castille Ferguson Missouri Baines Congress Tamir Rice Massachusetts Cleveland Kira LA
"civil rights division" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:53 min | 5 months ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Civil rights division investigating the discovery of a noose found in the Talladega speedway stall of driver Bubba Wallace the only full time NASCAR driver who's African American who earlier this month push NASCAR to ban the Confederate flag at its races this is a very very serious act and we take it as such we will do everything in our power to make sure that whoever has committed this act incomes to justice and and comes to light we read this type of behavior from our sport right from our sport ask our chief operating officer Steve Phelps Saudi Arabia says this year's hajj will not be canceled but that due to the corona virus only very limited numbers of people will be allowed to perform the Muslim pilgrimage the kingdom saying only people already residing in the country will be allowed to perform the hajj the government didn't specify how many people would be permitted to take part the film is usually draws about two million people for five days of worship in Mecca Florida continues to deal with corona virus that has officials planning on how to handle upcoming elections schools are expected to open in mid August for the next school year in Florida and while usually school stays in session on election days while the buildings host polling stations this year they might shut down for those days to accommodate better social distancing for voters Florida's primary will be held on August eighteenth and the general election day is November third many county elections chiefs were hoping governor Ron DeSantis with extended early voting periods in hopes of avoiding ballot box chaos in Broward county Florida Evan brown fox news director behind the lost boys St Elmo's fire into Batman movies has died Joel Schumacher died in New York City after a year long battle with cancer he was eighty on Wall Street the Dow gained one hundred fifty three points the nasdaq at one ten hi Lisa this.

New York City Evan brown Mecca Florida Steve Phelps chief operating officer Lisa cancer Bubba Wallace Joel Schumacher director Broward county Ron DeSantis Florida Saudi Arabia NASCAR
Trump’s policies have enabled police violence against black Americans

The Sunday Show

04:32 min | 6 months ago

Trump’s policies have enabled police violence against black Americans

"I think the part of what we're seeing is the reality of what African Americans have been saying all along it's like the recent video that came out where police in buffalo pushed an elderly man down cracked his head and they just walked on by it is the power of that image to recognize that this isn't just about black people it's some of it's similar to like freedom summer where whites came down to Mississippi and and felt the power of what was happening the horror of what was happening and I think that the the change there is going to require what they talk about them ripping this structure out root and branch the white supremacy out root and branch that is the key to stopping the recurring cycle of white rage those policies like eliminating the the the sale of military military grade weaponry to our police forces us to stop monitoring of the consent decrees those sorts of things that's what this truck regime did in response to what the Obama administration had to Adam Serwer I want to get to you on that exact point because it's something you wrote about this week you wrote a piece in the Atlantic called trump gave police permission to be brutal and you know the president threatened this week to engage US troops significant military presence has been brought to DC by the president especially in front of the White House so what does the president see as the role of the police the president's vision of the role of the police is very old and I think it's it was on display decades ago when he took out a newspaper ad are calling for the death penalty for the Central Park five and saying you know bring back to the police bring back the death penalty you know Kiki since since that time of course Central Park five exonerated but he hasn't got retracted that statement or that sentiment because he has an idea that the police are there to impose control on people like the Central Park five so even if they were not actually guilty of the crime they were convicted of their guilty of the kind of people he wants the of being the kind of people he wants the police to crack down on but you know I mean the the the problem the problems of American policing a really structural and date will depend on it our policy changes both on the federal and local level and you can you know if if if president trump doesn't get reelected all right there's a strong possibility that Joe Biden will have a civil rights division that is at least close to as aggressive as the Obama administration in overseeing local police departments with federal authority but that's still you know there's still a lot of issues that can really only be addressed at the local level and you know that's a place where even if you look at that New York City for example it's actually quite difficult because even liberal politicians are very afraid of angering the police unions there's a number of areas in which policy would need to change in a lot of different people who would have to be responsible for doing that what do you think a factor that you you do have and in some cases for the very first time members of the military coming out and saying it is absolutely inappropriate to to use the military force the way the president has been doing I mean this is like a breaking point do you think I think people need to understand that the police and the military have very different political and institutional incentives the military has a as a the American military is a culture of wanting to be an up here nonpartisan there under civilian control so it's really important understand that you know not only does the military have a different institutional culture but it's very unusual for retired generals to speak out in this way against a sitting president on the other hand the president has put all these former military officials in a very difficult position by suggesting that he wants to order the military to go out and finally quell protests against police misconduct

"civil rights division" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

04:10 min | 6 months ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Around with the fires in both Minneapolis and St Paul there's mark fry Minneapolis police abandoned their third precinct overnight as protesters breach the headquarters at the epicenter of this week's unrest following Monday night's death of George Floyd Minneapolis fire chief John Friedel told WCCO television the situation was untenable for Minneapolis firefighters and once he approve the firefighters we've had box in different type of projectile shorted us the last couple nights and it's it's made it made it very challenging and surely our number one priority is the safety of our firefighters St Paul Klee said overnight they responded to one hundred seventy businesses damaged or looted along with dozens of fires no serious injuries were reported from the west metro mark fry newstalk eight three WCCO we have received reports regarding many attempting to get into the third precinct on numerous occasions that is Minneapolis mayor Jacob fry in an early morning press conference explaining his decision to remove officers evacuate them from the third precinct the decision that I made was for the safety of our officers and the safety of the public the symbolism of a building it's not always easy importance of life the building burned continues to burn as to a number of other buildings in the area president trump taking the opportunity to tweak criticism of the mayor calling him weak a radical left mayor this is worth using to take responsibility for your own actions weakness is pointing your finger at somebody else during a time of crisis try repeating its call for members of the community to do what they can to help stop the violence that has racked the city Saint Paul police say upwards of one hundred seventy businesses were damaged during the day and evening looting primarily although there were several fires also reported in the capital city overnight none of them quite to the degree of the fires we've seen in Minneapolis earlier this morning St Paul mayor Melvin Carter had this message for his city and anger as we are that that that George Floyd in the first name in the first personally seen live their lives in that way and frankly as angry as we are that we don't have any local basis to be able to be confident that somebody's gonna be held accountable for his killing that you know destroying our local grocery stores and pharmacies the places we're in the middle of a food crisis well your family need to get groceries or the places where in the middle of a pandemic are seniors need to get the medicine that does not honor his memory that does not help us build a better future like Minneapolis he says the National Guard has been deployed to help local officials in Saint Paul as well Minnesota senator Tina Smith with strong words for both the death of George Floyd and also the violence overnight speaking with WCCO is Dave Lee on the morning news she says she is actually now working to get the U. S. justice department civil rights division to take a look at Minneapolis police department and their patterns and practices because I do believe that there are some systemic issues wrong there that can't be fixed by improving training or changing policies and procedures so I think that that is that is one step that I think we should take immediately she said this morning that are concerned about the department actually date back when she was chief of staff under then mayor RT Ryback a CNN correspondent crew were arrested earlier this morning while covering the unrest on Lake Street cameras were rolling life when Omar Jimenez and his crew were arrested by state patrol they say the crew of four did not identify themselves they did and they say they were not moving out of the way but that was not the case because it was on live television wherever you'd want us we will we will go we are just getting out of your way when you're advancing through the intersection so just let us know maybe gotcha moments later the African American Jimenez was arrested and led away in handcuffs followed by his cruel but released soon thereafter after CNN's president Jeff Zucker spoke with governor Tim walls who apparently apologized and said it should have never happened he also promises walls does too apparently address that and the rest of the state of affairs here in the Twin Cities what else a press conference.

