20 Episode results for "City Hall"

Brisbane City Hall

Haunted Places

47:20 min | 10 months ago

Brisbane City Hall

"Under Thirteen Eileen made her way down the crowded sidewalk thinking this episode features depictions of violence abuse murder and suicide listener discretion is advised especially for children or a gaping hole in the metal roof below but there was nothing. The woman had vanished into journey to Brisbane City Hall in Queensland Australia and discover why to this day it's haunted welcome to haunted she looked back over her shoulder at Eileen with tears streaming down her face she stepped backwards off the and charged up the steps into city hall she spotted the birdcage elevator from across the foyer a sign hung across the bars of the door only a few steps away from a one hundred fifty foot drop to the roof below Eileen crossed King George Square in an instant out of order Eileen spun on her heels and sped back in the opposite direction she would have to take the stairs Eileen fluid a woman was walking along the outer edge of the clock tower inching toward the edge of the thin safety netting that surrounded it she up the narrow stairwell taking the steps three four sometimes five at a time her heart pounded in her chest but our legs continue to churn trembling body up at last she found the courage to open her eyes and she had expected to see the woman's broken body just city in Australia and the state capital of Queensland located on the country's eastern edge between the Sunshine Coast and the Gold Coast the city Bob Sunlight blinded her she burst through the door onto the landing the woman was there on the edge just a few feet away real places on earth you can find all episodes of haunted places and all other podcast originals free on spotify or wherever you listen allege Eileen lunged reaching with all her might her outstretched fingers graze the ham of the woman's dress for an instant be receive plummeted out of sight Eileen shutter is clinging to the Barest Ray to hold mark and if you enjoy today's episode the best way to help is to leave a five star review wherever you're listening this week join me on a supernatural broadcasts to stream hot places for free on spotify just open the APP entitled haunted in the Search Bar at podcast we're grateful for you our listeners you allow us to do it we love let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at Parkas Net Brisbane or Brizzi as it's known to locals is the third he's home to a subtropical climate and experiences warm to hot weather for the majority of the year trips Brisbane include activities such as snorkeling strolls along the Brisbane River's South Bank and hikes up Mt Kuta named after the aboriginal word for honey you probably wouldn't expect faces a podcast original I'm Greg Paulson every Thursday I take it to the scariest aereas most haunted among these is the iconic downtown landmark that is almost synonymous with the city itself Brisbane City Hall the Sunny City to be a prime location for ghost hunting but Brisbane is home to more than its fair share of haunted locales and foremost leash shines the main foyer houses vaulted ceilings and a grand marble staircase imported from Italy Belgium and south apple ever since its completion nineteen thirty the building's construction lasted ten years and cost approximately nine hundred eighty thousand Australian POW more than eighty one million Australian dollars today at three hundred feet high the imposing clock tower that rises from its center name the oldest working manual crank elevator it Australia but those who ride won't be alone they'll be it already had to repair the same elevator five times in as many weeks Brisbane City Hall wasn't even scheduled to open for business for another two months pull the crank further all the way to the final position the cage continue to rise passing the third floor and then the people's place since its grand opening it has been host to countless music performances local dances and all manner of cultural events was the tallest building in Brisbane for nearly four decades but while its outer appearances nothing to scoff at the interior of the building is where it really Wales in addition to being the seat of local government the city hall has long been a focal point of public life in Brisbane earning it the moniker the the pants coveralls and slammed the control panel shut rather than simply install another fuse he decided to rewire the entire thing from the the decades as skyscrapers in other modern structures emerged around it but through all this time the means of `accessing the platform has remained the same breath and kicked the Mesh cage of the lift in frustration he glanced up something was moving above him barely the long rectangular red brick building lined with imposing Corinthian pillars Brisbane City Hall has been a point of pride for Queensland visible through the roof of the cage a dark shape said huddled on top of the elevator he reached for the Claw Hammer protruding from it isn't doing him any good so George rolled-up sleeves and got to work two hours later George wiped his grease covered hands on chart if that didn't fix the problem well it or not chinks it George crossed fingers and flipped the power switch breath George Pied Open the door to the control panel and stared at the mess of melted wires he let out a grown of despair it's it's guests include Queen Elizabeth the second and the rolling stones and according to local legend it also happens to be haunted so it couldn't have been operated more than a dozen times at most he simply couldn't understand what kept causing it to break down but complaining about it was by not one but four ghosts the first of these spectres resides in Brisbane city halls most visible feature it's central a company of one night who's been writing the elevator for almost ninety years I against the unyielding stone for several decades visitors to Brisbane city as expected the elevator began to rise George breathed a sigh of relief as it travelled from the first to the second floor he these mechanical problems are nothing new it frequently broke down immediately following its installation and two days after city hall opened toolbag he'd been taught not to hold a grudge against any of God's creatures but if this critter was responsible for all the lifts troubles it had to go next part would be the real test George placed his hand on the crank and slowly turned it from the one position to to keep pushed open the hatch and peered out into the darkness of the elevator shaft. Whatever he had seen crouched in the corner was gone but George wasn't one to give a beasley he clambered out of the lift cage onto the mesh roof leading the Hatch Shut Large Spinning pulley system that crew effort closer there was no stopping as progress is only other option would be to fling themselves a fire ignited in the elevator fortunately it was extinguished before anyone was hurt a potential explanation for the tail of the hunt the lift man these similarly named George Jones a few minutes after leaving bets on the Clock Tower Jones and several council members Oh clock tower the observation deck on the top floor provides a three hundred sixty degree view of the city the view has changed significantly over and lift lies in one of the first unnatural deaths to occur at Brisbane City Hall on October Thirty First Nineteen thirty five ghosts the female phantom who haunts the grand staircase you're with all his might but it wouldn't budge and the elevator was arising gaining speed with every moment george looked over it's ghost is cited as the reason why the lift frequently breaks down while the lifts finicky behavior is more likely a result of its significant age behind him he looked around but there was still no sign of the creature the elevator shuttered began to rise as the down the elevator shaft something he could not bring himself to do George made a silent prayer he hoped he hall's clock tower have reported seeing chilling figure the silhouette of a man standing in areas that were supposed to be inaccessible to the the engine sputtered and died the elevator ground to a halt coming to a stop midway between the third and fourth floors George Kirstein Taurus bread public he is said to be the ghost of lift operator or repairman who was killed in an accident not long after it was first installed today this wouldn't feel the impact as the ceiling came rushing at him George let out of final screen before his body was crushed human fingers reached up through the truth they seized the rungs of the hatch and pulled it shut again George pulled out the trap door out there to see the ceiling hurtling toward him his nose Dong as it took in the puget smoke pouring from the worrying gears and a construction worker named George Edward Betts stopped by City Hall to pay water bill while there he was given a ride to the observation platform don't be the last coming up we'll examine another of Brisbane city halls famous hosts perhaps the most famous of these is the unidentified female phantom who was said engine roared to life startled George dropped to his knees and reach to open the trap door he jumped back in surprise as in Brisbane City Hall the lift man is not it's only supernatural occupant many believed that the building haunted by at least four lift man who died when the towers elevator was first installed this ghostly lift mad could potentially be the spirit of George Betts I have some scary good news for you because you've been such amazing listeners we released our entire back catalogue of shows and they're already in your feed or perhaps he and the go star one in the same but while he was the first person to fall from the Brisbane City Hall Tower he would not had spirits at bay but instead as a attracted the paranormal whether you're reliving some of your favorite episodes or hearing these fantastic stories a grin spread across his face as the motor chug to life so far so good but the deform plummeting almost one hundred fifty feet to the copper dome roof below George Betts might be the inspiration for the story of the lift man working at the time heard the violent crash of something smashing through metal George Betts had either fallen or jumped off the observation Paris and meet the grim Specter's who call those labyrinthine tunnels their home you can be sentenced to death and held in the Tower of London as the that's sixty episodes of haunted places that are available to listen to right now be sure to check out some of my favorite episodes you can visit the bone filled catacombs you both do to her proximity to the main foyer were the ghost is believed to reside in the shocking nature of her death on for the first time these sixty episodes are available right now and don't worry we'll continue to produce and release new haunted places episodes every thirsty ghosts of executed nobility wait for you to join them in the afterlife and you can travel to the winchester mystery house which was constructed to keep in the meantime get caught up on haunted places for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts now back to the story According to local legend the Iconic Clock Tower of the Brisbane City Hall in Queensland Australia is haunted by the ghost the first man to fall to his death from the clock tower but just as George Betts was not the last person to meet his untimely demise to haunt the foyer grand staircase and mezzanine balcony descriptions of this coast are as varied as it sightings are numerous mickey sat at the dining room table grimacing at his untouched toast and is leaping from the tower she had been an inmate at a private hospital in the area suggesting she may have been suffering from a mental illness swampland as far as the I could see according to legend this ghostly woman drowned in these fairy waters I'm later and rushed to a nearby hospital where she died that same day another woman proves a more likely candidate for the ghosts identity has been city halls foyer ghost actually perished far earlier than either of these two women in fact some Brisbane locals believe she was rushed to Brisbane General Hospital where she soon died of massive injuries. The Brisbane Courier Mail reported that before Zander the fifty five year old unmarried Brisbane night who collapsed in the washroom on September Fifteenth Nineteen forty four she was found some time you're actually expired. Inside the walls of Brisbane City Hall lease them as less than satisfactory candidates but a third tail suggests that bree talk of the clock tower and climbed out past the protective netting that had been installed after George Betts fall from the same spot many one version of the story claims that she does not present a physical form at all but as merely felt distinctly female presence high standards including Australian Police Officer Eileen O. Donnell watched as Hilda Boardman leapt off the ledge and plummeted one hundred as with Mariam Alexander Hilda Boardman's death did not actually transpire within the walls of City Hall her heart continued to beat well Hilda Boardman's public and shocking death seems to have been more likely to inspire ghost stories the fact that neither she nor Miriam Alexander Fifty feet she crashed through the galvanized metal roof breaking a thick metal scaffold on her way to the concrete floor skimming the historical record presents a number of potential candidates for the spirits identity the first possibility is Miriam Mary Alex at a bed and dressed for school normally he would have been out the door and halfway to work by now but he'd been particularly slow getting out of bed ended copy of the Brisbane Courier Mail he could hear the sounds of his wife Elsa moving around their houses only other room trying to get this six children Mickey wasn't sure why his wife is always concerned about him getting enough to eat he could afford to lose a few pounds he pushed away from the table down the last December twenty first one thousand nine hundred thirty seven four days before Christmas of thirty two year old woman named Hilda Angus Boardman rode the lift too his coffee and toss toast to the dog momentarily there would be men and horses and shovels drills it would be dangerous she had to move she just her until he stood directly in front of the woman her face was lined with creases and wrinkles Mickey had never been able to decide stared at him unblinking the pain behind his eye boomed again infuriating Mickey even more than the woman stare he forced to smile the one he learned through the years of explaining simple construction procedure just stubborn businessmen and politicians still to maintain his composure he explained that the building would be going up whether she liked it or not and if she refused to move herself the city would find some they'd lost a good man yesterday when the crane had collapsed the fifth accident since construction of the New City Hall had begun Governor Mickey spotted her as he reached the edge of the worksite or a solid ground rapidly began to transition to the mud floor of the swamp the aboriginal woman what else to move her at last the woman blinked for a moment Mickey thought she was going to say something but then some say that she is a Brisbane socialite from decades past others insist that she's an old woman and still others a young girl that her death predates the building itself during the late eighteen hundreds the tract of land that would soon become downtown Brisbane was vast Adams had already been breathing dot its neck over the delays but that's just what you got for trying to build in the middle of swamp as well as it paid and around at the men struggling to save it if it fell days of their hard work would be lost Mickey told the team leader to grab a rope and he said that one of his men had spotted a woman out in the swamp the water level was rising quickly the pain and mm stood a few yards away in ankle high water watching the workers with narrowed eyes she wore the same simple khaki front pulled the woman in the swamp had made her choice and he had made his Mickey Wove through the piles of Red Sandstone and oak lumber massaging the side of his temple with us Tom a sharp pain had been steady Mickey was beginning to regret ever taking the job ill swept into the room and bought working quickly to tie down the teetering scaffold Mickey heard someone shout it's name and turned to find his waterlog beating leader rushing up the site of her husband's sitting at the table she gently reminded him that if he was late for work the governor was liable to start looking for a new foreman league growing behind his left high and that was before this new obstacle had arrived to ruin his day woman was back skull pounded angrily the waterlog rope slid through his hands biting into the flesh of his pals he looked up at the teetering crane mark and your gray hair was time back with a strip of cloth Mickey removed his work boots and socks and wait it out into the water gaze shifted to peer over his shoulder at something above and beyond him Mickey looked up as the first drops of rain hit his bald scowled toward the crane grabbing a coil of rope from the ground in calling out for the workers to do the same as they reached it they hurled the ropes over the wooden beams and hours later mickey sat on the tarp covered stack of bricks leading the warm sun dry his trenched close the story the sound of wood cracking and splintering and turned to see the third crane bending in the wind it was going to fall Mickey race that she might take her lunch in the shade of Brisbane City Hall's Clock Tower but as the building came into view she could instantly tell that something was wrong because she was closer to fifty or one hundred years old in as reasonable boys says he could muster Mickey explained that his men would be digging on this land shouting commands over the howling wind while the men worked furiously to fasten tarps over their equipment and building materials he froze then she planted a kiss on the top of his bald head and glided back out of the room shouting a final reminder not to forget his lunch pail again and just what he needed more water the storm arrived quicker than Mickey had thought possible he dashed through the work site had gone just as quickly as it had arrived miraculously taking Mickey's headache with it all around his men were clapping one another on the back congratulations all three of the cranes were still standing they had done it. Mickey stomach grumbled unhappily crave up next we'll explore the ghosts who lurk in Brisbane city halls most haunted four door now back to the story Brisbane City Hall in Queensland Australia is said to be home to at least China's sacred aboriginal site is not implausible nor is the possibility that it's foyer ghost met her end in watery a few hundred yards away it was a female figure floating face down in the water for much of Brisbane's early history the city was home to countless conflicts between European settlers and truth Aboriginal Australians do consider some old watering holes to be sacred sites with special connection to the dreamy a unique Shen of the physical World Brisbane City Hall was built in the middle of swampland and specifically on large reservoir and watering hole known as check did to five major floods so I'll know historical drowning victims have been identified the idea that Brisbane City Hall was built for Natural Activity. Well there's no clear evidence to suggest the site in question was significant in this way the story possesses a glimmer of all was completed in one thousand nine hundred thirty their numbers had been decimated by countless massacres to this regional. Australians the indigenous peoples who had called the country's eastern coast home for over fifty thousand years it is estimated that as Lee the horse pond it is believed that in the forty years before nineteen hundred the swampy area that would eventually become downtown Brisbane was case to the first floor the third ghost is said to be an American sailor from World War Two according to local legend he was stabbed to death he gingerly reached out to turn her over a whale escaped mickey slips as crippling pain erupted inside his skull day some Brisbane Heights contend that city hall was built on a site sacred to the aboriginal people and that this is the cause of it soon he lifted his dead wife from the water and various face in her neck well uncontrollable sobs of grief. I'm down off the tarp and made his way across the worksite picking up speed as he went a crowd of workers had gathered at the edge of the swamp staring at something rack his body a metal lunch pail floated past glinting in the sunlight complex concept from aboriginal culture that simultaneously encompasses all life and refers to a period of history that predates the cree you heard a shout from across the worksite the low dull ache bloomed once more in the back of his skull Mickey Mickey tore off his boots as he charged out into the water it was up past his waist by the time he reached her frail figure in her pale blue dress arrival after the two men argued about each other's significant other they say that if you find a quiet corner of Brisbane City Hall it is eight hundred twenty-five tens of thousands of Aboriginal Australians lived along the banks of the Brisbane River by the time construction of the Brisbane City Hall you can sometimes still hear them arguing followed by the sound of knife being drawn once again four ghosts I is the phantom lift man second is the spectral figure of a woman who was occasionally seen descending the grand stairs has been historical records offered no evidence of an American sailor dying on the premises but there is some historical context that might shed light aw during World War Two many American servicemen were stationed in Queensland Australia before being deployed to action and in the Pacific while the United States and Australia we're allies in the fight against the Axis powers American soldiers were not always well received by the local population soldiers were much better paid than Australian servicemen and their uniforms were considered to be far more attractive this gave American soldiers a significant this was particularly true in the city of Brisbane which at one point housed over eighty thousand US troops at the time Americans they were overpaid oversexed and over here. Tensions between the soldiers reached a climax on on the origins of this ghost story it centres on an event that is not particularly well known outside of Australia the battle crispin edged in Australia and women and ultimately resulted in some twelve thousand marriages by the end of the War Australian soldiers member twenty-sixth nineteen forty two after weeks of scattered brawls in bar fights a massive riot broke out between the forces is in male civilians were none too happy with the situation a popular Australian refrain listed the three problems with the Americans footsteps can be heard around every corner furniture moves without warning upsetting carefully maintained filing systems toward the American troops and seems to birth the ghost story of an American sailor in Brisbane City Hall that lasted two days by the time the city was under control again one Australian soldier was dead and hundreds of men on both sides had been injured stories about the riot were suppressed outside of Australia the people of Brisbane remembered the riot left deep resentment at some point in the nineteen fifties the strange occurrences are said to have gotten so bad that the city council members moved all business out of the center for more paranormal activity than the rest of City Hall Combined Cereal Whispers Creep from the shadows and the sounds of hurried ONTA cluster of rooms on the buildings third-floor collectively known as room three Oh to this small area is said to have been the take Care Center Nora softly chided which brings us to the building's fourth and final ghost this spectral force is described only as sinister and powerful it is said to same room three Oh two was temporarily used as a photography darkroom but haunting persisted eventually the stepped out without saying anything nor slipped her phone back into the pocket of her jeans sightly chastising yourself for not being more alert a wing was abandoned entirely by the nineteen eighties the stories of strange sounds in the walls had been mostly forgotten and the news was determined that Tau would not receive any such labels for weeks she had avoided mentioning his behavior to his mother despite the daycare managers has gone Nora called tiles name gently she patted down the narrow corridor she senator but he was also her favorite the way he would stand apart from the others staring off into oblivion with a glassy distant look grew louder as she crept closer to the room there were two of them both male one of them had an American accent while the other ups for just over fifteen minutes in half an hour she'd wake them up for the final activity before their parents came to pick them up for the day she she'd have to be louder if she actually wanted him to hear her but she really didn't want to run into Mrs Race or even worse one of the children's parents he council sought to utilize the rooms once more several walls were torn down so room three two could be converted into a children's raised her eyes from her phone screen and scan the room noticing with a start that the chair behind Mrs Reece's desk was empty the daycare leader heads before taking a five year old boy's hand leading him to the circle of the other children child had been the biggest handful ballade since she had started as a teacher's aide at the daycares assistance that she do so each time he wandered away from the group nor would patiently take his hand and lead him back to the others she had to be the responsible one when Mrs Reese was out she turned back to the rows of sleeping children one of the Matt's was empty this for a moment she was filled with horror at the thought that the five year old had wandered into a city council meeting but none of the rooms in the outdoor besides the one she had just entered throw it was like the men had vanished into thin air nora moved a photographic darkroom and there was no one inside the voices of the American and the Australia had completely disappeared reminded her so much of her own younger brother Jack Jack Teachers had labelled him a daydreamer among other less kind things career to the open crack to listen the American man was laughing he said that the Australian could have whatever he wanted soon enough the American goosebumps crawled up nor his arms as she stared at the image it showed a middle aged woman in an old fashioned dress American howling at the top of his lungs Nora looked around wondering why no one else is coming to see the Commotion Hall Were Supposed To be used for city business in fact most of the rooms of the swing weren't used at all nevertheless the voices adore up ahead was open just a crack as she drew nearer she could hear voices wafting from inside raised male voices after a typically hectic morning nora sat in the corner of the dimly lit Claro scrolling through the messages on her phone the kids had been down for their nap was clearly Australian and by the sounds of things they weren't on the best terms nora pause has she reached the door for the poor photographer nora world back toward the door a man loomed over oppressively close she pushed the door open the room Nora saw within was bathed in an unearthly red light simultaneously both men charged neuroleptic back as the men collided the ignored her completely as they fought standing in front of a marble grand stairway that led up from the main foyer and the image of changing fading rapidly the woman's features blurring into nothing nora had left the door open the natural light was ruining the exposure feeling pangs of Guilt Nora turned and bolted through the door she flew down the corridor making for the birdcage lift at the end the door was open between the rows of chemical bath trays stopping to appear into a single photo lay on the bottom glowing in the eerie red line being a blue blanket lady sided with the head of towels fuzzy stuffed Koala poking out but tau himself something moved above Nora rattling the cage she looked up a dark shape stood on the roof would be shipping out at a few weeks he'd be all done with it that the Australian didn't like that suggestion very much he started shouting profanities at the if the men kept on like this any longer they would ruin the kid's nap if no one else is going to tell them to keep their voices down Nora would have to do it. His features were stretched in a sinister grin and he warned odd little white cap like one taken from sailors costume crashing through the tables and knocking side chemical bath trays as they pummeled one another the Australian raised something I nora's step through the doorway scanning the corners for any signs of the arguing man but there was no place for anyone to hide and did she told him she didn't care she just needed to get out of there as soon as possible the Lippman nodded understanding Louis He drew the elevator aw she recognized that laugh it belonged to the American she heard through the door a second voice sounded in her ear causing her here's cage door shot then turn the crank control to the first position Norris Shudder is as the elevator began to descend try this head which glinted as it caught the red light Nora gasped as the knife plunged down into the American sailors back on she was alone in the elevator which had come to a stop between the third and fourth floor she could see a short man in great coveralls fiddling with the lifts manual crank control he looked up as Nora flew into the cage and asked what four she fueled by terror she reached up and grabbed the trap door and pulled it shut again knocking the manual crank control the process the lifts into force her breathing to slow she couldn't wait to get outside to put as much distance between herself and a madman on the third floor staring down at her nora shrieked as human fingers reach down through the Mesh and the hatch in the roof began to lift he would have appeared a bit comical had he not been bathed in the eerie red light the man cackle maniacally because he took a step toward wherewithal to wrench open the elevator door and stumble sunlight blinded her she had stepped out onto the observation platform at the top of the clock tower and to jump in whirl around to face a stout balding man in a crumpled grey suit and features stretch in a look of unbridled fury her just a few feet ahead of her was Tau the five year old boy was standing on a ledge outside the protective netting that Nora refuse to let go she lifted her feet off the floor using her body weight to keep the door shut the lift ascended faster and faster there was a horrible manic scream and then the cage slammed into the roof a torrent of blood whose just a few more steps and she would have him then she blinked and Tau was he dirt and began to rise slowly at first then gradually gaining speed the figure on the top of the cage pulled harder from the ledge tears began to form in her eyes tout didn't move Nora step toward him still crying scream for many years the wing formerly known as room on the verge of hysteria she didn't know what was happening she just knew she had to get Tau off the Ledge and back through the elevator roof like sausage pressed through a meat Grinder Norris doubled back screaming at the top of her lungs she had just enough then it hit her in her terror she had forgotten all about towel when the other children she had left them but those maniacs is permanently closed today the purportedly haunted area is home to a collection of art and history galleries known as the Museum of apt around the tower one step in either direction and he would fall to his death nor pleaded with Tau to step away it was a young woman no older than herself but strangely dressed in an old fashioned police officer's uniform before either excite but there was one other figure a few hundred yards in front of the building a woman in a simple khaki frock stood in ankle deep water staring up at Nora even from this great distance she could feel the woman's is upon her thanks again for tuning into that had plagued the area in previous decades in two thousand nine the entire third floor underwent a significant restoration of the daycare center oldest crank operated elevator at the very least you'll have plenty of company from ground she climbed over the barrier and stepped out onto the Ledge Tau still hadn't moved an inch was gone replaced by endless swamp and marshland the city hall was the only Structure Three Oh two was utilized by Brisbane city halls daycare center fortunately none of the youngsters reported anything like the strange occurrences and she had lost her grip on reality that much was clear she had to get back to firm ground she just couldn't look down -freshing plunge in Inaugura Damn but if you're in the mood for something a little more chilling why not take a ride on Australia's with deep cultural significance to a city with a rich and vibrant history so if you're planning a trip to Australia's eastern coast host keep

Brisbane City Hall Brisbane Queensland Australia World Brisbane City Hall city hall Eileen Mickey Mickey Brisbane River George murder Mickey stomach Brisbane Heights China United States Zander Natural Activity Lee Pacific Australia
Why Is There A Texas Flag Outside S.F. City Hall? What is S.F.s First Square?

Bay Curious

10:07 min | 9 months ago

Why Is There A Texas Flag Outside S.F. City Hall? What is S.F.s First Square?

"From Cutie Hello Hello Olivia Allen Price Ice here with the bay curious podcast. Today we have two questions from two different listeners on deck one why they're a Texas flag in front of of the San Francisco City Hall and to which Town Square was. San Francisco's first answers. Just ahead but first we need to do one little thing thing support for bay. Curious comes from the institute on Aging Providing specialized care for those with dementia or Alzheimer's both in their home and at the enrichment day center. Learn more at I o aging dot dot Org. Our first question comes from a listener in San Francisco's South Beach neighborhood. I'm Kevin I was born and raised originally in Texas but I've lived on on the west coast since two thousand and two day. Kevin was walking around San Francisco checking out a display of historical flags outside City Hall. I noticed you all the other flags sort of made sense. Yeah Down with the shift. You had the flag of Mexico things like that. But then I saw Texas the Texas state flag flying outside San Francisco City Hall. The Texas flag is made out of three bars and start. There's one vertical bar on the left. That blue with a white five pointed pointed star in the center and then there are two horizontal bars and the rest of it White are above red wine here to answer why there's a Texas flag in front of City Hall is reporter Ana Decline Hanukah. I love you so first off. Walk me through what these flags outside City Hall even are okay. So if you walk up to City Hall in San Francisco you'll walk through two rows of nine flags each they all represent these different points in American history. It's kind of like walking through a time line of these important moments like you have betsy. Betsy Ross's thirteen stars in a circle that original American flag. Or you've got the classic. Don't tread on me flag with rattlesnake which would become the navy's first flag there's also a republic of California flag which kind of looks like our current state flag. But a little bit more of a I would say like a kid druick Shen rudimentary. Bear looks a little bit more like a pig to me just to me. You know maybe other people disagree But the state did upgrade so when California became a state and joined join the Union in eighteen fifty Later on the flag would change. Now we have the ferocious grizzly right but as our question Asker Kevin Notes. There's a Texas Texas flag Among these flags outside City Hall so why Texas that flag is technically the Republic of Texas flag so also in the mid eighteen hundreds the republic of Texas existed for about ten years. It was its own independent republic recognized by the United States. At the end of that run it became the twenty eighth state but that flag stayed the same. So it's kind of hard to differentiate between the Republic of Texas flag and the State of Texas flag but I'm told by our city's parks and Rec Department that it's the Republic of Texas flag. It just looks exactly the same basic. Aren't you access flick. Okay cool so. The inclusion of you know flags like like the Republic of California and the Republic of Texas. They were kind of odd choices at the time But the people who curated flags for inclusion in the eighteen flags felt they represented important if not sometimes tumultuous points in our country's history flags you know certainly throughout history. There's many examples of when they've been pretty controversial. Are there any other other interesting examples of ones that have been outside our city hall well since you mentioned it. The confederate flag actually flew for a short time outside of San Francisco City Hall. Oh but it was removed shortly after it went up because people protested it was originally part of those eighteen flags that went up in nineteen sixty four and then civil rights groups and others said hey you know we don't want that representing our city. Wow well there's a story that you will not find that Civic Center Plaza these days but you can find details about all the rest of the flags on these little plaque set center at the bottom of each flagpoles can check that out If you can't make it out to Civic Center Plaza you can also head online to bake curious dot org where we will have information about all the eighteen flags that are out there in front of City Hall all right. Well thanks for finding the answer and you're welcome. Our next question comes from a listener. Who didn't want to be recorded? But I can tell you. She's a big history buff during the early days of European settlement in the bay area public. Life centered around the town square. But these days there are dozens and dozens of square scattered all around in San Francisco. Our listener wants to know which was the first public square in the city. And what happened. There we sent reporter Mari Soul Medina Katina to hunt down the answer today. I'm at Portsmouth. Square in the heart of San Francisco's Chinatown around here are a lot of GRANDMAS and grandpas playing playing cards. I've heard this is the city's first square which makes sense because it's in the center of everything and the TRANSAMERICA building funding. If literally right across from the park there are some rich. History here at Portsmouth Square but is this the first square for San Francisco to find out. I met historian Christopher pollock before this became the city of San Francisco known as your but Plano and It was occupied first by Spanish and then later by Mexicans pollock told me the plaza was the center of government affairs for the Spanish and Mexican settlers. flers so Portsmouth Square is the first square. It was around before San Francisco became San Francisco and before it even had the name Portsmouth Square. The name would come when the Americans arrived during the Mexican American war that broke out in eighteen. Forty six. It's the two year war that resulted in the US. Acquiring half of Mexico's territory to fulfill. What many Americans believed was there manifest destiny any captain John? Montgomery lands near Portsmouth Square and symbolically raised a flag to signal that the Swiss American Occupation Montgomery went on to rename the square after his ship. The US Portsmouth Being the oldest square in San Francisco a lot. What has happened here so year? After the American Yerba Buena in Eighteen. Forty seven Portsmouth Square became home to another I the first public school house in California. Some anecdotal stories say that not many attended in in the beginning Trying to rope people into during education was far from their thoughts that at the time. Another claim to fame for the square is that this is where the discovery of gold was first. I announced as news spread. Thousands of prospective miners migrated to the city. Many of these newcomers came from China. But up racial discrimination and miners tax targeting. The Chinese pushed them out of the gold. Mines and into the area around Portsmouth Square but we now know. Oh as Chinatown. The Chinese were brought in as railroad workers and they were well established here in California in the very early days. Many ain't got jobs in the laundry business and working for the railroad fast forward a couple decades to the nineteen o six earthquake and fire which devastates the city city Portsmouth Square with all its open space becomes a place for people to stay after they were displaced burnt out of their homes than the military terry established an official camp and they ended up building. Some one hundred fifty two room earthquake cottages ages as they're called that were in neat little rows within the square. The next big thing for the square happened in the nineteen forties. A huge parking garage was proposed for underneath the square was pretty controversial. At the time people felt the cars. We're taking over the city too much much as we do today. Actually it's no different. Since many San Francisco residents were already upset about a parking. Aw put underneath. Union square adding a parking lot underneath the oldest square. Wasn't going to go over easy. But eventually the board of supervisors there's did approve the law and it was constructed in the nineteen sixties. ooh So there you have it question. Asker take a walk through the park in. You'll find a number of commemorative plaques highlighting all this history of the city's first square thanks to Kevin Platform question about the Texas flag and reporters on line and my soul Medina Kadena. We had so much fun at our anniversary. Sure happy hour last week. Thank you to everyone who made it out and if you did it be sure to get early word about future events in the bay curious newsletter. Sign up at bay curious dot org slash newsletter. Curious is made in San Francisco at K. Q. V. Allen Price have a great week

