35 Burst results for "Civil Rights"

NAACP leader on diversity in Biden's Cabinet and commitment to civil rights

Here & Now

04:43 min | 1 d ago

NAACP leader on diversity in Biden's Cabinet and commitment to civil rights

"Speech days after the election, Joe Biden think black voters for helping him win the White House. The African American community stood up again. For many with always having my back on, I'll have yours. Now. There's some concern that Biden isn't making good on that promise. At least seven civil rights groups are pressing to meet with the president elect, including the end of the P and the National Urban League. They want Biden to name or black leaders to top jobs in his administration. Marc Morial leads the Urban League mark. Welcome. Hey, it's great to be with you. Thank you for having me. My pleasure. And if and when you get a meeting with the President elect, what will you tell him? So importantly way look forward to a direct communication with the president elect, and we're gonna reaffirm our interest on behalf of the community that the number of Diverse cabinet members, particularly African Americans. Prominent and every level of the body Administration Cabinet sub cabinet. As well as at the White House. You know, we want to give the president elect due credit. He chose an excellent running mate, Senator Harris. He's made an important appointment of Cecilia Rouse, his chair of the president's Council of Economic Advisors, and Linda Thomas Greenfield as U. N ambassador. But we're heavily focused. What's known as a statutory Cabinet, defense and justice and transportation and commerce and labor and hot and education and HHS, For example, that is where The important levers of power are We're going to communicate that to him, and the second thing will be communicating. Eyes our interest in the public policy arena. We need aggressive enforcement of civil rights laws. We need strong investments through both stimulus. And infrastructure plans, and we need Focus on long term issues of racial justice, criminal justice reform, police justice reform just to name a few high priorities and finally With respect to cove it we need to ensure That the vaccine is safe and effective for all people and that there is a community based distribution system. To ensure that people in our community have access to the vaccine. I guess What I'm trying to understand is if you are actually concerned with what you've seen so far, or if you're just trying to get ahead of the process, As you point out, there have been many black officials appointed to keep jobs in the Biden administration says they're not done yet. Yeah, I think it's both. And I think it's uh they've been to statutory Cabinet nominees thus far. Treasury Three rather Treasury homeland security as well as the State Department, and that's important and we do have a concern and we do want to get ahead of the process and We want to be clear that we're looking for a cabinet. When it comes to African Americans and meets but really exceeds the high water marks of the Clinton and Obama cabinets. This is a different time. And the president elect is made of important public commitment to racial justice, and I believe he's serious about that, but toe execute that He's got to have people who have lived experiences. As well as professional qualifications, along with connections to the communities that have borne the brunt of the country's systemic racial injustice. Look, there's no doubt having a diversity of opinions from all walks of life is critical in any leadership role, but make the case why Race matters so much here. Ben Carson. I'm thinking of Ben Carson, a black housing secretary. I assume you don't agree at all with his policies on many black leaders At the same time, we're saying that outgoing Senator Doug Jones, a white man would make a great attorney general because of his record fighting for civil rights. So let me say this. Van Carson is a great doctor. I never thought Ben Carson was qualified. To be secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. I thought he would have made made a great surgeon general. You made a great secretary of health. Human services. I think it was an example of picking a quote unquote black person and putting him in what some perceive to be a black position at the Department of Housing and Urban Development. And I think it was It was a mistake, and I think it was a disservice to Ben Carson. So I mean, it's important. Understand this is not just about a black face in a certain place.

National Urban League African American Community Marc Morial Biden Body Administration Cabinet Su Senator Harris Cecilia Rouse Linda Thomas Greenfield White House Joe Biden Council Of Economic Advisors Biden Administration Cabinet Ben Carson HHS Treasury State Department Senator Doug Jones Van Carson
Decades Later, Liberian Warlord Faces War Crimes Trial in Switzerland

Dennis Prager

00:31 sec | 1 d ago

Decades Later, Liberian Warlord Faces War Crimes Trial in Switzerland

"Former Liberian commander was a rebel has appeared in a Swiss court charged with war crimes 45 year old Elliot Kaze a fought against Liberia's leader, Charles Taylor, in a civil conflict notorious for its savagery. With that conflict ended. He fled to Switzerland, where he was arrested in 2014, after a civil rights group presented the Swiss attorney general with evidence of his involvement in war crimes. He denies the charges and will give evidence to the court next

Elliot Kaze Charles Taylor Liberia Switzerland
Atlanta's Kwanza Hall Wins 5th District Special Election

AJC Briefing

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Atlanta's Kwanza Hall Wins 5th District Special Election

"Former atlanta city councilman kwanza hall gets to walk in the shoes of his mentor. Us representative john. Lewis hall one tuesday's runoff and will complete the final month of lewis's term in washington representing georgia's fifth congressional district. The georgia secretary of state's office said it has already transmitted the election results to washington to allow him to be sworn into office immediately hall defeated former morehouse college president robert franklin in the runoff he at trumpeted his ties to the lewis family during the campaign all grew up in the same neighborhood as their home and lewis son john miles endorsed him. His father leon hall worked with lewis on civil rights issues

Kwanza Hall Representative John Lewis Hall Georgia Lewis Washington Atlanta President Robert Franklin Morehouse College United States John Miles Leon Hall
Judge: Detained immigrants must see a judge within 10 days

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 3 d ago

Judge: Detained immigrants must see a judge within 10 days

"Civil rights groups are applauding a ruling by a New York federal judge that newly detained immigrants must be presented in court within ten days of being apprehended not months immigration advocates say judge Alison Nathan's ruling is the first time U. S. immigrations and customs enforcement has been ordered to provide prompt access to a judge more important because of covert nineteen spreading in detention facilities judge Nathan said while detainees may not have a fundamental right to be released during removal proceedings the government does not have an unfettered right to detain them in twenty fourteen the average wait to see a judge was eleven days more recently it's been around three months one migraine Shemar Michelle said ice officers told him he'd be home by dinnertime when they took him from his children but it was six weeks before he got to see a judge I'm Jackie Quinn

Alison Nathan U. S. Immigrations And Customs New York Nathan Shemar Michelle Migraine ICE Jackie Quinn
Bruce Boynton, who inspired 1961 Freedom Rides, dies at 83

Hugh Hewitt

00:29 sec | Last week

Bruce Boynton, who inspired 1961 Freedom Rides, dies at 83

"Civil rights pioneer Bruce Carver Boynton. He inspired the Freedom rides movement of the early sixties, has died. Authorities arrested Boynton 60 years ago for entering the white part of a racially segregated bus station in Virginia. Boyd and contested his conviction. His appeal resulted in a Supreme Court decision that prohibited bus station segregation. It also helped inspire the landmark freedom rides of 1961. Boynton was 83

Bruce Carver Boynton Boynton Boyd Virginia Supreme Court
NYC's first African-American mayor, David Dinkins, has died

Steve Scott

01:09 min | Last week

NYC's first African-American mayor, David Dinkins, has died

"New York City's only black Mayor, David Dinkins, has died. WCBS reporter Mac Rosenberg joins us live from City Hall. Michael David Dinkins like to refer to New York City is a gorgeous mosaic. The city's 106th and first African American mayor held a few titles before being elected in 1989. He was first Manhattan borough president, State assemblyman and city clerk before he upset three term incumbent Democrat Ed Koch in the primary and then narrowly defeated Rudy Giuliani in the general election, who would beat Dinkins four years later. Think it took over a city that was in trouble economically, and also saw racial tensions come to a head during his administration with the Crown Heights riots for which the state ultimately said Jenkins did not act quick enough. He later admitted regret for that. Former governor David Paterson said that Jenkins tried very hard to be the mayor of all the people. Civil rights activist Al Sharpton says that Dinkins made American politics more inclusive and progressive. Dinkins wife, Joyce died in October and the former mayor died last night at the age of

Wcbs Mac Rosenberg Michael David Dinkins New York City David Dinkins Dinkins Ed Koch City Hall Rudy Giuliani Jenkins David Paterson Al Sharpton Joyce
'Waste' Activist Digs Into The Sanitation Crisis Affecting The Rural Poor

Environment: NPR

04:40 min | Last week

'Waste' Activist Digs Into The Sanitation Crisis Affecting The Rural Poor

"Catherine coleman flowers. Welcome to fresh air. Thank you thank you for inviting me. You've been active on this issue for a long time and have brought a lot of people. Philanthropists reporters elected officials to rural areas to see for themselves. Poor people living with this problem of simply not having sanitary disposal of human waste. I'd like you to describe the experience of just one of these tours and the reaction of those who saw what what you showed one of the persons who's reaction with i think sums it up was Dr phillip boston. Dr allston was to you in special rapporteur on extreme poverty and when he was invited to lowndes county. It's part of his official tour. He went to see areas where people were living amongst also which was the one of the homes that we went to It was a compound with a number of mobile homes that set off of a dirt road and one could see the the water lines. They carry water into the home. Going above of what looked like a ditch. Full of raw sewage and nearby was a Was a basketball goal. Which children apparently played basketball. And when he saw there was a were reporters with us On his his his tour and one of the reporters asked him. Have you seen this before. And he said this is common in the developed world. And i thought that that spoke loudly of what i had phil for all of these years did this and so what what people would see a new taken. So many people to this and observe their shock at what they saw was often in a peace pipe. V pipe running from home or a trailer to a hole in the backyard. And then when you get closer what you see. There are when you get closer. You probably see human feces and toilet paper. Aisle whatever was flushing in the toilet. that day. The one place that we win That was this out in my mind. Is that it was full of pitfalls raw sewage. As you say the person had pvc pipe there was a lot a lot of ingenuity. This involved. In this they the the pvc pipe was buried underground and it went to appear in that period again was full of you know raw sewage and you could see the eyes of a frog that was embiid in the sewage and was p p coming out from it and oftentimes depending on the time of the year and now that the days we have long warmer seasons. Their mosquito sometimes congregated on top of the sewage. Those animals will spread this stuff to wherever they go exactly. you grew up in lowndes county alabama. It's an interesting place in the history of the civil rights movement. Isn't it yes. It's very interesting place. In the history of the civil rights movement. Most people know about lowndes because of his fight for voting rights and the establishment of the lowndes county freedom organization which was the original black panther party And that the black panther was chosen because a lot of the sharecroppers had not been afforded the opportunity to go to school so they wanted to use a symbol that people could understand and also you know they wanted to slogans from their time was pulled the till for the panther When they organized their own political party and ran candidates On that part because at that time it was not But people running. This candidates was accepted on either republican or the democratic party In lowndes county. So that itself was more was a a great accomplishment on the side of sharecroppers former sharecroppers who had been kicked off property just because they sought the right to vote and that was the lowndes county freedom party that preceded the black panthers organization right yes and it's also is this area on the root of the famous march from selma to montgomery that dr king led yes. Most of the civil montgomery mind troop goes to lowndes county lowndes. County is actually between selma and montgomery