Minneapolis St Paul
"civil rights division" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:58 min | 6 months ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Download you can search and browse privately avoiding trackers all for free DuckDuckGo privacy simplified your next update is at nine fifty eight on the traffic leader KCBS sixty forecast now without clouds I make that clear skies tonight with lows in the forties and fifties it's gonna be a sunny day tomorrow look for sixties and middle seventies cosigned seventies to mid eighties around the bay and inland more sunshine for Sunday with temperatures warming up into the low to mid seventies cosigned seventies to mid eighties around the bay upper seventies to low nineties inland for Memorial Day we have a excessive heat watch that will take effect Monday morning and continue through Thursday night with Monday's highs in the mid sixties to low eighties at the beaches seventies to upper eighties around the bay and we'll see some eighties to mid nineties for the inland areas Tuesday Wednesday should be sunny with highs in the upper sixties to low eighties up coast mid eighties to low nineties bayside and nineties to some triple digit temples temperatures possible for some of the inland areas Thursday should be partly cloudy with highs in the sixties and seventies upco seventies and eighties around the bay upper seventies to mid nineties in one and then on Friday partly cloudy with highs in the upper sixties to mid eighties sixty for this hour in Santa Rosa the nap airports at fifty nine degrees Concord's reporting sixty five it is sixty eight in Oakland San Jose sixty one Livermore sixty two Hayward at sixty and in downtown San Francisco it's fifty degrees traffic and weather together on the eight son all news one of six nine AM seven forty KCBS KCBS news time nine fifty ones ever in person at the KCBS editor's desk the US department of justice has sent a letter to the mayor of Los Angeles warning when an extension of the coronavirus stay at home orders may be unlawful the fake letters sent today from the assistant Attorney General for the civil rights division said recent comments by mayor Eric.

KCBS Santa Rosa Concord Hayward San Francisco editor assistant Attorney General Oakland San Jose Livermore US department of justice Los Angeles Eric
Mississippi prison crisis: 23rd, 24th inmate deaths reported since late December

KYW 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Mississippi prison crisis: 23rd, 24th inmate deaths reported since late December

"Great have been more inmate deaths in Mississippi has the state deals with a crisis and its prison system autopsies are pending for two male and one female inmate who died in Mississippi this week at least twenty four prisoners have died in Mississippi since late December the deaths along with prison violence that has escalated into riots have prompted lawsuits by inmates added investigation by the civil rights division of the U. S. justice department Mississippi's corrections department has been plagued by lack of state funding short staffing and poor living conditions Jim chrysalis

Mississippi Jim Chrysalis
Mississippi prison crisis: 23rd, 24th inmate deaths reported since late December

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Mississippi prison crisis: 23rd, 24th inmate deaths reported since late December

"More prison inmates have died in Mississippi is that state deals with a crisis and its prison system autopsies are pending for two male and one female inmate who died in Mississippi this week at least twenty four prisoners have died in Mississippi since late December the deaths along with prison violence that has escalated into riots have prompted lawsuits by inmates added investigation by the civil rights division of the U. S. justice department Mississippi's corrections department has been plagued by lack of state funding short staffing and poor living conditions Jim chrysalis

Mississippi Jim Chrysalis
Justice Department opens investigation into four Mississippi prisons

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 10 months ago

Justice Department opens investigation into four Mississippi prisons

"The justice department has announced a civil rights investigation looking into several Mississippi prisons after a string of inmate deaths in the last few months the announcement came today after fifteen inmates have died since December CBS news justice and homeland security correspondent Jeff the gase with more this is a notable because of over the last month or so there've been fifteen inmate deaths every time we look up it seems another inmate has died in one of these prisons and so today the department of justice's announcer investigation to see what's happening inside some of Mississippi's prison the investigation by the justice department's civil rights division will focus on conditions at the Mississippi state penitentiary at Parchman southern Mississippi correctional institute central Mississippi correctional facility and the Wilkinson county correctional

Justice Department Mississippi CBS Jeff The Parchman Southern Mississippi Wilkinson County Correctional
Justice Department opens investigation into four Mississippi prisons

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 10 months ago

Justice Department opens investigation into four Mississippi prisons

"The justice department has announced a civil rights investigation looking into several Mississippi presence after a string of inmate deaths over the last few months the announcement came today after fifteen inmates have died since December CBS news chief justice and homeland security correspondent Jeff the gays with more it is a violation of the inmate's rights if the conditions inside these prisons are such where they are not getting the mental health care that they need or are they are being protected from physical harm at the hands of other prisoners investigation by the justice department's civil rights division will specifically focus on conditions at three different penitentiaries the state penitentiary along with one in southern Mississippi and a correctional facility in Wilkinson