San Francisco City Hall San Francisco Portsmouth Square Texas Town Square California Asker Kevin Notes United States Mexico reporter Olivia Allen Kevin I Portsmouth dementia Betsy Ross Civic Center Plaza South Beach navy Alzheimer captain John
Cooking with Ms. Quad

The Queen's Court

36:40 min | 4 months ago

Cooking with Ms. Quad

"The in thing fact to go to trial is it. Oh is it honey. If this thing recording us up Youtube Land Switzerland it's the grimness Chat Brown described. Btc Jack facebook periscope and last but not least every single one every single one every single one of map chump who shot which was the father son and the Holy Ghost Sean. Mingle ask all across the land. This is your medicine. I'm coming to you loud and always and forever from the Queen's which the Supreme Court Act as it alone Tabah Chai it. Amen Light the night the the break the pie because we got we got listen we got. Medicine Rossi. The House we got Robert Walking in the house. We got rolling to just play. Queen's sister surf the wrong. Did we got some broad to run up through the marvelous Shanto lesson. We Got Sal loud now. Only not grave. You've been quiet for a long time. That you WANNA quite as much as I wanNA call. 'cause I listen to what thing about a good attitude and baby come through what the back walk where I got an attitude it. I feel like what is really payment past this data. A woman people cheering. You know. I've always felt that I would love to sit down and comes out. Ride my dad or whatever. She's encouraged me. I remember she and I were at the the the getting out of the. What is that thing? They honor we honored at the WHO had City Hall City Hall and we were down at City Hall and and the way she spoke she eloquently spoke honey when she received her award and and there was something that she spoke about that really resonated in my spirit and ships talking about people making narratives about you and it was. It touched me and I was like garage has gotta have I was like grow. I gotTA HAVE DOT Neva. Is Good you absolutely? You know trying to facilitate it but you know she. Tv Roy to grow. But we all away regardless now. This is your microphone. Does the pickup boat baby anyway? What's the radius on this but no no the deal is? I love who I love and I'm into I'm into and I think it's really good person very beautiful person inside and now now we don't play the radio all the fiddle neighbor but we are good and we have good hearts and I feel that our spears in terms of our hearts kindred very so we're regardless of being on Bravo being on TV one at the same damn time may add having day proclaimed after me your very own. Listen she's saying until atoll face. I can take you to the kitchen with a couple of days or two. I am never to be. Yeah I got your cookbook upstairs. A heavily game. You're got it upstairs or whatever. I never to be exhausted. It's a pleasure to be here. Let me tell you when I came through the door baby. They had all types of raw than some green years. Circe and the roast beef carrots. You got the good organic cares for the doll. Said yes. I listen to when I saw your cookbook. She's been some money on this cookbook. Get back and it's the talking to on the show. News is yes yes yeah I put a lot of blood sweat and tears and today and that was signed. I always like to tell this story because I don't want people to ever think that it happened overnight because I am who I am and I had the machines that are behind me TV one in Bravo that I could just wake up. And say hey. I think I'll have a book tomorrow. Cookbooks tomorrow and yeah I wanted to come out like five days afterwards. It didn't happen that way. In fact that was indeed in the Midwest for two years. It was worse for two years. You know there was a lot of ups and downs. Changes the turnarounds in my life. And you know I had to let some people go in terms of firing some people. Not Saying they're bad people but just say that they were not a good fit for me and do grow to the next level. You must not gotta do it. You must it's a must absolute. This is your life. This is your future your wellbeing. This is what you're trying to create for generations while we plan with this is our future and the future of our children so why we playing with it. That should be the question that adds a lot of times. People and I want to get too far presentable. A lot of times people feel like. Oh I've known this person for an extensive amount of time. Sometimes you feel committed to them because you've known him for such a long emotionally ain't got nothing to do with it. Are you getting the job done? That should be the primary question as because here's the deal you can still have a relationship. You can have that emotion racial. We don't mean the dubious you feel understand so what I was saying he was. I had a literary agent. Who BURT OVER. Three hundred and twenty-five thousand authors but for whatever reason when it came down to me and maybe some things have shifted in his live personal things to. He did not know how to package me. He didn't know how to sail me. He didn't know how to go out there. And get those meetings for me because if I ever walked through I can close the deal and whale Gandhi to the jets to the table. I'm showing up showing that no closing the deal walking out and you see what I'm saying so I had to make the decision to end that relationship and You know I it. Didn't it wasn't a hard thing to do because it wasn't personal again. Like I said it was for my future and then we had to get back to the drawing board and the second time around. I went in an ice sit in on interviews and had my particular questions for The literary agents before I said Yes. I didn't just take literary agent because this person was one like I did the first time this time I was more informed. I knew exactly what I was looking for. And what I wanted and so I was able to sit in a multitude of interviews and I made a decision and you know I made a great decision because as you can see that person took me to a large publishing house in New York City and went in and I close the deal so in this particular. Cookbook is not just desserts are sweet and savory yesterday now let me just talk to the people. I don't really do much deserves because I like to stay cute in the face of slimming away over the do much deserves but what I do. There are one hundred recipes in the cookbooks avenue and some of them are things that I grew up own homegrown recipes and I'm from Memphis Tennessee. Hunter for work for you. The cousin passed from Babe. Babe I think after the video circus surface around hunting he had a new name longtime John but that one that one and the girl that was in the past is down doing the vote. I'm telling you I love you but will you please. Let me get on your face to steal. Still Ain't what we're twenty percent of what we had opportunities Regina. Listen One thing about Regina. We're seeing over to me. She liked each. I want to do this woman face the she already out. Thank you Regina. Was THE GITA. Tonette move baby and you know you see the baby's sick or boroughs or get into their own. Lamey OUT CHARLOTTE LYBIA DOWN. Go the army's flavorful be MMMM but don't even like eight term. Don't do it like that. We have a little bit because they were but this is flawless. This is everything is just right here. Maybe you got a good quality. Yeah this is this is. This is beautiful. T care where we go. You're watching the show. You definitely see this. We're GONNA hold up. This could be on the show because one thing we do here the Queens Supreme Court we support black businesses and definitely black female on this thing I got in my life is a bunch of black female required to hear it was black females. Birkin Blade gays working hunting and we all got that we all minorities I e. We don't support one another. Ain't nobody else going support his home and that's just what he thinks. These teas it. We supported each other like we. Suppose to Louis C. Nobody else meg it into. I say it all the time. That's that's not that we we collectively use social media to really push and promote each other we could create Black Wall Street all over again. There was a thing such a save one. Yes it was. An Oklahoma was gone on banks. Black on black on everything. Everything was right there. You know come out of the community anything do fear like it's a fear now to recreate that a majority or the minority both I don't think that the minorities have put our heads together to to say this is what we're GonNa do and nobody was. Well what did they say? That's okay because that takes US education. We Know Education Rules Nations Justice. Communication does so. That's fine but I don't think that we've stopped for a moment and say hey we could actually reproduced isn't recreate this now. In terms of the majority fearless they. I mean they are fearful completely one hundred percent fearful Bernstein. Those black folks that were that were from those communities. They were so petrified. They didn't talk about it for generations. They didn't even talk about it. Because you think about why came and killed right. But don't you think we have people this in the position of power? Now like Oprah Winfrey and Tyler Perry and Pat McGrath. Make billionaire all of these people. They have the power and the money to to jump start. Black Wall Street all over again. What do you think I personally think that hasn't been the idea of? It has not been introduced. That's what I think. I just think that the idea of it hasn't been introduced. And sometimes we get so caught up in all of our project and what we're doing currently and it's working for currently and not only. Is it working for US? Currently we are actually giving back to the communities in a multitude of ways. So you feel like you've got all of everything you get your box checked and sometimes it just takes one person to say. Hey you know what? Black Wall Street did very well. I think we should try that again. And I think it's possible and I think what we need to do is we need to be really smart and bill vigilant about how we use social media because for example when I visit a restaurant or whatever it is and I think that it's really great and they do business well and I'm not talking about them because I can. I cannot imagine people listening but you can't always support black businesses. They don't do right. There are businesses that do it. Well when they do. I try to support them on my social media but we are. Don't think in that way like sometimes we WANNA keep it to ourselves. We don't want people to know 'cause you found this cute little place or whatever or because you want to monetize your social media which I get that too. You know what I mean. It's like they need to. They need to pay me for me to promote them on social media. But I think there I think I think we can achieve the goal for everybody. That's involved if there is a fairly thought out plan that both parties are all part is will benefit from right. You understand what I'm saying. I don't think that there is. It's not a one way street that Jay Z Z and Puffy. They've been working on some sort of an APP supposed to house all black on. Yes yes no when that. Suppose I don't know the lunching but yes it's so if you're looking for grocery store you can type now. Let me ask actually an African American young girl who is doing it as well and and I think all of the products are are created by African American people and blacks. Okay now let me pose this question in that situation crate but it was that when we start supporting African American businesses with the Gay African American the apart is GonNa be and I know you were posing a question to create. But I'm a jump I say is I'd say absolutely I'd say. Let me tell you something for me. What's going on in somebody else? German got nothing to do with me at all at all point blank period. It has no bearing on my life and my thing is is and especially for African American people. The oppress being the oppress person. Who wants been ahead of enslaved people and you know what it feels like to have to have not ought to be looked down upon to not be giving equal rights. Equal pay equal healthcare. Why would you turn around and be like that just because a person has a different sexual preference than you understand what you'll be like? Yeah but that's one of those things that divide us as a community all right so what we're GonNa take a quick commercial break. We'll be right back when I released my first book. I remember thinking very heavily about healing Harris in how he did it how he managed to reach millions of people around the world through his work and how to do it. His readers became my readers a ride. Because it's my passion a right with black people on my mind in black gay men in my heart. Tony Morrison gave me the courage to say that out loud about life. People white people can blackmail. Anything can happen in art fair no boundaries there. I could write about anything anyone but I choose to write about our experience and I spent my entire writing trying to make sure that the white a was not the dominant one. In of my book of Joel's Bismah Love Letter to black people. It has nothing to do with who reads the bugs everyone. I hope of any race any gender any country Brooke of Joel's is eleven of the biggest life. Lessons learned today and the stories behind those lessons book. Gills is available now on audible all evening news and Amazon Dot Com visit. Www DOT craigs stewart dot com for more information? All right. Now you already know where time honey we are going on vacation always know down there to that. Don't Republican. She told head up the week. Taken it down to Mexico on it really mix at girl different cover girl dead. You couldn't guess we'll let me hear your class that passed that is be back. Gestured Ju- through the field team. I made the rush over there right now and get your tickets at W. F. C. VACATIONS DOT com. That's www dot USC vacation dot com. And honey. Listen don't meet me up here I love you girl. Let's get down to business. Let's make sure you got your tickets for our Mexico trip because we might be surprised. You might find something very special when you arrive. You may find something very special now. Ladies and gentlemen crowd was talking and Craig we were talking about black businesses and black businesses Black Wall Street and and then we went over to the touchy subject of we'll gains being include Caisley including yeah and quad spoke. He spoke of heavily. Were and what we were on the commercial break. The word was so strong. Regina fill into the spirit and she wrote three times. I don't know if it was English Spanish on the board but she's spoken three of backwards and say audible salary what that means but whatever it was. We must've say something real good right. Regina D. C. Silent. Now because she's still slade in the spirit here now ladies and gentlemen you know is so good that quiet sitting here because we watch we watch on television. We see all married to medicine. And that's just got a couple of questions like misquote. How real is that? It's all the way real real. All the way live in fact everything that I have ever been through or say it or done on. Merit medicine has been completely real real. I don't believe in being tribe rehearsed structured or with practice. It's been real so when you see me at times where I have been angry. Yes indeed. That was emotion that I felt. You've seen at times where I've been extremely happy. That's an emotion I fail. You've seen me at times where I've been even sad. And that's that was real to Romania. I get the privilege of being able to Comfortable as you ran away some of the girls do I. Don't get it wrong to carry. So you mean I invite you. Everything now is weird. I got on these about assessors. Because that's just drag Paul said if this were all born making the rest drag and it didn't resonate with me until I started really looking at like damn got into pieces and got us all dragged naked. Well we take our stuff off and and and he's riding but like you were saying a moment ago. Madison we on our way. So my question for you. Quality is when they first approached you about doing reality. Tv apprehensive what was there any anxiety or anything like that? I don't get much anxiety. Do very well under under pressure in in Do very well with stress to be honest with you. At the time I was married and We were very young in marriage and so that was something that was heavily considered Because wanted to make sure that we're making the right decision as a couple And you know and I and I think overall we did you know I think that in life and relationships period where it's you know you're married or business relationship or friendship Sometimes things can go wrong in. Both parties are not in the same place at the same time mentally and emotionally fan. We know that that can come to our can succumb to an end. Did you want to say something? Yeah because I mean I've been having the conversation with people relationships I've been saying like this is just my personal opinion. I personally think that relationships sustain longer would would people's occupies difference basis. Obviously the relationship. I feel like they. Do you believe that a person a couple can be and I can see on the north side and that I can stay on the south side and we can have very beautiful intensified relationship at loves. These are my now we now. We don't have anyone in particular. I am very much so divorce. Thought Process is putting an atlas. Yeah I feel that I just think that you know you. It's this. This is how freeze even remained friends. Long period of time. You got to go home at behind on your own and it's just like I wanNA love you. I WanNa be would you wanna I wanNA love you there? But when it's getting on my nerves go go at your space. I don't WanNa see you what we're going to say. I don't know I will say maybe have a live have large home where you can go on his wing and then I can go on this winter and yeah yeah and that's important. That's a lot of times when people have nothing going on then it's very challenging to see someone blow up or indeed if it's not just that then it's the fact if you have one party who's overly confident but you have the second party who has low self-esteem an insecure that's gone. That's I mean that is going to be the demise of what of that particular relationship period and you can't you cannot continue to carry people you just can't you can't how. How do you approach dating now? Are there things that you look towards a look forward now like what what you could do better because I think every relationship is about learning and growing shorts all designed to grow you you ship grew? Yeah the relationship has an expiration. Yes because we all have to die. It's not because you grow up. It's not just because you grow apart but we all have to die so every relation I limit to Ukraine. I do still believe in love Youtube. Let's let's take that bothering I. I just think that when it's win win is like an amusement park arrive when it's done respectively. Get off get yet. That's what I'm saying. I don't think that all love is intended to be a forever kind of love. I think some some but not all some people just don't know when to get off the ride down. They don't know where to back. They'll see the ride as it is is bumped the girl when the day land get all right. Okay so you don't keep going back around get off it when it's done but it's over. You know this is how you possibly when you know is over casteel sustain some type of friendship or whatever afterward like it's just done right so that's the case if it's a bad relationship or it goes bad But what if it never goes bad? Do you still believe and I'll believe in. What was your relationship? It hasn't went bad but it's believed that don't mean I just want to know what relationship hasn't went bad i. I don't know if I think that all relationships go bad as much as I believe the Craig okay. Limit WHICH SONG. Marriage last song about kindle. In which one did she sang for that whole that whole round was about Kim? Because I'm telling you I remember what she got with kid do and I remember she was was the happiest the happiest moments of her. And I know when can do when she found out about Kidwai was the worst part? But you know what? I think this speaks was Santa. Monica acquired the cardinal mistake that she made was that she wanted to feed into his insecurities amount of this was the insecurity for him or not but she made him her manager because she was trying to make sure that felt and trying to hurt him up a Lulu responsibility but the responsibility that society has placed the onus on the women. Okay so yes why? You say it ain't our responsibility. We have been conditioned to believe. Indeed that she is it is a responsibility. I think with that situation. Mary gave far more to him that he could have given to her. And so you asked me earlier. What was my musical will have learned. What would I do differently what I would do differently? I don't give too much too soon. So so the deal is now you have to prove yourself to me and I said this the other day on another podcasts that I was on And I I meant what I said. I have four horses in a race right now. I'm about to draw. The deal. Is that. It's fun because once I say the everybody's stepping up and everybody's that they're trying to figure out because they yeah. They listened to what she's saying. I'm going to break it down in turn. The she didn't talk on the phone right now because his way out of here and I don't WanNa pull pull pull it up and pull it to the statement. I I hope I ain't the one I'm not the one I had someone to call me the other day in quite you're very sexy attractive woman. Thank you and listen and I don't even want to say this but like a darker skinned woman not be. I don't WanNa say because you doggy beds. Not In there. That's I guess it's because you are dark skinned. You are so beautiful. It's not like Oh she. Does she go you that color brings it does? I don't I really don't think that dark darker skinned women get told they're beautiful enough. I this down in shame because you know when when the lights gay woman walks automatically the assumption. That's kind of that's about going back to Jim Crow and I'll let him prior to Jim Crow here. Well we had the Field Negro. We had the House Negro because you are a flight of skin complex. Then you were able to come. It's house hall in the Work Field. Docker we have to stop allowing the masses or the majority. Tell us what it's beautiful and what is right right. The magazines have done Vanity Fair's done because for a long period of time. I wanted to like a white woman. I is transition. I started transitioning in my teenage years and all I saw were white and I wanted to. Why there's no this is how we start getting deeper to these. Cosmetic surgery knows get is T- Bay. That's a little something and it was patterned after little kittens notes. Her first knows knows for these other four snows that she had it was it was conditioned and outside. Lamelo and begin up her was she was darker previous. Yes was the answer was so gorgeous ninety S. I think that she was at her prettiest when she was darker and she was just naturally such a national beauty. I don't think enough people told her that or not even told her that but I don't think it was in. There was a firm for her it through periods. Like your dark. Beautiful docking lovely are gorgeous. I don't want you to under head under. I just want you to know that because we the US that adds to it of them grow as an extra layer of beauty. Because you'll beautiful woman. I have because the Melanin in the skin may listen. Brigada say as you said. Great Glimpse hunting man and she came to power down. I'm done baked. Go whatever man whatever horse about the drought is GonNa Miss Out? He's going to for sure he's already made my decision so I got all of them scrambling right now. Everybody's trying to figure out ahead. One say wait a minute the text me what you called me and said well what Horse Emma. I want to get a shirt. What's my name. Oh squash horse on this and then look at you. Aren't you something then? I had another one today. Takes and say well. What do you got now? Then I had the other one the other day loading business tower dating but let me tell us the important for women to do. This is the best would have ever taken abundantly clear. All Board Lee on vocal about it. I think it was better for me. And I'll tell you why and I think women should do it too because when people know that there's competition us then everybody has the game. I have made a mistake even after I was divorced dating someone and was one person a very focused on him. And you know a whole lot to do and this and that and have a kids and dental appointments and Chabba matter to people and that in turn out so favorable because there was nothing in his. I thought that he was of age. Emotional emotionally mature that he would value what. I was giving. He was just thinking like you know she this what she's supposed to be doing. It took it for granted so I said thanks. But a wake up call and activated and so when I activated babies for understatement. I'm here to pick up more boom right so let me ask you this question before we close out. Do you think that your presence on television your presence in just like social society or just you being a successful black woman. Who HAVE YOU EXPERIENCED? Difficulties in dating or difficulties in commitment or difficulties in men having the esteem being intimidated by intimidated trying to over compensate. Yeah because I think sometimes the qualities that that draw people to your often the same qualities that make them insecure once with you. That's what happened in my marriage. But here's the deal. The one that I'm about to let go. I'm letting him go. Because there's too much capping. There's too much pudding on. There's so much I'm acting like and I see clearly that you. I don't like that unions company real. Just don't come at all. There is more I have more value in you when you just let me see who you are. But he's trying to keep up with me you can't because we already own different level. You're doing very well for us. We're on different levels. I don't try to keep up with me. I want you to just be who you are and take care of me as the man that you are. Don't try to do me do you know do meaning. I get it. I get his car. So he's out of there. So this is the one of okay. So we're GONNA call him a good and go. Go go go. Who was putting money this whole. You might be listening honey. You definitely know who you are. I xe this question to this. Might Be. A tablet little bit vulgar. But it's just I don't WanNa word it in a vulgar way. I want to ask you in dating. Is it okay. If a woman has had sex with all of them no no absolutely not the word is dating no everyone is not going to be privy to this. M- shot come through. You're not because you're not worthy and I'm not here to be a notch on your bill to bill your self esteem so you'll run around and say you hit me squad. No God who haven't which you have had dinner with me. What we have had was helicopter rides. Well we have had maybe a trip or something. What you have had was maybe even a massage which you have not had me. What do you even page to be? You know you hug you get a little closer to people. I mean I asked you misquote. Because it's for me I might be trash or whatever I need to know what's going on because I don't want ways you can do that man. It's without even trying to get the part of being a woman. I don't I think but I bet only to say they've been with manning that but see. This is the part of being a woman that I possibly have mastered you. Love being honest on the I'll probably have mastered that because I don't think a woman should really freely give her body whatever but I am very much so I'm not a person that likes to take a Lotta time when it comes down to a man like Sir I need to know is if I'm if I don't build so deep in love with you and you can hear they're right over here like you call your free time. We bad but you can call it a friend either because this lady like you're not GonNa do that even now. There are many ways to sustain yourself right here. Let's do the rest down right now. Get misquakees Cook Book immediately. Come through this quad. Tell can follow to tell them. What again absolutely absolutely. You can get my cookbook cooking with misquote. Live laugh love and eat anywhere. Five books or phone anywhere. Fine books are sold its Barnes and noble books a million Amazon anywhere five bucks or so you can find me and you can follow me absolutely quiet on all social media platforms. You can see me every single day of you looking to be inspired motivated educated and entertained at sister circle. Tv ON TV One. And when you want to get your good dose of Medicine Baby. You hurt in the back as you can see we every Sunday medicine. We are preparing to film for season. Eight of marriage morality. Ac's any. He's good all the time all the time. Dave those checks and the ugly. That's what I do want to thank you so much. Come into the claims Supreme Court and also being on our pocket definitely have to do this again one or two a longer time. I actually really like to sit down with at least once or twice when you say well we do a whole lot because people like to see perspectives of people that they think are tangible. Because when you get into that they show yeah she has been one of the most Daraghmeh. me leave. We got there. Thank Greg is down to Earth to. Hilo goes booze in a way. Everybody knows you lost by. My Book is one thing for certain things ashore. Go almost to say a book of quotations absolutely clogged. I'm hoping that you've watched the show. 'cause WE WE'VE had an amazing show and if you ain't go back because we bought the turn you already know where time we are going on vacation always know we went down there to that. Don't get Republican up. But we've taken it down there to Mexico. Really mix is called at girl. Girl you couldn't guest will let me tell you pass the thaddeus. It'd be back gestured. Gelati do the tea party. I need you to rush over there right now and get your tickets at Duffy. Hipped up dot C. VACATIONS DOT COM. That's www dot jalousie vacations dot com and honey. Listen don't meet media media. I love you. You're makes a girl. Let's get down to business.

US Supreme Court Amazon Mexico Regina Craig Switzerland Midwest Medicine Rossi City Hall City Hall Queen Roy New York City Oklahoma Memphis City Hall Brown
6: The Circus