Catherine Coleman Flowers Lowndes County Dr Phillip Boston Dr Allston Basketball Lowndes County Freedom Organiz Phil Lowndes Panther Party Alabama Lowndes County Freedom Party Democratic Party Dr King Selma Montgomery
Chicago police accused in federal lawsuit of brutal attacks on protesters

WBBM Programming

00:29 sec | Last week

Chicago police accused in federal lawsuit of brutal attacks on protesters

"In Chicago accuses police for attacking protesters this past summer, According to a federal lawsuit filed by civil rights attorneys at Northwestern University, Chicago police used brutal, violent and unconstitutional tactics. Stop protesters over the killings of black Americans. The allegations are that protesters were beaten, hit with batons and the target of chemical spray. There are 60 plaintiffs, and the lawsuit named Chicago's police superintendent and 20 officers. Chicago's law department says it will review the complaint thoroughly. Jennifer

Chicago Police Chicago Northwestern University Jennifer
No federal charges in Washington DC police shooting of Deon Kay

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 2 weeks ago

No federal charges in Washington DC police shooting of Deon Kay

"Of D C police officer will not face criminal civil rights charges in the shooting death of an 18 year old man back in September. Police say Dion Kay was running from officers in Southeast D C with a gun in his hand shooting which took place on our streets. Southeast and Congress Heights touched off a syriza protests. Prosecutors say they cannot prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the MPD officer who shot K committed willful violations of federal law. Officers at the time, responded to calls about people displaying firearms in a parked car. Prosecutors go on to say the police body worn camera footage show Okay, holding a gun in his right hand and raising it around the same time the officer fired while the investigation is closed at the federal level. The D C. Auditors probe in the matter is still ongoing.

C Police Dion Kay MPD Congress
Judge says border agents can't use COVID-19 order to expel migrant kids

Here & Now

05:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Judge says border agents can't use COVID-19 order to expel migrant kids

"Trump Administration can no longer use a public health emergency to justify deporting migrant Children who cross the border. The U. S border alone. That's the ruling of a federal judge in Washington, D. C, who struck down a policy from the CDC that the White House had argued with prevent migrants from spreading the coronavirus, an immigration detention. But the judge wrote in his ruling that the government overstepped its authority and trying to undo immigration laws passed by Congress. League Alert is an attorney with the A. C L U one of the organizations who sued the administration and Lee. What's your reaction to this ruling? We're ecstatic. You know for that, for these Children who are fleeing danger coming here all by themselves and had been Routinely expelled by the Trump administration. This was a cruel policy, not unlike other Trump administration policies directed it, Migrant Children. It was also unnecessary. We've always viewed it as a pretext. The medical professionals have all said you could bring these Children and test them as needed Quarantine them as needed, but you don't expel them. And I think recent reporting has shown that CDC did not want this. His policy in place that they were over, ridden by the White House, so we're thrilled. We hope that the administration will not appeal it. But we're not holding our breath. Given how the Trump Administration has Enacting the immigration area for the past four years. Well, I want to ask you more about that. I mean, unaccompanied Children would normally be placed in shelters how many Children have been expelled since the rules went into effect back in March at the start of this pandemic. And what happened to them in Mexico? So the amazing thing is that the administration is not actually even providing numbers of Children who have been expelled in this policy. We know from recording and leak sources. That it's over 13,000. And that was as of a month ago. So we expect that the number when we finally get a new number will be over 14,000 possibly 15,000. Who knows, But thousands 1000 Children and their expelled to Mexico if they're Mexican, and if they're not Mexican there, put on a plane to whatever country they came from. Usually Central America. They were being hidden in hotels on the border, sometimes detention centers. The policy was largely in secret. And then they were just put on a plane without an asylum hearing and Children as young as 10 years old. Thousands of Children, some as young as 10 years old. But these explosions weren't limited to just Children are our expulsions of other immigrants continuing and is that legal? So that's absolutely right. We believe that over 200,000 adults and families have also been expelled pursuant to this policy, this particular case involved on Lee unaccompanied minors. We hope the Trump Administration will get rid of the policy. But obviously we're evaluating next steps in the litigation because we're acutely aware that many adults and families are being harmed by the policy as well. You know, we've been talking for several months about family separation. Is that still happening as the border under the Trump Administration? So the family separation tragedy is still ongoing, but there are very few continuance separations, but the reason for that is because of this title 42 policy no one's even being allowed in the country. So therefore they're not being separated. The real issue now with family separation is that we still haven't found hundreds and hundreds of families who are separated at the beginning of the Trump administration were searching for them. And we would like to see the Biden administration do four things in particular with family separation when they come in. We would like to see them allow parents who have been separated for years and are in Central America to rejoin their Children in the United States. We'd like to see all the families separated by the Trump administration, given some form of legal status, given what they've been through what I think many people don't know is that the Trump administration right now is trying to deport All of these families who were previously separated. The third point is, we'd like to see some kind of fun created to help the families with medical needs. But beyond medical needs, and finally going forward, we want to make sure that separations do not occur. Unless a child welfare experts signs off on it. There's judicial oversight, but the immediate thing is to provide run provide relief for the families who have previously been separated. Lee. Immigration is very much a partisan issue. I mean, these four asks of the Biden administration. Sound really ambitious. Have you gotten any indication from the Biden incoming bite an administration that they would take on any of these four asks from from you. So all we know at this point is that vice President Biden has said this is an issue. He is very concerned about it and is going to create a task force. We haven't got the specifics. I think there's just some things we don't do in the United States, and one is making Children pawns toe score political points. League alert is a civil rights lawyer with the A C L U Thank you so much. Thank you for having me.

Trump Administration D. C CDC LEE Mexico Biden Administration U. Central America White House Congress Washington United States Biden
Officials offer few details about what led to gunfire killing 2 teens in Brevard, north of Miami

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:29 sec | 2 weeks ago

Officials offer few details about what led to gunfire killing 2 teens in Brevard, north of Miami

"Shot by Brevard County deputies in Cocoa on Friday, has hired nationally renowned civil rights attorney Ben Crump 16 year old AJ Crooms and 18 Year old sincere Pierce. We're in a stolen car when deputies tried to pull them over, according to the sheriff's office. Crume was driving and allegedly drove the car towards the Deputy who opened fire hitting Crume three times and sincere Pierce shot once both teams died. The parents of the teenagers say the Brevard Sheriff's department has yet to explain what happened. Triple A says the price for a

Crume Ben Crump Aj Crooms Brevard County Pierce Brevard Sheriff's Department
Why some labor unions are talking about climate change

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Why some labor unions are talking about climate change

"Labor unions work on many different issues that affect their members from trade and immigration to civil rights in public health. Michael younger radio. Executive director of the labor network for sustainability says. Many unions are starting to talk about climate change. There are unions that are becoming very active in getting involved in climate action. For example the board of the two million member service employees international union has endorsed the green new deal in part because many of its members live in communities that are disproportionately harmed by wildfires hurricanes and other climate related disasters but guerrero says other unions represent workers who worry about how climate policies will affect their jobs for example those in the fossil fuel industry are often concerned about the transition to clean energy. What happens to workers and communities that are gonna lose their industries that they've been dependent on for so long. And how do we make sure that. There's a social safety net. How do we make sure that this quality work on the other end of that transition. So guerrero says it's important that climate policies protects the earth and protect workers. So no one is left behind.

Michael Younger Labor Network For Sustainabili International Union Guerrero So Guerrero
Man accused of killing Houston PD sergeant part of 'The Sauce Factory' gang

Sean Hannity

00:48 sec | 3 weeks ago

Man accused of killing Houston PD sergeant part of 'The Sauce Factory' gang

"Against against the the 24 24 year year old old accused accused of of killing killing Ah Ah Houston Houston police police sergeant sergeant here here is is county county prosecutors prosecutors say say Robert's Robert's police police used used a a gun gun to to threaten threaten people. people. In In separate separate cases cases in January in October. They also say he's a member of the sauce factory gang. So Lisa's being held on a $700,000 bond in connection with Monday's shooting death of Sergeant Sean Rios. Now. Houston police chief Art US A. Veda was responding to Seles. His attorneys call for an independent investigation. There's already an independent investigation being conducted by the civil rights division of Harris County. District attorney's office attorneys for Robert's least one. An outside investigation into Sergeant Rios is death, claiming HPD is too close to the case. HPD escorted the body of Sergeant Rios from the medical examiner's office to the funeral home this morning. Funeral plans have not yet been announced.

Houston Robert Sean Rios Art Us A. Veda Seles Lisa Sergeant Rios Harris County HPD Rios
California Gov. Newsom eases penalties for former felons, including immigrants facing deportation

Tim Conway Jr.