Justice Department Jeff Mississippi Wilkinson
Deval Patrick to Democrats: Others have plans, I have results

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:21 min | 10 months ago

Deval Patrick to Democrats: Others have plans, I have results

"Divall Patrick is the accomplish two-term former governor of Massachusetts and he's running for the Democratic nomination for president. His is an Uphill Hill. Fight made tougher by the fact that African American voters are not giving the only black candidate in the race now the boost and support. He needs to have a fighting chance. The Patrick isn't giving up with reasons I said earlier. You know I have Others have plans. I have results here. What they are right now governor? Patrick thank you very much for being on the podcast Jonathan. Thank you for having me all right so when we were writing up in the elevator you said to me what what was that that you're a black man can't win so let's let's go right there. We're talking about my aunt. Gloria man part was off the Rick Now I read your column I read your column and I you know I was telling you on the way up about a caller to a a radio call in show. I was on in South Carolina a few weeks ago and he sounded. And I'm I'm aware of my presumptions and say he sounded like a Like a black man and he said To the effect governor. Patrick he said you know you are exactly right. You are just right for the country he said but I don't think that America's going to elect another black president And I will say more and he said well you see that Trump is the reaction to Obama and and we're just not ready for For Black President we thought we were when we elected Obama. But we're not today and you know I I have not Had not heard that again Until I saw your uh until I saw your article and I know you said that's not exactly what you were Right the article was about well. I mean what we're talking about is my my aunt. Gloria who lives in North Carolina at the Family Barbecue will uphold. I my relatives in in in the in the in the yard at the barbecue and she said the way the the the system the way it is right now things being so racist that it's going to take an old white man into beat an old white man old school against old school and that was her argument. For why Joe Biden she thought would be the person who should be the nominee the and should be someone who could beat President Trump and the Washington Post did a pole with Ipsos where Vice President Biden foreign away is leading among black voters in this was a poll. Only a black voters this sort of reinforced On Gloria's areas viewpoint you're standing in that poll was less than point five percent Do you think I mean given the call from the South Carolina giving on Gloria and the family hold them well the oath of the look. I think I might experience as a candidate. Eight and watching Candidates and in politics is to be deeply skeptical of polls Really right up until the eve of the election the mole that it matters to say the obvious is is Is the vote cast by by voters you know polls told us that the outcome of two thousand sixteen presidential the election was going to be very different than than the and it's not that all poles are bad. It's just I think most of what we're getting today are polls about name recognition in that. Add respect I have a lot of work to do Nationally and we're getting that work done but I think the the The part of the of the column Jonathan if I may okay so as a Respectful of your incredible work. I'll give you the critique. No it just made me sad Because I think what is happening in many ways and this goes beyond race but I also see it among A black voters I meet is that we are so focused on the very very very important work of defeating the incumbent president that we are all of us looking for permission to devote our aspirations so we keep being We keep talking ourselves or in some cases being talked into. What is the smart outcome and candidates do it as well Columnists pollsters pundits and And so forth and I think you know voters others have a singular power and that is to make up their own minds about who best represents events their aspirations for for themselves their families their communities and And the nation and seating that to To people who were you you know hard at work trying to sort of outsmart or forecast outsmart. The electorate forecast the election before people have really begun to focus in on it. I think is a a is a worry not just for me as a candidate but for me as a citizen. I'm going to ask you this question that I have I have here. You may have already answered it. But I'm going to ask it because it's sort of our black voters being pragmatic or too cautious is not just black voters and and When I say When you when when I hear pragmatic I am hearing That they are buying a narrative about likelihood of success from people whose success at predicting likelihood is mixed at best folks aren't GonNa unreason their way through polls and punditry to the right answer. They're going to Eventually pay attention to. WHO's making the best case and WHO's likely to make the strongest case against Against President Trump and the fact that we know Joe Biden. We're familiar with With Joe Biden. Who by the way is wonderful person? doesn't necessarily mean that He's the most effective at a At standing up to to president trump and I'll just say if I may on my own behalf and I say this mindful that there are it's big talented field with with a bunch of my friends in it no one else in this race has a range of life and leadership experience that I do domestic and abroad private sector and public And when you consider the range of challenges that face people black and brown and white and everybody else how much like The experience of growing coming up on the south side of Chicago with other black people and That I had and neighborhoods like it. How much like that? Experience is is experienced experienced today in In the suburbs in small towns among a white working class People better be willing and able to be a bridge to change that That lasts while speaking of of your career. I'll be a little more specific. You were the two term governor of the Commonwealth uh of Massachusetts. Yes you were the former. US Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights. Division during the Clinton administration correct rang and in private sector at Bain capital in other places. Why don't you think given this range of experience and having I'm Ben in the race now is two months yet? I think so. Yeah too much like today that you haven't that you haven't been able to break through through well we you know we have a lot of work to do. We are focusing not on national polls are becoming famous. I'm focusing on building in the early states. We have With a real emphasis on New Hampshire and South Carolina for reasons we can talk about but we have organizations in each places teams growing very a fast in those two primary states up on the air with TV commercials digital commercials in in the early states and that is a that is terrific. Perfect you know in the I think in the days before I came here To your offices in. DC We were in New Hampshire. I WANNA say three three days and did nine or ten events in those days had four front page Articles in local newspapers. There's big headlines and so on bigger and bigger crowds and they're very engaged so for me it's not about you know just showing up and having rallies. It's really trying to listen to people. I have a whole bunch of very strong ideas of my own campaign by asking people to make personal increasingly. They are they're doing so so again. I have no illusions about the about how heavy the lift And had life not intervened. I would have come in more than a a year ago and I think you know that story but I came in when I did because it felt like This great talented field. Good as it is and familiar to me as many many of them are Might Miss the

President Trump Joe Biden Divall Patrick South Carolina Gloria Massachusetts Uphill Hill Barack Obama Vice President New Hampshire North Carolina Washington Post Bain Capital United States Jonathan Chicago America Rick BEN
Michigan AG's office to investigate conduct of Royal Oak police after stopping black man