The Gravy Train

44:48 min | 8 months ago

6: The Circus

"I haven't I can't comment on the video that I haven't seen you guys have asked me a question so you asked me. You asked me a question back in May and you can repeat that question back a name that can use you. You ask a couple questions. What were those questions? Do you smoke crack cocaine exactly. Yes I have looked at cracker barrel do I am. I know when I've I tried it. call one of my drunken stupor is probably approximately about a year ago. I answered your question. You asked the question properly landry. Yes I've made mistakes. I've made mistakes. I all I can do now. Is Apologizing move on. I don't know what our because H can i. Just all I can say is a made mistakes. That's an you guys kept referring to alcohol a COUPLA isolated incidents there's been times when I've been in a drunken stupor that's why I wanna see the tape. I want everyone one in the city. The state this is the gravy train. I'm Jordan Heath Rally state that I was in. I don't even remember after some of the stuff that you guys have been in. That's a problem so I want us. I got five days ago now. Toronto's chief of police had confirmed that his investigators had in their possession a video that in the chiefs words up here to to be those images which were previously reported in the press and then Rob Ford stood in front of a gaggle of media and he said what you just heard heard and then things got even weirder the last time we talked. I walked you through the police. Investigation that eventually produced host the video of Rob Ford Smoking crack that the mayor had denied existed. That investigation was one of the darkest moments in the city's history. Toronto's top politician was living a double life. He was spending his evenings with gang members. He was taking hard drugs and the police were watching and and listening to him as he did it to those at the heart of the investigation it was an awful time to those in the inner circle at City Hall. These were some of the most stressful periods of their entire lives to the vast majority of just citizens in Toronto. It was a total shit. Show every day something else happened every day. Got Worse but to everyone else around the world look it was just not it was insane and it was hilarious. All the dark stuff at the heart of this story that didn't resonate because to everyone who was not impacted by it. It was a farse. Toronto was known by the world at large and still is sometimes when you travel as the place with the crack mayor a punchline and you can't blame people for that. It was a dark comedy and everybody was playing it for laughs. I was there the moment he said yes. I have smoked crack McCain. That's Cynthia Mulligan a reporter at City News in Toronto and she was there when while she told you this marked the end of act. One one of the Rob Ford Scandal and the beginning of Act to rob showed up to work that day in a black suit and with a memorable multi which featured the logos of all thirty two. NFL teams may step off of an elevator. In front of the press. The elevator the infamous elevator. You know it had its own twitter account if you walk through the front doors of Toronto City Hall You Find Yourself. In a wide open circular space. There are staircases and various. His Hallway is going off to all sides but smack ahead of you in the center of everything is an elevator Colin. This is the elevator. It's the one that the Mayor Talk Chuck to get to his office. It's one that's supposed to only be used by the mayor and Toronto Councillors. Bad Elevator became a character in the story and you would watch which floors the elevator was starting on because you knew if it was coming from the ground floor. It probably wasn't him so you you would. You would watch to see if it was coming from the basement where it was coming from and so many times we'd Spring to attention. Oh if security started coming you kinda figured figured that's a sign because they know he's coming so they're there to manage but sometimes you know we'd get a false alarm and the doors would open. Nobody would be there and we're like Aw or other times some poured you know resident. Would you know some old lady would get off. And she'd see us all at all. The cameras are honor and the lights and she'd be horrified and it became a little bit of a private joke for weary journalists who were looking to amuse themselves at times. There was no oh glamour and covering Rob Ford. The days were long and hard. 'cause you're sitting on the ground if you're lucky to eat you're eating your your lunch on the ground as you're sitting by that elevator just waiting to see what was going to happen and it was the unpredictability right because you never knew if he got off that elevator if he was going to drop drops some bombshell or if he was just going to walk right on by. You didn't know they always kept you guessing. I don't know what triggered it that day. Where where he was finally just saying I guess he was just tired of it? When it became clear that yes Toronto really did have a crack smoking mayor Amir who had admitted it? After months of denial then all hell broke loose and every major media outlet in the world came calling. They parked their trucks. One by one down the street and they swarmed into City Hall City Hall is a very strange strange and futuristic looking building its previous claim to global fame. was they set pace as a foreign planet in episode of Star Trek. Now it's image. Image was leading International Cable News. It was like the world had exploded. City Hall was just on edge absolute loot edge and and people were waiting to see how he was going to respond it was a never ending whirlwind of chaos. I would say say and amped up to circus levels the last FEMA. The Toronto political thing has been dominated plus shocking claims about the city's Mayor Rob Ford admitted he was not perfect but refused to step down. Garish factors where you got up around thereof Ford's don't nobody meteor for McCain cupboards cal. Could you have to connect at the auto foldable Middle Dot com even after he admitted to using crack Rob ped- really strong support and he leaned into it. He would hit his supporters against the media. For instance he would often make a point of chatting with them and taking taking pictures of them and then brushing past reporters with questions just a week after he gave that press conference and admitted that he'd tried it robs set up a table in City Hall. Selling Robbie Bobby's which were bobbleheads in his likeness hundreds of people lined up to get one. How long long did you wait for that to three hours and hours worth away? Are you afford fan. I am I'm I support him. Fully Rob didn't talk much to the press will all this was going on. And when he did he did not help his case one day for instance court documents had been released outlining concerns of a bunch of staffers his office. Remember Ford's wild night right on Saint Patrick's Day there were a few nights like that and the court records detailed all of this behavior including some offensive remarks to female colleagues six and after those remarks reported rob brought his wife to a scrum with reporters at City Hall and he shocked wrote Okay. So that's all I have to say for now and the next thing. I WANNA call Tanya in Hamilton and tell them that we're going to have to spank their little tiger cats phone. The last thing was Olivia gone back. It says that I wanted to eat her pussy lane gone back. I've never said that in my life tour I would never do that. I'm happily married. I've got more than enough to eat at home. They Cynthia Mulligan was always always in the middle of those impromptu. scrums and since they were basically the only time that rob ever talk to the press every member of the press crammed into them and created needed some dangerous situations instead of going out the back door. He decided to try and Ram through the media. And it could've been avoided. All he had to do was walk out the back door but it was so dense that the media had nowhere to go and the security was shoving adding people and one of the security guards actually shoved my cameraman so hard that he flipped over backwards over a couch. It was it needed. Crowd Control Troll. It was so bad at one point in an attempt to escape the scrub rob walked right into camera. Excuse me his took fully grace. It's good to speak. And so I sort of joined the circus at City Hall in the middle of all of this Jennifer Pagliara went from being a crime reporter for the Toronto Star to it City Hall reporter and if there was anyone who who had the background on the guy she'd be covering it was the reporter who worked on project brazen two but even Jennifer wasn't ready for the mass us. That was waiting at City Hall. I remember like the first one of the first ever events I was assigned at City Hall. there is a award ceremony for community safety and the mayor was scheduled to give out the awards and it seemed almost most Critical to us at the time like he still in the midst of this. You know the followed of this criminal investigation this police investigation and and I went to cover the events and was sort of standing in the back of the room and I had only just met some of my city hall colleagues and I said You know how does this work like this. He scrum after or you know. Sometimes a politician will you know make themselves available and you ask questions and they all serve laughed at me and we're kind of joking about hoping that I had worn like good running shoes Jews and said what do you mean. When the event finished he moved faster than I've seen any politician ever move up a side staircase and all of my press gallery colleagues went running after him and so I just went running after him too and I had my recorder out and we were trying to ask him questions about the investigation about election action about everything that had been going on? Jonathan Gold's be the reporter who had tracked rob on social media now at City Hall. I'm trying literally to keep up with the mayor. But what I remember so much about covering Rob Ford was the physical element of it. The actual amount of a physical running involved the amount of jostling and shoving and actually because there are so many fucking people trying to get into this tight space other than the mayor's office into space inside the mayor's office. You're trying to get a clear view of Rob Ford. Ideally hear what he says Even better ask a question but it It was physically intense in a way. You don't expect politico reporting to be like I said at the beginning of this podcast. This listen tire. Time was devastating for the city. Our mayor was a drug user and he wasn't stopping city council had devolved into reality television every every nightly newscast was led by whatever random thing that rob had said or done or reportedly said or reportedly done that day or even most days by video. Oh of him. Literally running away from the media and into his office Ford supporters and Ford haters again to move more fully into their respective camps city council then candidate is supposed to be the one level of government without partisanship. There was no question the council and the city were utterly divided. It was. It's tough but if you were watching from afar with no skin in the game and yeah the whole thing was hilarious. Aw Dude on FRAC excuse for smoking crack is he was drunk. The Mayor of Toronto Rob Ford isn't spotlight right now because this rumor that there's a video of him smoking crack but to be fair. There's not a lot to do in Toronto. Come on guys. Have I ever smoked crack. Yes but that was in. The past mayor was charged with being way too exciting for Canada. Talking track right now. Where are you getting this? This is the show from New York life as a late night. punchline wasn't easy for the people in City Hall who didn't Smoke Crack may began to look for ways to get rid of rob or at least to distance themselves from him. The most obvious sign of this was on rob staff which had by now al lost almost all of its original members counselors meanwhile began fleeing his executive committee some by choice and others because they spoke out about rubs CBS behavior. And he asked them to resign. Council's First Public Attempt to condemn rob was figurative. They turn their backs on him during a council session almost all of them it made for good visual and made a good point but it didn't actually do anything. Rob was very much in charge. They needed to figure out a way to get the city if not back on track than at least functioning despite its mayor. There's so many things that happen when a certain type of person who is uniquely uniquely unqualified for Public Office manages to get in. And you know when you you start to start to see just how resilient and or not resilient your democratic institutions are fats Jonathan goalby again what city councillors and the city at large quickly learned was. There wasn't a process in place for the city to remove a mare. Oh city council figured out how much they could do. They figured that they can take away the powers I think they were granted to the mayor by their own bylaws and they did that they removed as many as much of that as they possibly could and the excuse or partner with the deputy mayor For the time being but there are things like Rob Ford wanted to be wanted to cherish city council meeting. There was nothing anyone could do could stop him from doing that. He legally had the right to do that. And Council couldn't change that I mean thankfully gently didn't like to do that but there are legally representing the city In official events like there are certain things that are in law. That council couldn't change up. I guess we have a crack mayor now until the election. What a shit? Show what a should show show How can I get out of here? This is going to be bad for all of us that is councillor Joma havoc and he might not have agreed. Read with Ford politically on anything but as you might remember. He sat right near in council and he called him a friend and he played in a football pool with them every year but still he was one of the counselors leading the charge to strip rob of his powers for the good of the city so the person moved the motion was John. fill-in who sought not right beside me here then to over was where rob forties to send so John Fillion The was the one who moved the motion but the end the motion was the fruit of a lot of conversation on the second floor when we when we realized that regrettably that this is something that Ah to be done. City Council voted overwhelmingly in favor of motions that would reduce ROB's role in council to that of a figurehead. Thirty seven to five councillors voted to cut the mayor's budget and thirty six to six quoted to transfer many of Ford's deputies and much of his budget to deputy mayor Norm Kelly who would affect run the council and it had to be driven by that we are in trouble that was basic competency issue. It could not be seen to be the progressive side of Council ganging up on this guy during a a vulnerable moment and I think thankfully because of the people Who are more right of center saying yes? The moment had come that gave legitimacy into the process. It would be like today. The impeachment movement is purely in singularly in the United United States at Democrat Democratic Party movement. If half of the Republicans split from trump and say yes. This is the right thing to do. That's a very very different moment Then it does become one of a basic competency in office. That hasn't happened in the states but it did happen at At the at City Hall. And that's why. The motion carried the went forward. It was another wild day. I mean of so many wild days I remember the Wild Day. When and when city council stripped of his powers and basically declared war that Cynthia Mulligan again she was still on the Ford beat and on the day that council voted to strip the mayor of his powers? The Ford Brothers made it clear that they were not going down without a fight. It's is not an exaggeration to say that rob who'd already been behaving erratically. Simply lost it in the face of united opposition from council including including many counselors that he'd normally count among his friends and allies rob's brother Doug who'd made himself known as Rob's heavy and his confidante once again came to his defense as rob faced accusations of substance abuse impacting his ability to govern. Doug called out another counselor Paul Ainslie. Who had recently been stopped by the police and given a warning for impaired driving and what happened next was basically the wildest seen in the history of Toronto City Council the process of this council? If there's a code of conduct should be going through the right process process. It shouldn't be happening with with with getting to my question. Thank you okay counsel as you got your own issues cast too much such as Doug was saying what you just heard rob was leaning back in his chair and he was pantomime driving drunk to about the proper offer. Code of conduct counselor matters with respect to code of conduct so therefore please stop disrupting the long onto one of the accountability officers probably and it got worse from there. I will let Cynthia tell the rest of the story. There were hecklers. There's in the audience and Doug and the Security Guard and rob were walking around the chamber and and one of them was taking pictures of the people who were protesting with the camera and people got really angry because they felt that that was an an incendiary move and raw for some reason ran across the chamber. I think he was running to help. Doug he thought he thought they were on opposite sides and and it did feel like they were inciting the protesters and rob all of a sudden started to runs towards Doug and literally took out Pamuk on and and knocked her flying kind of Qatar but she really was was hit quite hard and then he kept kept going and she said after I remember she for weeks that her neck was hurt that she got whiplash and it was. It was quite painful. This folks reminds me of when I was watching. What my brother? When Saddam attacked Kuwait and President Bush said I warn you? I warn you I warn you. Do Not uh well folks if you think American style politics is nasty you guys have just attacked Kuwait Kuwait and you will never okay. You'll never see something that mark. My words friends. This is going to be outright right. Worn the next election when all the madness stopped rob had lost most of his Merrill power but he did get the final Lord and that was the end of another day that felt like twelve at City Hall. You know every every day was like that we used to kind of joke about it. Not Being a daily event or a career. It was hourly became hourly at the end Jay Robinson I was one of the counselors that used to serve on Rob's executive committee until she either left or was kicked off after she spoke publicly about rob needing to go to Rehab whether she was on the executive or not though she was still a prominent figure on council and was in the middle of all of the daily madness and it it was so distracting. I mean it was so distracting. We simply couldn't get it as much done at City Hall. Many of us actually stepped up to take a leadership. Aw because you know. The mayor was dealing with substance abuse issues so many of us stepped up into those roles to help help leave the city But it was so distracting. It was the media. Were literally running around the second floor. Like literally like a pack and It was very difficult to get really address. The business of the city with all that distraction. If you were on the outside looking in it looked like utter chaos on council if you ask Joma Havoc who sat on council with Jay. It was also an opportunity for some members of the team to shine to be frank. The last two years on the Ford mayoralty was some were some of the best days of city council and it was for this reason it was because the mayor was mia. The mayor was struggling with With his addiction issues in governing issues. But then counselors had to step up to the plate without Rob Ford pushing them into his camp or the opposition councillors from either side of the aisle actually started to work together. So all kinds is a folks uptown would move motions with downtown counselors left side council would would work with right side counselors on motion. We come to agreement it was actually Some of my best time at City Council throughout all this rob was still vehemently denying that he had had any kind of substance abuse problem yes he would admit to buying and using drugs and to driving drunk and yes to using crack once just that one time drunken stupor. But he didn't have a problem. Have you purchased illegal drugs in the last two years. I have thank you I sincerely insidiously apologize. I understand the embarrassment I caused every member of this council. I understand the embarrassment that have caused every resident resident in the city and humiliated by it. But I cannot change the past cancer Thompson. All I can do is move John. And that's what I'm doing when rob mentions the past that he can't change in a sense he's referring due to that one time more than a year ago but he's also referring to just one week earlier when the Toronto Star had released another video talk. Yeah I the government over these dead zone any species that we over financed. Ask a sick motherfucker. Dude might browser. W We're liars the birds birds. I suppose working under I would say fifteen minutes. It's all go. Oh Fuck it interferes and I will fucking donate rose buddy. It was a in the video. You just heard rob is pacing back and forth sweaty. He's not quite in the picture. He's talking in really fast. He's angry or at least really excited. It's hard to make out in the tape but rob starts off by saying I'm going to kill that fucking guy I'm telling you it's first degree murder. There are a couple of people off camera who can be heard clapping and encouraging and he says but when he's down I'll rip his throat. I'll poke his eyes out. I will fuck when he's dead. I will make sure that motherfucker is dead. I need ten minutes to make sure he's dead. ROB's response to this on the tape was made. Public Flick is that he was a well known wrestling fan and he had been impersonating Hulk Hogan kind of make sense by the way he was saying brother he certainly talking about combat might have been that but there was another video cheeks be around five months boma medium rare is up about about five months trying to tell me we're east high. They don't much money job in your eyes. Five of I swear to God awesome. It's the goal. This video was shot in a restaurant. Toronto called Steak Queen in Toronto's West End late at night rob is rambling incoherently again. I'm I'm not gonNA quote what he says because he's attempting to speak Jamaican Patois and I am not going to do that. Rob admitted that he'd had a little bit to drink amidst this frenzy over video after video rob went global he appeared on Jimmy. Kimmel live Kimmel had been covering the scandal nightly so head every other late night comedy show but it was Kimmel who scored the interview and so rob flew L. A. to make his appearance on March third twenty fourteen. He sat down on the couch and called himself an average hard working politician. He was in his usual ill-fitting black suit but this time he had decided to wear a bright red tie with a matching bright red pocket square. It looked nervous sweating but he stuck to the script and you give you phone number out to people and I imagine you probably be doing that the whole time man. She gave it to me already. And is that a good idea I mean. Can you get a lot of crank calls and not know what's happening. Never I give my number out. Because you're the boss. And when you say jump I say how high the taxpayers here want service. And I don't believe in going through all the bureaucrats call rob four guaranteed. Return your call uncle right to your front door disturbing for fourteen years. How high can you jump the now? You'd be surprised. How fast move I have to say? People seem very angry that I was having you on the show tonight people from Toronto on facebook on twitter. This is disgusting. Having our embarrassment of a mayor and your show is a slap to all Torontonians really disappointed. You're giving this abusive exploited the time of day. Jimmy a hope you remember that clown you're about to trot out is a very sick very bad man you know about rob Ford's words domestic abuse drunk driving racism homophobia and inability to tell the truth to right. Is there any validity to any of these things. I mean there's I don't know you got got a lot of money. They don't they don't talk. You may have set a record day. I guess they don't talk about the money I've saved How we straighten the city? I didn't save money. It's something you say and I have no idea. So that's I guess. I guess the city manager not manager Ford head walked out onto onto the set throwing Ford nation t shirts to the crowd and posing we sat down and Kimmel late into some vicious one liners. Are you homophobic not homophobic. You had more gay friends. You would not wear that tie a a lot. Let me get you some tissue. We're good bye DAB YOU MR mayor last week you dared the police chief in Toronto to arrest you now. This is after you told me you were coming on the show show and I was like no don't arrest him now But the video and so what happened to Kim Kardashian after her video camera. And I hate to do this to you but last last night you and given your with your friends and your brothers and stuff but this is from your dressing room. Last night you'll notice. The dessert plate has been devoured. The vegetables remain untouched. It was embarrassing to say the least and when Ford got back to Toronto Ronna there were more of his usual shenanigans. In fact the pace seem to increase Kevin Donovan. The investigative reporter at the Star was the first to get the scoop on this one. He'll tell us about an evening from March of two thousand fourteen. Two days after rob was on Jimmy. Kimmel I was contacted by and I apologize because I can't do. This is a really really deep source and the source told me that I needed to talk to personnel and and I went to talk to person X. and end over a period of a couple of weeks. I learned that there was an audio recording of this particular night. But what happened on that night. It is as close as four dollars on Jimmy. Kimmel as you said he'd just come back and he was driving around in his big black black SUV and he had a bunch of people with them. Those people included Rob's driver and fixer Sandra Lacey and a friend of his is from high school named Bruno Believe Him Oh and Ford likes to drunk dial and he was driving and and presumably hopefully using hands free but he was talking to people and and is calling people and saying all sorts of wild all things and this was all recorded on our recording. Which I was able to listen to? According to Kevin's reporting during one of those calls rob said nobody sticks up for people like I do you then goes on to use words that I won't repeat referring to Jewish wish black and Italian people then I'm the most racist guy around. I'm the Mayor of Toronto. He famously mostly set but then afterwards they go to mayor Ford's home and so now it's it's very late at night. He's high on drugs drunk not sure which or what combination and they go into his basement at this point the tape that Kevin was reporting from had ended and from here on. He's relying on interviews from people who were there and the Ford home that night. First of all he walks in the door with Bruno police. Emma and Bruno Has a bunch of a fast food that he's bought because they're all really hungry. Angry and for no apparent reason robbed suddenly hits Bruno in the face hard twice boom boom and the French fries and hamburgers go flying. They gathered up the food and went downstairs. Where Ford set my kids? Kids aren't home so don't worry van. I started drinking and A mere for according to my sources mayor Ford's awards wife. Renata he's there and he's he says to an individual Not GonNA use the show language but you can have sex with my wife. I fiscally and then There's another discussion where where Mayor Ford says. Apparently that you know my wife life lets me have sex with girls women in front of her all the time. So it's just just. The worst behavior is described Soviet on tape which I heard and some come from sources who were there? It was just over a month after that story on April Seventeenth of twenty fourteen but rob Bob announced. He was going to run for mayor again in the upcoming election. Thank you the in two weeks. After rob made his his announcement. The National Post published a story about another tape. The Post reported that someone in an tobacco bar right across the street from Rob's mother's house had recorded the mayor's drunken banter the tape included things like rob complaining about the candidates for an upcoming provincial. Election can also saying that if he loses his reelection bid he will be out of here he'll go to California because quote the city is GonNa get fucked so bad they're going to say thank you then. Another male voice comes on the tape and asks rob about another candidate in the race. His colleague Karen Stints and Rob Responds. I'd like to fucking jam her but she don't want it. I can't talk like this anymore. At that point a female voice can be heard and rob says. I'm so sorry I forgot. There was a woman in the house we asked Karen stance. She felt when she heard it robs remarks. I WanNa ask you about the the tape. Now that the national postcode They call you right after they got it What did they tell you? Say you play it for you know actually and I part of what I know. So they didn't. They told me what he had said. And if they play play the tape to the conclusion actually because at the end he said but I don't think she'd want to because the tape was I'd like to you know I wanna Jam Karen stance or counselors stands. I can't remember exactly what it all was. And it was clear that he was being taped and he didn't know he was being taped. And I don't know why anyone would tape that but if you got to the actual end of the tape. He said but I don't think he'd want to so he was at least if that self-aware and if I listened to the whole tape I probably would have focused on that as opposed to the beginning of the conversation. Listen and and it was so ridiculous it was just so the whole thing was just so ridiculous and In hindsight I should have handled it differently but and just dismissed it as ridiculous and I should have actually stood up for the fact that he was taped without knowing. Because I don't think that was a good practice and I don't think it should have been a story but instead I I bought into the story that he'd said something Lewd and and I say that because in all the time that I did work with him there was never a situation where I felt uncomfortable in his presence because of anything that he may have thought or felt about me. That was one of two stories that broke on April Thirtieth Twenty Fourteen about Rob Ford. The second story ran in the Globe and Mail. It was about another video video this time. The Globe had screen shots to back up their reporting. It was very clear from the pictures and later from the video. What what was going on one of the screen shots of a cell phone in the room displaying the date which was only four days earlier the video video was reportedly shot by a self professed drug dealer? Rob's sister Kathy's basement rob is wearing a white shirt dark tie and he's holding a long copper pipe he can be seen exhaling a cloud of white smoke shaking his right hand and shuffling back and forth and then the camera hands hands around the room and a man. That looks very much like Sandra Leeson can be seen sitting in the background. You in the hours after. That story broke. Rob's lawyer announced the mayor was taking a leave of absence from City Hall from his campaign and the very next day rob left Rehab and his brother Duck even emotional press conference rob was very emotional when he told me the hardest thing about this is he knows he let people down. I told rob that everyone knows someone who is faced the challenges and I know they will wish them well and in a speedy recovery. I also believe this with even people that may not have the same political stripes as rob. Does I love my brother. Aw I'll continue to stand by my brother and his his family throughout this difficult journey. Please join me in. Keep Robin his family family in your prayers. In the interest. Rob's family asked media. Please respect his privacy. Thank you Next time on the gravy train. The man tries to get better for a long long time. I resisted the idea of getting help. He he added an issue with You know all you don't heal from an addiction by taking an extended week away when people realized Crack cocaine then. I felt like it was open season in a new way. When he saw that he went into his office and put his head down on his desk unsolved unsolved? I could have done more. I should have done more. I didn't do more because I couldn't stomach an anymore. My family is very close family. Very tight knit family family. Something really fucked up happened to that neighborhood. In the eighty s and is kind of an under appreciated part of the Ford Story I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings host and writer of the gravy train. Stephanie Phillips an analyst Analysts Nielsen Produce at and Stitch Every episode together Ryan Clark is also a producer and he mixes masters this entire podcast there brisard and provide editorial guidance. Danielle John Tomaso and rob purchase. Handle archival sourcing audio credits for this. This episode include Jimmy Kimmel live. This hour has twenty two minutes Saturday. Night Live Euronews the tonight show with Jimmy Fallon as well as the tonight. Thank show with Jay Leno and the Kobe report our production assistance. Are Lucas. I- Annetta and Matthew Maura you can find the gravy retrain the other podcast host the big story and almost a dozen more at frequency podcast network DOT COM or wherever. You get podcasts uh-huh.

Rob Mayor Ford Toronto City Hall Toronto Ford Rob Ford City Council Cynthia Mulligan City Hall City Hall Jimmy Kimmel crack cocaine Toronto City Council rob Bob Jordan Heath rob forties reporter City Hall twitter Danielle John Tomaso City Hall.
Bob Lonsberry Show Hr 1 Wednesday 7-22-20

Bob Lonsberry

26:35 min | Last week

Bob Lonsberry Show Hr 1 Wednesday 7-22-20

"Good Morning Rochester length for a run yesterday. well I, think I was turning in twelve minute miles. There are some who understand physics who would question whether or not? That's actually running, but I was moving I was perspiring and the sun was largely a shining so score that a win, but as I a shuffled along. This path of Chafe. I, went past. The City Hall over on Church Street for the the city of Rochester and They have a out front of the building three flagpoles. each for one or more banners aloft all at half staff. We need to talk about that I. Think we're in the middle of historic event. I can't find another time in American history when the American flag has flown at half staff as long as it is currently flying in the state of New York, seemingly in violation of a US flag code, but that's a a topic for later in the show. We're still now glorying in I. Don't Know My amazing demonstration of fitness yesterday back to those twelve and thirteen minute miles. But as I am A. Shot. Shuffling Past City Hall I look up there at the flagpoles and see as I look at it. The flag of the United States to the on the left in in the center paw. They had the flag of the state of New York. In over on the right hand, Paul. They had when I think is the transgender flag it turns out. There's a lot of drama and controversy about the gay flag a rainbow flag, and you know what colors do belong on it, and what is appropriate, and is it disrespectful to the transgender flag? It Issues I. obviously don't follow, but there was a flag. I presume the transgender flag. An it immediately beneath that on that poll to the right was a flag. It was white on black and It had in its center that that clenched fist, the upraised clinched fist, which are around the world is design of of global communism. right now. Being used in America. It seems by the black lives, matter movement in all its many forms, and it printed in block letters white on black across the bottom of the flag it said black lives matter. So their city hall on Church. Street Rochester New York. really not far from a lot of empty businesses. It is amazing when you go. North on a state street from four corners. places that used to be places are now just vacant, and it's really that way. up to Lyle Avenue end and beyond, but it it. That's not our point. You're you're. They're looking at the Front City Hall, a very interesting kind of building architecturally It has a an austere. Look from the outside. It has a pretty impressive beautiful Kinda look on the inside. It's got that atrium. If you're been in their seeing on the TV news, but so the the they got three flagpoles, and as I sat down for a second on the bench. Because obviously, when you've just gone almost a mile at the pace of twelve minutes a mile. Oh my Gosh! You GotTa copy squad. They sat on that bench, looking at city, hall see in that black lives matter flag a question came to my mind, which I'd like to take up in just a moment time now for traffic and weather on the tens on Newsradio, wham eleven eighty. He's Radio Whammy Levin Eighty, weather brought to you by William Muhtar hurt in a car call. William Muhtar it's a cloudy today. There's potential for storms in the middle of the day and again later in the afternoon they could bring some significant wins and a little bit of rain, a high today in the mid to upper seventies anticipated. It's a sixty nine at a about eight eleven, and you're listening to news radio WHAM eleven eighty. So again, you probably still kind of impressed overwhelmed. Some of the women might have the vapors at This astounding account of my late life guerrillasi going on this lunchtime. A run through downtown Rochester. But looking up at a city hall, it Rochester New, York and seeing their the black lives matter a manner. A A question arose. Would the mayor also authorized the flying of the thin Blue Line, flag, And you know you may think that that's merely some snarky inquiry, but this is one of those days that I wish that. I had gone to law school, which would have required me of course to have gone to college before that which would require me to pay attention in high school which would have required me to have had at least average intelligence which is a whole lot of hypotheticals that sadly just in lineup for me, kids. But. If I was a lawyer today I would type up the fancy letter, and lay it on some authoritative desk over at City Hall and say this is my official request to you that you fly the thin Blue Line flag. And just stand there and watch the sweat Kinda breakout on your brow as it dawns on them the situation which they find themselves. Because of course, the black lives matter flag in. Everybody believe what you want. Do what you want. March for what you want I mean stay out of the frigging road, but you know we all got our opinions God bless assault good to live in a free country. But of course, the black lives matter of a 'cause argument is currently a matter of public controversy. Right the it is not universally accepted view. There are really in a diverse people, no universally accepted views. They're always slight gradations and opinions and stuff like that, so it is a matter of public controversy and the black lives matter of flag, representing whichever little faction of that movement might or chance are presenting the NALL. Is Of course a statement about a matter of public controversy. One could reasonably argue and I probably would in that letter that I put on the important persons desk. I would argue that flying the black lives matter flag in front of City Hall is a government endorsement of a particular stand on a matter of public and political controversy. Right. Because it undeniably is, and it is not just a matter of public controversy. It is a matter of political controversy because quite obviously. The Black Lives Matter Movement I I. Think we all can agree is going to a draw and inspire pharmore voters to the Democratic ticket or to Democratic candidates than it will to Republican candidates. Right, so you have a matter of public controversy, that is eight Lee political, and you are flying a flag thereby. offering a government endorsement of of that position on that issue. Right you have chosen to use that flagpole, which is the government? You have chosen to use that flagpole to Raise that banner and take that stand. and. You know typically in America. We do not use taxpayer provided facilities to advance one political perspective viewpoint over another. And when a government does choose to use taxpayer, dollars and facilities like the flagpole in front of seventy. City Hall to. Endorse one political stand. It is obligated to provide similar space for a contrary views. Right be it because we're not supposed to have. Government endorsed politics, and yet they're. They. Are Government endorsed politics flying from the staff in front of the Rochester City Hall. And so on the letter I would put on the important persons desk. If I was a lawyer would say We'd now like you to fly the flag of a different perspective on this issue of philosophy and politics before society. Right. And I'm not just saying that is some Mike. Loser on the radio. This is not a joke. It's a a not snark. It's not a stunt. It's an earnest request. which has a founding nod insane, my personal political of us or even on my views on this issue, but on what I thought was the universally accepted stand. That government should be neutral in matters of politics, and that government is obligated to give forum to all if it gives forum to any. And so my request to Rochester City Hall is. New seem to be obligated by conscience and law. to, either put up the thin Blue Line flag, or take down the black lives matter flag, and my question to you. City of Rochester Madame mayor is which will be back with just a moment on Newsradio wham eleven eighty, those radio whammy Levin, eighty weather brought to you by William Muhtar hurt in a car. Call William Muhtar be cloudy today, which disappointingly will not be good for my farmer's, Tan could be stormy noon into the afternoon. High in the mid to upper seventies is anticipated is sixty nine soissons NERF I like to say at eight twenty two, and this is newsradio wham eleven eighty. Here's the thing, no real quick. This black lives matter flag flying in front of City Hall. It's a it's a model of efficiency. Right 'cause because think about it. you've got seven hundred officers approximately in the Rochester Police Department and what you WanNa do is spit in every one of their faces and f-bomb every one of them. Okay, it's an listen spitting, and I can hawk Lougee with the best of them, but spitting and seven I when I was like twelve thirteen I was true and frigging tobacco. Okay, I expect reiter but it would be hard even for me to spit in seven hundred faces, and you know i. I'm a veteran of the army. I've been specially trained in creative use of the F. Word but again I would even get horse. Seven hundred cops I've got. You know an f-bomb. But if you fly just one flag in front of City Hall the headquarters, they all serve. I mean what that does is it allows you to spit in all seven hundred faces and f-bomb, all seven hundred officers all at the same time without having to work up any spittle so again. Wonder wonder, wonderfully a efficient Francis. Glad you called up. Sir Welcome to newsradio eleven eighty. I, can you hear me? Yes, sir, very clearly. Oh, my goodness. I can't believe I made it. I just wanted to make a comment and say that For years the confederate flag. Was Flying in front of buildings down south. And that is like spitting in the face. Francis Francis. Francis. You're more on because here's a deal. South all right. isn't here. down South is not a government building. Right. And two wrongs don't make a right. So you know it. You're moron it. And I thought I was the only one on the shores a Moron Rod glad you called up welcome to newsradio damn eighty. Morning Bub, as well sort wanted to remind. Listeners and they've run quite public library. There's a great big black lives matter banner and people should realize black lives. Matter is is at its heart. As much a political organization as Philosophical and civil rights one? And it's just political as having A. Candidate, sign on your lawn, and it s no business being on public property like that then I wonder what the article I police depriving would do if I stroll over there and that was. Tear the thing down. They would they would. Cheer you as long as a supervisor couldn't hear them, and then they would externally handcuff you and March you away it. If you nice. Maybe it'd be in the Front Mike Glad. You called a welcome to Newsradio wham eleven eighty. Thanks for taking my call. You Bet so. Here's the deal. There's a flag pole out there. We're in the best country in the world. The United States of America stop for a second stop Mike, you and I may believe that, but there are some who believe that saying that makes us racists. The the deal is when you say we're in the best country in the world, you are speaking for about forty percent of Americans of which you and I are proudly part Bhagat. Understand there are a lot of people listening right now. Who are deeply offended by what you just said, anyway, go ahead, you yeah, you pointed out a much bigger problem that's. That's a much more you know. Extended conversation, but so we're in the state of New York, so fly those two flags. This is all political posturing. This is basically let's fly. You know the Let's fly these other flags like last matter, the transgender whatever and that's basically lovely war and say hey, look at me I support this. Don't forget that reluctantly next time. That's not the point of this whole thing. If he's a true leader, she's trying to bring the community together. Not Divided by flying that black lives matter flags. She's basically hey. I stand with these people and I'm police. See I think that's the point I'm not I'm not bothered by the Trans whatever flag you know what I'm saying that's what Democrats do you fly? Put the thing of your solidarity great. That's fine you know in individuals advancing their particular needs and interests in life now we're accustomed to that, but the black lives matter movement is intensely political. It's a very large financial political undertaking it is a matter of instant and direct public controversy it has implications in the November election, and it also is broadly and directly and purposefully disrespectful of people who actually worked for the city. Which is again? Spinning in their face and F-BOMB, we will stop because elects. alzon is in with the newscast. We'll be back when she's done on. newsradio Campbell eleven eighty. newsradio whammy eleven eighty weather brought to you by William Muhtar hurt in a car. Call William Muhtar well. Cloudy, today's see right now. There's a chance that new time and into the afternoon we could have some potentially significant storms saw be cognizant, and prepared a high in the mid to upper seventies anticipated. It is seventy at eight forty one and you're listening to newsradio. WHAM eleven eighty. Potassium iodide. Who will talk about that in the second say? Yes earns Jackie Mills, you see you went to college my right about that for a little bit Yep Oke. Really did you graduate? No, okay good. No, no good good yeah! That's one less thing for me to pick on you. I mean the truth of the matter is I school I was not very studious person at all. Me, took me extra time and I'd wait till later in your employment with. Honestly guys I never do my home. Never ever. Are you familiar with. Do you know what potassium iodide is not? Not at all, you have no idea. No I know potassium is okay. What? What is protests like some I take there's a there's pills that you can take the have potassium in it. Isn't that like what that? What like just small triangular blue pill or What Bananas? Potassium advocate. You! Don't talk about. Exactly Right Bananas Hepatitis. Yes, you have just said everything I know about potassium. Element. And you get it in bananas and every time you do banana, you say well I'm getting potassium. I have no idea but I've got some got some potassium now. Sam We. Talk about potassium high died in a moment Bernice I. appreciate your phoning Good Morning Ma'am and welcome to news radio. WHAM eleven eighty. Good morning, Bob, how're you? How am I? Hear her call That's a little different from the previous caller. And have the rules changed were flying the flag. I understand from way act that the American flag showed always lie above any other flag, even the state like. on the same poll, different polls, or which the the setting ma'am, please. How well I guess probably on the same poll but I noticed. When I looked at the flagpoles in front of City Hall yesterday on the news. that. The American flag looked flying lower than the other two polls which city hall. Rochester remember. That was on the news last night. It was what channel you watch. Thirteen thirteen well, if L. sent him out of must be burden when I was there all three flagpoles were at half staff. The American flag was was a little bit higher than the other. The the issue if they're on different polls. Is is more which police the American flag on and the one in City Hall yesterday. When I was, there was in the right location the American flags always supposed to be on its own right. The position of honor is is to the right, and so the fact that as you look at the front of the building, the American flag is closer to the door to its own right. The left as you look at it meant that they had it on the right on the right pole and yesterday when I was there. The IT actually was higher up on the pole than. Than The New York flag and in the third flagpole with this flags so I I'll I see I because on the TV and looked as though it was lower than the other. the other. You know what trump would say about that. Now Do, you know what trump would say about that. I don't think he would like it. He'd say fake news. Oh why? Character have fake new I. I didn't see the thing from a channel from channel thirteen. Maybe that was from some other day, but I I I I I happened to notice the flag just a on City Hall and the America thank you for the call ma'am, the American flag was in its appropriate place, and also They were half-staff, but you could see that. Whoever put them up. There had left the American flag rather noticeably a little bit higher, and you know I I appreciated that. Failed, this is newsradio. Wham eleven eighty, good morning and welcome. As far as the American. Flag is concerned, one a group of three polls together. The American flake is supposed to be the highest poll when there's two flags are group of flags together. The American flag is always on the left pole as you're looking edit. E If! I, I agree with the second part. In now, here's here's what will happen. Is sometimes they'll be places where they had. Hey Sam Sam? Yes, Sam. Schreier works here at the station took place that one girl who used to be here. This is pretty pretty exciting radio. Your background is largely in FM. Right or yeah, but I mean I I know I know stuff about America and stuff about America and stuff yeah. You're. verified that no, I would just saying that like. You're probably used to radio with a lot of exciting stuff. Going on fascinating topics some of that jive people isn't do now tapping toes and stuff like that always moving forward. Yeah, but right now we're talking about fly. Get a kit for elderly people got it. Very much proud to serve I. Know My Nancy, Sammy I know my niche, but but here's the deal the you'll see sometimes where they'll have three flags, and one will be out front, and the other two will be sort of flanking it in that situation. The American flag belongs in that one out front. If you have a situation where a flagpole is taller than other flagpoles than the. The American flag belongs on that but if you have lined up as they have the Rochester City Hall, the Gentleman's correct as you look at it the American flag goes on its left, which is, it's right, which yes, somehow, this is all very important, and if you don't believe me, you're a frigging Communist. Okay back with you in the moment on Newsradio wham eleven eighty. newsradio whammy eleven eighty weather brought to you by William. Muhtar hurt in car. Call William Muhtar. I just thought his unfunny. which is the first time that's happened to me and frigging years I? It could well be stormy this midday and afternoon. You need to be cognizant of. That's pretty cloudy out there right now. A high in the mid to upper seventies anticipated. It's seventy degrees at eight, fifty two and you're listening to newsradio damn eighty. Let's go to Sam Schreier. The potential, the only person at the station with less education than I have. How long were you at College? About a year. Did you complete any classes? Yes, okay, well, then you top me very nice. You need to rub it in my face like that. Okay. This is an idea of just came to me. means it won't be funny I. Can you know you can't tell you seen those videos that people have been doing of late part of the covert thing like it like it'll be a softball team, and here is you know pitcher Susie and she takes the ball and she tosses screen an an on another screen. Here's you know a first baseman. Betty and she catches the ball and quickly turns and throws it off to coach Mrs Jones saying and yeah. That and that whole kind of concept has been different ways. Yup, what if? What if? You? Had A video. Maybe even a tick tock I don't know. What have you had a video? Where someone is walking their dog and they've got that bag. You know saying. That's holding the you know. What s and what are they tossed off screen and here's some happy person who catches it and looks down and has horrified. Look then you go back to the other person who's running off into the sunset with your. He can be funny. That's pretty cool. That'd be primary. Sam Schreier agreeing with me. which should scare him? A Sam I'm glad you phone Sir Welcome to Newsradio Ham eleven eighty. Hello Sam. Welcome you're on the air sir. Same Amigo I'm calling in regards to. They're blocking off four ninety on, Friday. Brand is about somebody is giving them the authority to do this and I. Don't know who's doing. It I've called everybody turney. General's office KOMO's office. The mayor everybody nobody wants to tell me who's doing this and wife. Who has the right to shut down that road? You don't you don't get protesters. I've been I'm seventy seven years old I've been working since I was twelve I. See these kids out there today. y'All got cell phones big screen TV's air-conditioning. They got everything but a job. Dorey professional protester. Some aren't some do get paid. who has authorized clearly at the end of the day is the mayor and the governor. That's what we saw last. Sunday police agencies over soon seen by those two elected officials. Did Not do their duty. They did not enforce the law. They facilitated the breaking of the law I suspect that that decision wasn't made by some troop commander in Farmington or some police chief. Over on Exchange Boulevard. That came from higher up. That came from where they don't wear badges to work, but they wear suits. There was another shutdown yesterday. sort of ad hoc on Winton Road and and and here's the deal. They say the protesters. They're going to shut down more on Friday and we've heard no pushback from any official Dallas Texas to a police chief got up there and said you do it now. Arrest you. They did and she did. We're not hearing that Russia. Chalk News in a story that will touch your heart right after Joe, Lasky with his premier newscast on newsradio jam eleven eighty.