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

California Gov. Newsom eases penalties for former felons, including immigrants facing deportation

"Newsome has granted 22 pardons 13 computations and for medical reprieves of the 22 pardons 10 or illegal immigrants who face deportation. The governor said they're deportations would be an unjust collateral consequence. It would harm their families and communities. Pardon helps restore felons, civil rights and other privileges. A commutation modifies the sentence and typically allows for a parole hearing and the medical reprieve is recommended by prison doctors for high risk prisoners to serve out the remainder of their sentence at an alternate location Since taking office, Governor Newsome sprinted 63 pardons 78 computations and four reprieves

Newsome Governor Newsome
"civil rights" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

07:21 min | 3 weeks ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"Today's horoscope brought to you by geico. People will take note of your sunny disposition sagittarius. That's because you just switch to geico and discovered you could save hundreds of dollars a year on car insurance however your newfound. Inner glow may prompt unfounded rumors. Did you get a promotion. Or you want to juice cleanse. Did they give you too much anesthesia at your dentist appointment. You're a secret is safe with us. Secretary geigo fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. This is semi jay. And i have some exciting news to share. We are back for season two podcasts. Let's be real sanjay this season. We'll have more revealing and unfiltered conversations with celebrities. Influencers activists and athletes guests include the amazing singer and actor. Anthony rama's tiktok sensation. Dixie emilio nba star. Aaron gordon and many more listen to. Let's be really sammy. J on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast. We wanted to say happy veterans day to all of the military personnel who have served in the united states armed forces. Happy veterans day. Everyone thank you. Thank you for your service and your bravery. Yes absolutely day. We're celebrating you. Yes to my brother served in vietnam Go boy he's still mad day. St about vietnam man made man head over there man heat eating needed not know and where he got treated when they came back. That's what he hated of autumn warm and he said we over there got our life on the line. They come back. Call us baby killers win. We deserve he said mad. They sit us over there. He's i know nobody over there. That won't it to be right. Everybody i talked to wanted to go home right. Yeah all right steve. We're going to switch gears here and go back to the phones. Eight seven seven twenty. Nine steve. eight seven seven. Twenty nine steve. Let's go to line three and talk to troy on a camden new jersey. troy sub. What you man. what's on your mind. Man listen steve is so much to talk about what i just wanna say this Pro you and your show shirley and everybody that talks about this and vote. Evaded people in those critical areas As a civil rights person down in new jersey There's a lot that i could say about this topic. Steve but try and stay on course. the one reason why a lot of people believe showed out especially in. This is bandaged and Underserved communities is because they realized doing nothing at all was more detrimental than showing up and doing something because the argument store he was steve. It's been made time and time again. Because i sat back. I'm not only Catholic from abc. But i'm also with police. I was a black police officer. And how term civil rights person. Because i sat back and said somebody else is gonna do it. I don't have to be that one but everybody comes to grips with. You have to do something and what happened in this election because in those visit vanish communities. It's unfortunate but those all did we lose them. Oh man he was making a valid point. I like that brother right there. And thank you for calling in troy and choi's absolutely correct but and you know what i'd this is. What i was saying to in and i'm pretty sure it's connected to what he's saying is not that black people want you to do. Something for us is just. We want you to stop doing stuff to us a bit part of this election and the turn out was because of what you causing this nation to continue and start to do to us. Hey matt black lives matter because we just wanted to matter like yours. Do you think. I'll give us nobody and you've got a fact. Don't give us no special privileges. We just won't say guy and solid cap capitals matter to we not losing no cap on his phone number so let's make sure we we stay connected. Okay you're not losing nomo capitals on this phone. I mean that. go here. He just he just came to go ahead and call quick line. Four leshan out of summit illinois hairless. Sean got about thirty seconds. Give it to me. Good morning steve. Good morning shirley and you guys. I hope you're having a wonderful day. I just wanna say the region that this man is hiding because he's a clown that's it isn't that's all in the whole country thirty collect she's right bullies man when bullies is getting jumped on and getting whooped. They get quiet now. He fine people. I'm getting his tail hook now. He go y'all a law to me. Dog you leave partner leave. We're going to be his son and his son's girlfriend. Have you seen this ridiculous in that they trying to do yes with the rnc nephew. Tommy with the sprang phone call is up next right after this. You're listening party morning. show everybody everybody. This is jill. Scott and i am pleased to introduce you to that. Ill the podcast. I'm joined by my amazing brilliant girlfriends. Lyon saint claims what up doe and age. A great dance like. Hey y'all we are going to be talking about a lot of amazing things like individuality family and blackmail us. Listen when you're soaking in your bathtub. Listen while you're washing dishes. Listen the first episode traps on november eighteen. Listen to jill. Scott presents j. dot il the podcast on the iheartradio app. Oh podcasts on september seventeenth two thousand nine twenty four year old my trees. Richardson disappeared without a trace. In the woods. Near malibu california and was never seen alive again. I'm katherine townsend. Host the podcast telling gone. We're going to try to find out what really happened to my trace. Richardson school of humans in iheartradio present. Helen gone season three. Listen to helen. Gone on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

steve iheartradio geico shirley Scott apple Helen Secretary matt black united states Dixie emilio Anthony rama abc Aaron gordon vietnam california Richardson katherine townsend
Lucille Bridges, mother of civil rights icon Ruby Bridges, dies at 86

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:37 sec | 3 weeks ago

Lucille Bridges, mother of civil rights icon Ruby Bridges, dies at 86

"And we have to point out the passing of Lucille Bridges. Lucille Bridges was the mother of activist ruby bridges. She's died at the age of 86. Lucille walked with the six year old Ruby Bridges past crowd screaming racist slurs. And she became the first black student after all, White New Orleans elementary school. The year was Really? Not that long ago. 1960 last night, Ruby said that her mother helped me after the course of so many lives by help me alter the course of so many lives by setting me out on my path is a six year old little girl. She's our nation lost. Mother of the civil rights movement today, and I lost my

Lucille Bridges Ruby Bridges White New Orleans Elementary S Lucille Ruby
Bucks’ Sterling Brown reaches settlement in civil rights lawsuit against police

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:18 sec | 3 weeks ago

Bucks’ Sterling Brown reaches settlement in civil rights lawsuit against police

"As the guard. Sterling brown is agreed to settle his lawsuit against the city of milwaukee for seven hundred. Fifty thousand dollars after police officer used a taser on him. During a january twenty eighteen arrest for a parking violation brown said in the lawsuit officers used excessive force and five that it is fourth amendment rights during the

Sterling Brown Milwaukee Brown
What Does  A Biden Presidency Mean To US Foreign Relations?

Morning Edition

07:39 min | 3 weeks ago

What Does A Biden Presidency Mean To US Foreign Relations?

"Might Joe Biden's presidency mean for US foreign policy with us, now three of NPR's international correspondents in some of the regions that are most consequential to the United States? NPR's Emily Fang is in Beijing. Lucien Kim is in Moscow and Jane Arraf is in Erbil, Iraq. Hello to you all. Good morning. Morning. So, Emily, let's start with you. The relationship between the U. S and China right now is quite tense. How was news of of President Elect Biden's win received in Beijing. Well, there wasn't much news because two days after the election results were called noticeably Absent is any official reaction from China's leader, She Jingping, He's not put up a message. By contrast in 2016. She congratulated Trump hours after the race was called this year. Foreign Ministry has dodged every question we've had for comment on their views about the election, and the silence is not because China prefers bite in over Trump, Trump of replied, And it's more out of an over abundance of caution because Trump has not officially conceded. Seven China's view It does not want to take a side if you will, and until someone is definitively inaugurated, and Trump still has more than two months left in office so he could put significant pressure on China. Still, if he's provoked Okay, So China's taking a wait and see approach Lucy and there was all of this concern about Russian potential Russian interference in this election. We didn't see much of that. How is Moscow, reacting to the prospect of a Biden presidency? Well, it's interesting. It's very similar to the situation in Beijing here. The absence of any congratulations from President Vladimir Putin has been noticeable today. His spokesman told reporters that Putin will wait for official results because Trump has not conceded and wants to dispute the the count in the courts. One prominent Russian who did congratulate Biden, his opposition leader, Alexei Navalny. He's recovering from a poisoning that he blames on the Kremlin. The day after the U. S election. Navalny went on social media to say that the suspense about who Would eventually when the race was evidence that America's elections are real, but officially on state TV. The main message is that this election was marred by irregularities and fraud. So in a sense, not that different from Russian elections and the messier the transition of power is in the US, the better it is for the Kremlin because the US stops looking like a model democracy. Well, that's interesting. Jane, China and Russia both taking a wait and see approach did Iraqi leadership say anything this weekend? They did. They generally welcomed Biden's election. And, you know, there's not expected to be really a dramatic or immediate change in policy. One of the big issues here is withdrawal of US troops and Biden like Trump is in favor of those, But I gotta be honest Officials here are breathing a sigh of relief. You know, one of them put it. Will no longer be one tweet away from learning of major foreign policy decisions. And then there's the fact that Biden you Noah's head of a CZ, a member of the leading member, ranking member of the Of Senate Foreign Relations Committee and then the point man on Iraq. For then President Obama knows the leaders here and he knows them well, and that will make a difference. I spoke to one senior Iraqi official who said he's dealt with them in years for years. Sorry, and and the thing that stands out is Biden's essential decency, he says. Decency. OK, Lucien Joe Biden known for his decency, Yes, but unlike President Trump, he does not seem primed to like Vladimir Putin or to soft pedal things with Russia. How might his election change the U. S Russia relationship? All right. There is no expectation here at all that Biden will be easier on Russia. I spoke to one of Russia's leading foreign policy experts fielder Lukianoff about what he expects from a Biden presidency. They don't think that many people at Moscow believed that the U. S will be able to be back to the old good days of liberal order as it was in 90 Sorento Seldon's, But the rhetoric will be ah, muchmore like Obama or even Clinton spirit. So in other words, the expectation in Moscow is that Biden will bring up human rights and democracy and also take a greater interest in what happens in the former Soviet Union. There is no love for Biden in Moscow. He met with Putin when he was vice president and has been very critical of the Kremlin. But those negative feelings aside, there is also a certain trump fatigue in Moscow. There were really high hopes for years ago and today U. S. Russian relations are at their lowest point since the Cold War. So there is some hope in Moscow that Biden will be more predictable and be able to start a sober professional dialogue on pressing bilateral issues of the first one that comes to mind his arms control. More predictable. Emily might also be interesting or helpful to China, right because it's been four sort of madcap years of trade wars and overnight tweets. And yet Beijing's position in the world is different now than it was when President Trump took office, isn't it? Yes, it's gone from what was then A developing regional power, too, in the U. S has eyes and this is accurate. A global competitors and that growing more negative view has led the US over the last four years to sanction Chinese officials, major Chinese companies and to limit the number of Of Chinese people who study and work in the US, But within China, you have the inverse of this negativity. China's had this surgeon self confidence since 2016. It's controlled a corona virus pandemic. It's produced some truly global companies, and that gives Beijing a sense that this is China's time to shine. And right now we're at this hugely uncertain moment in the relationship trumps refusal to conceive means that there's even warn certainty because Beijing cannot decide what its next move is going to be right now. Okay. If China is under the impression that it is, it's time to shine economically makes a lot of sense. Does a president Biden change that in any way? He could. Biden is expected to continue to push China and human rights issues such as Hong Kong civil rights Xinjiang, where hundreds of thousands of people have been detained. Remember he called cheating Ping a thug during one of the last presidential debates. But many in trying to hope us under Biden will temper the relationship and cooperate on things like trade and climate change. But Biden could also have a much more multilateral approach and that could actually put pressure on China. And Jane. Lastly, I want to reach back into history. Joe Biden once suggested that Iraq would be better off his three separate autonomous regions Kurdish, Sunni and Shiite. How was that idea held up? Yeah, so he was suggesting autonomous regions, but still with the central government and here in the Kurdistan region of Iraq, they very much welcome that support for increase power to the regions, but in other places it was seen as fuelling Iraq's sectarian divide. And there's still a bit of concern about that idea. But a lot of it has moved on to concern about Iran. And on that one he's seen as not being quite a cz obsessed with isolating Iran. So even some militia leaders here have welcomed his election. Okay. NPR's Jane Arraf in Erbil, Iraq, Emily faIIing in Beijing and Lucien Kim in Moscow. Thanks, everyone.