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Michigan AG's office to investigate conduct of Royal Oak police after stopping black man

"New this afternoon the Michigan attorney general's office will be investigating an encounter between Royal Oak police officers and an African American man WWJ newsradio nine fifties Michael Cohen joins us live with more Michael a good afternoon broke Attorney General Dan and Nestle today directed her civil rights division to look into the conduct of Royal Oak police after officers stopped and questioned Devin Myers on Tuesday the twenty year old was detained after a woman called nine one one and reported that she was cold uncomfortable after men circle her vehicle Myers says he had parked his car was walking to a restaurant when he was stopped Nestle says if there any cases where the civil rights of a Michigan residents have been violated office is ready to investigate and pursue the matter Royal Oak police so supervisor was disciplined in other supervisors have received additional training after this incident police say the officers had no legal right to demand Myers identification and encounter should have been very short reporting live Michael Cohen WWJ newsradio nine

Michael Cohen General Dan Devin Myers Supervisor Michigan Attorney Royal Oak Nestle Twenty Year
"civil rights division" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Ken. You're on the air. Yes Hi my name's Ken Barnes Nsen. I just wanted to chime in because I was the trial attorney for the Civil Rights Division. It's just department when he sued the city of Yonkers New York fourth largest city New York over exactly the same thing and what we alleged was that the city itself was liable for housing segregation in the city that occurred because the city chose to Put v Seventy eight hundred units of public and subsidized housing while within one square mile and the city chose to reject a thousands and thousands of propose units that were proposed all over the city and mostly white neighborhoods which would have led to more desegregation so the city's policies where where liable for <hes> the segregation that occurred and I don't know if that's exactly the facts of today's New York City <hes> but there aren't that many lily white neighborhoods there that I know of anyway in New York City but the city's choice of where to place the the subsidized housing <hes> affects what kind of you know where people are GonNa move in yonkers just like in New York City now the housing units were built in the minority neighborhoods and they said well oh where knocking down minority old <hes> bad housing in order to build these units and so the minorities who lived in those areas are entitled Relocation Act to move back into those areas but you alluded earlier earlier to the idea that <hes> folks are applying for these things as if they really WANNA move back to a segregated <hes> maybe less well-off neighborhood and that isn't necessarily the case they want housing can't afford to live in new. You're kidding so that's where you built the unit. That's where they wanna most right <hes> so so can just just for for people including myself who don't know what the outcome of this case against the deejays case against the city of Yonkers was briefly. How did that case conclude well? It's interesting. It was the first join housing in school desegregation case we won in a landmark opinion in the district Corey was upheld in court of Appeals. The city tried to not comply with <hes> with orders of remedy and the Supreme Court upheld contempt citations for the city officials just as a reminder mayor and <hes> and people who are now working for New York so yes we won and <hes> indeed when units were built in any white neighborhood as a result of this plus it it was very interesting because the white neighbors really were objecting to it both pre lawsuit and after and they were afraid that people who moved lived in there would be minority in poor and not good neighbors but it turned out that they got along well once they were able to test the waters and meet each other and see that they're real human beings just like me you and <hes> it was really the <hes> very salutary thing not nearly enough units with bill would like anymore but it worked out well well and that that problem of not enough units still persist to this day but Ken thank you so much for your call. Now we have been focusing on New York <hes> for for <hes> the first part of the show but this issue is actually br one felt broadly in many cities across the country a little in the little bit we'll hear from Louisville Kentucky but for example in California San Francisco adopted a local community preference program in two thousand fifteen and in this clip. You're GonNa hear San Francisco resident. Mario Watts sharing how that policy helped him secure an apartment in the very neighborhood where he grew up and then we're here. We'll here in this clip <hes> San. Francisco's mayor London brain. Here's what's I I moved into my new home of this year. February twenty fifth of twenty nine hundred my son and I happened to have great lottery numbers because of the makers of preference. We're winding moving into this lovely..

New York City Ken Barnes Nsen yonkers Yonkers New York Civil Rights Division San Francisco Ken. trial attorney court of Appeals Mario Watts Corey San Supreme Court Louisville Kentucky California one square mile twenty fifth
"civil rights division" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Shell. I've been telling you the story of Kelly Stimpson who you'll notice is now with frequent guests on the show again for over a year and a half we weren't hearing from Kelley because he was a nominee of the president to serve a very important function at the Pentagon. He got out of committee twice his nomination was voted out of committee. And then it just sat there and sat there and sat there and Kelly's not the only one there are literally hundreds of others who just sat there and sat there the entire first two years of the Trump presidency. Never getting a chance to have their confirmation voted on by the United States Senate because there's some arcane rules that I believe now have finally been changed. We spoke with Senator Mark Lankford of Oklahoma during CPAC several weeks ago where he instituted or or propose some changes here, and it looks as though majority leader McConnell is finally coming through on. This Hans von speak. Kaczynski is our guest. Here's the manager of the election law reform initiative and also senior legal fellow at the center for legal and judicial studies at the Heritage Foundation has leader McConnell actually, made this change. Now. Official Hans no I don't think they've had the vote on it yet. But they certainly need to do it. In fact, there are three hundred and nine if you can believe it three hundred and nine nominations of President Trump sitting in the Senate, seventy one of those are judges, but the other two hundred thirty eight our executive branch nominees and the rule that they want to change is one that says that if if a vote comes through to end a filibuster. Well, then there are thirty more hours that senators can use to debate particular nominee before they then hold a vote. Well, that's ridiculous. If if they use thirty hours on the over three hundred nominees it would take years to approve. And most of the time the party in the minority have not exercised that they they waited. And they just let the vocal threw out of deference to keeping our government functioning and letting an administration actually work, but this time around Chuck Schumer. He's held the line on a whole lot of those. Right. Yeah. They have. And what what the resolution that's been introduced by Senator James Langford would do. And this is what Senator Mitch McConnell is. Now supporting is say that instead of thirty hours of debate on all nominate as there would be two hours of debate for non all nominees except nominees for the supreme court and the appeals courts and secretaries of the different departments. Other words cabinet the cabinet posts, everybody else all the district courts all the lower position sub cabinet positions. You would get two hours of debate. Which makes a heck of a lot more sense. Now, what happens to those three hundred people? At the beginning of the new congress. Do they have to start from scratch again now and go through the committee process again? Yes, one one say congress ends all those nominations are sent back to the president. He has to re-nominate, you know, I I guess I you know, they they could decide to waive another hearing if they wanted to. But in essence, the nomination process starts all over. All right. And so the president then has to renominate everyone needs to go through the committee process, and then they'll get their book. But at just put it in perspective, Hans it's remarkable that the administration's been able to function with all of these positions vacated, right? Yeah. No, it it really is true. Look in the Justice department, for example, they had for the first two years. They had all these empty seats sitting at the heads of major department. Heck the associate position which is the number three slot has been empty. For more than a year and a half. And we had other positions ahead of the civil rights division, head of the criminal division, the head of the civil division. These are the major divisions.