City Hall Rochester William Muhtar America Rochester City Hall US New York Sam Schreier Front City Hall Sam Sam Mike Glad Newsradio Rochester Police Department Francis Francis newsradio Campbell official Paul Newsradio Ham
City Hall

The Gravy Train

47:33 min | 9 months ago

City Hall

"Impartially exercise this office to the best of my knowledge and ability was sworn in as mayor of the city of Toronto on December that's no that in all the pre-campaign polls that were conducted before anyone and wasn't even that close and in the days to come there was no shortage of high profile amongst them legendary Canadian hockey broadcaster Donald S Jerry in Jordan drawings it started with an underdog there's no real achievements beyond therefore notable contenders Sarah Thompson Rocco Rossi Joe Pantalone it put him at thirteen percent. The same poll had smitherman leading with forty and frequently in the months to come that he didn't care about polls he didn't have a competent campaign or the infrastructure that goes with it second as rob signed up to run for mayor his campaign lacked the stuff that every of cash they needed to get serious they've always struggled with the strategy side before he came on board rob had a base of really passionate supporters fundraise had a really fun raise had to do voter identification had to get out any stakes we need to put up this many lawn signs this is how many screws we need to put this many stakes notorious and most reviled political operatives and he plays that part you get the sense that his core belief is that politics is a game to win about Nick Strategy Mixed Company called campaign research he introduced himself by saying something like something to the effect of I'm will but not working right that was my thought was the first time I met him and his company started working for the fords they quickly realized they would have their work cut out together and bring in some people who had some semblance of some experience in running oh the season campaign people I mean the fords might have called them elites quote the best political operatives in Toronto we're already working for other candidates and that wasn't rob he said dumb stuff he didn't listen to advice about how you know rob was in the end Thal Rob was an educated rob was you alert voters who didn't see the and earth all when they looked at rob and what the Ford could make real numbers out of ROB's man of the people meth someone who could quantify new campaigns and new data and they found a man named Mitch Wexler was interesting it was also challenging because you know they they they came be what Mitch did on campaigns was simple he organized databases what the voter cared about how solid they were would they take a lawn sign would they knock on doors all those visits and phone calls that rob made his constituents those calls and at least he promised to and then he went away but you remembered him and he voter and who's not and the whole key is to identify the voters make sure vote on election day and so rob said well I have all the phone calls I've made like he we've kept all that where is it is at the house and boxes so I wanna see it piece of the Rob Ford math this would be an urban legend if it wasn't absolutely back everybody remember Doug Holiday last episode getting a late night call from rob voicemails and write down all the numbers on a piece of paper with no names just the phone numbers there's many of them were duplicates but it was like one hundred and seventy thousand unique you see a few of them to see and they were all Ford supporters and so we took about whole list and we an eighty four votes cast in the two thousand ten election in Toronto so as you might imagine had a positive memory of it was a really good place to start and if you dr goes phone numbers were gold mine they did politics from you know there's a lot of politicians wouldn't do that and they did so mm-hmm he had data entry workers put them into a telemarketing program then he into a huge database of information about potential for voters so whether you want to call mm Ford nation so they had the legs but what they still didn't have was money and fast we need to raise money and a lot of people wanted always a person you can probably guess the obvious solution here like he'd the Gecko his campaign was I'm going to use the word corrupt that voice belongs to get his campaign they could not could barely attract a donation from the public like isn't it Adam Shelf would become a perpetual thorn in from there he was hooked and by the Time Rob Ford launched his campaign Adam was shit disturb her but we are talking to Adam now Doug Ford Holdings had spent seventy thousand bucks on Merrill campaign expenses like Shen and no as you probably guessed corporations aren't supposed to donate to campaigns at didn't change the result and during the campaign that infusion of family like your professional and ready to go in that you've got a big team behind you and from the get-go Janik basis support that they were bringing money from or they hit arranged appropriate loans and create the appearance of a rich campaign it also freed Rob Ford up to weaponized how it goes Ford would highlight frequently the five dollar and ten dollar contributions L. voters the regular people those folks giving hundreds of bucks to George Smitherman it's such a complicated job with the electorate doesn't think it's that complicated and Wallace Wexler and their team and the hundred and seventy thousand strong and Ford nation sure was there check and they were getting close to it when they up was about broadly the message was down with the political elites captured all the rage rob was capable of conveying when he talked about his colleagues talking to voters and on his youtube channel which he used to get around the gatekeepers Herman and Pantalone Ian all of them and robs mind every other person on city council the free stuff they'd never do anything but spend your money and looked down on the free zoo pass and every council had all of these perks while they were making one hundred thousand dollars the gravy train and we have a lot of fun with that it's time and has come to an end but an end to the savy chain and the wasteful spending where did stop the gravy train come from came from a focus group so like it's not something you know fifteen or twenty different clips of Rob Ford talking about like I get one of the famous bat and one of the clips we showed was he said in that man in particular hadn't reacted positively to anything and let's start asking everyone how they feel about it and it turned out everybody thought for another person it was like I like the unions but the counselors are spending too much money on coffee there's so many more people and that's why I blew wide open to where he went up to fifty in the polls sticking to a simple phrase one talking point was the way he approached things both in politics and generally about things that he's not comfortable he's he's comfortable delivering that message about whatever they wanted to and robs message was was always the same during the late spring and the summer months of the campaign rob who was trying to us every single lap and that's where I got to talk to him a bit more and which answer goes with what question they're asking and when you don't know you always say this he was really good at campaigning following direction and and and he saw and the two thousand ten Merrill Campaign 'cause rob was in a really crowded field first and we'll all those proposals got lost rob's message got through walk ruckle Rossi that's what we used to call them they wanted to get TV debates neanderthal into stupid and then they figure that's the way the to catch such could be the thing about it is that there's nine or ten candidates on stage and there's an hour scripted but doesn't necessarily isn't trying to be to chance you get you can make a lot of ground on the people who are trying to explain those had been the only words coming out of Rob Ford's mouth this election would have been a cakewalk but they still had rob the candidate and rob summer and he rose day by day in the polls his opponents naturally started an openly gay man took the first shot remember that idiotic would face homophobia throughout the campaign and he decided to go after rob for I cannot separate that which I believe to be a reality and I had a lot of homophobic perspective on Rob Lake's speaking about the things like authenticity at the heart of it this is not a person you're voting council if you're not doing the mayor for all people and you Mr for to explain to email uh-huh Ford's answer had nothing upbeat it wouldn't aw award was asked the question why the protection football eighty things you both that comment and rubs history of comments on council and in doing I was offended because Ford's campaign had not called him back this upset rob to here then he went out with a reporter and a photographer from the star to meet the man who it was not the last time the dealers name would come up in this campaign dealers at all that clip is from a fifty attend rob offered to try to buy the painkiller off the street for detour it was obviously you heard the tate he sounded very disturbed looking south you know I can actually see your house when the Ford campaign and the data was taking advantage of his well known desire to do that and didn't hurt as much as you might imagine that Meryl candidate agreeing to Buy Street drugs for a Citizen Front of it and rob explained the situation at that he was put in this you know on tenuous everything that he did that was opposite to what was increase his support and once we passed the big controversy in June a couple scandal the kind of scandal that used to bring down politicians all the time of a joint was found in his pocket he was charged with possession and with refusal in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine I was on vacation in Florida to our condo that same evening I was charged him of lying about the possession of marijuana he claimed he had simply forgotten ed go ahead take me to jail and then he threw money on the ground sample received the fine and did some community service heard worse he told you the media was going to be out to get him and now that there was a new scandal to be reported on something else started to happen and we knew that wasn't going to be an about working on Rob Ford's campaign because of all of the controversies happening here's people saying he he had no chance as the campaign was was gaining steam and among opponents that could be possible for someone as it took up all those controversies took all of the oxygen in the point it's mid August twenty ten there are only a couple of months left the scandals have begun to seem repetitive and after weeks donald and a boat was crossing the Pacific Ocean I'm sure Lanka at the debate George Smitherman was there and he was ready to go his onic temple and that debate began in a in a really strange then they tried to powder them like dust him in a makeup the makeup way is expecting what happened next not even Kouvelas I am ask Merrill candidates in downtown Toronto if Canada should accept he says full and everyone goes a ha they got them right and it's always tough and he said no no our hospitals are for roads are full the traffic is bad USA I de France I like that is the narrative for populous then rub whole showed that it had gone from a tied race to fifty twenty they were trying to snarl him so it did fit our frame of wind in our sails they were going to folks race back they were trying to pin him there and the public said enough unrealized people I just had it they saw something in themselves with Rob Ford Right Ford said something on live TV a lot of people thought crushing and I knew quite early on Had a pretty good sense that my goose was cooked legal standpoint the vote was held on October twenty fifth two thousand ten I heard it's perhaps worth noting that pantalone and Smitherman is combined votes tonight my friends they have sent a very clear message I've just hard-fought like me I'm sure that the city that he sought to change relations difference differences aside no no Toronto is too important there are no boos tonight political standpoint a little bit validated insofar as people understand what

rob Toronto Joe Pantalone smitherman Sarah Thompson Rocco Rossi Donald S Jerry Jordan one hundred thousand dollars thirteen percent twenty fifth five dollar ten dollar
400- The Smell of Concrete After Rain

99% Invisible

30:11 min | 3 months ago

400- The Smell of Concrete After Rain

"This is ninety nine percent invisible. I'm Roman Mars. There have been tens of thousands of deaths as a result of the chronic virus. Penick all have been tragic but there are two people in particular that we've lost a covert that were part of the world of architecture and design that we want to honor with a couple of stories. Today I we are mourning the loss of architect Michael McKenna along with Gerhard Coleman McConnell designed the unforgettable Boston City Hall completed in Nineteen Sixty Eight. They won the commission for Bosnia. All after submitting their brutalises heroic monument in a contest when Michael McConnell was just twenty six years old it was always a controversial structure. Much of the public ended ugly and too unconventional but architects and critics tend to love it. This is often the case with brutalism more. Generally and that is the subject of a piece starring Boston City Hall that Avery trauman reported for us. Back in two thousand fifteen to celebrate Michael McKenna's life we're GONNA play that story for you now. It's favorites hoping like the best. James Bond is either Sean Connery or Daniel. Craig I lean towards Daniel Craig. The new movies are just better. But the Sean Connery Films Definitely had best villains. There's blow Feld of course so iconic that he turned in the act of cat stroking into a thing that super villains do but bonds flashiest nemesis has to be Goldfinger. Expect you to. Do you expect me to talk talk? There's this Dorky. Fun fact that the Bond Villain Goldfinger was actually named after a real person. That's trump them dropping the author of the James Bond Books in funding named Goldfinger for a man. He found so dastardly so terrible that he immortalised him. In pop culture. The real goldfinger was an architect earn Goldfinger and he made giant hall caine austere concrete buildings. Goldfinger buildings were decreed. Solis inhabitants claim to suffer health problems and depression from spending time inside them. Some of gold fingers buildings were vacated because occupants found them so ugly and yet many architects praised fingers builds his trump tower. Which was once threatened with demolition. Has Been awarded landmark status this divide this hatred from the public and love from designers and architects tends to be the narrative around buildings like gold fingers which is to say. Gigantic imposing buildings made of concrete. What some people refer to as brutally honest architecture and a lot of folks beyond the creator of James Bond. Love to hate them. We are in Wurster Hall which to my great dismay and frustration is often considered though worst building on campus or Wurster Hall. More like worst. I met up with Sarah Briggs Ramsey in Worcester Hall of rootless building at UC. Berkeley can't tell you how many times I've been locking up my bike outside and I overhear undergrads walking with their parents and going ironically. This is the architecture school and it's the ugliest building on campus Wurster Hall. Is the architecture school. Sara completed her master's their buildings. Like this are pretty pervasive across most American and Canadian campuses. Yeah there was a big bulky concrete building on the campus where I went to college and I hated when I had to go through it and it just reminded me of a bunker or a bomb shelter. These big concrete buildings just like from me out absolutely I mean it has these connotations of Soviet era construction sometimes third world construction all these negative associations this is professor Adrian Forty author of the excellent buck concrete and culture. He's been researching concrete for around ten years. Now has a bad name. Apart from aesthetic. Criticisms concrete buildings present environmental concerns Loesch. These buildings built time when energy was cheap and they use up an awful lot of energy to heat and cool them. Concrete buildings were built with the illusion of plenty that we will always have enough energy to build and heat and cool these massive inefficient structures as harsh as it looks. Concrete is an utterly optimistic building material arguably too optimistic really from the nineteen twenties. It was seen as being the material that word change the world. It had the potential to build things in a way that hadn't been seen before concrete. Was this material that seemed boundless. Readily available in vast quantities and could create massive spaces unlike any other material so concrete sprang up everywhere second second most heavily consumed products in the world. The only thing we consume more of than concrete is water we use concrete for sidewalks bridges tunnels and highways and of course for giant buildings whether we're talking about stage our area or condominium or Gymnasia or planetary act so historically government programs all over the world loved concrete particularly in Soviet Russia bottles so later in Europe North America it was used for welfare welfare state projects concrete presented the most efficient way to house huge numbers of people and philosophically. It was seen as humble capable an honest. Concrete was just out there. All of it's rough glory not hiding behind any paint or layers saying here. I am love me or hate me and his concrete buildings came to signify humility honesty and integrity. They were erected all over the world as housing projects courthouses schools churches hospitals and city halls. You'll stand outside and a tour bustle. Go by. And they'll be ladies and gentlemen voted the most ugliest building in the World Boston City Hall. How do you compete with that? Chris Grimly is up against a lot but he's trying to restore Boston city halls reputation My name is Chris Grimly. I'm with my fellow Heroic People Mark Bosnich and Michael Kubo Chris. Mark and Michael embarked on what they call the heroic project chronicling the concrete structures in and around Boston rather than referring to these concrete buildings as brutally honest. They prefer the term heroic. Because like so many superheroes. These structures have the best most noble intentions but are sorely misunderstood. Also just generally brutalism is a big broad label that gets used inconsistently in architecture. People tend to disagree on one precise definition. The brutalism also just sounds intense. Even though it's not actually related to brutality. It comes from Bitam brute. Which is the French term for raw concrete? In any case to these guys heroic feels like a better term especially in Boston. Where concrete architecture swooped in and save the day? You'll have to situate Boston in late. Fifties nineteen sixties. It is America's first city. It is America's most historic city again. Not really but I get your point and yet it finds itself in the doldrums. Boston like a lot of other. American cities was plagued by loss of manufacturing jobs and white flight to the suburbs and for decades Boston and the highest property taxes in the nation. And almost no development there is this recognition from civic authorities. That something needs to be done. Something needs to be done quickly. So Boston sets an agenda to make the city great again with big soaring capable thoroughly. Modern buildings made of course out of concrete and though some of these buildings were celebrated others. Were really not what we call the third rail of Boston. Concrete modernism is city hall. When Boston City Hall was built in Nineteen Sixty eight critics were put off by this concrete style. It was called alienating and cold and since it was a government building. This criticism became impossible to remove from politics. Boston City Hall became a political. On mayors and city council members kept trying to win public support with promises to get rid of the building like John. Tobin did when he ran for city council. Everybody is John Tobin. Thanks for visiting. Both Gentlemen Dot Com. We are on City Hall Plaza in front of Boston City Hall. I'm not an architect but I actually wanted to see the building. I think we can do a lot by knocking. Just building down former mayor. Thomas Menino actually started a study to really look into tearing down. It turned out as a result of the study that you would need something like a nuclear weapon basically to destroy this building because it's so heavily overbuilt it concrete and so when they couldn't tear down city hall officials chose to ignore it people that occupy the building for decades and decades didn't like it and so they invest money into the building and effectively wanted to see the building go away this is called active neglect and it happens with a lot of concrete buildings. They are intentionally unrepaired on renovated and UNCARED for which only makes the building more ugly and then more hated and then more ignored in creates. There's a vicious cycle where the public hate of Boston's all feeds itself. And then the discussion years on really became about what the original architect had done wrong. As if this were not a failure of maintenance but a failure of the initial design when people built these mammoth concrete structures. No one really thought about maintenance they seemed indestructible in the early eighties of concrete. People assume the this was an everlasting material. That wouldn't need any attention to tool and that's wrong. We know that it does need to be looked after it does. Deteriorate does two K. But it can be hard to tell when concrete is decaying if you think brick and timber the two K. Takes Place on the surface of them but with concrete the deterioration is internal concrete deteriorates chemically from the inside out. Part of this has to do with the metal reinforcements that help hold up. Most concrete buildings. The rebar will. It can rust and the rust eats away at the overall structure but Adrian Forty says tearing them down is not the answer because as soon as you tell them down then you have a problem first of all what you do with a d'etre GIS that were left and secondly you've got to replace them with something else isn't us up a whole lot more energy and create a lot more. Co Two in building. Something in place already used up all that energy when they were made. They're already there. We can adapt these buildings to make them greener and make them more appealing places to be by an windows for example but basically professor forty things. We can all develop the capacity to love these concrete brutes in all their hulking glory. Yeah sure people can learn to love anything but as with any form whether it's opera painting literature the more you know about heads the more you get out of it the more you'll appreciate and this is especially true of concrete buildings architecture. Students appreciate them because they know that concrete actually requires a hell of a lot of skill and finesse to work with to do architecture in concrete is proof that you really are an architect. It's the test of being an architect. Concrete building every little detail needs to be calculated in advance. Concrete is wildly intimidating. To work with once you pour it. There's no going back with a concrete building. It's like the result of an immaculate conception the whole thing ease an integral monolithic hole and it it has to be right and aside from the interesting design challenges that poses concrete itself as a material can be subtly beautiful. If you look closely what we think of. As a monolithic consistent homogeneous texture is actually really rich and Has a lot of interest when you actually go up to it and consider it Sarah Briggs Ramsey. The one I spoke with at Berkeley's Wurster Hall did a year long project traveling around the world looking at concrete buildings in Europe and Asia and south of North America to create a global comparison of one material. That I think is so sort of under considered. It's like the background of all the cities but no one actually stands to look. We call the city a concrete jungle to talk about the artificial -ness of the urban landscape but concrete can actually be very natural expression of the environment concrete's color and texture can be dictated by local climate local earth and local rock. This is the Harvard Science Center on the Harvard campus. And it's got a purply really pronounced purple color and that's the ground from the site. Concrete can also be an expression of local style and custom Mike how? Uk concrete has big thick textured chunks of rock wall. Japanese concrete is very fine flat but the beauty of concrete architecture is all the better when you can just observe the buildings like pieces of sculpture without actually having to live and work in them which brings in concrete surprising ally photography. Concrete looks good in photographs. It provides kind of neutral background. It provides a wonderful setting for people's skin tones color of Clothes Fashion Photographers realized this first and then pockets of the Internet started to appreciate these concrete buildings. There are lots of These blogs which show a kind of extraordinary enthusiasm for concrete photography is allowing a new audience of non architects to appreciate these buildings for their strong lines. That Chris Shadows and increasingly the idealism they embody represent sets of ideas about the state of the world. And what the future is imagined to be that we we want to preserve. We should remember what people were thinking. Fifty years ago we tell these buildings down we will lose all of that whether we want to admit it or not has a sort of shelf life a time after which buildings fall out of fashion and then are allowed to fall apart back in the nineteen sixties Victorian style buildings were considered hideous falling apart impossible to repair. And we were tearing D- batches of them down all the while big concrete buildings but enough victorians were saved that today. They are these beautiful lovingly restored treasures route. A-list heroic whatever you WANNA call it. Concrete architecture now finds itself at a potential inflection. Point too outdated to me modder too young to be classic and a small but growing band of architects architecture enthusiasts and preservationists would like us to just wait a bit and see maybe with a little time and love. We might discover some architectural diamonds in the rough that we just can't see right now Michael McKenna architecture. Boston City Hall died of a cove related illness at the age of eighty four. He is survived by his wife and architectural partner. Stephanie Malice Heart. Goes out to all after the break. We honor a true vanguard of architectural criticism. Michael Sorkin stay with us. In late March. We also lost designer architecture critic. Michael Sorkin to complications brought on by Kobe. Nineteen when he started writing for the village voice in the Nineteen Eighty S. He brought a totally new kind of approach to writing about buildings. One that focused on people in politics. I feel like he really stretched the boundaries on how confrontational you could be in print. This is Dr Critic curbed in front of the show. Alexandra Lane Sorkin became famous for ripping into conventional wisdom and sometimes ripping into important builders and other critics to gave a vitality to architecture criticism and stretch the boundaries of what it could be in a way that really brought it to new generations attention and has continued to be really important for younger critics. Much will sorokin wrote about buildings but also the much bigger factors that make up in urban landscape. You know one of the things that comes through really strongly in his work. Is this idea that it's not architecture isn't just this pure profession of your mostly men. You know thinking about forms and then placing them in the city. architecture is something that is shaped by. Social Change Political Change Dirty money all these things. Add always really brought that into the mix in two thousand nine can published a book called. Twenty minutes in Manhattan which traces the walk from his home to his studio in New York. Sorkin wrote about pain special. Close attention to the little details of his neighborhood and how those small details taught him so much about history and community. The book that ninety nine percent of visible listeners would love and it feels especially relevant right now. The kind of attention that he was paying to that part of city is something that we all can do. Now I mean people are obviously feeling. Stir crazy in their homes but they're also feeling stir crazy in their neighborhoods. One Way to get over it is to you know. Add another layer of attention or go down streets that you don't normally go down and I feel like that twenty minute limit could actually be a little more freedom if you really want to drill down and think about your neighborhood in a deeper way than you usually do because you're rushing through it to go somewhere else. A lot of Michael's ruins writing is not online but one of the pieces that made the rounds a couple of times on the Internet was a provocative meditative list called two hundred fifty things in architecture. Now it'll be nice to read some of it now. Some selections from two hundred fifty things in architecture now the feel of cool marble under bare feet how to live in a small room five strangers for six months with the same strangers in the lifeboat for a week. The distance a shout carries in the city the distance of a whisper. The number of people with rent subsidies in New York City in your town include the rich the flowering season for Phileas the insulating properties of glass. The history of its production in US and of its meaning how to lay bricks with Victor Hugo. Really meant by. This will kill that. The rate at which the seas arising building information modeling be. I am the energy embodied aluminum how to turn a corner. How to design a corner at a sit in a corner. Now Anthony Golden muddled the Sagrada Familia and calculated structure the rate at which that carpet is specified off gases the migratory patterns of Warblers and other seasonal travelers the basics of mud construction the direction of prevailing winds. Hydrology is destiny. Jane Jacobs in and OUT ELEMENTARY ERGONOMICS THE COLDER WHEEL. What the client wants what the client thinks it wants what the client needs with the client can afford with the planet can afford the theoretical basis for maternity in a great deal about its factions inflections. Let the brick really wants what went wrong improvement. I go what went wrong with the bridge? We're the CICI. Tv cameras are the secrets of the success of Robert. Moses reciprocal influences of Chinese and Japanese building the proper proportions of Gin Martini how the crow flies. How the Pyramids were built. Why the pleasures of the suburbs the horrors the quality of light passing through ice the meaninglessness of borders the reasons for their tenacity. The need for free is possible. To begin design anywhere the smell of concrete after rain the angle of the sun of Economics. How to ride a bicycle? The depth of the Aquifer beneath you slope of a handicapped ramp. The wages of construction workers where materials come from out again lost the pattern of artificial light at night seen from space. The reasons for the split between architecture engineering many ideas about what constitutes utopia woodshop safety the architectural impact of colonialism on the cities of North Africa a distaste for imperialism the history of Beijing Dutch domestic architecture in the seventeenth century. The rate at which copper acquires a Patina the levels of particulates in the air of Tianjin capacity of White Pine Trees to sequester carbon? The fire code the seismic code the health code how to listen closely. There is a big danger in working a single medium the logjam you don't even know you're stuck in will be broken by shift in representation. How Escape Quirky the proper way to behave with interns the history of big machines including those that can fly outta ecological footprints three good lunch spots within walking distance the value of human life. Who Pays who profits what to refuse to do even for the money. The fine print in the contract a smattering of naval architecture burial practices in a wide range of cultures the density needed to support a pharmacy the density needed to support a subway. The effect of the design of your city on food miles for fresh produce squatter settlements via visits in conversations with residents the history and techniques of architectural representation across cultures. A bit of chemistry and physics. The importance of the Amazon how to batch leaks components of a comfortable environment for sleep strengths of materials. If only intuitively why you think architecture does any good depreciation cycle what Russ good model making techniques in would in cardboard how to play a musical instrument the acoustic properties of trees and shrubs Garda from thoughts how to give directions efficiently in courteously. Hell close is to bicycle safety in etiquette the acoustic performance of Boston Symphony Hall. How to open the window the diameter of the earth? The number of gallons of water used in shower the distance at which you can recognize faces now and win do bribe public officials for the greater good concrete finishes Straw Bale Building Technology. Rachel Carson your neighbors the remediation capacity of wetlands the capacity of wetlands to attenuate storm surges the depths of desire the heights of folly the golden and other ratios burn those are selections from two hundred fifty things in architecture by Michael. He died on March. Twenty sixth twenty twenty from he was the head of the Michael Sorkin studio and President of Tax Reform a nonprofit research group. He is survived by his wife. Joan Cope check. She is a professor of modern culture and Media at Brown University. We Center our sincere condolences. And thank you for giving US permission. To Air. Michael's writing ninety nine percent. Invisible was produced week. Avery trump woman and Chris baruba music by Sean Real Katie. Mingle is this new producer. Kolstad is the digital director. The rest of the crew is senior editor Delaney Hall. Joe Rosenberg so few clots Sharif Yusef Gerald Vian lay and me will in Mars. We are a project of nine point seven. Klw In San Francisco in produced on radio row which is distributed in multiple locations throughout the East Bay but in our heart will always be in beautiful downtown Oakland California. We are proud. Founding member of radio took from PX fiercely independent collective of the most innovative listener supported podcasts fund long Ray Utopia FM. You can find the show into About the show on facebook. You can tweet me at Roman Maher's show at ninety nine. Pi Org on instagram and ready to but our forever home on the web is ninety. Nine peon Dot Org Radio to lean on April second. Nineteen nineteen president. Wilson caught the flu on April fourteenth. Eighteen sixty five Abraham Lincoln was assassinated and on April twenty third nineteen ninety four Howard. Stern was nominated for governor. By new. York's Libertarian Party. The newest show from Radio. Topa is called this day in Esoteric political history. Each episode takes one moment. That happened that day in our political history. Some are well known some are esoteric hence the name but they all have lessons for this moment and those lessons last about ten minutes. Perfect length of podcast. It's hosted by my pal. Jody Avirgan formerly of five. Thirty eight and the brilliant historian Nicole. Hammer of Columbia University. New episodes arrive every Tuesday and Thursday. You can find this day esoteric political history. Wherever you get your podcasts. Or at This Day pod Dot Com. I will not make age an issue of this campaign. I am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience well. The country from Florida Oregon from Washington to maim people will rise up in November and John Kerry will be sworn in as president and this country will reclaim its promise. Join me an effort to reshape our society and regain control of our destiny. Is We go down the Chisholm trail for nineteen?

Boston City Hall Boston Michael Michael Sorkin Wurster Hall Michael McKenna professor Goldfinger Adrian Forty World Boston City Hall James Bond Berkeley Michael McConnell Sarah Briggs Ramsey America US City Hall Plaza Sean Connery campus Wurster Hall
Trailer

Technopolis

01:27 min | 1 year ago

Trailer

"Malia. It's clear that technology is totally reshaping our city's. Yeah. But often without permission and sometimes without even a clue, but I think tech assu appealing because it can feel kind of magical, right like when our groceries appeared our doorstep, or when you can get from point a to point b with a swipe if you listen to what these companies say about themselves, they're solving all of our problem. Give me a break. Yeah. Anyone tripping over electric scooters or being spied on by their neighbors camera knows that all this new tech comes with a lot of new headaches. Also. Welcome to novelist a show about how technology is disrupting remaking, and sometimes overrunning our cities, we're going to discuss what needs to change in Silicon Valley and in city hall to make technology help solve more problems than it creates. I'm Molly Turner. I teach urban innovation at UC Berkeley. And was the first policy person at Airbnb, and I'm Jim campus. I was a climate negotiator in the Obama administration and now advise tech startups, Molly, and I are really passionate about cities or tech positive or skeptical that either cities or techies have all of the answers. So we're going to invite them both on this show to ask questions nobody else's asking and to get better answers than we're getting right now. So come join us in the wild west of urban tech subscribe to the show and apple podcasts or literally anywhere. You listen to your favorite shows protests is free. So don't miss out. Subscribe.