Biden China Donald Trump Moscow Beijing U. United States Jane Arraf Lucien Kim Emily Fang President Elect Biden Russia Foreign Ministry NPR Alexei Navalny Navalny Vladimir Putin Erbil Iraq Senate Foreign Relations Commi
Interview With Senator Cory Booker

Toure Show

07:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Senator Cory Booker

"What's your superpower because you have been a sort of superstar at life for as long as i've been aware of the name cory booker which was before you were mayor before you ran for mayor. I was hearing about this guy cory booker. who's coming and he's big and he's on point with everything. And what are you doing. i. I don't know what we're hearing it'll be before. I was mayor than in the time of public enemy. And you don't believe the height. Look i was the superpower that was evidenced for me growing up which was not exaggerating. I think it's actually. A superpower under underrated is kindness. Like i just. I just watched two parents who were really good people and would see people that folks walk past all the time. I one of my favorite quotes by humorous gave. Barry has this goes someone who nice to you but not nice to the waiter is not a nice person but you and i both know 'cause i know you have this kindness and you as well that when you are kind of people. Incredible things happen that you don't realize your favorite stories and i'll tell you the quicker version but you go into school at stanford i'd five back and forth across the country. I still remember getting on this plane as a stanford student and being is torturous. When you're like six foot three football player tight end just like coach. Was you know always like my knees. We're going to be banged up on this plane. I have two seats open next to the rest of the plane is full and just before the door closes. This woman walks in with a screaming baby and a little boy and everybody on that plane. Those where they're sitting because the only three bodies two seats. And i think that we all don't realize we have a choice that we make every moment of our lives which is to accept things as they are or take responsibility for changing and so something evolved thought for teenage college student. That point hit which was. This is either going to be the worst flight in my life where i can try to make the best so i just leaned in and started talking to her in the cry baby in soon as i got into my own drama. I realize. Oh my gosh. This woman has a crying baby. The whole plane is looking at her like she's evil as she did something outside and told her baby to cry. Purposefully right and and so we just having a good time. I still remember the movie. Think about this. How purposeful this moment for me. That i remember that movie was glory with denzel washington. And she's like. I haven't seen the movie and so long and i'm like watch this movie your son and i we're gonna play games. We played hangman. Killed them with all my best. Dad jokes that. I had even back then killed them and hangman mad. And by the time we landed. It was the quickest flight. I ever had cross country. You said we keep in touch. We exchange addresses back then no email and didn't and five ten fifteen years later. I'm running for mayor of the city of newark. And i'm getting like thumped and on one of my toughest ones frustrating days. I get this letter in the mail saying to me. You may not remember me but But i you were on this flight first time. I flew with my kids telling me what the kindness then meant to her and then she tells me by the way we. My family owns a big factory in newark and we have tons of employees. She ended up becoming a big part of my campaign. That kid that i tortured with my jokes became one of our best volunteers or per workers. Excuse me to take. Their churches introduced me. It was just an amazing full circle. Kindness is energy stanford. Professor actually studies this that you just doing one kind act witnessed by someone. It will affect people three degrees of separation for you. it is created a way to measuring it. it's a virtuous thing and so my life you know. I just think that that's is a superpower that we under related just a kind word to somebody at the right time can make a difference that you don't even realize so. I don't know if i don't have any superpowers. I'm really far more ordinary than the hype as you just said but i've just tried to go out of my way for me. It's it's a matter of my faith which is of radical love trying to do for people and you have parents like you. And i probably had two black guys who had parents would not let me forget of the struggle parents that were involved in the civil rights movement. That my i. I was raised up thinking like i didn't the privileges that i enjoy. We're not earned. They were paid for as my grandparents. Would by the blood sweat and tears of your ancest-. I definitely grew up thinking i stand on the shoulders of those who came before me. I have a responsibility to the people who march to died protested. Who were enslaved. There i remember being in college and thinking you know i was why and i didn't feel that responsibility. The past i mean cool to like pena. Cia but i can't. I have a responsibility. People came before me. I wouldn't be here without them. So i have to do something. And perhaps my think my journey in media has been something of being helpful black people in some way but you know that sense of responsibility that you talk about. I definitely felt and you have that has powered your life. It is the my faith earlier. But that is in trenton. Integral part of what motivated my life decisions. And very you know i. I'm here because a group of people fought for my housing rights. Like i grew up in the town. I grew up in harrington park. There was a group of activists when my parents were getting denied real estate agents were lying to them and telling this house is sold. It was called real estate steering at the time right and so they set up this sting operation where they would send white couples right behind my parents and so it i mean this was the story into making chapter my book because involvement at one point. My father's lawyer getting punched in the face and just like dog being signal. my dad craziness. But i'm a baby when that happened. Fifty years ago this summer that had happened and so imagine growing up with parents that could live. Look you in the eye. My dad be like boy. People had fight even get you a chance to be in the school. You're going to. You're going to get your out of bed and go to school and make the best out of yourself and so coming out of loss when i'm done and i always joke that my dad was like bat impressed. He was proud of his son but stanford oxford yale. He's like boy. You got more degrees the month of july. Which ain't hot life ain't about the degrees you get. It's about the service you give like. We're gonna do with all this privilege and so the first job. I had coming out of law. School was a tennis rights lawyer. People fought for my housing rights. I was going to go and fight for other people's and so my life. And i love you said this because we grew up reading bolt we reading voice and talented tenth and the obligations of that you get from getting the privileges that you know are denied to you. Got here is black. Men who i know the data i mean the leading cause of death for us murder fifty four fifty between fifty and sixty percent homicides in america are people look a lot like us black men and and so you feel this sense of. I can't rest. I've got to keep working. Got to keep pushing until we can make the society be what it is and by the way we never get there. At least we can try to pay that payback. What was given to us.

Cory Booker Stanford Newark Denzel Washington Barry Football Pena Harrington Park CIA Trenton Yale Oxford Tennis America
"civil rights" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:51 min | 5 months ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"People in power have something to lose by some level of organization. They will do whatever they can to squash. by any means necessary, and obviously this is much more of a human rights you know like it's so much more deeply entrenched thing. It's more than just controlling money and power. There is a deep seated hatred and racism in those in power that really fueled a lot of this behavior as well not just the money, and not just the idea of controlling. And things like that, but Yeah, I don't know I just I'm. I'm inherently distrustful often of of of of any anybody that. has so much to lose by people asking for the right thing to be done, so I don't know it's. It's a little easy to get disenchanted with all this kind of stuff, but it's also incredibly inspiring to look into the history of some of the groups and the individuals. That really took this. Movement to to the next level and created this. Blueprint for where we are now at least in terms of activism, and not accepting this kind of status quo. One of the first groups you could look at were called the freedom writers. It was. A group they got together on May, fourth nineteen sixty one. Group Group of people from. Of, life different races who? Left Washington DC on a bus. They were headed towards New Orleans, and along the way their were actions taken on the bus. That seen it. You know it seems. Very strange to to talk about it today in two thousand twenty, but. Literally changing where they were sitting on the bus became a Revolutionary Act. There were white freedom writers who move to the blacks only section on that bus and black writers who moved to the whites only section on the bus and. It was It was something that angered. People who who knew that these meet these norms the were in place, and these regulations were in place, and they knew what they were doing. Violating the norms right the the. You can't really call them regulations, but the the. Rules, that were put forth on that particular bus and buses everywhere. In in especially the south. They knew what they were doing was perfectly legal. According to a recent Supreme Court case or several supreme, court cases, but they also knew that there would be people who would be so angry that this action was being taken. They were just hoping that the government or they're testing to see whether or not the government would respond to help them. just prove that these things you know. It doesn't not matter where anybody sits on the bus. Yeah Yeah because again an eloquently written. Line or two of Legalese. Feels good right? It feels good to know that's real. But how much does it matter? It matters when it is enforced, right? It matters when it is upheld so the freedom riders you know we were mentioning some groups. Notable individuals there are there are many many many more stories were just giving you a high level? Look at civil rights in the nineteen sixties. These people like you said Matthew knew. Knew what they were doing was legal, but they did not know whether it would be enforced, or whether the people who were supposed to enforce the law would indeed do their jobs. They knew their lives were on the line and they were beaten the buses were You know people were throwing stones at them. Their tires were slashed more than three hundred freedom. Riders were arrested during the trip..