Senator Mitch McConnell president Hans von speak Kelly Stimpson United States Senate Senator Mark Lankford Chuck Schumer Senator James Langford Oklahoma Justice department congress Heritage Foundation Pentagon Kaczynski Shell. Kelley Official executive
"civil rights division" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Number one radio show. Great to have you with us. What's my call? My pleasure. I'd like to talk about is the general Flynn, pending sentencing and some glaring hypocrisy by the FBI did I don't think anybody's really called out yet. As a local law enforcement officer the past thirty two years, and I retired as a commander from large in Washington DC and years ago, the FBI civil rights division came in and said that we couldn't be trusted for honesty and integrity. And at great cost CD agency. We were compelled to put in audio and visual recording for interview rooms for a tear Gatien's were interviews. We are supposed to accept at face value these three or three forms, not only the honesty and integrity veracity of the individual agent doing the interview, but also their memory, and yeah. We're in the twenty first century here and local agencies at great cost in now, even with our patrol functions or required to wear body cameras because apparently we can't be trusted for patrol functions as well. And the FBI is compelled this through the civil rights division on local agencies and yet it's very hypocritical. What happened with the Hillary Clinton interview? We'll never know. Boarded? Just what I would like to see is the attorney general the new attorney general needs to make an compelled the PI and their interviews. These are monumental interview. Sit impact the government in the in the inner workings of this government for many many years to come. And yet, we don't know if the memory of the individual FBI agent is even correct. Well, well, the other interesting thing about that is that sometimes I I gather normally a three oh three as you call it. Which is the the the report of the interview is this is this is when the the agent has conducted the interview, and then he goes to yield e worldy stenographer, and and and presents his recollection of what happened at the interview. And y'all de well eastern Agua forgets out the quill pen and writes up a written report of what the agent remembers happening at the interview that in some of these cases in the in the Malo investigation the alleged three oh threes. Were written in some cases, weeks and months after after the the interview took place Russell, let's that Scholley not normal law enforcement, either is it it's mind boggling, and it's absurd in the twenty first century that we're not recording these interviews. So that there's an caracul evidence as to what was said by the agent, and what set by the by by the defendant, or by the respondent cases. And and this is why the Third Reich. I'm sorry. The civil rights division of the FBI came into local agencies and said, wait a minute. You're having complaints that constitutional rights are being violated. So therefore, we're going to compel you to record these interviews. So there's no question as to whether there's any Miranda violation of someone's rights and taking these interviews and that the interviewer is documented correctly what they're hearing from the respondent. You're not doing this in the most important investigations in our country. Yeah. I mean because as you say that the F B I made you do it because your interviewing MRs Smith. About something that happened in a town of seven hundred people in the middle of nowhere. But you can take out the national security adviser of the United States a without even having any agreed neutral record of what actually took place in that meeting. That's exactly what an audio and visual recording is is it is a completely neutral recording of everything that is said by the agent and the respondent. Well, you're you make an excellent point muscle. I would say the as I mentioned earlier I'd coast to go to the FBI. But I think it, you know, I think we reaching the stage when you look at what has happened in this investigation where everybody who actually is interviewed by the FBI should actually take the precaution of making their own recording of the interview aside from anything else, I'm sure the FBI would object to that. But in that case, again, I go back to what I said right at the top of the show because Russell is. Absolutely, right. What what the FBI does to local police departments around the country. They say you have to record this. You have an interview room where you interview suspects. We're going to have to have cameras and microphones in that room. Okay. Thank you FBI. Excellent advice, by the way, what a camera and microphone do you use? So we can. By the same stuff, you'll using. So we'll all been away where we actually don't use cameras and microphones. We have these old fashioned three. Oh, freeze ten nine thousand nine ten forty whatever the hell it's called stupid mumbo jumbo bureaucratic form-filling. Why don't they? It's exactly the same. Well, they do to these local police departments Russell's. Absolutely, right. Is exactly the same as they did to Michael Flynn. They record his conversation with the Russian ambassador. But when they want to get him over that when they wanna ruin his life over that. They don't have to have a recording the judge this judge should follow this the idea that you can take out the national security adviser at the United States without even having a recording of it is absurd absurd. Lots more to come. You're listening to the network. Iheartradio.

FBI Russell Michael Flynn United States Hillary Clinton Washington Gatien commander Malo officer MRs Smith Miranda attorney thirty two years
President And CEO, President Obama and Department Of Justice discussed on Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

01:01 min | 2 years ago

President And CEO, President Obama and Department Of Justice discussed on Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

"That Vanita Gupta is our special guest former, head of the civil rights division of the department of Justice under President Obama. Current president and CEO of. The leadership conference on civil and human rights we had a long conversation last segment about the census we mentioned that. There's a separate survey in which the, US, government, asks about citizenship Vanita talked about. That different from the census so that naturally leads me to believe, in need of the government more or less knows with the citizens are yet, the. Government has the information that it needs through the American community, survey to as I said be able to, enforce civil rights laws to dole out eight hundred billion dollars of money it's. Got that information sufficient to. Be able to do its job and everyone knows that in the Trump administration citizenship question is just not benign There is nothing benign about it? And understanding that Steve Bannon was behind it I think, only underscores that rather nefarious