Molly Turner Obama administration UC Berkeley Malia. It Silicon Valley city hall Airbnb Jim campus apple
3: Whispers

The Gravy Train

42:41 min | 9 months ago

3: Whispers

"As he opened the curtain. That's when I first saw immediately. Rob Ford He was was basically bent over towards this woman's hand and right then and there I just heard an immediate sniff and then he kind kind of just drew his head back and just gave like a sigh and then after that I basically kept the stories to myself for about an hour just writing leading the scene over and over again trying to decide you know. Did I really see the mayor. snorting coke off of some women's hand I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the gravy train. The Rob Ford was officially the Mayor of Toronto. And it's fair to say that as twenty ten came to a close nobody involved in governing the city or even living in the city knew what the Hell would happen in twenty eleven and that was true for Nick Kouvelas and for the Ford campaign which was male attempting to form an administration. My head turn to okay now. We won now. What now what do we do now? He actually got to govern. How do we govern? It was also true for all the counselors like Gord perks at City Hall who had fought against rob every step of the away and it became apparent that this government was going to be a disaster and it rob was going to govern completely untethered from the reality of of how the government works. I you know you always kind of hold out. Hope that the figurehead guy has has people around him who will tell them the truth and keep them keep them focused but with rob. It was clear that he had a bunch of enablers around and right from the start and and it was clear that it was all wore all the time politicians and the people who cover them love to acquaint politics to war but in this case it was about as literal as a metaphor can get rob knew exactly who elected him and he wanted to make it clear right away But he was on their side their side by the way was the one that you had to drive to get to ladies and gentlemen. I'm in the war on the car stops today. That was rob announcing the end of transit city which was a complicated plan plan that would have modernized Toronto Transit System. The war on the car was a long running scenario of ROB's and to him it was fought on three fronts. First Cyclists who annoyed rob. He thought they were clogging streets and causing accidents and even when as is usually happened. The people on the bike got the worst of those encounters. Rob's loyalty is where clear please for him. When I hear someone gets killed? But it's their own fault at the end of the day. The second front was streetcars. Rob Really hate it. STREETCARS and to understand why you need to. I Know How rob got to work every morning. See Rob was coming in from his suburban Toba go home to Toronto City Hall which was right in the heart of downtown and to do that he had to drive along busy city streets streets like Dundas and Dundas had cyclists and it also had streetcars. It only has two lanes and you can't pass streetcars when they're stopped with their doors. Open and streetcars. Stop almost every block and so rob on most days. This would find himself stuck behind a streetcar. Making Room. For cyclists trying to navigate kilometers of Dundas just to get to city hall and it infuriated fury Part of transit city involved building more. Streetcars so rob canceled. Transit City we will not build any more rail tracks down the middle of our streets. Transit is over ladies and gentlemen the Final Front in the war on the car car was fought in the city's budget lines the vehicle. Registration tax is exactly what it sounded like sixty five dollars super vehicle with the money funding road and transit projects but it was a tax and a tax that applied obviously only two car owners so rob ABC canceled it. I take marching orders from the tax payers and when they say jumped by saying how high the war on the car was not the only fight that rob was picking and most of those fights involved taxes see rob had promised at various times to eliminate or at least is significantly lower basically every tax except he'd also promised to run a functioning city and so he had to find someone to balance a budget legit. That was never ever going to balance and he found a man named Mike del Grande. Who you'll hear was eager to take the job and I said I? I really don't have a choice to be quite honest with you. I said I have to be your budget chair. I said not that I want it. I said but everything everything from downtown happens with money and you gotTa have somebody control the money and I said it's shitty worthless job terrible job. Mike invited us over to his home in Toronto's eastern when you walk inside Mike's home it's apparent that he believes that if something ain't broke don't fix it ever in. His hallway sits vacuum. It would fit on the set of the Brady Bunch. He's clearly someone who is good at saving money. New Rob from his days says a counselor and he was trusted by the Ford Brothers so he became the budget chair. Rob was very smart because rob said to me one of the things he he did say not the most bright saying but he said that he wanted to surround himself with good people because he knew rob is not a smart guy. Rob Is the Bulletin of China Shop Rob and Mike were mostly on the same page. They wanted to save the taxpayer money. They wanted to cut the waste at City Hall what they had different definitions of though was waste. The first time became evident was the fight over counselor Salaam salaries city councillors in the summer of two thousand twelve or expecting an increase of three percent in their pay and rob very publicly decided not to accept his and so did his brother Doug who had one rob's Old City Council seat in the election that made rob Maher Doug even even when as far as to claim he was donating his entire salary to charity rob and Doug's fight against their colleagues raises. Didn't sit sit well with Mike or as you might imagine anyone else on the council. 'cause I said to him I said rob I said it's really not fair We're a millionaire. And everybody's like this a regular job and stuff like that as well too and he turned to me and he said I said No. I'M NOT IS A. I'm poor than a church mouse and I thought to myself rob you're Fulla Shit. I'm not gonNA fight you but I know that's that's not true of this kind of fight over money. In the budget became a fairly regular occurrence. Rob wanted something done. Usually something cut or something frozen and someone had to tell him Wifi. That wasn't a great idea. Except by then he'd usually told people that he was going to cut that or freeze that and he certainly didn't want to be seen breaking promises but it would also become clear but he simply didn't have the votes to get those things done so when that happened well he'd leave it to Doug Rhonda like acute just literally. Leave it and leave. I only got into a couple of really big fights with him One of them had to do on the budget. He went down to Florida and I of course got left with doing all the work of stuff. And when you when you're doing stuff you got to know oh who you're dealing with on the floor because if you don't get the votes rob's only one vote. I'm only one vote Geoghegan twenty-three votes to make it happen. So I yeah I knew for example had to give up a quarter point of tax to keep the the other guys happy. Okay boy. He Torah Strip off of me when he came back from. Florida just went off the deep end and I thought like should I've been busted my chops for forever four and we're talking a quarter point to get this thing through and one minute. It's my budget than its his budget. Then it's my budget and I said I can't operate like this. I just can't killing myself and stuff and then this is the the payback at the end of the day. And I'm not making an extra dime for you'd Robin. I'm meeting with your staff and I'm doing all this stuff rob wasn't there. He wasn't around and I can understand. Why the hell is he like? Where's he going to? Where's rob was a question that started as a curious? Korea thing then became a troubling thing and eventually became a really big problem for the first few months after Rob's win he had been a regular Giller blustering face around city hall but as the calendar turned in twenty eleven began rob schedule got lighter. He was absent from meetings and from some on public events. Ms Schedule would sometimes have big gaps in it. That got worse as the year went on and by late twenty twelve. The mayor was is rarely seen at committee meetings. And sometimes he even docked public council meetings. It was becoming clear that there were things that were more important important to rob Ford then being mayor and yes some of those things are exactly what you think they are. But some of them aren't art. In fact one of the major reasons rob was missing from council was football. Here's Mike del Grande. Explaining Rob's heart was always in football all always in football. He was coaching football concealed. His Way and I said to him when he was the mayor said Rob. I said you gotTa make a decision decision. You gotTA choose you want to football or do you want to be the mayor of the city K.. Because if you WANNA do football in resign because we need a fulltime mayor and he thought he could do both because he would disappear he'd be late for council he'd be good going to do the the football stuff like he didn't have his eye on the ball he just you know assumed that people apple mature with those people were. We're going to look after things until he got back until he he did but not politics. Football was his true love. rubs other job was coaching at an tobacco high school named Don Bosco and he would leave City Hall to attend practices or arrive late because he'd been running them him and he absolutely would not miss a game and if that meant missing high level meetings. You'd Miss Him Doug Holiday. You might remember who had helped. The Ford Family into into the political game had been named deputy mayor in return for that and Doug Tried to talk to rob about this. He sometimes he baffled me at times. We're we're when he went to his football like we have executive committee and I'd have to take the chair is rob was gone. He gives off to his football and then the media would fall follow and they have picked him up at the football. And I just thought we you can't your mayor the city. You can't do these things you've got to be here this this your job up. This is what you got elected for. Not The football. I mean it's Nice. You want to support these kids and help these kids and I I. You know a lot of people think that's fine and I do too but you you have a job here and it's an important one and you just can't step aside coach. The kids football. When you've got important business matters here here at City Hall Football Cost Rob More than just some council meetings see rob loved football so much? He had set up a foundation to raise money for high school players when he was a counselor and he was so passionate about this foundation that he would talk about it to anyone who would listen and that meant sometimes lobbyists back when rob was a counselor. He had been found guilty of soliciting donations to his foundation from those lobbyists. The Integrity Commissioner had made multiple attempts to get rob to simply repay those donations. But he hadn't hadn't and that was bad but it still would have gone away if rob had just written a check at any point but he didn't and so during a council meeting the Integrity Commissioner presented her report that said she had made six attempts to have rob proof that he'd repaid the donations and rob couldn't let that slide. So we got up in council as mayor and spoke to it publicly and officially. It said that meeting that Rob Ford gets up and decides to speak to the issue And vote on it and Ultimately eventually gets himself into trouble you might remember Adam Chalice from episode two. He he had been on a crusade to keep robs public finances. Honest Adam had lost the first round over ROB's campaign finance irregularities but but he still wanted to prove that the mayor was messing with public money part of that was Adam sense of fairness but part of it as he freely admits. Let's was an attempt to tangle rob Ford and scandals to make it impossible for him to get things done. We had an understanding of who rubbed Ford really was and what he wanted to do. And you know Rob Ford made some absolutely outrageous campaign promises. But the overarching principle was. Let's make this this guy you know. Fight something else so that. He's not actually getting around doing the job that he wanted to do. which was to in our view like the city on fire And disintegrate the things things that I think make Toronto a great city And frankly it was working it would force Ford himself to comment on these things And it would you know further. Take him off his own message. So Adam found himself at City Hall Filing Audit Requests and sitting in on council meetings and by coincidence he he happened to be at that fateful. Meeting where ROB got up and council to make his case so he wanted to let everybody know how unfair it was that he was asked to pay and that decision to speak you know so clearly important to himself was what eventually did him in when he tried to argue. That it wasn't. Isn't that important that it was such a small amount of money and the principal was was so minor that the court should just look the other way on this one. He made it into a big thing. Himself Council voted on the issue and they voted twenty to twelve. The Rob should not have to repay those donations so it could have ended. Did there once again. Except one of those twenty two votes was rob's there was a A lawyer friend. Who called me not long after that to say did you notice that Rob Ford spoke about the The donations to football foundation. That looks like a conflict of interest to me. You might want to look into that so adamant his team did they. Recruited a third party applicant and they launched a case against Rob Ford so out. We argued that what you see is what you got that we have a city. Councillor who was on the hook for three thousand one hundred and fifty dollars lurs of his own money and was dead set against paying it He should have known what is obligations were because he had been serving for such a long time as a city council and then mayor and so-. RV was simple. You know he should not hold off any longer during the deposition and the trial. Rob's defense was interesting. He had been a city councilor for almost a decade and he just been elected mayor but he pled ignorance so the two thousand election of the two thousand. Three two doesn't six twenty ten Four elections after each election. You get handbook is a city councillor in your offered training on all of the rules being as he counselor. He says that he never really read the rules that he never participated in the sessions that he had the most basic understanding that if there was a conflict of interest just that Anybody was worried about that. The city's legal staff would let him know about it Even though he acknowledged that it was not city legal staff's responsibility to do that was his responsibility and he was proud. Might be the wrong word. You didn't seem ashamed by this. At all they just the lack of responsibility ability and all of that was was stunning. Adam had launched this case fully expecting rob to win it it was designed just to bog him down but when rob took the stand you was so bad that the courtroom audibly giggled at his testimony and then uh the decision came down guilty and kicked out of office a Provincial Judge Sands Mayor Rob Ford packing convicting him of blatantly breaching reaching a conflict of interest law. But Ford says he'll fight to stay so my birthday was right after the lower court decision came out and I wasn't planning on having a birthday party that year but then suddenly I was having a birthday party But yeah I mean the Justice Hackman suspended his decision for fourteen days in part to allow the city of Toronto to have a smooth transition But also you know it gave route forty chance to appeal and so the first question that the appeal court had deal with was was Would they stay the ruling bending their own decision and they said yes and so that gave reports extra time to remain mayor. Well the hearing was going on on and But everything move really quickly after that for something of this magnitude and the work required just two months after Adam Adam celebrated that birthday rob won the case on his appeal he went on a technicality. The judges said that the matter that he'd voted on never should have been brought before council at all so conflict of interest was impossible. I've heard through the grapevine. I have no idea if it's true or not but it's been so long that I feel like it's it's worth speculating But you know through the grapevine I had understood that the the appeal court was wholly uncomfortable with the idea of of the judiciary removing a duly elected official. And they were looking for some way to make sure that they weren't seeing to be overriding democracy as a method of maintaining people's public support for the court system. I I don't know Could be one way or the other but they found a way it was legitimate and so you got to continue. After that rob remained the mayor of Toronto. Adam went back to the drawing board and in November number of two thousand twelve. The Don Bosco Eagles were flattened twenty eight to fourteen in the metro bowl by the Huron Heights warriors. So football season season was over but rob was still nowhere to be found at City Hall and as twenty thirteen began people. We're really starting to whisper. I mean you think kids in kindergarten gossip. You should try being in government sometime there. Were sure I guess some rumblings from staff that there were there were some problems a lot of people saying that they felt. He was drunk that that he had been seen later in the evenings drinking his office we knew he really liked tortured. Hard living hard drinking. But we didn't know whether it was a dependency dependancy or whether it was a weekend kind of thing and you heard about these incidents with with Ford out on the town and there would be like some chatter about it. I would come in early. And and so you know. I found Bala Vodka. I found a couple bottles of wine that ramp. They talked about finding empty alcohol bottles in his office. They talked about him clearly. Being drunk at evening events I mean there will always was denial the Nile from his brother denial from his family. Denial Denial Denial Rob's term as mayor had begun two years ago with a flurry of declarations and orders and policy action. You might not have fully understood the intricacies of executing the office. But he knew what what he wanted to do. He was rewarding his supporters with the red meat. He had promised you'd also made enemies and he'd been frustrated by the Resistance of council and the limits placed on his powers and things stopped getting done and rob stopped showing up to work I now his schedule was as then as it had ever been. He was only meeting with his allies on the council and according to reporting and the Toronto Star the most common item on his his itinerary was private time and that couldn't go on for long before the general public started to notice that something was wrong with the mayor. One of the Great Things About Rob Ford is. He's extremely recognizable. Jonathan Golsby was at the time a reporter at a weekly Alternative Alternative Newspaper in Toronto called the grid and among local journalists he was an early adopter when it came to using social media to report on municipal politics and as he did that he started to see Rob Ford everywhere. You know from the front back side. His voice ace everything about him very recognizable And so when he would go somewhere or do something pretty much regardless of what it was if it was in public or Arthur released other people around people would share that people would tweet about it. People would post instagram. And so because he was so recognizable because he's like this beacon floating around the city you to an extent retrace his movements simply by a searching certain terms on twitter. Ford's office was notoriously secretive about his schedule. And so most of the time the media didn't know where the mayor was and Gold B began tracking him down on twitter and reporting it in the grid. The mayor you see was notorious for taking pictures with people everywhere. He went and the mayor was famous so people would post the pictures on twitter and instagram. So being the Internet junkie he is gold be would hunt through lists of searches for terms. That might not him photos of rob and he. He found photos of rob lots of them. And what I discovered is also his drinking habits if you want to buy hard liquor and Toronto Ontario you only have one option officially chilly. It's called the Liquor Control Board of Ontario. Unofficially it's the L. C. B. L.. And it has stores everywhere in the province and all those stores worse look the same. They have the same core same cash registers sandwich and so if you're searching social media for photos of Mayor Rob Ford and you start to see the same decor and so many of the backgrounds of those pictures. There are certainly certain patterns of you've what nights of the week times the night. He was out and other photos of him where it had been clear he had been drinking if not doing other Thing and yeah that will come up for a politician or any public figure now and again charted pretty clearly irregularity to golds be began collecting these posts and publishing them an segment and the grid called the Rob Ford Agenda and as the posts built tap and people got to know them people took more pictures and their frequency started to grow even more suspicious. There will often be a correlation between how well or how well or how poorly things went for him at City Council and they given day and him hitting up and Al Cbo and then being seen late at night. One of those particularly memorable nights involved rob running into a Bachelorette party there. Six women in the photo with him younger hunger probably in their release mid twenties a couple of them have pink boas a couple them have some sort of like pink fluffy and Tanai on their heads and and he is in the center of the of the picture looking totally wasted His shirt he's not wearing a tie. His jackets open their stains on his shirt could just be sweat. But they're definitely they actually. Here's what period sweat stains than another larger stain below. Oh his eyes appear to be closed and vaguely staring in the direction of the Bachelorette and he's holding a what looks to be a blue liquor bottle as well as some magazine or publication. Same hand May Not be a liquor bottle. It's very possible. Also quite possible is like a slurpee or something because he would also get those but Yeah so that's the. That's that's that photo. Throughout this time time. Robs office continued to publish his schedule but it was becoming pretty clear that it was no longer an accurate picture of where he was or what he was doing. And even when he did include events on it but he was attending he would often show up to those events late or miss them entirely entirely. And nobody would tell you where the mayor was. It all started the fit one larger pattern of What you started to know or figure figure out about him but what does he actually do during the day? 'cause he didn't show up till the office told the midday most of the time it often be out late at night Is staffed always know where he was and as it turned out the most effective way to to figure this out it was to comb the Internet as Gold's be was diving deep into social media trying to figure out the mayor's whereabouts other scandals had been just kind of piling up not even really noticed a lot like the scandals during his campaign in October. Twenty eleven for example and this is just one of them. A Canadian comedian named Mary. Walsh from a show called this hour has twenty. Two minutes came to ROB's house. She was dressed in character up bizarre character as part of an ongoing princess warrior bed there. She simply approach politicians or high profile Canadians and try to provoke a reaction or get them to play along. It's really harmless. It's me you know I gave up all the all Princess Warrior stuff and I came up to give you a hand. Hunting Rub was not going to play along with Mary to come to my home at eight o'clock in the morning. Little girls crying in the windows. Come on the line rather than just smile for the camera or wave her off rob ran back in the house and picked up phone. Well he got upset about it and his daughter was scared so they ran inside the house and he called nine one one. When you call nine one one? He explained what was happening and the dispatcher. Asher told him okay. We're sending someone over. Don't worry ten minutes later. No one shows up and rob Ford is limited. So he calls back and he tells the woman quote you bitches riches. Don't you fucking no. I'm ROB fucking King Ford. The mayor of this city those are the kind of scandals that had come and gone around rob for the previous two years a few months after the Mary Walsh Bet nine one one was called again from the Ford House. His inlaws the calling to report. That rob was drunkenly trying to drive his children to the airport to take them to Florida for the holiday. There were other nine one one calls to it would later become clear but there was one scandal and particular at everybody inside. City Hall seem to know about nobody outside city hall at heard about almost nobody but it was really the the big thing. The big specific thing that was is an open secret in political media roles was around his antics on Saint Patrick's Day two thousand twelve. I didn't see him walk in but from the rumors come around staff members and other people speaking seemed like he was already in pretty rough shape. That's Leeann Varo. You was a busboy at the beer market. Which is a big upscale downtown? Toronto pub on Saint Patrick's Day in two thousand twelve was about midnight. The kitchen was closing up for the night but a special guest sitting in one of the restaurants. Private rooms wanted a snack. My manager comes to me and says Rodney's Boutin because you you know I'm guessing he's really hungry at at this point but nobody was there because the kitchen was already closed so my manager himself actually had to make the Putin for him and so once he did that gave it to me and obviously we had our main security guy standing there so in order to ensure nobody would walk in randomly As he opened the curtain. That's when I first saw immediately. Rob Ford He was bent over towards awards. This woman's hand and right then and there. I just heard an immediate sniff. And then he kinda just drew his head back and just gave like a SI- I didn't actually see any of the drugs but from experience of you know seeing people do these things you just automatically assume these things from there. There was an awkward silence once I walked in obviously because everyone had just noticed realized that maybe maybe saw something that I shouldn't have and an awkward way of doing it. I basically said. Here's your routine so leo turned around to leave and one of ROB staff members grabbed his arm. He asked him who he was what his name was and then he says. Okay Leo Thank you for Your Service and what you've done here today but here's my business card We would absolutely appreciate it if you didn't say there were about what you saw here tonight and just give me a call anytime and We'll we'll try and figure something out for you so basically it was a bribe. I guess you could say in a way and to be honest at that moment in time when I saw what I thought I saw. I wasn't entirely sure so I mean had this guy maybe not stop me and give me his business card. I don't think I would have even thought twice. It's about telling anybody about it but because of the way they reacted to me seeing what I saw is what I think gave up up the impression that he was doing drugs at the time. It is here that I have to mention that Leo Navarro worked on George George Smitherman Merrill campaign which could potentially call his story into question however based on reporting I'm from numerous outlets and based on police documents that would later become public. We know a little bit about what rob was doing that night. I'm going to re day compilation of the events that transpired some of them. Allegedly some of them confirmed in court all of them pointing to a mayor who started partying. Early stay late was out of control. ROBINA staff headed to the beer market after pre partying drinking at the mayor's office office on his way to the bar rob allegedly called the taxi driver a Paki and mocked his accent while partying at the beer. Market staff eventually got sick of ROB's belligerence and asked him to leave so he and his staff headed back to city hall to of his staff members. Who are with him that night? Where Isaac ransom and Olivia Gandak? Isaac ransom would later report that he heard rob tell Olivia. I'm going to eat you out and I banged your pussy. Staff Concerned for rob at one point unplugged. His phone rob turned to one of his. Staffers told him I hate you and shoved him down onto the office couch at two thirty. A M Rob Ford stumbled down to the City Hall Security Desk. Ask carrying a half empty bottle of Saint remmy French brandy. He told the security guard but he wanted to drive home but his car had been stolen stolen. He asked the guard to call the police. The Guard reminded rob that he had not driven there. Isaac ransom again reported later. That Rob told all day female security guard. He was going to eat her box. Another staffer got rob into a cab. took him back to his house and a tobacco once they arrived rob said that he wanted to go out again and he backed out of his driveway in his own car. Almost ran over his staffer. Nobody but he heard from rob for almost twenty four hours and for a long time. The story of this night was closely kept secret in City Hall circles and in media circles because nobody could report it because nobody could confirm anything one year later though there was a very similar incident. It's a black tie event so Everyone's dressed very fancy and And it was kind of set up you know as you would expect. Act like a big fancy wedding this tables and and you were assigned to table to sit out and we are assigned a table with people. We didn't know the garrison ball is an annual dinner held in Toronto. It's attended by eight hundred military personnel soldiers sailors air force and a few civilians. The ball raises money money for the wounded warriors charity and it's billed as an evening of pageantry income rotary. It's a big deal in Toronto and this particular dinner was held hold on Saturday February. Twenty third twenty thirteen at the Liberty Grand Ballroom near Toronto's waterfront guests at the event included the Minister of National Defence Fence. The chief of defence staff and the commander of the Royal Canadian Navy and one of the active military personnel attending. The ball was navy commander. Nancy sexual who you just heard. Nancy couldn't say a word about this when the story exploded because military personnel aren't allowed to talk to the media but Nancy is retired. Now we're sitting at our table and I mean there are lots of dignitaries there the Chief-of-staff Defense Officer. The head of the Navy was there the minister national fence. Which is Peter Mackay? was there There are all sorts of people there and And then it it's like oh my Gosh here come's Rob Ford and he was kind of been bowling along with his one of his aides And then the speech is going to start and And Peter Mackay. He was giving his speech so they were trying to get him to sit down and sort of like get him under control What do you mean by get them under control? Well he was he was he was very impaired us very very intoxicated. When you say he was impaired how can you tell? Well I mean is that like the classic signs like rosy cheeks and sweaty which. Maybe that's might be natural state but sort of Glassy eyes and slurred speech. And not. I don't WanNA see trouble standing. But he was the bits dumbly so the Minister of Defense I was giving his speech. Rob was next to Nancy's table and his staff was having a hard time keeping him quiet And and he was going on. Hey picture he was happy to get pictures with everyone and And you know I got a picture And then they were just is trying to because he was just going on talking and sort of not aware that there were some formal speeches going on the the event so they came and actually sat down like sort of true three seats away from me at our table and he was still sorta talking through throughout the speeches a little bit and he'd sat down at someone's spot and then they went and move somewhere else and while he was sitting there. He grabbed their wine glass. That was full. Insert just like drinking from someone else's wind glass when they were there and and just sorta carrying on and when this redone. That's when we got our pictures with them And then he took off. Did you see him after he After you took a picture I didn't see him after the picture I think they took him off Somewhere else. One of the event's organizers had noticed that Rob Ford was intoxicated executed and they told counselor Paul Ainslie to see if they could get him out of there without a fuss. But Rob didn't leave. You stayed and that's that's when he had his drink at Nancy's table. According to reports Ainsley then went to speak with mark to Rob's chief of staff at the time and urged to to convince the mayor to leave to he denies this and I should add that we tried to talk to him and he refused. He said he had already said everything he wanted to say in his book. But his time with Rob Nancy meanwhile describes the efforts to get rob Outta there and then his aide came and said you know gave us occurred and said you know if there's anything American ever do for you and I was like well. I just live in Toronto. I don't think there's not really looking for anything in particular from there but it was mark too. We had this fancy business cards mishandling the mountains and and going on so we were just kind of like what just happened. There could just seem a little bit weird that you know. The mayor of this giant city was at this very public event where there lots of high profile and lots of hope high profile conservatives as well the event and And he was he was he was pretty far gone. You were there with your husband. Yes yeah you guys talk about it on the way home. Well we totally did. Yeah Yeah we totally did and and he was just. I can't believe you've got a picture of that like that was crazy But Yeah we talked about and we talked about it like you know it was. It was a topic for quite a while after. It's an even put a picture of myself and Mr Ford up on facebook and I said you know there ain't no party like Rob Rob Ford Party. After years of whispers and rumors and two and a half years of Rob Ford as mayor all of his behavior. The garrison ball incident the beer market the nine one one call on Christmas Day of two thousand eleven. All of it was made public by a reporter named Robin doolittle and the Toronto Star on March Twenty Six twenty thirteen finally arrest of the city would learn what people at City Hall were already said about there. I remember not sleeping the night before I remember. We're hearing the newspaper. Hit My door in the morning And it just you know. It was the longest thing I've ever worked on on that point. Think it was a few days as later. I know it was April fool's morning. My God is calling my cell phone number. I didn't recognize and that was this guy. Saying I have a video of Rob Ford Smoking crack. Do you WanNa see it and VAT is next time on the gravy train. The gravy train is hosted and written by me Jordan Heath rallies it has produced an edited and the whole thing is stitched together by analyst Nielsen and Stephanie Phillips Does also co-produced as

rob Rob Ford Toronto City Hall ROB Toronto Rob Nancy rob Maher Doug rob ABC rob I Ford football Florida City Council Toronto Star government Mike del Grande Adam Adam City Hall Football Ford Family Nick Kouvelas
Why Torontos transit problem never, ever gets solved