Supreme Court Washington Matthew New Orleans
"civil rights" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"About university of kentucky basketball and has grown is going to launch his own candidacy for the democratic nomination for senate in kentucky. He just announced he's putting together a set an exploratory committee. There's been lots of controversy about matt losing his job bob on a couple of state television shows and whether or not amy mcgrath's campaign had anything to do with it which they absolutely deny matt's writing a book about mitch mcconnell. It's drama filled and so here's a fun fact. Beth and i went into college with matt jones. I've known match since i was seventeen years old and he is very smart and he is very driven and i still still believe that amy mcgrath is the right candidate for kentucky. I think that this drama <hes> will do no favors for the kentucky democratic party. Freddie also matt has been in this sort of long narrative about will-he-won't-he run every time. There's a race house race. I think there was talk about it. Last time. Mitch mcconnell was up for re election or maybe ran policy. It's an ongoing thing i get it. I get the appeal but i wish we can move on desperately really trying to speak very carefully. If you can't tell i respect the really media empire that jones has built <hes> and i think they do really get an interesting work listed in the field of like recovering attorneys that we both participate in he's a star he's really are absolutely he took that they took that law degree and transferred it into the career that he always wanted good for him. I think in kentucky we have a history of taking are celebrated celebrated figures who are sports stars or sports adjacent stars and putting them in political office and i would like us to change that it i think if you consider what a united states senator does it is just not close for me in thinking that amy mcgrath is the right handed it and here's what this really pulls out if name sarah you've spoken to this a number of times we all all walk around repeating things like a woman. It can't be president yet. 'cause the country's not ready. Aiming mcgrath can't meet mitch mcconnell but maybe matt jones could and we repeat them as that. We have no agency on process. We've agency in the process. I i think that the more amy mcgrath travels the state of kentucky and she is out there doing it far western kentucky far eastern kentucky northern in kentucky. If you follow her on instagram she is hustling all over the state and really spending time with voters and having really spent time with her in person ourselves. I can tell you that she sits across from you. She looks you in the eye. She listens to you. She disagrees with you to your face in a respectful way. I think i have a lot of difference with amy over the role of the federal government and i also think that i could roll up my sleeves next to her and we could get things done because amy is about not doing what is straight and honest and good and what makes progress she will not let the perfect get in the way of doing better and i think in that way she is so representative of kentucky values statewide and so if i worked for her right now i would just keep matt jones jones name out of my mouth and i would keep doing what i'm doing. I would really follow the joe. Biden model like i'm running against mitch mcconnell the end <hes> mhm and and i would hold onto that what worries me too is just because we have people in california saying i've given her money. We've traveled recently and we had so so many people tell us oh yeah i like already given her money and she is gonna need a law of money to defeat mitch mcconnell. I don't wanna lose use those people you know we've we've captured the nation's attention. She's captured that donor information. They're giving her money. Some people already giving her money monthly and i don't want to be like oh. Will we hold on. We're gonna have a primary..

amy mcgrath mitch mcconnell kentucky matt matt jones university of kentucky matt jones jones democratic party basketball senate jones Beth Freddie united states president bob federal government Biden
"civil rights" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

"But mostly this can't be solved through through litigation. The only way it can be solved as we develop a new civil rights movement. New consciousness about our obligation of nine only morally and practically but constitutionally to address this issue, we we would adopt policies. Those policies would certainly be reviewed by the courts and the courts if they understood this history in the history became more widely known and the court was forced to acknowledge it of. The courts would have to uphold remedies that were racially explicit to reduce the segregation. But until we have a broader political consensus civil rights movement as I say around this issue. It's unlikely that the courts will get the kinds of cases to review that could substantially of address racial segregation residential segregation. And is it your view Richard that the reason the courts, and I don't want to single out John Robertson, or or any individual jurists who says, you know, we we don't have an explanation for why housing was segregated or why schools are therefore segregated is it your view that. That's a again, I'm asking you these questions that are unfair about why people do what they do. But it's just is this just so that we get to say the sentence. You know, we're over the race problem in America is this. I mean, it's the same rationale that we have in the Voting Rights Act case that we just wanna feel that, you know, they're the we've solved all this. And that's why the courts can so. Oh, blinker themselves to the reality. You've described. I don't think we think we've solved it. That's I say most people think racial segregation of metropolitan areas neighborhoods is too bad. We don't think that the problem has been taken care of. But we think there's nothing we can do about it. We've convinced ourselves of this myth that at all happened by accident and what happened by accident because only be undone by accident. And so it's a rationalization that takes us off the hook from doing something that we otherwise be required to confront friend listeners who are listening and saying like, oh, dear God, absent a massive civil rights movement to desegregate are urban areas. This is hopeless d do you have a couple of notions about concrete things that could be done. Well, there are many many remedies of remedies are easy to think of the prior condition has to be a political will to do it in the nineteen forties and fifties the civil rights victories that we won in the beginning. Brown versus board of education and then in the nineteen sixties. They were also considered completely of inconceivable. So knowing what will be conceivable in the future. If we develop a new understanding of the necessity is not so easy to do. But here's an extreme remedy levittown. For example, today is about two percent African American in nineteen sixty eight we passed a fair housing act which prohibited future discrimination ongoing discrimination on the basis of race in the sale and rental of housing, and as a result a few middle class African Americans have been able to to buy homes in levittown. It's about two percent African American area around it, perhaps it's fifteen percent African American if we understood this history, it would be conceivable that the federal government could and could buy up homes in. Town at market rates three hundred four hundred five hundred thousand dollars resell them, the qualified African Americans for hundred thousand dollars as a very narrowly targeted remedy for a very specific constitutional violation. Now, that's not realistic. I I'm not suggesting that that's something that people should start advocating for now. But it's the kind of thing could be done as a remedy of still not realistic today. But more conceivable is a we could Bala Sh-sh-she exclusionary zoning ordinances, we could understand that zoning ordinances and all white suburbs or.

levittown Bala Sh-sh-she federal government America Richard John Robertson Brown two percent three hundred four hundred fiv hundred thousand dollars fifteen percent
"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"If you have a Bank that is centered around an identity, then I guess there's a thing there or or even civil rights corporations. Right. Like human rights campaign is southern poverty Law Center with that mean anything, and you have a lot of corporations if you move outside of the business contacts. Well, then you have lots of corporations the NWC is a corporation planned Parenthood's corporation, the NRA is a corporation. They're all corporations in the nonprofits, do you see the NRA? Just kidding. People of gun. Recently. I have changed their name to I and. Made fun of them. And like it's like, they're probably thinking oh. So they're like shooting corporations. Why what did you think about the show viewed? No. But that's true is now relying on corporations to be our benefactor. And then now corporates trying to have personality and others like some young woke dude tweeting for Wendy's. Like LL beams. It's so depressing and scary, and now corporations are becoming actual people because there's literally a person saying like, you just got roasted Carl's junior or whatever. So it should it shouldn't have been international house of bacon, should not what I was thinking or bombs, actually. Legalize, but we were we were laughing corporations race. But like corporations have religion now corporations legally, that's like that's so weird. How do you deter? Corporation, does whatever religion they say, they are for whatever policy. They wanna put through technically all corporations Jewish. I was just about to say like, I don't know why. But I didn't make very, you know. Why that one another question? So on the one hand corporations are really large, and they provide a lot of jobs to, you know, people for the middle class all the way down on the other hand, I feel like a lot of mom and pop shops entrepreneurialism as a whole has been down for a while now. So my question, basically is do you think corporations are a help to our global economy? Or are they on the whole of that thing because they do provide a lot of jobs, but they do kill Dr. Yeah. No. I mean this. I don't know that there's an easy answer whether they're good or they're bad. It's a complicated story. You look at a company like WalMart. Walmart's terrible in so many ways, you know, they're cutting out so many mom and pop stores who can't compete with them on price at the same time. There's a lot of consumers who really have no money, and the fact that they can buy so much more at WalMart. That's a really great thing for them. So I think that part of the reason why dealing with corporate power is so difficult in America. Is that so much we do benefit from the prosperity and the consumer items in the lower prices the corporations tend to? Give us, and so we kind of have to struggle with that at the same time because they're fighting against our moral values and polluting our environment and sometimes selling us products that aren't even good for us. So is there any hope? No. That's our show, folks. Thank you very much. Professor out of. Guy brand of you have been a lovely group by everyone would come back. Another episode. Goodnight.

NWC WalMart southern poverty Law Center Wendy Professor Carl America Dr. Yeah one hand
"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

05:15 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"If he was elected enthusiasm. Yeah. Glad liberal Twitter made it out. Pretty centers type was elected would that person be able to make any impactful change on the corporate civil rights that they currently inhabit? Or would they continue to be a mean factory? All right. No, I think it's very difficult to overturn corporate power one of that the fact that it's constitutional rights. The corporations have means that those rights are not subject to the political. Whims of the day. Doesn't matter who gets elected they have those rights, and so but nonetheless, you wanna have presidents who are going to appoint good justices to the supreme court who think about these issues and a little bit more of a nuance balance way than maybe some of the justices have in the recent years. So really, there's no hope in going back unless we were to have endlessly deep pockets and go back to the supreme court one by one and fight these cases and reverse their the rights of corporation or pass a constitutional amendment. That says corporations are people we have had a nasty habit in this. This country of like not being responsible about voting or expressing our interests through elective government. We've been waiting for the courts to do the right thing. And sometimes it's lovely remember when I was winding about gay marriage. But also we need to learn to fucking law. We need to learn to fucking get rid of a Republican that two-thirds of lake district doesn't like but isn't enough to show up for so Mr. democratic socialists of America, please show up to the general election and vote for somebody who is better. I know that they're not going to be your perfect dream. For them. Got a question. Rakish? Okay question is we don't burn it all down. What about nationalized corporations like what we nationalized Google or apple or Tessler, whatever else. Like do. They have the same rights as a private corporation or how does that work? In other words, kind of kind of what Cuba after the revolution? Right. Like, the the government takes over the corporation. I think what he's asking how come more company. Amtrak is what he's asking to. But but that's an already established corporation or was there a takeover of Entra. Okay. Interesting. Yeah. What about that? You can have the government nationalize accompany. I mean, there's just not much political will for it. And they'd have to pay the shareholders compensation and paying the government paying for Google seems like deal that the government wouldn't want these days with stock prices being what they are. But there is the government power to nationalize corporation, in some way, shape or form. And it's happened before. The fish of Amtrak. Any other questions questions got one? All right. We got one. But I've got a question for you. How come more companies don't fate? Why wouldn't that solve everything of corporations were always VPN? I had the same question. Question. I know nothing about law but good start. Interested in the role that like. Your economic status plays in whether you're deemed a minority or not and how the fact that corporations have most of the money and Arkansas people affects the way our Justice system. Use cases. Interesting very, very inciteful a law background. But I do have the most inciteful. No, no. It's so true. And part of the story is that is that corporations have gone to court and portrayed themselves as persecuted minorities time and time again and actually often convinced the supreme court to think of particular corporation as being persecuted. And so certainly a difficult problem there. We also have the issue with regards to how race ties in with corporations because if we say corporations are people certainly they're not people with a race. But yet there's also been a history in American law of trying to racial is particular corporation. Okay. Here's the question, then which companies are like black, and then like which corporations are like gay, and then which corporation, would you say or women, so we have there are whole straight white men. Excuse me, this podcast this hit corporations are there. Okay. All of them. Yeah. Okay. That's good. If. What do you mean by racial corporations? So we have things like public contracting policies that provide benefits for minority business enterprises white firms that don't like those plans go to court claiming their victims of race discrimination. So yeah, you do a rant. We're talking about Anna rans over Mike. I don't have a clue moved on remember something, but we killer. Mike big call to action is black banking racialist corporation, right?.