President And Ceo President Obama Department Of Justice Vanita Gupta Steve Bannon Vanita United States Zillow Trump Administration CBS Eight Hundred Billion Dollars
Ebola outbreak in large city 'very concerning'

Morning Edition

02:27 min | 2 years ago

Ebola outbreak in large city 'very concerning'

"In washington i'm dave mattingly the world health organization says there's now a high risk of bola spreading regionally from the democratic republic of congo npr's ava peralta says there are fourteen confirmed cases of the virus in the country including one case in a major city outbreaks of ebola in drc are usually easily contained because they happen in rural areas the chief of the world health organization says a confirmed case in the city of more than one million is concerning but he says the global community now has more tools to deal with any poll outb break a vaccine for example is already being deployed in congo more than four thousand doses of the new experimental ebola vaccine arrived in the country this week a house committee will be questioning the justice department's point person on civil rights this morning he is expected to be pressed about a citizenship question added to the twenty two thousand census npr's hansie lo wong reports the government says the question will help enforce the voting rights act many democratic lawmakers are skeptical of that reasoning and they're worried that this question will discourage non citizens from participating in the upcoming national headcount that's why they went to question the acting director of the justice department civil rights division john gore he was invited to testify last week at a hearing but he didn't show up and now he has agreed to attend a foul appearing with the house oversight committee i'm dave mattingly in washington and i'm dave freeman in san francisco on kiki we at five forty three coming up on morning edition in a few moments us wine exports to greater china which includes taiwan were two hundred ten million dollars up ten percent last year and four hundred fifty percent in the past decade but chinese tariffs have fifteen percent put into place after trump put tariffs on steel imports are threatening the export market the export market growth the story on american wine and much more ahead you run an american company you use imported steel and aluminum yellen we had ships on the water with material so we are paying the tariffs but as far as going forward we're kind of in a pause i'm kai ryssdal yes please we would like an exemption trade of a global nature next time on marketplace the financial story of the day in the week on marketplace today at four pm on k q public radio i'm judy woodruff on the next news hour ahead.

Dave Freeman John Gore Justice Department Dave Mattingly Judy Woodruff Taiwan China San Francisco Washington Acting Director Congo Ebola Ava Peralta Two Hundred Ten Million Dollar Four Hundred Fifty Percent Fifteen Percent
"civil rights division" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Artistic expression um i just my religion teaches me that samesex marriage is wrong and i i'm just i'm not gonna make you a cake youth you feel free to by case that we have here feel free to buy cookies and all that stuff but i i i think i have a first amendment rights come to to not be compelled to do something which is in violation of my religion okay the the same sex couple did not agree they filed a complaint with the colorado civil rights division in colorado there is a state statute which says that some sexual orientation is a protect the class describes swimming against them on the supreme court is ultimately agree to hear this case and i i don't know um i think it's going to be close calls to how they come down on its there's a similar sort of case which has been bubbling up as well and it comes out it comes from minnesota and was share with you it's an an when i see how you feel about this mean here's the deal it's a it's a saint cloud minnesota couple and what they do is they run their business years wedding video griffey so you know you hire them and they come out in the film your wedding it than things like that all right now they have this business and their business and they make it very very clear um they they advertise and they say kill part part of our business involves our our christian beliefs and what we we're we're just gonna be very fronts about this we're because of our christian beliefs we are not going to provide.

colorado minnesota the deal first amendment civil rights
"civil rights division" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"We return now to the events in charlottesville over the weekend join me now's beneath the gupta the head of the justice department civil rights division during the obama administration she is now the president of the leadership conference on civil and human rights a nonprofit legislative advocacy organization and george salim he was the first director of the office of community partnerships in the department of homeland security and the inter agency countering violent extremism task force you left at apartment just ten days ago but if it's 2017 last year you helped run the civil rights division under the first black president what goes to your mind when you see on friday night young men holding torches having a march and obviously the events of yesterday as well well i think all assess stark about the march on friday night and then on saturday was that these folks felt so involved and that they weren't even wearing masks and heads that they had been in prior in prior times and then of course hearing the president of the united states make the statement that he did on saturday without specifically condemning the white supremacists who are marching in his name with david duke explicitly saying they were carrying out the promise of donald trump followed then by you know another anonymous statesman statement from the white house on on sunday it is deeply troubling that we are in a time in 2017 where today the national news is covering the news that the president of the united states is actually finally condemned white supremacy i mean it's it's it's shocking none of this is normal none of this should be normal uh but we also know it's an administration that right foot s out a steps outside of the oval office steve bannon is a strategic advisers sebastian gorka in others they've been pursuing a policy agenda which reflect some of what we are seeing play out right now in very visceral terms are for the rest of the country who george leads use this.

charlottesville president human rights director united states david duke donald trump steve bannon sebastian gorka justice department civil rights obama george salim ten days
"civil rights division" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"A great piece over a daily coz that a the headline uh i in our references my conversation with bob ney about ten fifteen minutes ago but the headline trump and sessions jeff sessions turn civil rights division i would be the civil rights division of the department of justice which is charged with enforcing civil rights laws into a weapon to protect white privilege and and uh the the article says the trump administration is preparing to redirect resources to the justice department civil rights division port investigating is suing universities over affirmative action admission policies deemed to discriminate against white applicants orting to a document obtained by the new york times and so oh yeah it's uh they're going to start suing schools are they know that are doing what the supreme court said you can do and you should do in fact is you know try to have a diverse campus it's good for everybody but no no no no you know uh make america white again they you know it was just a typo right in his slogan should have been ma wa mala make america diving this is what it's all about jason wilson a day before yesterday wrote a piece in the guardian titled young white guys are hopping mad confidence grows at farright gathering this was the socalled american renaissance conference that was held in tennessee over the weekend and are calling for a race realism and a white ethnos state within the united states uh this is very very spooky stuff but it it is going mainstream uh the is talking about this american renaissance these are white nationals white supremacists and this weekend american renaissance held its annual conference in montgomery bells state park or west nashville teddy's and speakers clearly felt a growing confidence they have seen appreciable growth in membership of established emerging farright groups they've also seen the election as president of donald trump uh the uh some of the topics race realism and race denial is the white.