The Big Story

22:43 min | 1 year ago

Why Torontos transit problem never, ever gets solved

"Hey, it's Jordan, and I've podcast for you. Commons is Canada's most popular podcast about politics last season. They tried to answer the question how corrupt is Canada this time around. They're investigating our national addiction oil the currency's and featuring host Arshi man is called crude. And it's about Canada's relationship with the oil industry. The good the bad the ugly and the weird you'll find Commons wherever you get your podcasts. So go check it out. This has been a very unpleasant day for the and the TC writer. Like the third day. I'm just tiredness. I well, maybe not I but a while back. There was transit city. It was an ambitious project to use light rail to solve Toronto's ever-worsening transit problem. Then an election happened, and it was replaced by subways lots of subways want subways folks, they want subways subways subways seriously that sums up the entire plan. Ben an election happened, and there was smart track or a downtown relief line or across town L RT. And it honestly depends on who you ask. And when you ask them how much it will cost when it will be ready, and what it will eventually be called. And now while on taros premier is very excited. I'll tell you. I was so excited about this announcement. I didn't even sleep last night. Barely. Yes. There is a new transit plan for Toronto a brand new one, and this one will be cheaper and faster, and definitely better and less. It's not failed transit plans are something of a thing in Canada's largest city, and by thing, I mean perverse running joke transit city might not be so far away that it's being forgotten. But do you remember the Queen Street subway plan, you probably don't it was in nineteen forty two. But about network twenty eleven that was a brainchild of the late eighties Toronto's. First subway was proposed about nineteen o nine and its first subway opened in nineteen fifty four if you want to get a sense of how quickly. These things move. Meanwhile, on the TC things get worse by the day. Extreme crowding hundreds of people pushing up narrow staircases only to hurt their way onto a dangerously packed platform. Illegal little ridiculous. It's a nightmare. How did Toronto end up here? Why have none of the plans proposed for the city's biggest problem one? That everyone across the political spectrum acknowledges as a huge concern, ever, fully materialized. What is the next step here? What does Doug Ford's plan mean? And how close are we getting to the worst case scenario? Jordan, heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Wouldn't you look back through the history of Toronto transit, certainly you understand the frustration. That people have when they look at the state of Toronto transit moment. Karachi is the city hall reporter for six eighty news for folks who either don't live in Toronto, or who are lucky enough to not need public transit in the city, you kind of describe because you work at a News Radio station that's on the air every single morning. Can you kind of describe what it's like in rush hour in Toronto today. Boy, you know it. It depends a lot on where you are coming from. But pretty much any line on the subway lines are pretty crowded during the rush hour. So even if you're taking the Scarborough RT, which is very old at this point in rickety. If you're taking the young university line in particular is really really packed up. You know, if you try to catch the train on the young line anywhere between like shepherd through to Eglinton law. Lawrence. You know, all the way down to York mills all that whole stretch there. It's packed. It's absolutely packed in the heart of rush hour. It's you have to wait for multiple trains to go buy sometimes before you can finally get on and then in particular at young bluer station, which is the epicenter of the the big change station. That is getting dangerous at points where the peak of rush hour the platform is so full that some people have raised concerns about possible dangers of standing on those platforms and the has put out a report saying by twenty thirty in the past previously. Yo Andy Byford it said by twenty thirty that's sort of the the the point where they have to have some sort of solution for young ler station or does become quite dangerous. So there are certainly parts of the lines which are so packed that they need to find solutions and find them relatively quickly. So what happened Wednesday? What is Toronto's newest subway plan? So we just we should take. Back because we know that since Doug Ford is elected premier last year that he had this idea to upload and take control the subways, which is still in process. They're still having those discussions, but we also knew that he wanted to make some kind of sweeping changes to what Tronto transit looks like he has some big ideas and some big things that he wants to do some of the stuff that he wanted to do. And he was here as a counselor and his late brother was the mayor. And so now that he's premier he has that power to be able to throw in these types of things. And so what we saw was some real changes to some of the existing plans that Toronto had namely on the downtown relief line which they've decided to call the Ontario line now. So that line initially was supposed to go from pave station down curved through and go down to Queen station, and the whole purpose of that line is to take pressure off of the younger station that we had talked about which was reaching capacity. So that people from Scarborough wouldn't have to go all the way across the young lawyer. And then change go down. They can conceivably get off at Pape. And then take a line. That into the core of downtown. But what the premier announced that they want to extend that lines the line hasn't even gotten anywhere close to construction, but they want to extend it so that it goes up to where the Terio science center is down through pap- across through Queen. And then all the way down to Ontario place, which is something that hadn't ever been discussed at never been broached here on the floor of council chambers or any the city planners. So that's really the most significant change. But it also came with lots of other changes. So he wants to switch. The Scarborough subway extension, which was initially or at least what council had approved and was going to go forward with try to procure construction later on this year and move forward that plan was one stop just go straight from Kennedy station to Scarborough town centre. And now the premier has switched it to a three stop subway Lawrence east Scottown center mccowan now, that's what his brother had proposed. When he was mayor here. He tried to switch it council. Switched away from that. For a number of reasons, they had a number of concerns, and that was also supposed to be coupled with an Eglinton east L RT, but that was nowhere to be seen in the. Discussion today the seller. So those are sort of the two big things there is also a bit about the Eglington west which was going to be an L RT under the city's plans they want to bury that and make that a subway. There was also talk of extending it all the way to the airport. So there are certainly lots of things lots of lines drawn on a map, which we've seen before in terms of people showing up lines on a map, but this map had a lot of lines. That changed significantly some of the plans that the city had made some of them were brand new which would reshape the way Toronto transit exists. How often do we hear of a new transit plan? And how often does that transplant actually materialize? Well, I've been covering city hall for about five and a half almost six years, and in my time here, the only plan that I've seen come to fruition is the young university spina subway extension that went up to your university and beyond into von that was under construction for several years in my time here at city hall. There's been lots of debates about transit, you know, namely in Scott. Abro? There was the L RT which was switched to the subway extension. Which was then switched to the one. Stop subway extension. Plus, a Eglinton east L RT that was supposed to go to UT. And then there's other things that are talked about a lot. So downtown relief line waterfront. So there's so many different transit projects, which are always being talked about at the city level of government, which I think is the norm for a lot of cities. But it's always a very slow very stage gated process of which usually take several years before shovels, even go into the ground. What happens to transit in a city when plans switch every election or every couple of years. So when the province had begun talking about uploading and taking control of the subway system. What a lot of people were raising concerns about in this building when it came to city councillors, and the mayor among many things of raising concerns about, but it seemed like the biggest thing that people were concerned about was the possibility of delays, and even though the province and the premier and minister uric, the minister of transportation, we're saying look, there's gonna be no delays. The fact of the matter is that if you re starting to transit plan, or if you try to amend it to significant changes to it that you have to kind of go back to the drawing. Board for big parts of it and that can cause major delays in. So the plan that has come forward reshaping the Scarborough subway extension could come with some significant delays the way they've looked at the downtown relief line. They would have to go back to some of the planning stages and redo some stuff. So the problem. One of the biggest problems that Toronto has faced in terms of building transit is that the reimagining of lines the re drawing of things the pitching things on council chambers floors or different meetings is that it can cause delays, and it can push these plans back and back and back and the actual seeing transit come to fruition is one of the things that suffer is initially the plan in Scarborough was to build a fully funded paid for by the province, seven stop L RT to replace these Scarborough subway extension, and then then mayor rob Ford said no I want to switch it to three stop subway. And then city council say well, what if we the plan was brought forward at city council that would if we switch that from three stop subject to a one stop subway, but we include. A multiple stop Eglinton east L RT that goes to UT now if they had stuck with the initial plan to build that seven stop L RT, it would already be under construction right now and potentially be a few years away from being completion. And giving people in the far east end of Scarborough, the transit that they've so desperately you've been craving. But instead we're still in process of discussions and construction hasn't even begun on. This Scarborough subway extension, the image of lines on a map continually like being redrawn. Is the one that I can't get away from when we when we do these announcements and photo ops. You've been at city hall for a few years, but you've also been around Toronto daily news for a long time. Do you remember transit city? Yeah. Absolutely. How far have we gotten away from that? And what kind of evolution or de-evolution evolution? I guess has happened since then. Yeah, transit city for those who don't know was a plan that existed under mayor, David Miller had all these again lines on a map, many of them were L RT's, and it was. Supposed to be this big transit expansion across the city. And then when rob four became mayor. They kind of scrapped it and went in a different direction. And it is one of those things again where they had a transit plan to head unapproved transit plan. They were going to go forward with it. And then somebody comes along pitches. A change council that's on board. And you kind of go forward, and these are the steps, and this is part of what you know. The premier has been very critical of the way trauma city council has been stagnant. I don't think it's fair to say they've been stagnant. In in building transit because I'm here, and I know people maybe who aren't involved with the process can only look from the outside and say, oh, they're doing nothing. But that's not true. Because you know, I've been at TD board meetings. I've been at executive committee meetings. I've been at city council meetings where they do discuss and approve different stages of Toronto transit. So whether it's the downtown relief line to Scarborough subway, different parts of different L RT's for different lines buses streetcars city council does work on getting those things done, but they are very slow moving. But the slow moving for a reason because. You have to do environmental assessments. You have to financial analysis. You have to do procurements to get people to build it and get the land and all that kind of stuff. So that stuff does happen over time. But there's no question that wouldn't you look back through the history of Toronto transit, you think all like so much of transit city potentially could have been built up by now that Clinton subway line that was cancelled in the nineties would have been opened by now there's different you know, that Scarborough L RT could have been pretty close to completion by now. So certainly you understand the frustrations that people have when they look at the state of Toronto transit. You also mentioned that the premier's late brother mayor rob Ford, how to plan that has since like so many other plans kind of gone by the wayside. But it speaks to the relationship between this premier and the city council in Toronto that John Tory wasn't at the press conference that announced this new subway plan. Can you kind of expand on that? What what is that relationship lake? And how does it impact a decision like? This. Yeah. I mean, it's certainly very interesting so premier Ford was a city councillor here for four years. It was the four years that his late brother. Rob Florida's mayor. Everybody knows about the story of what rob Ford's tenure was like here, you know, he had some substance abuse problems. He had some serious issues that he had to deal with went away for rehab and during that time, even before the scandal broke, you know, it was kind of mayor Ford counselor for against the world's in some instances here on the floor of council when they tried to push their agenda, certainly become a little bit more competitive a little bit more feisty inside council chambers. The decorum kind of fell apart a little bit in certain instances. So when when councillor Ford walked away from here after those four years, he chose not to run for reelection. And then his actually he did sorry run for a for mayor when his brother got cancer, and he decided to run for counselor in Doug ran for mayor. And then he lost to John Tory. Rub war came back as a counselor until he passed away from cancer a couple of years into his term as councillor and its many people feel that the premier still holds a little bit ill will against the council that he wasn't happy about the way he was treated the way his brother was treated here. And that a lot of the moves he's making, you know, you look back to last summer when he shrunk the size of council with the snap of a finger down to twenty five members from windows supposed to go up to forty seven a lot of people felt that that was a personal vendetta. And that that's why the premier did it in other premium has never said that publicly he's denied that publicly. But a lot of people here inside city hall some counselors of believed that it was because of a vendetta, and then the moves that are being made. Now when it looks when it comes to transit, many believe that this is premier Ford trying to also be mayor of Toronto and kind of big time or Bigfoot the city with these decisions that he's making now the decisions he's making could well prove to be beneficial for the city some of them at least in the long run if he actually. Is able to build this downtown relief line. Let's say in eight years or get all these things accomplished in the long run. It may look to be beneficial. But you know, it's hard to say because these decisions for planning transit, which usually are done over long. Periods of time in heavy consultation with city planners, and financial experts and environmental experts. There's questions as to whether any of that was even done with this new plan. So there's a lot of history, and the mayor not being there at the news conference was very interesting because number one he was left in the dark. He says he didn't know about any of the details of what was going to happen that he didn't want to go because he didn't know what the specifics were of this plan. And he didn't wanna be there on camera looking like he endorsed the plan if he didn't endorse it because he didn't know what it was. But at the same time would also kind of looks bad is if there were other mayors were there, you know, the mayor of Markham was there. They believed the mayor of Burlington was there. There was other mayors they're on site. So that also looks a little peculiar at least that mayor Tori, wasn't there. But other mayors from other jurisdictions where. There with the premier kind of leading more to is there friction. Now, the premier says there isn't the mayor says there isn't they say, look, we have conversations all the time. Everything's fine. We're working together we need to work together. But there's no question that there is a little bit of I dunno tension or unease or friction or there's something there where you know, that history there is built up because they did remember go head to head to run for mayor in in two thousand fourteen you're at city hall today. Mayor toria side, what's the general feeling and sense there about the future of the city's transit plans being announced nowhere near where all the counselors are. Yeah. So I've spent a lot of my day kind of going around and talking to different counselors getting the feeling. I mean, it depends on who you ask. I would say it's fair to say that most counselors are looking at it with a bit of skepticism maybe cautiously a little optimistic by what they see on the lines. But you know, a lot of them worked with Doug Ford when he was here. They. What he's like they know what his history is like, so they're not really buying into it. I guess the best clip of the day is to councillor. Gord perks. And the first thing I asked him was, you know, what do you what what's your take away? From seeing the premier's announcement. He said to me mentioned takeaway is a group of high school students with a box of crayons could have done better. So you know, he was very not happy with what he saw. I talked to counselor. Josh Matt low who is normally very critical afford and said, look I like some of what I saw I like the idea behind the downtown relief line with the on -tario line. I like the idea of them building in eight years, but I'm super skeptical. I think it's good to be skeptical is what he told me to wonder whether they can actually do this. And he said, you know, the thing with Ford that you have to remember is he doesn't have to upload and take control of the subways. He can literally just say here's the money go build the subways. It doesn't have to be done this way at a chance to talk to counselor. Brad Bradford who is a former city planner for the city of Toronto. So he's very experienced in this kind of thing, and he has been tapped by miratory to be sort of the champion of the relief line to make sure that the relief. Gets built. And he said look his experience as a city planner is that this isn't how transit gets built that you are supposed to do heavy consultations and talk to city planners and talk to people who do environmental work and talk to people in different departments and really methodically plantings out. And he said if the premier is able to build this transit line this downtown relief line on -tario line within eight years. It'll be unprecedented. But he says, you know, if it can happen, it'd be great, but he certainly has questioned. So I think a lot of counselors here are skeptical about what they saw a, but maybe wanting to be able to be pulled off. But they just aren't sure if we'll be able to and there is a lot of questions that they have about where they'll stations will go. What this new technology is how will it look? And a big one is how much money will the city of Toronto have to put in for this. They don't know yet not as a podcast house now. But as a Torontonian, I will take better transit from whoever province city federal government wants to give it to me. But how likely is it that I'm actually going to see this plan as it was outlined be the way that this city finally clears some of the log jam. I mean, I understand why all those counselors are skeptical. I think your sentiment there is something that a lot of people in this city and in the GTE share. And you've heard the mayor say before you hear the premier say people really don't care who whether the city builds a transit line with the city owns a transit line with the province builds a transit line with the province owns a chain that line or whether the federal government does it. They don't care. They just wanna see those lines on a map become real and beyond those subways on those streetcars on those L RT's. But the problem is that it takes years to build those out. Right. But you have to have a council and a government. That's a gonna come with the funding beat be politically committed to making it happen. You want you are as a person who lives in the city, you should hope that it's done responsibly that they build out the lines that are data supported so what certain areas of the city need that. They're not going. Oh, willy nilly that. There's ridership numbers that back it up and that they're done properly, and you know, our expedited with under the right channels. But as to whether you will see exactly the way things have been mounted. I mean who knows who knows you know. I think if you see some representation of it a lot of people will be satisfied that they can ride those lines. But I mean, even the what they showed the Ontario line didn't have stations mapped out on it because they don't know where they're gonna go. So that is all subject to change, you know. And then there's the things like the Eglinton west subway line. That's something the city's looked into before. And they found that it wasn't the right thing. And that's why they chose L RT's. So that's all subject to change. You know? So I don't think you'll see exactly what is laid out there today. But will you see some semblance of it? I think most people certainly hope so, but you know, I've been covering city hall and Queens Park long enough to just say, you never say never in that we I don't know what tomorrow holds. So I don't know. I'm gonna. Hold my breath for it moment. Starting right now. Yeah, that's probably a good idea. I just just to add something in, you know, something that was really interesting the premier in. His remarks was very critical of Toronto city council, and it's you know, reluctance to build trans inability to build transit, but he was kind of doing it in a way where he was that's them in. This is me, but he kind of washed over the fact that he was a member of that council for four years, and that his brother was a member of that council for four fourteen sixteen years, you know, whether it was as a counselor. So he can't wash his hands completely of what happened at city council, and sort of be critical of them and pretend to not have at least a little bit of connection to that history. He was here for a while his brother was here for a long time. And so they were part of that now whether he's able to remedy that and get all this transit built a at this point only time will tell. Thanks moment. Thank you, Jordan anytime. Moment. Crush city hall reporter, six eighty news. You're stuck way for the TC six eighty Scott. You covered was a free plug. I was also the big story for more from us. Visit the big story podcast dot CA. Find all of our stories there hit us up with a suggestion of what we should cover next. You can also get us at the big story F PIN on Twitter and at frequency pods on Twitter on Facebook and Instagram, but mostly we're wherever you get your podcast. We're on apple and Google and Stitcher and Spotify. You can leave us a rating, you can leave us a review, and you can tell your friends. Thanks for listening. I'm Jordan heath Rollings. We'll talk tomorrow.

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CBS 2 News AM News Update 06-26-20

CBS2 News Chicago

01:00 min | Last month

CBS 2 News AM News Update 06-26-20

"From the CBS newsroom Mugabe here the top stories. We're following this morning today. All of Illinois including Chicago moves into phase. Four meaning movie theaters can reopen. An indoor dining can resume, but with the reopening comes a warning that at any time we could be forced to go back. If there's a surge in new cases, these four also means parks in Illinois second biggest city can reopen today Aurora reopens all city. Parks and even some playground equipment will get. Get routine cleanings. And of course you're encouraged to wear masks this morning. At eleven thirty, a number of black LGBTQ, groups planned to protest together in front. Of City Hall they want the Chicago. Department of Public Health to expand funding for black lead community service agencies, especially to fund more testing and services for people living with HIV your forecast active day during the afternoon and evening with a chance of severe storms from the CBS. Newsroom I'm Mugo Od, Guay.

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CBS3 NEWS PM NEWS UPDATE 06/18/20

CBS3 Eyewitness News Philadelphia

00:51 sec | Last month

CBS3 NEWS PM NEWS UPDATE 06/18/20

"I'm just ca-car and here today CBS three eyewitness news headlines this morning, Pennsylvania lawmakers and federal officials gathered in City Hall to buy partisan legislation in the Senate. The proposal would outlaw the standard chokehold or any action that obstructs breathing or the flow of blood to the brain leaders of the democratic. Party in Philadelphia gathered to discuss the current racial tension in the city, former and current. Current elected officials in clergy members discussed the protests over the killing of George. Floyd and the clashes recalls to remove the Christopher Columbus Statue from Marconi Plaza unemployment numbers continue to rise one and a half million Americans filing for unemployment last week. I'm just kick our Talia. Be Sure to follow us on facebook and twitter at CBS Philly. We'll see you later tonight on eyewitness news.

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Ep. 80: Nick Cave and the Art of Chicago

Chicago Stories

27:08 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 80: Nick Cave and the Art of Chicago

"You're listening to Chicago stories a podcast from city hall, featuring the stories of everyday Chicagoans and special guests as told to mayor Rahm Emanuel. This is mayor Rahm Emanuel. Chicago stories were with world famous artists Nick cave who just did a beautiful station Garfield station in Chicago on the south side. What was the inspiration for that station? I think the inspiration sort of came from a number of things was Eunice not just putting a work of art in the station. But it's you know, the ideas or sort of incorporated within the architecture that was a real sort of interesting way of working, but then it was really own stats perspective of that part of the south side in looking at the parks and the landscape set the first project you've ever done with the city on a public works as anybody else any other city. Where you've done either a library or museum or or park district facility now nothing permanent. So you've done installations. Oh, yeah. I kind of like. Yeah. Capital type thing investment type thing you, and this is really sort of a phony phone call when we called over and said, we'd like you to do now because I know Lee, well, we've been doing a number of things there. But I think it was really sort of also, you know, that was the entry into the sort of world's fair the the expo eighteen extra. The sort of transportation to get there. And I loved that whole idea that, you know, this is an immersive installation. So it's not that you once you come out the train, you're like in this experience. And so that was really important. Also the way that I work in terms of my sort of connection with floral and pattern, and how do you how do you? How do you sort of welcome one coming to the station to go into the city as well as coming back home, and they have the sort of amazing sort of transition sort of space. You know, some people think I've lost my mind in the sense of making art in almost now eight months stages. I'm it's never that is gold standard. I'm not sure we're ever going to replicate or be able and it's it's it's my daughter before she goes back to school wants to go see it. So. Yeah. Yeah. So let me I read in your background you worked with Alvin Ailey. You don't know my background? I had a scholarship to the Joffrey ballet. Oh, really? Yeah. So how did I doesn't every mayor have background with Jaffe? So how how do you think Alvin Ailey in dance as a form influences your work today and Muniz Elvin as one of the great dancers and companies United States worldwide. What what did you learn there? And how did you think it influences your work today as an artist, you know, I think that it influences my work in sort of two major ways and one is how I look at space. Unite look at spaces. I would look at the way in which one coral Griffey's of work can how does the audience entered the space what is that encounter? What are they surrounded by? What is the rhythm of how things sort of fit and flow together? And so it all becomes part of this sort of inaccurate kind of sort of experience and the other part is performance. You know, I do a lot of performance work in particularly with the sound sued said do a lot of work. Throughout the entire world where we will bring fifty performance suits. And then we will build the performance working with the community. What was the background to the sound sued? I've read before it had to do with the Rodney King. Yeah. You know, it was really sort of my sort of response to the Rodney King verdict in ninety two in that was the first time that we I saw anything recorded too. And just the impact of that alone was just overwhelming. And so it was really meet sort of you know, trying to sort of put the pieces together. And I happened to be in the park one day grant park sitting and I looked down on the ground. And there was a twig and that twig was the catalyst for the first sound too. I started to collect all the twigs in the park because that twigs sort of represented, you know, what does it feel like to fill? Carded less than dismissed if I started collect all the twigs went home built this sculpture. But didn't realize I could put it on the moment that I put it on and started to move it made sound, and so that's how sounds suit came about. And then when I made sound the ninth start to think about the role of protests and audit to be heard you gotta speak louder. And so just sort of kept sort of evolving, you're the youngest seven now, I'm the second to the oldest second to the old seven boys. I'm going to build a statue for your mother. I'm one of three boys. And I've said we've worked our mother crazy, and we're joined if your mother can survive seven boys, you should be nice to her. I'm very. We're one year apart. I mean, like really like how no that's not. What was she thinking? But I realize about your dad. What was he think he was the only child and my mother only child? Yeah. And my mother came from a family of sixteen she was the first. So my mother had been raising her brothers and sisters anyway. So it was like she had fully under control. We should we should we book the wrong cave to talk to we should have booked, mama cave and had a conversation with. Oh my God. Now, you close to all your brothers. Yeah. One also lived here in Chicago, Jack. And which one is Jack Jack is the oldest. And what is Jack? He's also an artist. He also teaches at the school of the city of Chicago. So both of you. Yeah. We're kind of materials does work works primarily in the design sort of program. And so he makes amazing sort of accessories amazing leather bags. How did both of you get in? Into the arts. Can I think it was or anything in the family back? Earn your parents expose you. It is there, you know, through quilt making, you know, my grandparents were sort of would makers, and you know, construction and things of that sort. So I think that that was sort of our vision of what we saw. But I think it's you know, parents just sort of giving us the independence to sort of. Explored. Yeah. When not sort of, you know, shun that idea that we wanna go to art school. Where'd you grow Missouri? And how'd you make it to a no you go to Michigan? Hi, Jamaica, disaccord ago. I grew up in Missouri. Went to the Kansas City on institute for my end grid. Then went to Cranbrook for my masters, and then at my clothes Zine sort of meeting with my professor he goes, oh, by the way, you have a job in Chicago at the school of the do. And that that's why I'm here you got your bus ticket. He got right here. I was like, okay. Like, all right. How do you find making her in Chicago? How do you do you think Chicago's welcoming to earth? What would do? I mean, Chicago's been great for me. You know, I think it's a great art sort of center. I think there's a lot of amazing young artist here. I think it's a great environment to Chicago's very forgiving in terms of you know, you can like do. Performance June assimilation and exhibition it could fail, and they you know, will give you another chance. It's not like New York or not one hundred percent agree York you fail you might as well just leave forget about don't even you know, don't come up for another like a Lear. I think that's the sort of amazing thing about Chicago is that we collaborate, and we do a lot of work in Chicago. With a lot of dancers a lot of. Boone genie, gang. So we're like really invested in being here and really looking at and how did you look at it as a form of service at the same time? Now that you've done one CTO station. Would you want to work on another project with the city? Yeah. Might not know it was it a good experience. It was a great experience. Really, really good. You know, we go into these projects we understand when we're working within corporate sort of sector in when things aren't ready, and what's ready, and it's just part of have works. I think the most important thing is that, you know, my vision can be realized, and I think that's why it was a great experience at that point where you know, I have an idea, and can if your own board, can we really sort of make it as to what dinner last night, Amy Alana, and I were sitting down. I was the one thing with the tile. And the pictures I said the only thing I was thinking of is I was waiting for the sound of birds and nature in the background to be. I mean, it's really you don't think you're in the train station. No. Well, and I think too with the Lynn tick, you're as you sort of moved from one side to the since you've there's a rhythm that happens. There's movement built within the design, and so that really sort of shifts your experience, and I think just be named to look up at the ceiling, and you're just sort of mass memorized with pattern and imagery that also sort of inspires. And so tell me about televised about the place an older neighbourhood. Why did you pick that neighborhood? And what's the vision for that space? No, thirty six north Milwaukee. Of new park not far from my old congressional office. Really that was an Irving and Elston. Okay. Bartle I've been looking for a building for probably six years, and every place that we looked it really came down to zoning. They we can get this owning changed in the number of places. Why did we come to you? I don't I don't know. Yeah. You mayors have inability to solve these things like that it would. But and so were there other neighborhoods. You looked at. Okay. Well, you know, we were on the south side, and we just going to stay there. But then also the cost of things were going up. And then we found this amazing building. We were looking for space where the studios could also be on one floor you stood out on one floor solo. Then you all of a sudden, you know, you're galleries that you need to hire five assistance. And then you're like, okay, I'll take another room. And then you before you know, you've got twelve and you're like three rooms. Sort of for like from one floor to the other. And it was just crazy. And so we want all facilities on one floor. So it's just easy to make move into the shipping receiving them photograph and then ship out to New York, and it was just really about the flow and then also looking for the right kind of live work situation. And so Philip is what the new building is called. And it's really going to be the sort of special project the space that will facilitate projects working with the public school working with local artist. So people come in there be able to work they will be to work. They will be able to come there in experiences, you know, performances or installations, and you know, we want to start a scholarship program for you know, school. Yeah. When you're teaching Art Institute. Somebody says I wanna work. I want to be an artist what you're like goat to kind of remarks about what they should be ready for. Well, you know, that's the first question. I asked them what do you want? What do you want to be in? If they say in artist or designer, and I say, well, we're going to work toward that at the end of the day. It's really about sort of, you know, it's a two year program that I'm sort of under in it's really behalf. So I get these young people should know how to trust themselves and the only way to get there and for them to sort of come to that understanding is failure the hardest part. You know, that's the only way they're going to understand and find out who they are through sort of expiration mistakes. I give when I do look commencement dresses. Always the most important thing that will happen in your life is when you fail figuring out how to pick yourself up. It's an essay if you can. Can figure that out you'll figure everything else out in like, what do you think was your defining failure that kind of gave you your trajectory? God was here in Chicago. I did was doing a sort of massive performance project at the cultural center, and I was maybe hit like fifteen volunteers that were helping me on the project in only five showed up for the day of the performance performance. And it was a disaster. Like, literally, I didn't think that I could recover. It was that extreme why was it that because I was just trying to multitask. And I couldn't focus on what I was there to do because I had to go run over and pull the curtains open or again out it was and then get back on stage. It was just a disaster into three ever contact the other ten that never showed never. What year was that? Oh, God that was probably eighties. And what how long it take before you did another show slash performance. Probably two years later. So it took a while. Because I understood like, you know, number one I had to pay everyone. That's what I knew. But, you know, back in the day, we just sort of like without help out and y'all have you with your gig. And it was just sort of thing in. So, but it was okay. Was it cultural affairs department helpful in the sense of you is young artist giving you a place to work a place to show your stuff? I think I had my first big major show there in the gallery. And that's when my gallery in New York was interested in my work. They flew here to see the exhibition, and that's when I signed on with Jack Sherman gallery in New York. And they sold that entire show out is that your gallery when you go around the world, and you look and you say. You say, you know, I want to bring this home to Chicago. I this. I gotta have this in the city or this idea. Is there something that we would do is a city that would be help the artists cultural community here or type of relationship or something you've seen? I mean, I will like that piece of you've done the L station that literally came from reading a story in the New York Times about a station in Berlin nightside's adorable. We should do one of those stations. We should do something like this. That's how that started. So is there something you've seen in had been exposed to say, you know, my God, you know, this we learn and then we say, it's alright do was an original idea. We never get the city at credit right fair sort of exhibition. So the project called Leo ally. L L E three thousand Lil three thousand in mill France. And I was part of that project where there is this Curators there that sort of curates all. The sort of spaces. They could be vacant. They could be part of the museum. But it's basically all of these sort of installations exhibitions that earth throughout the entire city. But the entire city is completely invested in this weekend. I mean, it's the press the okay hovering in the windows, just everything. So the whole thing becomes like a gal or my God, it was fabulous. And then they put on this amazing parade that kicks off. And so they asked me to do this amazing inflatable sound suit that led the parade that year based on a postcard that Bob created in DD looked at the post coincidence. I want this to lead the parade. And we were like, well, it's not real. He goes, we'll make it. But this fast of all has been going on for probably a decade. So six amazing six years ago. Maranatha those there's a Frenchman, and he was sitting in this room. And then they have these giant. I'm talking four story puppets. And it would be like a parade. And it would tell a story. And I think Liverpool he's French. But it Liverpool. Did they do an annual thing? And we were going to try to make Chicago the only city they also did it, and he was going to tell the story of the eighteen ninety three world expo. Wow. And come from all different parts of the city with these. I dunno describe three to four. But that would be moved towards the city and tell the different parts of how the city came together for the world expo and this sounds eerily similar to it. So I'd be I'd be very interested in looking it up. But it was just incredible just how the city I'll came out and was part of this shared sort of moment when you reflect in your career, and you look at a Chicago you have yourself. You have the Astra gates you have he. Why do you think Chicago is such epicenter in the visual arts? Martial GM Kerry didn't incredible mural on the side of the cul culture fin. It's. Yeah. The. We have four African American men all not nationally internationally. No all doing a tremendous artwork. All also teaching. Why Chicago you think? Have you ever thought about you know, for me? It's I needed to be going. Guess I could have moved to New York, of course. But today, we never gotten a zoning changes. You never be in the mayor's office doing odd cars. Just kind of space. I think it's really, you know, for me just needing to sort of separate myself from the world and to be to be in a space where I can just focus on the next sort of vision and to develop that in for me, Chicago allows me to sort of be quiet allows me to get into the sort of. Yeah. To sort of a work through I tend to I'm very quiet, and then I just sort of hit the center of the target, and I drop off the deed, and then I step back out, and it has to take care of itself. And so just that development must be being number two of seven boys that kind of thing quiet, and then all of a sudden throw the hanger Neda the mail room a walkout. I was really just. Is that your role nam long the brothers? Do not know who has that real probably th the fourth one the middle one. Yeah. I'm a middle child of three boys that I always wrote were we wrote a book more or piece we could do either one. But you know, we were also sort of. Yeah. We were very much raise, you know, boys. You, you know, you're always fighting each other. But we were always talked to sort of hug and make up. So that was fighting each other in the rules were we fight each other. Nobody from the outside could touch one of us, then we. How did you in Bobby meal? Bob met Bob came to my house may be twenty five years ago to a clothing sale from a friend actually Greg cameras, I count as a really from Greg Greg from Joffrey ballet, ballet, great. Isn't that crazy? This is a small world. Yeah. I just like the record show. I never got the invite for the clothing sale. That's okay. So that you can. Oh, my point. And so Bob came to the cell, and I said, what do you do? He goes on the graphic designer. And I was like, oh, you know, I'm doing my first publication with the cultural center, are you interested in doing my book. And then interesting enough Bob was living on Wabash, and I was on Michigan. We were like a block and digital and didn't for years never even saw show never about like in the nearest coffee shop or something. Like never from that day till today. Bob does all the publications anything that's printed or produce paper wise. He produces all of it. I mean, amazing designer amazing. I and so we've been best friends for you know, for a long time. What's your favorite material to work with? Oh god. He's is twigs. We got that. I've worked with everything. It's not that. It's. Ever sort of what is the best material? It's really I tend to sort of like, you know, finding the means necessary to support the idea. So it could be clay. It'd be painting. So it's really not a material. That's really sort of what allows the message to be clear given that we are so known for theater, others any companies that you any of the theater companies. You would love to just come and say I want to work with you on a stage set or something like that. When you think about Shakespeare, your theory or yeah. Looking glass or opera the lyric over left. Do not pro. Can you imagine like me greeting the states that why not no I'm all for? I'm I'm all open. I'm not on the committee. I'm out of the curator ready. We're putting it out in the world right now happen think edgy, it'd be good for the lyric opera since of opening itself up to a larger audience. Yeah. I mean, I would love to sort of work with the lyric opera in with the sound suits, and how to sort of bring these two ideas in the sort of mash of two differences, and when you look back at working with Alvin Ailey, did you ever wish you've done one dance of his, and you didn't do or some piece of his I was sort of studying with them doing my sort of time ended grade at the Kansas City ordinance. Tic- the university of Kansas had a branch, and that's how I was sort of involved in dance. But I was never looking and dance as a pathway. It was more looking at dance as a another sort of medium to consider to sort of incorporate within my practice. I think it's well, obviously. I have a background. But I think it's one of the great art forms and it's math its interpretation. And it's a whole new way of thinking. I mean, you know, there's that section the bible or God says I have piped music onto the the hypnotic danced. It is the ultimate human expression. Oh, yeah. So and that's it for my several orange education. That's all about do is a quick route on Chicago. Okay. Okay. Yeah. Thicker than pizza fan. Okay. That's one. Okay. Cubs are socks sucks lake or river, lake Sears or Hancock Sears twelve inch or sixteen inch softball twelve. Looks like you got your studio in New York. All right. We're here with Nick cave. A Chicago artists from all the way from Kansas City, matoco home. I really want to congratulate you on the new station. I'm crazy. I said to my family last night. I said it's something you'll not experience anywhere else. And they'll never I hope no other ultimate look at it. Because they're going to say, I don't want that station anymore. I want that one over there. It's really, and it's going to be such a gateway. No, yeah. I've already contacted a the Obama foundation of making sure that when the president of first lady are back that they go see it because I really do think it's going to be I need to open up a performance for their or you need to get yourself. An agent. My. I'll be free after three months from now. Hey. Bob. And I were both take ten percent there. It has. That's so. So shake him. That's right now, I'll introduce you. I I think I told them when I when he was talking about the library Osama build a new station that was actually a federal grant that tiger grant. It's a department of transportation grandpa. I said we're going to build a new station that will is people come in. They'll come there when we went to a bus service. I said it will just totally be stage one of their immersion into your library. And I it's a chief everything and more than I've ever thought. And we're redoing the whole streetscape from there all the way to a library from your L station that will now go we're changing the name of the Garfield L station to the Nick cave guard ELS day, would you like that thing? Snap snap. It. The cake. Thank you. It was great. Thank you. You've been listening to Chicago stories with mayor Rahm Emanuel. You can subscribe and leave a review on apple podcasts and tweet your guest ideas, using hashtag shy stories. Thanks for listening.