Amtrak Google Twitter racialist corporation Mike big Cuba Entra lake district Anna rans Arkansas America Tessler apple
"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"And and that was the rule that was said to be violated and so citizens United because they were charged with violating that rule. They said, okay, we're going to go fight this all the way to the supreme court, and the supreme court agreed with them saying that just because you use some corporate money that doesn't matter at the end of the day that corporations have the same right to spend their money on elections. Anyone else that is the moment of that demarcation point Alito fit, right? What actually I've been thinking about that type there? They're fucking. I love your movies. Alito just Barack not that cool. That was good to wait. So what what why is it such a an atomic shift in our country? Why is Bernie Sanders rally against that wife? Sixteen states ratified a Bill to make a constitutional amendment to overturn it. Why that thing? Well, I think it does tie into what we talked earlier in terms of the bailouts, and the anger that people had about the bailouts in two thousand and eight citizens United was decided two thousand and ten and it really sort of cast a real spotlight on the fact that we have a political system that's got way too much money and one in which corporations are gaining evermore rights and gaining more strength at the same time when many people feel like we need to cabin corporate power restrict corporate power little bit. Got hypothetical question just thinking that the citizens United thing I formed corporation, and I gave it I put two hundred dollars of corporation. It takes out an ad and slander someone so the contract to do that. But I, of course, wrote it I reach -able for that slander, or can I somehow shield myself with the corporation from from doing an act like that question on that question. Which is what did your question me? You lost me basically trying to figure out he wants to talk about someone under the guise of corporate actually slammed. Moshe casher like eats feces four brunch in the Hollywood reporter. Okay. Wait. Which is important eating the shit for brunch. In the headquarters of the Hollywood reporter, or are you publishing the story in the publication that loves to cover me because of my celebrity the Hollywood reporter, I'm saying you're eating it in the Hollywood reporter publishing in variety. Okay. Against each other. This is okay in this type of situation is it's slanderous because in this world. I don't eat shit. Correct. Yes. A hypothetical you don't shit for. We're not in the real world here or yes. Limbo, weird nebulous level. Like don't eat crap. Don't censor yourself up. Okay. So he wants to guy wants to publish an article in the in variety, which doesn't cover me. I don't want to Noorwijk productions presenting. Okay. Is he protected? Well, you know, it depends on this the facts and circumstances all I'll tell you as a law. Professor, that's. Great. Take over. The corporations that would protect you. But if you set up a corporation, and then use it purposely to commit a fraud to avoid liability than courts will often what the Pierce the corporate veil, and impose liability on you personal. I have a question now. Can you do like 'cause I know satire law America's it's kind of big, right? It feels like you can get away with anything. So through my corporation. If I wanted to make a statement on corporate culture. If I I wanted to print shirts and sell them that said black and decker lives matter. Kosher on that. Okay. I think you're going to be okay with that one really gonna disagree with the primary purpose of is to sell t shirts. Okay. He is primarily there are four factors that you consider when you're considering whether it's fair use and one of them is what is your economic purpose? The other is whether it's educational, and then there are two other things I went to law school eighteen years ago. Great. I have a topic cute. Yes. Mary. I want to hear your thoughts on model corporations. Is that like where we should be heading for instance? Your paddock on. Yes. You're Costco's people that. Allegedly little you know, try to. Make it part of their public image that they pay their workers reasonably and so on should we be trying to just make that the norm and be totally up in arms when there are variations that don't do that list. You do. That really that reminds me Mary thing I'm thinking a lot about in the wake of the gun, which is also something you're an expert in the recent sort of the backlash against era..

Moshe casher Hollywood reporter Alito supreme court Bernie Sanders Costco Barack fraud Noorwijk America Professor two hundred dollars eighteen years
"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"The cutting edge of so there's a world in which some of these these fights have been positive for the long history. But mostly what we find ourselves now is like corporate control of the government in many ways, how serious is that how much do corporations control how government operates? Well, I think cooperations exert tremendous amount of control, you know, and especially after citizens United how the corporations can spend an unlimited amount of money to finance election ads actually take us through the whole citizens United story because it's crazy. And I didn't know that had to do it something called Hillary the movie, but it definitely what was that story. Tell me tell us that story. It was always the obsession with Hillary wasn't it. There was kind of was all citizens. United case was basically based on one guys like vanity movie about how awful Hillary Clinton was. It was this political sort of hit job organization citizens United that had a movie about a hit job movie against Hillary Clinton about how dangerous she would be where she where she elected president. And this was prepared for the two thousand eight election called it. Yeah. Hillary Hillary them, but movie creative name name, right? Very creative lawyer behind that. And and the movie, and I just make some. Minimalized the whole naming ceremony. I mean, there's a lot of circumstance to it. What I do. Take this subject of the movie put a colon after it. And then say the movie and then on the poster I throw that in an impact on what happens. So he made this film calls the movie. Guy under cooperation called citizens. United a group of people who have been very active in politics. The famous willy Horton ads in the nineteen eighty eight presidential election group the same group. Same people, basically, it's a conservative sort of active media activism collective, right? That's kind of way to think about it. And they do hard hitting political work. There were very involved in this racist. Way to take misogynist racist. It's. If people races colon the group. Great thing about a corporation is when Satan comes and pulls one of them down into hell, you know, somebody else can take over continuity. One. The big burn. So so what what happened with the movie? So they had this movie, and it was financed with a little bit of corporate money some business corporation the name of which we do not know some might not know it was never disclosed as part of the record. But we do know that. There was sorry. What if it was Patagonia? Quill quilt. And there was a federal law that said you cannot take out an ad and run it right before an election. If it's got corporate money behind it and the Federal Election Commission, this movie counted as an election at okay there prior to citizens United what did ads? Attack ads. Look like political look like they look differently were. They only know they look just like they are now which is like instead of saying vote for vote against they say pick up your phone and call this person and tell him that you disagree with you a person had to give money to the campaign, and then the campaign could do it. And like, oh, but also like organizations could do it the AFL CIO could take out an ad or something like that. So the AFL a no. He's actually very politically active both corporations and unions prohibited from financing any ads in a little run up periods sixty days before an election..

Hillary Hillary Hillary Clinton Federal Election Commission AFL willy Horton CIO sixty days
"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"To make that argument and it worked and the supreme court, although it didn't give corporations all the same rights as criminal. Defendants did say the corporations are protected by many of the same provisions of the constitution that protect criminal defendants. So this is literally legal precedent that corporations can kind of do it over they want and not be punished for it. Well, they'll be have an easier time getting away with it. Let's say that is there a world in which we do you say that like the civil rights movement mimicked the practices of the corporate rights movement and vice versa. Is there a way in which individual groups could find us? Defense against criminal prosecution by mimicking what the corporations do you? Remember when the Starbucks? Mermaid did those lunch sit ins in the old south? Tabet civil rights. Okay. Okay. I got to do. We're all here. So we'll see what is there is there a world in which like what could the indiv- the civil rights movement. Learn from the corporate rights movement what could they do differently? They'll be more. Be able to be more ruthless in acquiring their own rights. Sure. Well, there is something to be said about persistence, so corporations have been very successful. Because they've been persistent. They've been some rights that they wanted to win. And it took them over one hundred years to win those rights. So there's a persistence that goes to it. But there's also the we also benefit from some corporations to some of the most important first amendment free speech cases were brought by newspaper corporations that were seeking to fight off against censorship and people like Huey long who was who accuse the newspapers of fake news eighty years before Trump did but ended up giving us better, and broader free speech rights that all of us enjoy that corporations were really at.

Starbucks Huey Trump one hundred years eighty years
"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"That if I kill someone than I only have to pay a fine. Why do they get that? Right. What if you kill someone through your loan out corporation? I don't think I would work with it like every comedian every not not every comedian. But every incredibly successful comedian has like a corporate, and I feel sort of hypocritical about having corporate entity under which you incorporate yourself to sort of indemnify yourself from things that may happen on your watch or whatever. But there's a corporation. That's only one I mean, then that corporation literally. I mean in the case of a comedian corporations are people. Corporation. It's brandon. Weird way. That's what Mitt Romney meant. When he was saying corporations are people like their collection of people doing thing, except those people then just get to walk away from a problem or like, if they say, hey, wait. This is immoral. The board of directors say you should leave. Now, you're no longer part of this corporation, right? There's no one to leave is you. Although sometimes I try to fire myself. What is the now I have a new favorite corporation Moshe? Oh, yeah. It's called the it's called nuts group LTD. Device device vented invented by Mark Twain, by the way, Mark Twain was the first artist who do who formed a corporation around himself to protect his intellectual property rights. What was it called? It was the Mark Twain. I'm not gonna do you should be. Not that you want. What book? Going with exactly the joke. Connecticut, Yankee and king. Not that one. The joke there. So what do you know the name of his version? I think it was the Mark Twain company, but I could be wrong. Fucking did not have a good imagination. We all know that. Okay. So why what is the answer? Why corporations have so many assertive rights, but not any punitive consequences like ice isn't like bursting in corporations like you're all people like a great question. It just feels like if you're anyway. Why don't they? In a real robust way, and the traditional ideas that a corporation because it's a collection of people that it can't have the sort of evil intent that's necessary for a crime to be committed. But, but we don't really think about corporations and quite the same way. But they're still very difficult to punish you can't throw them in jail. And part of the problem is with you. If you punish a corporation. You're often punishing the employees who are innocent or many of the shareholders who themselves probably might not have benefited or even known what was going on. So when you punish a corporation? It often has a lot of collateral consequences on innocent parties, which tends to mean that we want to focus on individual wrongdoers rather than corporate entities. And so that's what they try to do to go all basically what they seems like what they try to do when they punish corporations as far up the ladder as they can and still have the power to punish that person. So if they go to the CEO their pockets are so deep that they're going to hire some of it's going to wiggle them out of it. So they go to like four runs down. Let's put this person in a white collar prison. And kind of pretend the Justice was done. Well, and that's a big reason why corporations can avoid criminal ability to because they have the money and the resources to hire teams of lawyers to really make it difficult for prosecutors to go forward, whereas so many ordinary individuals, especially people who are impoverished don't have any resources to be able to fight back against the government. So the government just sort of runs roughshod over them. So what about that what about corporations themselves? You talk about your book. It's not just an abstraction of them indentifying themselves from of punish they also won the rights of four criminal defendants. How did they do that? What was that story? Well, that story involves a teddy Roosevelt who was famous for cracking down on the big trust that we're running the economy back in the turn of the century. And he went after the tobacco trust that controlled all the tobacco distribution in America. And he subpoenaed the company's officers to testify before the grand jury is part of this criminal investigation and the companies claimed that it was a. Violation of their right against self incrimination to require their own officers to testify against the company. In other words, they were guilty. So they couldn't be held responsible for being guilty. Exactly..