bob ney new york times supreme court jason wilson tennessee united states montgomery bells state park president donald trump civil rights department of justice america nashville ten fifteen minutes
"civil rights division" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Program lauterbourg dumber than here with you and i just want to go through some of the news that's out there today for a few minutes and then we'll pick up your phone calls them and and it continue of mark some sumner wrote a great piece over daily coast that eight the headline in our references my conversation bob ney about ten fifteen minutes ago but the headline trump and sessions jeff sessions turns civil rights division over the civil rights division of the department of justice which is charged with enforcing civil rights laws into a weapon to protect white privilege and the the article says the trump administration is preparing to redirect resources to the justice department civil rights division ford investigating and so in universities over affirmative action admission policies deemed to discriminate against white applicants oregon to a document obtained by the new york times and so yeah it's they're going to start suing schools are they know that are doing what the supreme court said you can do and you shouldn't do in fact is try to have a diverse caplis it's good for everybody but no no no no or you know make america white again they it was this the type all right it has slogan should have been an awa mala make america that in this is what it's all about jason wilson day before yesterday wrote a piece in the guardian titled young white guys are hopping mad confidence grows at farright right gathering this was these so call american renaissance conference that was held in tennessee over the weekend and are calling for a race realism and a white ethnos state within the united states this is very very spooky stuff but it it is going mainstream they is talking about this american renaissance these are white nationals white supremacists and this week at american renaissance held its annual conference in montgomery bells state park or west nashville teddy's and speakers clearly felt a growing confidence have seen appreciable growth in membership of established emerging farright groups they've also seen the election as president of donald trump at the uh some of the topics race realism and raised denial is the white.

american renaissance nashville jason wilson ford department of justice civil rights donald trump president montgomery bells state park sumner united states tennessee america supreme court new york times oregon bob ney ten fifteen minutes
"civil rights division" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on KTRH

"One one when you look behind the myth and deceit and outright lies of the left and their agenda and their programs when you're really dig in at all falls apart it all falls apart now will continue on the subject but in one add another one this is from msn dot com reuters actually the trump administration is preparing to redirect resources of the justice department civil rights division torn investigating ensuing universities hct affirmative action admissions admissions policies deemed to discriminate against white applicants according to a document obtained by the new york times now there are a lawyers in the civil rights division most of whom were hired by obama and his leftists and they were secreted into these positions under the civil service system and one of them just violated the code of professional conduct for what for conduct for which they can be disbarred by leaking work product information confidential at this point to the media the document an internal announcement to the civil rights division seeks carat lawyers interested in working for a new project on investigations and possible litigation related to intentional racebased discrimination in college and university admissions the announcement suggests the project will run out of the divisions front office where the trump administration's political appointees where what's wrong with that the obama administration's political appointees barrow themselves into that bureaucracy and the obama administration had its political appointees do these things all the time there's nothing offensive about this roger clegg a former top official in civil rights division too in the reagan and bush administrations who is now president of the conservative center for equal opportunity called the project a welcome a longoverdue development as the united states becomes increasingly multiracial in other words as two percent.

reuters new york times obama obama administration roger clegg official civil rights reagan bush president united states justice department two percent
"civil rights division" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Radio international in collaboration with the new york times and wgbf moved boston publicly welcome back it's todd's will agree with you today there are new reports today that the trump administration is looking to change the way the department of justice police's discrimination at colleges and universities according to an internal document obtained by our partner the new york times the department is set to shift its priorities away from enforcing anti discrimination laws on behalf of minorities instead doj is preparing to use it civil rights division to go after cases where white college applicants say dave and discriminated against the supreme court has ruled that race can be used as one factor among many in a holistic admissions process but they are pending cases that the doj coup now get involved in for more returned to to mieko brown nagin she's a professor of constitutional law at harvard law school professor welcome hi todd what was your reaction to the reports of this change in priorities at the civil rights division at the doj yes while it's not at all surprising that the trump administration liquor state of this court yes for decades affirmative action has been both a legal issue and a political wedge issue it is controversial it his easy to mischaracterize at it riles people up the opposing affirmative action major had to be legally julius in the long run but it's definitely on a political winner for trump so you see this as good politics filtered through the civil rights division by political appointees giving some headlines in ways that trump supporters will appreciate that's right for those in his base who resent non whites at people who are inclined to believe that affirmative action as as are else son game that benefits racial minorities at the expense of lights after all this president is in battled his approval ratings our historically low his administration has lost in a number of our arenas on health care largely lost in the courts on the muslim ban it's loss personnel at alarming rate so yell our pita it may be legally dubious in the longrun idle no thatthat's true but it navy but politically it seems like it's.

Radio international new york times boston todd partner nagin professor constitutional law doj trump president civil rights harvard law school
"civil rights division" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on KQED Radio

"International in collaboration with the new york times end wg balloon fulston publicly welcome back it's todd's will agree with you today there are new reports today that the trump administration is looking to change the way the department of justice police's discrimination at colleges and universities according to an internal document obtained by our partner the new york times the department is set to shift its priorities away from enforcing antidiscrimination loss on behalf of minorities instead doj is preparing to use it civil rights division to go after cases where white college applicants say they've been discriminated against the supreme court has ruled that race can be used as one factor among many in a holistic admissions process but they are pending cases that the doj could now get involved in for more returned to to mieko brown nagin she's a professor of constitutional law at harvard law school professor welcome hi todd what was your reaction to the reports of this change in priorities at the civil rights division at the doj yes while it's not at all surprising that the trump administration would pursue this arts for decades affirmative action has been both a legal issue and a political wedge issue it is controversial it his easy to mischaracterize at at riles people up the opposing affirmative action may turn out to be legally julius in the long run but it's definitely on apolitical winner for trump so you see this as good politics filtered through the civil rights division by political appointees giving some headlines in ways that trump supporters will appreciate uh that's right for those in his base who resent non whites at people who are inclined to believe that affirmative action as as they are l son game that benefits racial minorities at the expense of lights after all this president is in battled his approval ratings our historically low his administration has lost in a number of our arenas on health care largely lost in the courts on the muslim ban it's lost personnel and alarming rate so our peter it may be legally dubious in the longrun i don't no thatthat's true but it.