Chicago New York Bob Kansas City Rahm Emanuel Alvin Ailey Jack Jack Joffrey ballet Nick cave Rodney King Garfield station Eunice city hall Michigan Lee Jaffe New York Times Garfield L station Muniz Elvin university of Kansas
Season 3 Trailer

Mafia

02:55 min | 10 months ago

Season 3 Trailer

"Hey Mafia listeners. Mafia is coming back on October sixteenth bringing you stories of America's most notorious glorious gangsters conman and cold blooded killers. If you looked up the word evil in the dictionary his picture would be that they don't genovese was never anything but a homicide maniac. I mean he was from the really filing schools killing him or just a daily business. It was like turning over a page of the book of little concern it means you're a full fledged member of an organized crime family and you have both the duties and the privileges that accrue to that position. You are enabled to make some money but you also. We'll have the duty to strictly obey orders. They tell you to kill somebody. You can kill somebody. Break your legs break. If you don't pay a lot so many times get the money this season we'll talk about the most notorious outlaw of Chicago. He literally literally kicked the mayor down the steps of City Hall to show publicly. This is what happens to people even politicians who defy L. Capone but al capone he wanted the spotlight to be shining and he loved it. The man who invented being a rat it was put into solitary confinement gave them a timely thinks what's his own the APP gotta become so he sends word to the Federal Authority that is going to sink come canary every the the number one thing that vote until the laci revealed to law enforcement and to the people in charge of this country was the structure of the month the history of the offi yet a vast knowledge and he was the one who exposed at all and the gangster who ruled the record before they were even gangsters mm-hmm Rusty Evans model example kind of paves the way for the people who follow him and that's why they're able to stay one step ahead ahead the law for so many years but rosty in is the guy that kind of sets up this model really fall to this day so he was getting cuts from of these illegal watering holes as well so you're talking about somebody with his involvement in every single step of the illegal alcohol trade which offers you of course more profit so so he can very rich very quickly mafia season three is back every Wednesday starting October sixteenth follow Mafia on spotify subscribe on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast so you don't miss an episode

L. Capone America genovese City Hall Chicago Federal Authority Rusty Evans spotify Apple
Behind The Lens episode 92: Another mans treasure

Behind The Lens

38:49 min | 3 d ago

Behind The Lens episode 92: Another mans treasure

"This week on behind the Lens. Protesters. Blocked access to Courts Force City Hall to lock its doors in an anti. Demonstration in equipment at the mayor's office raise eyebrows among housing advocates. Also, we'll talk with data analyst Jeff, Asher about racial disparities in law enforcement and the covid nineteen crisis, and we'll hear from sanitation workers now in their third month of labor strike in new, Orleans, their demands, safety and dignity. I'm Tom Right you're listening to behind the lens brought to you by community support, learn more at the Lens. NOLA DOT ORG slash donate. And warm welcome to our listeners on partner. Radio Stations Ninety Point Three FM. F. L. P. and two point three. FM W. H. I. V. L. P. New. Orleans. Hundreds of protesters calling for a halt to victims blocked access to first city court. Thursday, they also blocked entrances at City Hall. Next door video from the scene shows demonstrators preventing people from getting inside the court, which handles eviction proceedings on the east bank. Lynne's writer. Michael. Is Eckstein shot that video and he spoke with this Friday about the protest e protests on Thursday it was organized by the New Orleans Renter's rights assembly. It's kind of a new group that's popped up in New Orleans although I'll note off the bat that kind of the entire protests yesterday had this kind of decentralized feel to it where. It was a little the movements of it were a little organic. It was a protests essentially about additions and they were demanding that the mayor, the governor as well as the judge in city, court worked to either provide rental is's to you know the tens of thousands of working people who might be out of work to the pandemic or underemployed to the pandemic. Or otherwise, they wanted the addiction court to shut down the central goal. The demonstration was to block off the main entrances to the building that houses I City Court, which processes the majority of court evictions in. New. Orleans and and they were successful at turning away. You know just what I saw dozens of people that were going to court it should be noted off the bat. Not everyone going to court that day was there for an infection city core while civil district court deals with a wide variety of things like yesterday, most people were being blocked from entering regardless of what they were there for a another big story, you cover this week Michael a surprising to many appointments by the Mayor's office talk to us about who peterbilt. and. What he's going to be doing for the city Peterborough in he was the general manager of a company called Saunder and if you followed the Years long short term rental debate saunders pretty household name. You know when you were talking about all these these comparisons between you know your neighborhood short term rental owner who just you know out one side of their house versus these larger corporate short term rental operators and Sandra was always kind of one of those central examples of one of the big corporate operators that had hundreds of of short-term rentals around the city. He has now been a pointed to this. New Position He is going to be the deputy chief administrative officer of land use with this new job. He's GonNa be managing a lot of key city departments. The Department of Safety and permits is one department of Code Enforcement, the City Planning Commission, and you know very important to some people watching that you know these departments are are very involved with the regulation of short term rentals in the city along with those responsibilities, his position is also actually being expanded so. He's taking over for the former deputy chief administrative officer but his his position is actually going to be changed to the founding entrepreneur of the office of business and external services. So this is a brand new thing the city is doing it's kind of the brainchild of CEO Gilbert, Montagna something he's talked about in the past. In the goal here is to kind of integrate land use regulation with business development with economic development initiatives that the city is taking on. So kind of merging those two missions, which to some people's a very exciting prospect. Others is a kind of concerning prospect talk about some similarly response Salah blowback that you've heard so far. From Syllabi Housing Advocacy Group housing advocates. At least the ones I spoke to were not happy with the appointment affordable housing advocates in the in New Orleans almost universally believed that short-term rentals have contributed to the housing affordability problem in New Orleans in the eviction crisis in New Orleans, and so they kind of see short rentals in the advocacy for them as opposed to the. Goal of making more housing in New Orleans I think there's also some concern not just with the choice of Peter Bowen but what this office will be, there are a lot of land use regulations you know that the goal of them is not to stymie business, but the goal is to maintain resident liveability and that can sometimes butt heads against business development, goals. So I think. There's this concern you know within a in an office that is going to be handling both economic development and land use regulation know Kinda which way your office is going to lean when when those two goals are kind of opposed to each other Michaelides Eckstein reporting sorta Lands Michael Thank you very much. Thank you Tom Graduation rates in Orleans parish and across the state dipped A. Few. Percentage points in the two thousand eighteen nineteen school year that were this week from the state. Education. Department follows years of sustained increases. Martyr Jason has that and more in education news both the state and Orleans parish public schools saw a slight dip in their graduation rate and this is actually dated from the end of Twenty nineteen wasn't from this most recent school year. Data routinely legs year than it was further delayed by the pandemic because you know staff couldn't really look at their computers and stuff. But we did see a slight dip in Orleans parish. We went from a seventy seven point eight percent graduation rate to seventy five point, four percent I mean that's after several years of sustained increases. Any particular stand out in T in terms of Well we did where we've been reporting for a long time on Kennedy that had the graduation scandal Mesa pretty significant seventeen point drop from eighty one percent down to sixty five percent. Of that, definitely caught my eye and then the other school that really caught. My is a Walter Cohen, which has just been slipping year after year after year three years ago they are graduating sixty percent of their students and last year they only graduated forty three percent of their students. I spoke with CEO Joe Castro and he said he came on in the middle of this cohort of students. There were about fifty who had left in the last four years before that data was collected that they just couldn't track. So he said that was a major hit to the school, but that they're also working now to make sure that they don't lose like that in the system are other states. One of the most interesting takeaways about this data is it's basically going to be some of our if not the last like pain pre pandemic data that we have about the schools, we didn't have state accountability. Test this year, our graduation rate is probably gonNA look a lot different, just -cause schools had more freedom in their attendance requirements. So I do I do think this is really interesting that this might be some of our last pre pandemic data coming out right meantime. The Nurul Orleans, school systems are preparing to open virtually or the new school year but there some continued concern about the Internet access for some of these students in households about yes. The Orleans parish school districts is estimating right now that about. Twenty percent of their students likely do not have a connection to the internet or a device that suitable to connect with to do schoolwork. They say this is something they're working on every day to reduce that number but it still something that you know both educators and families are concerned about as we start the square online for the first time. Ever right. What can possibly be done to be sure that twenty percent of student body is is not falling off and on it's schoolwork we know that. schools in the Spring newspaper packet models in that that was able to work for some students I think especially for certain age ranges of students that can definitely be an option but other good news we got today that the Department of Education? John Bel Edwards. Have announced that the state gotTA seventeen million dollar grant from the Federal Department of Education Grandma. Some of that money is going to go toward helping get students online. We don't know exactly how much that might come to Orleans parish but. Anything helps. Recall efforts early in the pandemic as the school year was had been winding now to get modems and that sort of Internet access gear into more households, you would think with the Funday, they could reexamine that effort and Damore sign. Yeah and I think I think they're going to one thing I. Guess. I would say that I find us being lucky in that your Orleans parish school district actually took over a school in his running directly right now. Ben All Charter. So now that they're running cog hill elementary that actually gives us a much better window into what what is the district exactly doing a day to day school level operations so that really good at cog hill they do have. chromebooks each of their four hundred students is faking cargill. You were Gordon. Also this week on News State Ethics Board allegations against some people add that will tell me about that words, right. So the Charter Board, a better choice foundation handed handed the school over to the district on July first, and that's after their charter wasn't renewed for a variety of reasons, and then we got this news this week that to board members and to cocktail employees who were each. Related to a board member have been hit with ethics charges because in Louisiana we have state laws at say that you cannot work at a school where you have a family member as on aboard in Louisiana we have state ethics laws that prevent family members of board members from working at the schools that they supervise unless you're a certified teacher and these in place did not appear to be certified. Teachers were acting in that capacity Mar. Juiston with the lamps. Thank you. Stop the city of New Orleans request to stopped moving forward on plans for a new jail building has run into a wall of opposition local state and federal stakeholders filed their responses to the request in federal court. This week Nick Crystal has more. The city has said basically that the new jail building unnecessary that. They are one that they are currently providing sufficient, medical and mental health care to the inmates at the jail that they don't have the money for it, and that also a recent reduction in jail population makes it unnecessary. The various other parties in the lawsuit are disputing all those claims they're saying that the current space at the jail is not sufficient treat inmates with mental illness and it certainly won't be sufficient once these inmates that are at a state facility return and they're all sustain that there's plenty of federal money for the project. The city had been given a certain amount of money from FEMA after Katrina, to rebuild the jail and they're. At some of that money is still available. There is some dispute over how much is actually available. So the city will actually have to now file a response to to those objections and and we'll see what they have to say the judge has asked them to enter some some very specific questions out around those issues. This is all pursuant to a twenty thirteen consent decree regarding a among several other findings, some some real lackey mental health facility that. The jail. Yeah. Mental Healthcare at the jail has been has been considered inadequate by by the jail monitors by the federal judge for years, and it's it has been getting slightly better recently. But the concern is with these inmates coming back that that they won't have the proper is, is your resources to to handle it full details at the website the winds nola Dot Org and grocery evolves I've been covering the city council's considerations within their criminal Justice Committee About some changes to enforce our binder laws the criminal justice committee, they didn't vote on them but they they discussed to proposed ordinances brought by Jason Williams Susan City, council president and the President of the of the Criminal Justice Committee and is also notably running for district attorney. So the two ordinances the first one would, as you said, basically, give police officers slightly less. In when they can make arrests for municipal expenses in municipal fences are generally low level offenses that are are governed by city law. Some of those offenses could be something like graffiti or. Minor thefts. So this proposal would limit the times in which they could make her arrest as opposed to issuing in a summit which they are for the most part directed to do mastic violences. One offense that is there's a provision in the law that does not direct officers to not make an arrest in domestic violence cases for the most part officers are directed to make an arrest but for other municipal charges, they are directed to issue a summons and less a few exceptions apply things like what if the person is fender or they don't have an ID on them? That is still a proposal in process and. Nelson eminent meantime since we've mentioned the DA's race and Mr Williams participation in it, are there any other updates in the race following the current DA's decision the on Kenna's decision to retire last late last week there haven't been any major updates. There are now four declared candidates that those will be the candidates qualifying ended. Cuba Landreau who is a former judge Arthur hunter also former judge and more a reed who is adjudged in the nineties as also been the at at the New Orleans Nwea. WAC. P. also declared his candidacy. Okay. Thank you for that neck and neck crystal covering criminal justice affairs for the Winds Chesney. Who? New Orleans, leaders and residents have a couple of new tools to help analyze the data surrounding civil services. One of the new dashboards offers a detailed look at racial disparities in Law Enforcement Jeff Asher helped produce those data interactive's the longtime analyst smoke with this Wednesday about that work my company. And we work as the public safety consultants with the city, Council. So everything from doing what we did today building dashboards and providing them to the council and setting out to helping with random community meetings to provide a more arching reports. Hackel. question the council has. So you presented to items in terms of of. Data Interactive DASHBOARDS. That able can say on on the website of the criminal justice. Committee, tell me what those dashboards are. We've racial disparity a criminal justice dash dashboard. It really been in the works for like seven months. It was born out of a suggestion from councilmember. Williams that. That came from on high. The just discuss that they'd had that it would be to take a look at the various thing that we all voting. And by all with New Orleans is that were very anecdote driven city. We collect data. Let's data use in showing the pollock in value major situation, and so the dash was born from that it looks charges the main metric, which makes exit against various different types of disparities allows you to use the same metric as metric as reported by the police deaths. As that's correct Adam, and the reason for that is that you know if you're arrested. And you compare could be arrested with do people could be arrested with marijuana charges, but the other guy has marijuana and murder and one guy has just marijuana. There's probably GonNa be disparity holidays do things to arrests or three lack. In theory, the marijuana charges should be treated. The same emerged should be treated differently but the whenever the base charges in a world without racial disparities without any disparities at all those should be treated about and so my bringing it to the charts level, we're trying to sort of level the playing field in. At. Highlight the disparities on at that level the dashboard looks at charges which really just shows number of people charged or number charges in each type of March I by race gender, it looks at Bond Gates? So how much money people have to pay to get out jail and it looks at sentece which I think is that charges of the most interesting and depressing disparities on on What are you saying? What? What are the takeaways from? That sort of visualization of the data, what are you say in terms of disparities regard to both frequency? Of Arrest and sentencing what you said, it's what you expect which is that there's a heavy disparity in the number of charges filed the MVP lane average length of. Or after American men to everyone else in your population, even for things like simple possession of marijuana up. Get arrested or often they have longer prison sentences they see suspended A. Longer relation periods at the charge level relative to everybody else. You can imagine in a handful of cases that they're sort of extenuating circumstances that might be that you're looking at at a couple of cases. That's now it'd be why the disparity exists might look at it at tens of thousands of different charges over. And that is not A. An over over what period of time by the way? What how many years are you going back into the twenty ten and we? Shot over time so you can see how the number of charges the sentences changed and you can also zoom in if you just want to look at two, thousand, eighteen or twenty nineteen or you just want to look at, you know white males you can you can filter out and council Williams the goal is to fall for Daren what is to show the disparity into is in an ideal world show the despair getting better and so they not. Too, for a while. Ideally. Tommy about the community safety. DASS for that you put together as well. Yeah I mean honestly this. Is My partner in as Dave Lennox. Are. We really just wanted to show kit. Basically, we wanted to produce a map catch basin cleanings and it just sort of. Looked at all the. Data. There's not one day. There's all sorts of different types of data, the Joe, and then we constantly get requested like you know, hey, and wanted look around my house or around a business address the going on, and so we built a map that tastes pretty much all the public safety data the city is laughing. And puts it on a map so that you could say I to look within. One hundred meters of my house over the last month. Just. What has happened? It's not exact. It's not designed. The funniest was not designed to show you exact addresses of everything but I. Sort of see what's happening everywhere you see. These. Rows of data and. Unless you're. Able to take it, get it in excel and you really look at it. It makes it difficult and so we just wanted to take you know you're talking about one of them are serious dashboards in terms of the practice or out of the jail snapshots is not providing an intimate look into the justice system. It's really providing thinking interesting look at things like traffic accidents or your spaces being the things that are public safety interests but our. Major crime or the the things did you would typically We just might might also be likened to a quality of life map rod exposed. That's what we should have call. Thank you where. Could work out the details later. But I know I know both that and the racial disparities dashboard again are coming for public data coming straight from law enforcement data not a matter of just working from nothing about trim lines. You know you you're working with hard data and real people in terms of each of these incidents that that you dash out abuse laws. And like I said, the idea is just take. And provide it sort of data behind it. And data driven narrative as opposed to what typically tabs in the city, which is an antidote driven narrative and opposition easy way to find both those masses. Google. New Orleans Criminal Justice, committee and look for their webpage yet capsules criminal on occur justice committee. I. WanNa say be dashboards. The castle site that we've designed is it's a matter of pride for me because it really gets the entirety of everything. Three one one calls to extremely serious racial disparities. Today's example a good example of just like the entire entire factor right speaking of data points the ones we have regarding co the nights have been her as we were recording on Tuesday you have. Had An opportunity earlier today to take a look at some fresh data coming out of the state health department just indicating where we are in terms of various parishes with regard to case load and again, one case one person in. Tell me what you're saying today in in terms of some of the parish data including East Baton Rouge her. And their apparent jump on the list of worst hit parishes or the corona virus. Tell me what you're saying today yesterday today was weird. In terms of number of cases are best normalise. Something like eleven hundred cases reported statewide and then in new. Orleans? Sixty, sixty, sixty cases, I think reported New Orleans. Really it you can't separate number of Jason from the number. One S ideally want lots of tests load number of cases. Today we had cast cases lumber Jason Better. Cases are number. By the Moose art loose lying in statewide and in Orleans parish probably are at or past tobacco rows for mid June early June through mid July Ish and evidence. Really suggests that we probably you entered the platinum days ago maybe or even on the other side of it really hard to say because most of the testing news to lag. So only seventy percent of the tests of the cases that are being returned are coming through tests that were conducted last week. Today. We had cases far back as mid-may bads. Some Stachel in terms of reporting lag. Yeah. I mean ninety percent of them were from July which is good I. Guess but. Now test that was administered in in early. July. Theory should be very different for retest. There was administer yesterday the day before just because the spread was so much more was increasing salvage faster in early July I think that there's evidence that we're slowly starting to see a decline as we would expect I mean we've seen this in in Texas and Florida in Arizona too to a degree states that have. Big increases are now starting to get on the other side of it. I think we Louisiana and especially New Orleans parish probably there because our tests are so lacked in it. So buried how long ago cases it's it's really hard. It's murky talker standard trend. We really have to wait two weeks or the state to release their Jason tested ministration data basically two weeks from now no. Way Thank you for what you do to help us understand the data and what they mean for the Community Jeff. Asher. Thank you very much. Thanks. Since may fifth fourteen sanitation workers in New Orleans have been on strike. They form the waste union to demand better pay personal, protective equipment, and Greater Safety Provisions on the job I spoke with some of the hoppers this week to get a better understanding that their concerns. My name is d'artagnan Yang we brought attention to not being supplied with. A low wages of twenty five or couldn't get any changes to them. Hasn't paid which we never see. For them to fixed it truck-level. Majority of the drugs have broken leaking hydraulic fluid illegal us. On streets majority time on us so. Tell me about hydraulic fluid. If you would tell my help at rescue that has for you or we found out that it was, it was not only just risky. Would you know deadly? The fluid itself caused irritation inflammation discoloration to the scare I had experienced myself several different times so. I personally, you know what it does to the skin. After we've done some research on found out that it can be deadly. It's nice now biodegradable subsidized. Drifted even one hundred years so. It's on us or in us you know just got into people's eyes. With mild and we were. Right different time. It'll spread out of the truck we could taste it in the air we could smell it. You know. So remind people ups of who actually. Who actually employs you? It's not the city remind people who actually employs you, and what did they say when you brought your concerns and your your call for P and More. Safety precautions, chase them. Even, before the band of extravagant, we will try to get. Different. Or? Even other civil pieces of equipment. You know we've experienced things like they would run out. You. GotTa supply your. Own. Constantly be we definitely have Powell never. From the governor's. got a home rain jackets. Own Rainbows any rain year because we are rank were in the rain. When you say company went which company do you mean specifically? People ready supplies with gloves to wear that. It's like a garden glove. Love. Of course when it runs out, they don't have any mortar. Give you. They all spout invest. LESS AMOUNT OF THOSE And experienced. So when they run out of those you gotTa Provide Jones. Well, the also is that man that you wear this equipment would provide that kind of gear is more important now than ever it's always been important to me from a safety perspective but with the corona virus and what it's capable of doing y'all need that you've failed more than ever and what are they they? They just held you that's coming out of your check. Okay. Well, I'll first experience with day in the attempted to provide some sort of masking it ran out and again you had to provide it if it was not there. To provide yourself. But they didn't. They never have enough equipment equipment to spray around it. Don't give us anything I is I is a government about mouth. It's not provide if you don't go this saving, you feel like you need to have you got to go and get into. So what's the current hourly rate from people ready currently getting or our elite down ten twenty five how much feel like you should be making given that you're subcontracting with the say you're still doing at essential steady function what do you think you should be making it an hour About, twenty dollars an hour. More likely. But we west at a minimum was fifteen but will we think we should be making how we feel? Definitely wear the numbers around the country late with other other sanitation. Have Gotten this thing together. Around around twenty thousand dollars. And, what about benefits getting health benefits? Anything, like that retirement. Funds. Fish store time with no vacation on experiencing it stuff if you don't have all no sick leave. have pay for any any health coverage Danny medical coverage out of pocket. Yes. If it's not all on the behalf of company, Metro yet you have big problems the yourself take time away from the job to take your personal business you're not being paid that day. There's no way possible to you. Know you have to forfeit a of things like going to court possibly making it to doctors appointments, and you know just the things that you normally have to take care of just. So you can make money I want you to talk to me about my preconceptions maybe other people's. Fake conceptions about sanitation workers. And you know when I was growing up garbage man was always considered. You know at least for four subcontracting you know the wages tended to be good steady and many locales getting public benefits. What do people need to know? About the work. Of a sanitation worker today especially given that you are considered very much in that big group of frontline workers. During the pandemic, you know what I mean. No one's asking a garbage man take a day off during the pandemic. Tell me what people need to know about this work in the state of. Louisiana. How was hurt at? I guess you can. Say something like. convincing. I've only heard it in a convincing manner. That sanitation workers, the garbage man, they make good money. These guys are they make good myself. I ever heard growing up you know any even as an adult this is. The the street narcotics when you hear about these people. Yeah get good good, and then I actually get a chance. were. Bit. That's lasted. Is Like only convincing? Commissioner come here and built water, but it's not. None of it is true. Amount of, money? We. May. If Nobody's take account is up. Twenty five cents. You don't see any of this money. You have to work broodingly. Like working twice in one day. Two Times a week at at your, you know the basic job gives you A. Forty hours before time. Guys sitting in this room network seventy, eighty hours. So. You work in that amount of time. The amount of money you you're trying to get. In Your Way Overboard. Considering what you heard about the job you know anything. And when you say seventy eighty hours a week you're talking about. On the truck she talked about hopping, you're talking about That that's. Not The way they made the changes was the to via were Longo go we were we were used to get an off of between three and four or five hours a day maybe but now. Because of the the way they. The way they pay us from day rain to the holiday ranger. Were full five dollars a day. That's. Fifty dollars. A day. So you gotTa make ten hours to make what you were making before. About. Taxes mid wicket. So many things at the same time you pollen on all these through the week. Granted you've been on strike since since May, but in terms of the work during. The pandemic when you got more people spending more time at home, for instance, less time in the. Office districts in that sort of thing has changed the work for you on the line. Is it different now? Are you having to pick up more ways to residential neighborhoods it any time there's a holiday and there are more people at home is more trash pickup. Summertime hits a kids a home. Is Way more tragic pickup so Everybody's known is way worse. Is Way more trash pickup is is is ridiculous. POWs positive press in front of People's houses, and it has to be removed it offense. It's like holiday hours but no holiday pay certainly no hazard pay definitely definitely I'm Jared Sam. Been happened eleven going on twelve years. Over the years picked up a lot of garbage all over the city. What's the end game for you? What? What makes this in the long run? All worthwhile in terms of going on strike or going pay you know having to drive this message weekend and week out what's the payoff for you when when it comes down to what's this all about? Only, on a boat, you know me being a man and enough of ourselves. Each dinner last one of us, the way that we put this together. By everyday like the last almost three months now. Know. The conversations you know. I have seven kids myself. You know maybe if we faisal some believing, maybe one day marquee may be making more money than me. You know by. Bennie gaulish man of people don't know. We go months and you know years without even getting a raise. Making the same. You've been doing this a long time. You know one of the jobs I know that don't give you know some jobs get ready to every full months I used to work in. Breathe at all. You know he was just Thailand get Mesto. You know come down to like you know standing up ourselves no. You. And those are just a few of the members of the city waste union about begin their four months on strike in New Orleans. Well that's all for this way. Join US later in August as your new host Caroline. Heldman. Takes the reins of this podcast. Reporting is online at the limbs. No Dot. Org. I'm Tom Wright's keep a mask on your face and New Orleans in your heart. I'm Charles Maldonado editor Lens we're committed to covering the COVID nineteen crisis here in South Louisiana, but we can't do this work without your continued support for nonprofit news. Learn about ways. You can help us keep the lights on at our website. It's the Lens Nola Dot. Org. Slash donate the lens is your newsroom and we thank you.

New Orleans Jeff Asher Louisiana Jason Williams Orleans Orleans parish Michaelides Eckstein Orleans parish school district I City Court CEO partner Courts Force City Hall City Hall analyst Department of Safety Department of Education Michael marijuana
VIDEO PODCAST: Celebration time! Witness Jesses first-ever speaking part on Odyssey! Plus: AIO wins NRBs Radio Program of the Year and new secrets about the upcoming Album 69

The Official Adventures in Odyssey Podcast

07:46 min | 5 months ago

VIDEO PODCAST: Celebration time! Witness Jesses first-ever speaking part on Odyssey! Plus: AIO wins NRBs Radio Program of the Year and new secrets about the upcoming Album 69

"Biography fans welcome to the official adventures in Odyssey podcast. I'm Bob and I'm Jesse. And no focus on the family has not changed this dress code from smart casual too. Well wedding formal. We're here to celebrate a very special occasion. You see adventure. Odyssey was awarded radio program of the year by the National Religious Broadcasters on February twenty fifth executive producer. Dave Arnold was Nashville Tennessee to receive the honor. This award is given to a program that impacts the listener by being compelling relevant informative personable and entertaining while also demonstrating and authentic Christian faith and the emphasis isn't so much on the number of stations or the number of listeners or even the size of the budget. It's on how God has used the program to make a difference for Christ adventures in Odyssey. Certainly meets those criteria. Congratulations to the entire. Odyssey team on the award. But that's not all we're celebrating today. There's also a very special announcement about an appearance and album. Sixty eight out of the blue. Which is you know. Hint hint all right. So you know how bob here's appeared in a bunch of adventures in Odyssey episodes while I don't know about a bunch. Well let's just say thirty four different characters in thirty one episodes But WHO's counting? I know someone who is well but somehow to this point. I've never had a speaking part in an Odyssey episode until now Jesse's grand debuts featured in albums sixty eight. This was such a monumental event that we had documented. Let's see what went into the recording of Jesse's I ever part on adventures in Odyssey. My Line who here we are the Burbank airport. It's getting real first line on Odyssey. You know the podcast is play myself but now I have to play city hall worker. I believe the key to method acting is to become your character. You have to live like your character and when I visit City Hall I see a lot of people wearing care. Joe I'm GONNA wear a bunch of hair gel to become city hall work already think I'm ready. Got The suit on the hair general. Got The works us on with my wardrobe and makeup complete. It's now time to meet. The expert will ryan the Voice of Eugene thirty coach. Me And I need all the coaching I can get. It will just artist. I'm doing good. I'm a little nervous. All right. All the sparkle. You're all dressed up. She's trying to method acting getting into my characters city. I'll work today script totally yard otherwise with you jake from the top okay. Here we go. A city worker has a map to tip. Here's the map Ted tips. Next step fill out a few contracts. Hey where's my pen? Okay wow time for the big moment heading to the recording studio do this red leather yellow leather red leather yellow weather as we are rolling on. Take One. Here's the map Ted. Thanks Terry also Mr Worker. Three variations on that line okay. So let's make you bored out of your mind annoyed and then the angry okay three zero. Here's the map Ted. Here's the map. Ted here's the map Ted Corporation how was it just more stressful? But you'd think this these guys are good. I'm not laughing at what else is going on. Around here is probably the hardest part excellent to be in the studio. You can hear Jesse's first line and all the other lines in breaking news one of six episodes in album sixty eight out of the blue. That was out of the Blue Anyway. It's available now and the adventures modesty club on CD and download. And it's airing on the radio and online each week and until mid-april check out the links at our website and even though album. Sixty eight is just out work on album. Sixty-nine is already well underway. Listeners have a lot of questions about this album so we figured we get ahead of it this time with a quick hyun a hold onto your hats secrets right now. Revelations revelations revelations partly California California Dream Part one part two to nine news company upheld secrets are uncovered and revelations are commonplace album. Sixty nine listeners have long wondered about Maury right else clients for the kids and Odyssey all will be reviewed and questions answered in these episodes elsewhere. Jones mother suddenly shows up in Odyssey from California and wants to Joel's back with her is jewels. Gone for good. What about her newfound musical career and all of her friends back in Odyssey awesome. Why does the next adventure is not as he album always seem cooler than the last well? You can listen to albums sixty nine in the club this summer starting July fourteenth and you can get it download in September or a CD. October or you can hear it on the radio or online in October as well. Lipa countdowns begin. Well that's all for this edition of the official adventures and obviously podcast presentation of focus on the family. Visit US online at wit's end dot org slash podcast or call us at one eight hundred family. I'm Bob and I'm Jesse. Remind you that with God in your life every day's an adventure.

Odyssey Ted Jesse Bob US official Mr Worker City Hall Dave Arnold Nashville Tennessee Burbank executive producer Ted Corporation California Joel jake Joe ryan Maury
Could Torontos fight against Ontario lead to independence?

The Big Story

20:57 min | 1 year ago

Could Torontos fight against Ontario lead to independence?