Mark Twain teddy Roosevelt Mitt Romney Connecticut nuts group LTD CEO America
"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"Okay. So so take us through the idea of what it means corporation. It'd be a person because obviously that's the fundamental legal fiction that I've never been able to wrap my head around. I know I'm supposed to be against it. I am against it. But I don't even understand what it means. I think some of the supreme court justices are struggling with the same thing too. What does it mean to say corporations a person well under the law that generally means a corporation as its own independent entity in the eyes of the law like you can sue a corporation? If you slip and fall at Starbucks. You can't sue the individuals shareholders or the employee's, you shoe, sue the corporations Starbucks its own independent entity in the eyes of the law, and of and of course, if Starbucks kills you with one of its products, it goes to jail for the rest of its life doesn't get to sell coffee anymore. He's back. Correct. Feels like a rhetorical. That is a really interesting point. It's like they get the rights and freedoms in one direction, and none of the responsibility or consequences in the other. It's not I mean, white people invented imaginary people to not get in trouble. That's all they did. They were just like. Oh, yeah. No. This whole thing's a personnel blame them fine. And the point of it at the beginning was supposed to be well there these things than they allow groups of people to do stuff than an individual couldn't do with their own money and stuff take on wrist. But then also the state will get to like regulate the more. We'll be able to go into their business little bit more and the United States being this place that is all just about making as much money as possible loves to pretend. Oh, it's a free market until shit goes wrong at which point in time. We are paying banks for being dumbed. Mary earlier you ask the question. You didn't know if you're right or wrong about whether or not being too big Phil is a bad thing. Or at any rate. Maybe it's about thing. But maybe it's a necessary thing, do you. What is? Do you feel like the onus of how evil the corporate empire is or do you feel like that is blown out of proportion that we're just living in the world? We're living. Do you life be like corporations that evil? Yeah. I mean, you were making the case. I thought an interesting case for like, well, this is the world we're living evil, but I guess I feel like they're necessary. And like if we just close Bank of America and Wells Fargo, and Goldman Sachs it cetera all of those just closed them. And we're like yet the world's fixed. I would imagine tomorrow would be bad. That'd be up brand fells war go we're back. Maybe. Although there are corporations that are particularly evil, chocolate and Wells Fargo can't we just at least punish the most of them. I mean fucking Cadbury is not too big to fail is it. Why do they get away with murder? I'm hoping they're not getting away with murder these days. But part of the reason they get away with murder because. This low murder of children everywhere. Because they have constitutional rights. You don't think about the rights and the constitution? We don't really think of them all the time in terms of criminal defendants rights, but most of the Bill of rights, we're about was about the prosecution investigation and punishment of criminals, and when corporations were started to be targeted for criminal punishment about one hundred years ago, they claim the same rights as criminal defendants under the constitution to and have used those rights to make it harder to go after a corporation, which even if his guilty of a crime will only have financial consequences rather than be put in jail, but it's not one of my rights.

murder Starbucks Wells Fargo United States Cadbury Phil Mary Goldman Sachs Bank of America one hundred years
"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"The best lawyers trying anything you can to try to win. I wanted to ask you sorry. That's what I wanted to ask you about the whole the whole quest for corporate rights. It was based. Foundation myth itself was based on a lie. Right. It's the opening stanza in your book. Can you tell us that story? And how that really was to me that the original scene of this pursuit of corporate rights is based on an actual lie from a person that should have known better was really kind of like spine tingling. Well, right. So this is right after the civil war the fourteenth amendments adopted to protect the rights of the newly freed slaves and about ten fifteen years later, the southern Pacific railroad company, one of the most powerful corporations in America goes to the supreme court files a series of test cases, more than sixty all seeking to win rights of equality and due process that we're guaranteed to the newly freed slaves but for corporations, and they hire a lawyer guy who'd been a nominated and confirmed to the supreme court himself turning down the seat because he was making too much money as a lawyer for the railroads, and he was in his early career had also been one of the drafters of fourteenth amendment. And he said to the justices that when we were drafting the fourteenth amendment. We. Intended to protect business corporations to and it turns out it was a ball faced lie that was not supported at all by the evidently record or the history. I mean, this is a dude lying about the constitution who wrote the constitution. So it's like these constitutional liars have been just sort of an ability in the law to get their own way. Literally, one of the people that wrote the constitution, it kind of throws pebbles at the idea that the this holy. Oh my goodness. Right. That we worship this thing. Some sort of truth document Yasser to do your question. No. Okay. Okay. So we have the voters of California that I couldn't get married, and then the constitutions that I could get married. So I think it's gel. No. And that's that's a big part of the narrative of the book is that throughout these these leaps forward that are as you would say chill like abolition of slavery super chill. Jim crow. Chills. Book. Women being able to vote extra chill the corporations were mimicking mirror. Is that correct were mimicking and Mirroring the struggle that these like actual aspirational movements were were gaining rights through in order to just manipulate further and further rights for themselves. That's right. They fought test cases. Like, I say the southern railroad hired the dream team of lawyers long before these dream team of lawyers fought against bans on same sex marriage here in California. The southern Pacific railroad was doing it one hundred years ago and winning. So in fact, there was a study done in the early nineteen hundreds of fourteenth amendment cases. And it turns out the supreme court had only heard Twenty-eight fourteenth amendment cases on the rights of African Americans and three hundred and twelve on the rights of business corporations in how many of those three hundred and twelve were successful versus how many of the African American or women's rights or gateway? We know the answer. Crazy. Yeah. And one in a billion numbers are often. You're the guy that said you could remember things very well. It was never even minute case. Hold on. It was twenty eight and twelve oh, man. I gotta go. Mary. Do you have any questions? Not yet. Okay. Maybe if women operated more railroads, they would've gone rights earlier, also railroads are sorry. Wait is it the opposite. I think it's the opposite that didn't Firestone by all the railroad no Firestone tire company. Didn't they buy all the railroads in Los Angeles all the tracks? Right. And where the electric cars used to be. So they get up end. And there was supreme court Justice was Roger rabbit. I apparently. But that's based on a real case. Correct. My understanding is that's right. That the trolley cars the public transportation system was bought out by Firestone and some other other businesses civically for buses, right? My understanding is that's right, and the and the car, and creating a more, vibrant, car culture. That's that's my understanding. Although I'm imagine there are some. Dr. Furious movies. Two polls gay marriage and periods. It's been worth it. Diesel is the overlap..

Firestone California Roger rabbit Yasser Los Angeles Jim crow America one hundred years ten fifteen years
"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"It was a big battle against the world's most powerful corporation. It wasn't just a protest against the British government. It was a really a protest against the East India company, which was at the time responsible for the distribution of t- in the in the colonies and its fortunes went under and seventeen seventies and England passed an unprecedented bailout of the East India company and part of that bailout was the ability to sell tea in the colonies for the first time without American middlemen. So the Boston tea party was a bunch of American merchants who upset that they were being cut out of the tea trade the price of was actually going to decline because of this law, and they went and they through that t- overboard, very specifically because it was the T inventory that belonged to the East India company, and they were upset about this big corporation that had been deemed too big to fail. So okay. Take us through how it becomes too. Big Phil IRL. What does that even mean that phrase, right? Well, the 'too-big-to-fail. But it really comes down to these. I see you've talked to an idiot before. Check and ten. Checkers. Okay. So tell me, yes, please. I told him every expert I have on. I say you're going to be interrupted more than -ticipant. But I don't I don't mention it's going to be by me. And it's going to be the stupid shit. You've ever heard. Remember, I teach students year in and year out a lot about right here in the front row. Just call Cole. Named that means you're probably. You're unbelieveable. Stupid. And specifically remember you. Okay. So yeah. How does a corporation even become too big to fail? Well, because in just like with the banks here in America a decade ago. It was there were all these governments that had invested so much money into big financial institutions like banks that invested so much money in these corporations that if the corporation took a downturn and the price went down it would destroy the economy. And so the idea's this institution we need to prop it up. So that we don't destroy everything else in the economy, and essentially the story of the corporate struggle for its own rights is it realizing it wanting to become victims and also realizing that is too. So then it becomes legally in pursuit of laws and rights that will protect its from failure eventually learns to love. That's the plot to believe. Yes. So so how did that start? Where's the notion that a corporation even has rights even come from? Right. It's very very early days. Like, the first supreme court case on the rights of African Americans wasn't decided until the eighteen fifties. And the first on the rights of women not until the eighteen seventies. And the first on the rights of corporations was decided in eighteen nine almost right after the founding and corporations, basically pursuing constitutional rights. So that they could fight off regulation government regulation that restricted what corporations could do in the interest of the public or investors or the environment. Corporations tried to overturn those laws by going to court is that stuff even sound in constant in constitutional law. Is there is it logically even in there? How did they even come up with the idea? It's amazing. Of course, the framers who wrote the constitution weren't thinking about corporations. It does say we the people, and they're not we the corporations, but it just Tuttle book, by the way step way. Do you know what is dance for not? Sure. L very. Very. But they weren't thinking. But it didn't take long because wealthy and powerful. Corporations could hire the best most creative lawyers that money could buy and they found wants to make really good creative arguments. I'm one of those creative lawyers paint. Show up. I play my songs, and then I defend the love. I. I. Time to pay Z. Here at your view about your sentence discuss tort love of first flute. So tell me the story of the first argument before the supreme court corporate rights because it's a pretty pretty crazy. Well, this is that eighteen nine case. And it involves the Bank of the United States, which the time was one of the most powerful corporations in America set up by Alexander Hamilton and the subject of the famous route..