new york times todd partner doj nagin professor constitutional law trump president civil rights harvard law school
"civil rights division" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Can express your thoughts your views your opinions and be heard all over the country in every state in every region of the country well i've been telling people that we need a thousand ministers to march and it becomes clearer every day the department of justice where we're marching tool has announced now that they are diverting some of the funds in the civil rights division of the department of justice to investigate whether the white students are being discriminated against in institutions of higher learning because of affirmative action now you gotta understand is now we dealing with last week the president telling police to get tough during arrest we're dealing with transgenders near told they are going to at least told by twitter by the president that they're gonna be are barred from the military now they're going directly at affirmative action this is a clear pattern of 21st century racism to roll back everything back to king stood for if anybody did not understand why we need to go to washington august twenty eight the spiritual leaders if they're gone up all plainly take civil rights once that they ought to be dohrn police reform awe they ought to be dohrn criminal justice reform the ought to be doing voting rights and go to protect white students when you have more white students in college today than you ever had they're telling you in your face ace what time it is the question is what klockow you looking at this is a clear message that we intend to on voting rights on affirmative action on everything to turn back the clock saves time revenue tom rabbis tally man to stand up uk lead people if you're not going to stand up when it counts so i hope that everybody listening to me will say i dunno of was gone but i'm going now every mena every route by air remain to be there that day because we are marching for martin luther king's memorial battle mild to the justice department monday the 28 they will be work in that monday will we be there to.

president twitter civil rights voting rights mena martin luther king department of justice washington dohrn uk
"civil rights division" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Personal concerns of of attorney general jeff sessions i i mean political concerns actually is this something that's have been a major priority our major concern for him for a long time this has been a strain of conservative thinking outside the government in inside the senate and inside the cabinet attorney general jeff sessions is really the embodiment of a lot of this thinking not just on civil rights by it also um on voting rights on lgbt people and he's also talked about wanting to make police partners and set of investigating police this issue i'm sure is going to focus in the confirmation hearing for president trump's leader of the civil rights division eric dry band who is a former general counsel of the iaea so these report signal a real uturn from president obama's policy towards affirmative action and college admissions i want to bring in a voice from the obama justice department they need a gop does with us she led the department civil rights division until earlier this year welcome can tv hair thank you then you what do you make of these reports well you know i think i learnt with some alarm that the justice department is setting up the stage to sue colleges ever admissions policies that discriminate against whites and and yet in some ice it's us we've seen this clave up before what's unusual here is while there's any launched to try to undermine educational diversity in this country at the federal government has not initiated suits against colleges as way it's usually that the federal government swayed answer we will make his brace on the likes of this is a fairly across it at two really i underline core aspect of china cher that all students have stepped talents from all backgrounds louis xiv close luck unfair shot at overcoming obstacles to educational opportunity and aggressive move by is it actually your view that white people are not that being discriminated against by universities look the united states supreme court has at times time again of how the constitutionality.

senate civil rights trump general counsel iaea obama gop federal government united states attorney voting rights president
"civil rights division" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The letter sent by the same time by the justice department civil rights division if forced forty four states to provide extensive information on how they keep their voter rolls uptodate side of the 1993 national voter registration act known as the motorvoter law which mandates the state's help voters register through motor vehicle parliament's now it didn't the justice department is not saying how're you enforce in this law how we how're you doing the good stuff instead of saying give us your information chris kulbok ken blackwell ten blackwell was the guy who who printed ballots on on ten or twenty pound paper and and then decide and and distributed them in in a largely in neighborhoods of color and then decided that those ballots couldn't be cowdery because they were printed on paper to light that it had to be forty pound paper 65 paper whatever was it pound just like you know how much it it's out a actual uh this is how much reema paper ways but it's at one point in time in the distant past that's how they used to identify papered so it's kind of carried forward but in any case and then hans von spakhov ski and j christian atoms these guys are all votes oppressors naked vogts oppressors i mean this just it's it's just amazing n of veneto gupta was the head of the civil rights division of the justice department writing this this article in today's new york times or yesterday's new york times really worth checking out i encourage you to check this out and i'm still scratcher my head about why a donald trump doesn't no healthcare works and finally jeff sessions this the eric erickson wrote this over on the resurgent this is a conservative website conservative website eric erickson rightwinger to to the bottom enough from the office head of the bottom of his toes and he writes attorney general jeff sessions has long prided himself and asking to things are constitutional before priests preceding the constitutionality of his desires has run crashing into his law and order views he has decided to expand a positively unconstitutional policy that should be ruthlessly fought in courts in la legislatures across the country jeff sessions wants to seize the property of americans accused of.

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"civil rights division" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights division" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"What they are instead of just taking account of what actual progress has been made its debut over eight years where we were able to do was was pretty amazing in all areas of civil rights and that's what's it's important to note i mean this is from everything from voting rights is one of the most obvious ones and everything that we did to expand and find ways to expand voting rights to ensure that everyone who to everyone had an opportunity to vote everyone's vote counted to what we did in the housing arena in lending arena the discrimination in hundreds of millions of dollars that was returned to people who are discriminated against in in in housing and lending in part of what tank our economy the last time out what was done in the areas that i was most closely affiliated with an incredible justice what we did on policing what we did with you consent decrees what we did involving hate crimes involving use of force involving immigration involving human trafficking the work that we did audience gratien matters through the civil rights division incredibly important linking sold them together going and and really showing that would your pile was doing was unconstitutional illegal immoral and just fighting that fighter it just so much that we were able to accomplish that i really am sad to see what the created misery shoes do with all of this so you actually kind of grew up in terms of your legal career in the civil rights division starting out early on and then coming back into the administration as a as an official give people a sense of what the civil rights division actually does because for people looking at on the on the outside and i talked to my i worked in civil rights division and talking with my family it's hard to explain some time so what are the tools that the division and other offices dedicated to civil rights do you just to protects what.

civil rights voting rights human trafficking official eight years