East India America British government Boston Phil IRL England Cole United States Alexander Hamilton
"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Hound Tall with Moshe Kasher

"Discussions. The. Learn besser. Cetera. Discussions with your host Kesse. Ladies and gentlemen. Let's start the hound tall discussion series. Department professor at Winkler. Guy grabbed Yasser Lyford, very hill. The hands put your hands together as well. Dan. Hi, everybody. Thank you for joining me. Thank you professor for being here. Thank you for having me. All right. So guy Brandon is here are you? I'm doing well. Thanks for having me that you for being here guy guy is just interacting with a person for the first time guy. What do you think your favorite corporation is my favorite corporation is the Disney corporation because I own five shares of it, and they are keeping American copyright law from letting anything into the public domain so that Walt can keep his his frozen hands on Mickey Mouse. Let me think it's wall still frozen, Walt Mary, what do you got favorite court? Yeah. You gotta pick one. I know they're all evil. That's the fun of this game. This Australian pick Cadbury which was about the most corporation possible. Even Taco Bell is how much more evil in comparison to Cadbury Cadbury was very involved in the slave trade near the bed. You're the best every chocolate company is evil getting one notch below every company. It's like pure evil. He had a lot of the slavery in western Africa was from chocolate makers and a big part of the effort to ban slavery came out of people who love chocolate, so chocolate is the reason why we have civil rights today face. That's wonderful. I mean, human chocolate and actual chocolate is the reason why you. You. What are you slack chocolate chocolate? Mary. What do you what do you think favorite Corp that don't mention the chocolate company? That's actually, very good answer. Very well played there. They are a surf company wants you can tell young. What are you got? You got you gotta favorite Corp. I was going to say Nike shoe. Because I like I gotta say I like when someone subverts they're evil with style. You know? And I feel like they you're like, oh, the kids are like they're bleeding making the stuff. And then you're like, but it looks great. It's all like what can you do? Really? Well, isn't Nike. I heard that Nike has is one of these companies that they had a scandal. They had a terrible PR nightmare with with the sweatshops. They change their entire corporate policy their corporate culture, they completely become a model corporation and fucking does not matter because people only think of them as the child the sweatshop corporation. Have you heard that? Well, there was a big case involving Nike trying to defend itself mart. Yeah. This is a big deal, and they claim that when they were accused of these unfair labor practices. They took out a big ad saying, you know, we don't do any of that stuff. And then they got in trouble for taking out the ad. And there was a question. They took it to the supreme court tried to get the right to free speech, another free speech rights four corporations. Why they get in trouble for putting the well because there was a question about whether the ad was true or not. And so the warehouse children writing as for the paper. If it was true, it would be protected speech. But if it was false because it was a corporation, and it might be commercial speech could be subject to regulation. And so they said even though it was arguably false that because it was pulp olitical speech..

Nike Cadbury Cadbury Walt Mary professor Kesse favorite Corp Yasser Lyford besser Taco Bell Brandon supreme court Winkler Disney Dan Africa
"civil rights" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Students for dominantly from black and Puerto Rican neighborhoods stayed out of city schools. Many of the students and their parents joined picket lines at their campuses or protests at the board of education offices, Russ and proclaimed it as the largest civil rights demonstration in the nation's history. One and a half times the size of the March on Washington six months earlier in the end, however, the protests yielded little change newspapers. City officials even some advocacy groups that supported school integration all responded to the boycott with indifference or criticism and without real progress. New York City schools would continue deepening their patterns of inequality in the years ahead. As students in New York. We're taking their STAN plans for a new campaign of political empowerment were also underway down in Mississippi. The snick organizers who had come to the state in nineteen sixty one during the summer of the freedom rides had never really left, but the hostile resistance. They encountered had kept their progress. Slow during the intervening years by nineteen sixty four less than seven percent of eligible black mississippians were registered vote. But with a national election coming up in the fall, civil rights workers launched to statewide efforts to mobilize black voters. The first starting in April was the formation of a group called the Mississippi freedom Democratic Party or the DP the MFT P was meant to challenge. The all white segregationist Democratic Party establishment of the state M F D P members prepared to send an alternative integrated delegration to the democratic national convention in August and challenge the party's credentials committee to recognize them as the rightful rep. Tentative of the state one of the leading figures in the m FDP's mobilization was Fannie, Lou Hamer. A forty seven year old former cotton plantation worker from sunflower county Mississippi Hamer had begun organizing alongside members of snick in nineteen sixty two after she attempted to register to vote. She quickly suffered a vixen threats and economic reprisals, but they only drove her further into the movement in the summer of nineteen sixty three Justice, president Kennedy made his national address on civil rights. Hamer had been part of a group of activists detained by police and brutally beaten after staging a sit-in at the town of wino-. A few months later Hamer unsuccessfully ran for congress and Mississippi second district attempting to unseat one of the states entrenched, segregationists, her efforts helped lay the groundwork for the MFT broader campaign that summer, and she would serve as vice chairwoman of the MFT peace delegation Hamer's work with the MVP occurred. Alongside the second mobilization program what organizers were calling the freedom summer project in the freedom summer scheduled to run from June through August, a coalition of civil rights groups in the state invited volunteers from across the nation to organize in Mississippi. Their work would involve registering voters and launching educational programs known as freedom schools, the campaign, ultimately, drew hundreds of all in tears ninety percent of them white, which all but assured that media coverage would follow even before the freedom summer. Campaign began news from Washington gave reason for hope the civil rights Bill made a crucial breakthrough in congress a lengthy filibuster. The longest in the Senate history at seventy five days finally broke the following week. The Senate passed the Bill seventy three to twenty seven sunny it to the house of representatives for one final vote. While the debate raged on in Washington, the freedom summer volunteers spent a week in Ohio training for their campaign. But nothing could have prepared them for the violence that awaited the fury of Mississippi's white supremacist descended. Immediately. Just as the first wave of all in tears arrived three civil rights workers two white one black disappeared in a show by county as their families and fellow. Organizers feared the worst local sheriff whose deputies had participated in the abduction insisted it was all just publicity stunt staged by movement activists by then clansman had already executed and buried the three men though. A handful of the volunteers still waiting in Ohio dropped out after the news. The vast majority continued on ordering the next wave of buses. Imagine you're a white college student on the seven hundred mile bus ride from southern Ohio central Mississippi. You cross the Mississippi border a little over an hour ago. You know, it won't be much longer to your destination. You lean over to the young black woman across the..

Lou Hamer Mississippi Democratic Party Washington sunflower county Mississippi Ohio Senate congress Puerto Rican New York City Russ STAN New York clansman president FDP
"civil rights" Discussed on Crooked Conversations

Crooked Conversations

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on Crooked Conversations

"And I never learned about him. I never learned about even DeLores worth. Our says are Chavis like those were not things that I was learning in school. So I am wondering, we are wondering, is the Jenner is your generation learning about those parts of. Civil rights movement? Well, no, we're not. I have not heard any of the names that you just mentioned. All my God, all the studios on fire. Because not because you're not learning about it, we're, I'm still, I'm still like. So one of the things that that that in when we talk to to Moctezuma that made me that made me want to cry was when he said he knew how hurt he is that fifty years after after all the work that he did, people are still not learning about about him and about the movement that that Latin x people that to Connah's lead during the civil rights movement LASSO makes me me too because it's not your fault by any means and always at our fault that we didn't learn if anything, it's actually the fault of our generation and above for not insisting that this is taught in schools. It's real frustrating to hear. It's real frustrating, so. Wow, it is. It's very frustrating. One question we wanted to talk about with regard to your identity as Afra Latina you identify as Afra Latina. Yeah. Or is that you do. Okay. And does that, how does that influence your active. Visit. I'm that that influence my activism specifically in recognizing the tables that I came from and people that now it is my responsibility to represent at the table, but also bring to the table because I, I haven't intersectional identity as do many other people, but I cannot speak for every intersection and I and and I can't try to because every story, every experience every community deserves representation in the integrity to tell their own stories. So most of my work is focused on. Widening our scope of representation in authentic representation. Right now we suffer from in authentic representation in mainstream media specifically right now for trans women and the stories of trans women and trans women of color. They're being taken there being written by people who are not transgender. They are being casted by people who are not transgender. The roles are being cast two actors who are not transgender and the money is not going to actors, producers directors, screenwriters crew members who are here. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So so it's, it's now my responsibility and I take it. I take very willingly to use my education. I'm studying. I'm studying film to make sure that our identities are normalized, but normalized by us in us only and that our stories are told by us only and that we are that.

Jenner Chavis DeLores Afra Connah Moctezuma fifty years
"civil rights" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"civil rights" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"Civil rights they're calling bat the civil rights movement here's oprah it's a proud moment it's an evolving moment for our country the same thing happened is you know back in the fifties and sixties for the civil rights movement young people said we will not tolerate what our ancestors have tolerated we have had enough and we're willing to fight for it and willing to do what march in the street for it and if necessary die for the activist ruby hall agrees ruby hall said when i think about our babies today in them not being safe school i think that should be the next civil rights movement you know is to ban the assault weapons so there are babies can be safe and legal montoya your reaction came here sent a fourth adama think of ms what you're thinking myths that's a great point in ego that is a great point if they keep using the phrase civil rights but what they really mean as they want to deprive us of our civil rights missing we support civil rights and and we were suppose of a right so much and we're gonna take away one of your most basic civil rights we should clear this up this is a civil rights issue but oprah's on the wrong side of the civil rights issue if this were the 1960s you'd be on the side of george wallace should be in the side if this were the 1860s should be on the side of the democrats an end to the ones wearing though it's this is a civil rights issue the right to keep and bear arms is a civil right as a co it does it constitutionally protected civil right and it's a civil right that at bit throughout history has been denied black people uh so that a whites could oppress them this has happened for centuries the nra exists to protect that civil right against all sorts of tyranny and especially to protect minorities who for centuries have regularly seen their civil rights trampled on.

ruby hall assault montoya oprah george wallace nra adama