"It's fair to say, there's not usually a good reason for a national news podcast to report on a little community meeting. This one though was different. And it wasn't that little. Last week after a year of restructuring and cuts and orders and frustration and anger. The group of concerned, Torontonians got together to discuss what to do about it. Well, there is no municipal provincial relationship in Canada. That's quite as bad as the one between Toronto city hall, and Ontario premier Doug Ford right now, the problem they were attempting to address at that Toronto meeting has implications for cities across the country. And all these relationships the province holds the cars cities have almost no real power in Canada. And there's no easy way to fix that. But there is a hard way and that's what they were meeting about in Toronto, and the room was packed and the questions on the table were these, what would it take for Toronto to gain control of its own governance? How can cities fight back when they are subject to the whims of the provincial legislature. What if Toronto just wrote up its own charter? Jordan heath Rawlings, and this is the big story. Jennifer Pagliara is a city hall reporter for the Toronto Star. And she was at that meeting. I jennifer. Hey, how you doing? I'm doing really well. Why don't you start by telling me about this meeting you went to last week? So the panel was really focusing on the idea of getting Toronto more power, and that really this means power out from under other government masters in the city has been having this problem whereby. We aren't really in control of our own destiny. Just the way, all of the rules in this country are written. And the idea was to have this group come together and talk about the idea of creating a charter city, and it's a concept that a lot of people may be haven't heard of. It's actually a really old concept. And the idea was to get people sort of climatized to the fact that there, maybe is a solution to the way we are feeling sort of under the jurisdiction of this. Central government. I've been to so many different public meetings in my job from, you know, the kinds of meetings, where people are arguing about a condo tower that's going up in their neighborhood to, you know, consultations on new transit lines, and depending on, you know, how much media attention these issues get or just how involved, the communities are in those little neighborhoods, you can get, and I've seen one hundred two hundred people, and that's pretty good like most most politicians and cities will tell you. That's pretty good turnout. But when I heard that this meeting was happening, I started to hear from the counselor staff who are organizing that the couldn't find a space big enough that kept getting more and more people signing up and they finally moved it to a church, Saint Clair that has a huge fedral space. And I showed up I was I was running late. I jumped off the subway, the streetcar rather and it was full and the capacity in this church is like twelve hundred people and I was kind of blown away. By how many people turned up to hear a panel? So who is leading the charge on this? Who are the people on the panel, and China normalize? The yeah so counselor, Josh, Matt Lou is a city councillor for the young Eglington midtown area, he and his staff, but the meeting together, and he was joined by John Sewell, who's a former mayor of the city and John is part of a group that formed essentially out of the council cut that was imposed by the Doug Ford government. So they now have a group of active citizens who are both fighting the province with protests and other kind of letter writing campaigns. But they have this offshoot group that they thought would look for solutions and what they came up with was to fight for this charter city, and then there was academe, extreme Berta from the Ryerson city building institute pays a lot of attention to governance and policy issues. Another former councillor John Parker game and. MPP Natalie Rosa, who is actually a constitutional law expert as well. So there's a pretty venerated at least by Toronto terms panel up there in the houses packed, what was the mood like how was the evening, people were, honestly, like I was surprised that they weren't up on their feet. They were really like cheering and applauding and away. Also haven't seen a public meeting. I'm surprised to see like, not only the outpouring of support, but the like obvious desire for something to be done, and not just to stick it to Doug Ford, but to really find ways to protect the city's interests and cancer. Matt low gave the speech of the beginning that just got this almost like riotous applause, and cheering at the end and have never seen a counselor that get that kind of response at any other public meeting will one of the reasons we wanted to talk to you is because there was a ton of reporting on social media just from people who were kind of there and saying that there was a real energy for the. The city to do something. And I had not heard the term charter city before. I don't think a lot of people have. So if you can explain what that is, and what it would theoretically. At least look like. Yeah. So, like I said charter city the age old thing there are charters and Europe dating back to like the twelfth century and the concept is pretty simple in that right now, the way our Canadian constitution is written. It only applies to the federal and the provincial level of government, so essentially cities, get left out, and the best example, I can give is in our charter of rights and freedoms it says that we have the right to vote, it's this fundamental, right that we have to participate in democracy, but it actually only refers to the right to vote in the parliament and the legislature not to vote in your local city council. Now. We have all kinds of provincial legislation that guides municipal elections. Those are rights, that have been given to us by the province and theoretically can be. Taken away by the province that sort of sort of just exemplifies, a very like broad issue, but on a more granular level, but we have seen recently with the Doug Ford government is that they have the ability to change our budget. Midstream. They have the ability to change our land use planning what we decide about what gets built and how it gets built, even though the city has spent years of consultation and study on those plans. So the idea of charter is that it's, it's just a document. It's a written document that would be agreed upon and in order to bring it into force. You would need the federal government, and the terrier government to agree that this city charter could exist and essentially creates kind of firewall for the city that it would say in, in various ways that we have the jurisdiction over our own fares. And it can say whatever those writing the charter wanted to say, and that was part of. It was being discussed at the meeting is we need to start thinking about what kind of powers, we want how we want to approach other levels of government with those demands, and then actually start writing the thing and, and start debating it and start moving through the other levels of government to see if there would ever be an opportunity to have that brought into force will. That's what I find so fascinating about this is the details because there are lots of places Toronto certainly included that talk about succession when things start going the way they don't like Albert is done. It connects obviously made a habit of it. But this would force us to spell out exactly what that would look like I think, like, that's kind of like a scary ghost when you start having this charter conversation and it's important to talk about in the sense. It's important to talk about what a charter isn't, and it's also important to talk about which, I learned recently in terms of legality that there used to be only one way to get. Constitutional amendments which is sort of legal process, you need to go through to enact the charter, and in the old way you had to have all of the provinces agree, which is kind of a hornet's nest. Right. Because as soon as you talk about giving, you know, a city or another entity special powers, you automatically have this question of Quebec, and we've been through that before people don't want to go through that again. It just kind of creates a mess, but they recently changed the way the process works, and by recently, I mean like in the last few decades and the way it works now is if it's a provincial specific amendment. You only need that province's consent. And so the charter is also not separating the city from the province in a way that, like there will be borders, and we will have our own completely separate taxation scheme, the organizers of the event made very clear that this is not about separating ourselves from the. Lavigne's. There is a recognition that we are, we are such an important part of the province, but it's about setting sort of guidelines for who can meddle in whose affairs. And right now, we, we have no jurisdiction, as we are learning over how this be conducted own business. What were some of or maybe even just one if it really stood out the key components when the panel started talking about what would be included in a charter, the first one that comes to mind for me is elections, simply because we did a whole podcast last year, when the provincial government acts the number of city councillors in Toronto, and there was a ton of feedback on just what that would do to how we govern ourselves as a city, but we had no option and assumed that would be the first thing on the table. Yeah. Elections is definitely a big topic. It was a topic at the meeting John Sewell's group actually was born out of the change in the council. Makeup during the two thousand eighteen election, which, as you know, and if your listeners listen to your previous podcast they would know that it just caused so much chaos. When you disrupt something that's been planned for years in the middle of a campaign. And there are rules at spell out how a democratic municipal election should go. And I can't imagine that a city charter would have any different idea of how the election itself should be run. I think the city clerk does like amazing work. Trying to make sure that all that stuff happens fairly with the budget that she's given. But the idea is that the city would probably want to have control over how many wards how many counselors per ward? And what are the boundaries of rose wards? There's already like established principle in law in place. You know, you hear about gerrymandering in the states, all the time when it comes to ward boundaries that's definitely something to be conscious of. But there are already precedents here that, you know, if someone were to gerrymander let's. Say if someone said, well, it's not a good idea for the city council to have control over this. Well, first of all, they did have control over it before. And there was an independent consultant that recommended the forty-seven word structure, which council accepted without amendment, and that was the structure that they were moving forward with when the election was interrupted. So it's difficult to argue that there were special interest involved in what the city had come up with on its own for its own citizens. And so that I think the ward boundary issue would be almost obviously included in the city charter are there other examples of charter cities that we could look to are there, any and Canada in the United States. That would kind of prove give us at least a sense of what would happen. So the interesting thing that I recently learned about Canada, is that there are several cities in Canada, that are called charter cities, Vancouver, for example, actually, has what they call city charter. But what I've learned is that those documents are not similar to the documents that you. US cities have and the US cities being sort of true charter cities in the way described that there's this specific constitutional jurisdiction with others. He's in Canada. Have I've found is that there are rules like we have we have a special city of Toronto act that the province enacted legislation, and though they call their specific written document a charter, it's more like what we got all those years ago, and they're now just catching up to having some special legislative powers. It's more helpful to look to the US there. Lots of areas like New York, for example, has a city charter, their differences in that a lot of US cities run with a strong mirror powers. Whereas we, we have a week Mary system and those two things work hand in hand producing different results. So you can't say that having a city charter would produce necessarily governance style like New York. It would also involve changing our, our actual governance style. It's hall, but you can look. To the fact that places like Chicago New York do have jurisdiction over their own affairs free from state interference. And I think those are some of the examples that are hopeful when we are looking at the possibilities of charter here if it was an idea that was actually going to take root. What would the next steps look like the interesting thing about the meeting, which the participants were told quite clearly is that this is like, maybe at best, you know, in five years, kind of possibility, and that's because the political winds really have to be just right. It seems sort of obvious to the organizers in those behind this charter city push that they're never going to be able to convince Doug Ford's government to agree to a constitutional amendments probably not. And we know even federal election coming up and that road changed the context of weather. This charter said he has possible at the same time they did raise the idea that it could become a federal issue if. They had the ability to kind of get it on the Genda and the most important thing is, they have to figure out first. What do Tronto Neons want what should the charter say? And so what they're working on is sort of a draft of what the charter could say and what they want to do is have a really robust public debate, so that there's a really strong, you know, ground swell behind whatever this draft charter says that they can feel confident that this is what the citizens of Toronto would like to see and then try to assess whether the political winds are blowing in their favor and use the connection that they have to convince their colleagues at those other levels of government to support the idea. Do you have any idea how the rest of the counselors down? At city hall are taking this lately. We've seen a kind of harmony at city hall that we have not experienced at least not in the six years. I've been there and that is because sometimes when you have a car. Yeon enemy. You really see people working together, and that's really been the case with Doug Ford. You've seen those who are often very critical of the mayor, for example ally themselves with him standing next to him at press conferences in order to push back. I think what us at earlier about the whole expecter of succession did come up in the twentieth election. John Tory's main challenger, Jennifer keys, Matt, sort of raised it in this sort of offhand tweet. And she was she's admitted I was angry. It was before she actually signed up to be a candidate and followed her. It really did. And in a negative way like John Tory strategists, we're able to spin it as sort of like a like a blue sky like, you know, unwelcome idea. So I think it's important that they get the message right if they want the charter city idea to take root at council, but I think even more conservative councillors are really struggling with feeling like they don't even have power and their elected rule to represent their citizens. When things are being a yanked out from under them. So, I think it is possible that if they could agree on what's most important to make sure that they have control over that you could get even the most right wing or loyalist provincial. Loyalist councillors to perhaps come on board. When counselors and Torontonians say that they're not being treated fairly by the province. First of all, I guess what are they talking about specifically? And in that context, are they being tree? It'd differently than the rest of Ontario, or is this just kind of that's the provincial governments approach, and it affects everybody, I think there have been very specific actions at this provincial government has taken that disproportionately affect Toronto when it came to. For example, the public health budget cuts there were changes to the funding formula for areas outside of Toronto, but the cuts were most severe four Toronto and the province has tried to justify why these actions are disproportionate, you know, but we've heard from counselors, and even city staff, that they can't make sense of why Sharana would be treated differently like there isn't in their view. A logical reason they're not buying the reason that the province is giving, and they're, they're multiple examples. It's hard to say the council cut, for example, when you started to get into the comparison, which some of my colleagues did at Queens Park, for example, the minister of. Municipal affairs. The area Hebrew presents they started looking well, how many local councillors are in that area and comparing, you know, on a per capita basis to Toronto and some of the comparisons are to get pretty comical, right? Like if you apply the same counselor to resident ratio some places like shouldn't even have a counselor like maybe like one person or a mare. And yet none of those other areas were affected. There was some need. The province said to align Toronto specifically with the writings at the province and the federal government use. But why is that only true in Toronto? Why would that same logic not apply to the rest of the province, given that this is not likely to happen under the current provincial government? What options does Toronto have in the meantime, to fight back against these kind of cuts in this kind of treatment said that was one of the questions from the audience at this meeting someone sent a card and say, what do we do now? To survive. They ask the panel that and the panel kind of laughed nervously and everyone kind of laughed nervously because that's a big question. It really isn't seemed likely to me just trying to look at it objectively that this government is interested at all in providing Tronto any kind of freedom. And so, you know, for the next several years, this is what we've got and because our legislative powers are so loose and can be so easily taken away from us. I think it really comes down to average people, and that, that pressure from, you know, we saw the autism protests, we've seen public health servants you know, fight back against what they called arbitrary cuts. We've seen average citizens writing and calling and volunteering to door knock so that more people were convinced contact their local MPP at this point. It's more about trying to correct the direction that the province is going in, in hopes that they don't. Continue aiming the bullseye eye directly on the city and I think that will take a lot of ongoing cooperation between the mayor and his allies and those usually not allied with send like a unified and single message both at the public and directly to the province. Jennifer, thank you so much. Jennifer peguero city hall reporter at the Toronto Star. That was the big story for more from us. We are at the big story, podcast dot CA. We've got all your episodes. They're so enjoy and hit us up on Twitter too, at the big story. F PM. We would love to hear from you. We could use new story ideas take the long weekend about it come back to us with some if you like us rate us and review us and subscribe for free wherever you get your podcast. That's apple. That's Google that's Stitcher, that Spotify cast box, you know, the drill, I'm Jordan thrilling. Thanks for listening. We'll talk tomorrow.

Toronto Toronto city hall Doug Ford Canada United States John Sewell Ryerson city building institut reporter Ontario Jordan heath Rawlings Jennifer Pagliara John Parker Saint Clair Matt low John Tory Twitter apple Jennifer peguero
What the Fourth of July is and isn't

Seattle Now

11:57 min | Last month

What the Fourth of July is and isn't

"Hey. It's Patricia Murphy. This is Seattle now. This Saturday is the fourth of July and if it feels like a weird time to be patriotic. You're not alone I'll talk to historian Quinta Taylor more about that in a minute but first. Let's get you caught up. There is drama brewing at City Hall yesterday Mayor Durkan wrote the Council asking them to investigate councilmember Shama, sawant and to consider removing from office. The mayor's letter ticks off a few examples of what she calls disorderly or otherwise contemptuous behavior by saw one including holding an after hours, political rally inside City Hall during a pandemic and encouraging the occupation of the city's east precinct saw what has already called on Durkan to resign over her handling of the city's black lives matter protests. She called the move quote, a corporate politician desperately looking to distract from her failures of leadership. Out! As more more covert nineteen cases or showing up in young adults, public health officials are trying to contain an outbreak along. You Dubs Greek grow thirty eight students in ten fraternity houses have recently tested positive third isolating in their rooms. The university says none of them have had to go to. The hospital were even have had severe symptoms. They've set up a testing site within walking distance on Tuesday the head of the CDC called specifically on millennials and generations e to wear masks and take greater personal responsibility to slow the outbreak more than half of the new cases in King County are in people under forty. And you knew this one was coming, but YUP bumper shoots canceled. Organizers were hoping to bring back some of the old flavor this year, but Cova has wiped out festivals this summer. One Real says the beloved event will be Back Next Year for its fiftieth anniversary. The fourth of July is this weekend independence day and some celebrations will likely take a different tone this year, and that's not just because your favorite fireworks show is canceled many Americans. Particularly White Americans are thinking differently about what it means to be patriotic amid the racial injustices in our country, but these contradictions are not new. Frederick Douglass pointed out in his famous speech. What to the slave is the fourth of July that this holiday is quote yours and not mine? So, what does this all mean in twenty twenty? Quinta Taylor is a history professor emeritus at the University of Washington and the founder of black past dot org. I spoke with them to find out. Qantar Taylor thank you so much for making some time today. Thank you for having me so the fourth of July is coming up and it's a holiday celebrating our independence from Great Britain, but here in the US there's a lot of contradictions to this holiday. Let's talk a little bit about what they are. Oh I. Don't think we have enough time in this interview. The cover all give you the top lines for people of African American ancestry, the fourth of July has always been problematic and the fourth of July just in. The larger issue patriotism but African Americans have had mixed feelings about the fourth of July because we've had mixed feelings about the country, because the country is obviously had mixed feelings about us, we're celebrating freedoms here that we just do not allow everyone to have intentionally structurally. How does that show up for Black Americans and people of Color? Well I mean there are examples at about I. mean the the most obvious example that everybody's focusing on now. Is Police brutality? Reasons why the George Floyd murders so resonated with so many people is because. You literally see policemen's knee on the neck of this man, and he dies as a result of it, and it's sort of emblematic of the fact that black people felt that they've been under the heel or under the neck of American racism. Since almost the founding of this country, we still are debating the whole issue of whether or not, or to what extent black people have access to voting rights. It's interesting. My well throw this up. My my own parents couldn't vote in Tennessee Western. Until my father was in his fifties, and my mother was in her late forties. And that only happened in nineteen, sixty and it had to, they had to be federal intervention to make sure that they would be allowed to vote. That's recent. That's recent history, so this is not an old problem. This is this is a problem that started a long time ago. That extends right to this day. Is it problematic than that. We celebrate the ideals of this country, personal liberty, the birth of democracy, but we haven't lived up to them. Well Yes, it is. I know that's to me. That's almost obvious I think. I think the question is? Whether or not, we can actually turn that around whether we can actually make sure that we as a nation live up to the ideals, and that's that's been one of the goals of the Civil Rights Movement I. You know when I when I explained civil rights movement in my class. I always argued this wasn't about gaining new rights for African Americans in the nineteen sixties. It was about reestablishing the constitutional. Constitutional guarantees that was supposedly made with the reconstruction amendments, and between eighteen, sixty, five and eighteen seventy. You know it's it's about making sure that the constitution does apply to everyone. It's about making sure that democracy democracy applies to everyone in the country. There's so much emotion around the symbols in our country. The flag the national anthem, the huge controversy, when Colin Kaepernick decided to kneel during the national anthem. Well. Let's let's deal with the. Situation. And I'm sure not all of your listeners going to agree with me on this, but. capper nick was never protesting the American flag. He was never protesting the American nation. He was protesting police brutality. Unfortunately, the narrative got turned around twisted partly because the president of the United States that made it. A question of whether Nick was was challenging the American the American itself beyond say. You know the artists beyond say getting an award and I can't remember the exact reward, but. What impressive about what she said was that racism is so endemic in American society That's when people protest that racism. Others think we're processing America itself. And that's that's something that absolutely has to change. So in that way, these protests have been turned around and politicized and held up against the flag instead of the very specific. Yeah. I don't think you know I if anything. Black people have been loyal to this this country almost to a fault and what I mean, when I say to a fault, I mean we have been loyal to this country when the country has not precipitated. Would opening his arms to to people like me to people of Color. How does that happen? How does that fortitude take place as a white person? I can't totally imagine what that feels like so. I'm curious where that comes from that drive it comes from. You know an optimism, maybe in overdrawn optimism on the part of black people that somehow that the nation will come to live up to its ideals that somehow, even though there's been a past of oppression. And there's a president of oppression. That maybe the future will be different. And you see that at various junctures in in American history whether it's the eighteen forties whether it's the nineteen sixties, there's always the whole now that hope is couples. Activism and it's activism that says we are going to make it better. We are going to do what we will make it better whether that activism is black folks taking to the streets in terms of protest today, or whether it's black people going and putting their lives on the line on the frontlines of every war that America has been involved in in each and every instance the it's the ideas the hope that this time it will be different, but this time America really will embrace those ideals and extend those ideals to to African Americans. Is it harmful to celebrate the fourth of July without thinking critically about what we're celebrating? Well. People are going to have their barbecues. You know we're going to have a dog and they'll ribs, and we're all gonna eat too much drink too much and all the rest, but I think it's up to people like you in the media and other people who have command of you know if you will public opinion certainly influenced public opinion. The bring us back to that question. The. Say Yes, as we celebrate. Let's understand what we're celebrating unless understand that what we are celebrating in some instances is contradictory to what is actually occurred in other words. Let's think about you know. Let's make sure that we remember what the fourth of July is, and to some extent what it's not. What is Patriotism Mean to you Taylor? A good question it means. Celebrating the country, it means being proud of being an American. But it also means. The ability to critique. What's wrong with America? And and hopefully being even more proud of an America that correct mistakes. That's GONNA. Take some work. On America's behalf on individuals behalf at least a good portion of this country. How hopeful are you about that? Well I'm generally optimist We will see what happens. This is this could be a major moment. This could be a turning point. Certainly, there's a whole host of evidence out there. That suggests this is the case, but we're just going to have to see I you know I can I can tell you that that I'm hopeful that will be changed, but my saying I'm hopeful that we'll be changed does not guarantee that change I. Think we all are going to have to work on. How are you going to celebrate the fourth of July, Fireworks Guy, are you GonNa? Fireworks Guy, but I am going to. I'm going to participate in a barbecue and we're gonNA socially distance and we're, GONNA. And do all the other proper things, but I'm having A. Having a fourth of July celebration with my family, but I'll tell you. My family understands these things we've talked about the contradictions. You know since day one dot about the contradictions ever since we've been a family, so we understand what we are celebrating and the limits of that celebration. Plantar Taylor really get to talk with you. Thank you very much for your expertise and your. Well thank you for having me. Seattle now is produced by Caroline. Chamberlain Gomez Clermont mcgrane. It began. Jorgensen does our music I'm Michelle Murphy. Tomorrow!

Plantar Taylor America Seattle City Hall United States Mayor Durkan president Patricia Murphy Frederick Douglass CDC councilmember Shama George Floyd Quinta Taylor Nick Colin Kaepernick King County
Ep. 93: Theaster Gates's Community Canvas

Chicago Stories

36:40 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 93: Theaster Gates's Community Canvas

"You're listening to Chicago stories a podcast from city hall, featuring the stories of everyday Chicagoans and special guests as told to mayor Rahm Emanuel. This is mayor Rahm Emanuel Chicago stories we're here with world famous. But Chicago hardest the Astra gay. That's right. Okay. I have done some research artists community developer, educator, curator Potter singer, actor enterpreneur. That depart seems the most important. Okay. Well, that's because we all are performing. But how does the Astra gates describe the Astor, you know, a longtime ago mayor I stopped using the separations. I understand that the world needs these demining John's categories, but in a way, I feel like I'm doing one thing which is like using my interest in making in my creative gifts and the gifts that I've been given from on high to try to solve problems. Now, some of the problems happen in museums. Some of them are on the streets on the south side or the west side. But I feel like I'm using the same brain in the same creative energy. Whether I'm in the gallery or the museum or my crib. So at twelve we join a choir and church and fourteen somehow you won the election, which was only the Chicago way I wanted to know how many there was only twelve people in the choir, and you got thirty six votes. Yes. Okay. So how? How did you fourteen convince people to be head of the choir? When you only been there you had to be the youngest person. Or will you not the youngest? That's actually a great question. So so let's say that thank God. I have somebody doing some research around. Let's say that that I have been going to new cedar grove like all my life. But the choir was really it was less about being the musical director with the director of the choir. It was more about that being one of the places early in my life where black people were willing to give a young person a chance to be a leader. So the choir didn't really need me in front of them, directing them. They knew the songs they could direct themselves. But it gave me a chance to kind of with this choir that would temporarily pay attention to me as a leader. I could ask them to sing more quieter or more loudly or repeat averse, and that that early call and response that early opportunity to say, please do this and a group of people say, okay, we will agree to do that that that was a really important moment. And so one choir song at a time. It was actually probably growing my. Team to believe that I could say something to the world and the world might respond on my behalf. Do you still go to church on a regular basis or did it start to play a less significant? Are you? Thank you. That's not different. That's different than are, you still spiritual person. But different question. Do you still go to church and says an organized Fe? Sometimes I go to church. I also go to other places where it's spiritual spiritual power exists. But one of the interesting things that happened was probably when I was about thirty five I created a band called the black monks of Mississippi, and part of the reason that I created the band was because there was a you always want to be part of something called the black monks. Dismiss. The name. With that. Right. But I think that there were the parts that I loved about the church was that there was this meditative practice that would lead to an ecstatic practice an emotional practice, and that the ability to kickstart that emotion would then make you re consider all of the hardship of the week before and then reconsider all of the potential strength for the week to come and so church when people talk about going to church to give recharged. I feel like there's more in that than his said you mean, it's not unpack is not fully on packed. And I think that that church from me was chance to be with my community be embraced even if it was a tough week. Learn that my situations the challenges that I had that those weren't the things that actually made my personality, but that I was bigger than my situations. And you know, as a twelve year old it was like to have some fun with the people who I love. To the whole family go. Yeah. My dad when when we were young my dad was in so into it. It's only as he's gotten older that they he doesn't believe that all preachers are like crooked. But I think that when I was so good that he's come around. He's. But what was cool was that? When I was young my mom was the deep believer. And my dad he wasn't a skeptic. He was just like what have to work because there's nine of you, and I have to take care of my kids. And so it was like practicality on was sad in and then spiritual practicality on other side, which was like when you lose your job. And we still have the lights to pay. I'm gonna pray. And I think it was like this combination. Because like sometimes my dad was the father is sometimes the low was the father. You know, you brought up another subject I want which is you're the youngest of eight sisters. Do I have that? Right. Let's say I'm the youngest of nine and a half sisters because that would make me the eighth cyst. Okay. Okay. Okay. So we can get into that too. If you want. That would be news. Breaking. How did you arrive? Well, a sisters. I don't know how it happens normally. But let's say that. That define family. Survive it. I mean, let's say that. Sisters one through five. They have my mom's full attention. Let's imagine. But at time, my mom got two six. Yeah. You're on your sister. One was taking care of sister city. Got to me. I had nieces who could take care of me because they. So there was a way in which the profession of parenting. My mom had gotten so good at it that she was just kind of like she wrote. It takes a village before the accurate was awesome. He made a village. My mom made a village in often joked that I bounce between my sisters hips, but they gave me a tremendous amount of freedom. But like they really gave me a lot of love is. So, you know, like, whatever I was into whether it was roller skating or choir, directing, or my huffy schwinn, whatever the bike of the moment was my mom was there to really say. You know, I'm all in like, if we needed a new choir robe, or you know, whatever my latest hairstyle was like she was just in and she was in with love. And then the raising was really like a series of at key moments. My dad my dad whipping my butt from time to time maybe twice in my life. And that those key moments of parental intervention was enough to kind of keep me on the straight. Right. You'd felt it for like another two years. I felt it fell ring for another. The moments that it happened at felt his disappointment. And in that moment, I could tell like, oh, my dad is saying he worked so hard for me to be successful. Why am I disappointing him? There's nothing as powerful as that. Which is I am busting my butt. I'm your but to make sure you don't have to bust your. But the way I bust my butt. Yeah. And so I think that the show I could get a sentence with four butts in there. Yeah. So you grew up all this. But it was clearly a family a love. Yeah. It was a family. But it is a family of love. You talk regularly all the family. Yeah. I mean, I should call my sister's more, I'm sorry. Hey you. Hey. What about Glenda? Hedlund kerry. I'm sorry that I'll call you more data MacAulay today. I want you know, I call my parents every day. Do you really my dad's ninety one my mother's eighty four. It's fifteen twenty seconds because I can't handle more than that. I call every day. My dad doesn't want more than that. TI? You good. Yeah. Good. He's like a plane crash in Ethiopia. I know that I'm good. Eighty four eighty I say, he's eighty seven. But truth, finders just told me he was eighty four. I don't know. I it's you can round up you can round he's set. Well, who's going to argue at this point? Did you always see your art as perk community building? Or did that come in the process of making our community building be a fair description? You think I'm missing it describing it that way. So Ron this is this is super important. I just like the regular Joe I started as mayor in quickly within four came. Well, I would like Rahm. I okay game. I mean, you know, as I noted three waste don't worry about. This question is a complicated. One because I never had the intent of attempting to make change that others would try to measure. I was simply living where I lived and doing my thing. And I think this is what happens with artists where it's like doing your thing if you would unpacked that doing your thing could be like, oh, my neighbor doesn't have a lot more or I don't have a lot more in. My neighbor has a lawn more. Maybe I'll use their lawn more in our mobile grasses. Right. And it was like those moments where there was no attempt at doing anything altruistic. There was no community development in the way that a conventional model a CDC CDFI. I was not a conventional developer our simply live in my life. You didn't get any tax credits. There. Right. But on Dorchester, the buildings were available in two thousand six and people had taken the pipes and the copper was gone in the water was leaking. And there was nobody to rescue it. It's always like, oh, somebody has to turn the water off somebody has to call the water department. Somebody has to manage the building. And in two thousand six I simply started acquiring the buildings because I thought they were cool. I quiet the buildings because I wanted to have a studio space. I quiet them because I thought if I had the building next door I can have more people over and we can have a bigger barbecue. It was all selfish. It was all about a creative person growing his personal creative practice when we look back on that. It's easy to say, I was becoming a community developer. But in fact, I was being an artist in the reason that feels so important is because if there was a way that traditional developers and the department of buildings in the department of planning in your office, the more they understand that artists might be future. Great developers, and they may have the capacity to do soup. Interesting things that conventional development may not be able to do. The only difference is artists. Don't know the language of development. We don't know all the tools of development. We don't know who the allies are. And so I think that now we've gotten to a point where we're accidental developers. We have seventy units. Let me as you housing. I know who is we so we usually we who's the other artists that you think are working in your John raise your space. Is there a moment in your process that was a ha moment or the light bulb went off? I can make money at this. I know what I'm doing. And this is our actually when you said, I was doing development, and then I was just being an artist doing development. So is there an moment that went off for you? And was her some material that you were working with that influence that moment. So there wasn't a moment. Okay. What I was asked to do a Ted talk some years ago. And as a result of needing to do this talk. I had to find a way to communicate to a national audience the things that have been happening that I hadn't fully accounted for. So it's like well. Yeah, I'm an artist. But I'm also we're now forty units in by twenty thirteen two thousand fourteen I guess that's not conventional how do I tell the world about this phenomenon happening on a south side? So let's say that the need to try to communicate this to a national audience made me reconsider what about been doing all these years and the truth outside of my studio is that people would look at it and say, oh, you're an artist and a developer or you're an artist and place maker or something. And so I tried to give myself an empowering language around that which was an artist is a quipped with knowing the rules of how a city works an artist. Could potentially advance the beauty and the power. In the equity within a city, and I was accidents doing that as I o who do you want to live in the neighborhood while want the people who've been living in the neighborhood to live in a neighborhood. Well, who else can live in the neighborhood other creative people, right? And it was like it had built into it it in the thing that was built in wasn't. I could get a higher rent. If I make the space more beautiful. It was like I could attract other artists, and I in people who already live here my want to stay here. So you agree, the creative space and energy. Absolutely. And so when you say us working who else, do you think is in? No, you're seeing is the Astra grades says your mother would say, you're you're unique. But you must think there's other artists or you may not that are working kind of this vein. Yeah. Okay. So so a few things are interesting if we think about Donald Judd's Marfa Marfa, Texas. A dude moves to a town by some army. Rex puts his friends art in it, develops, a residency and does art and takes over the town in a way, I think about Donald Judd, a good friend of mine a brother named Rick lows. Started a thing called project role houses in Houston. Texas took some row houses that had been slave shacks restored them and invited artists to live and working. It's twenty one row houses amazing dig great work. The Manila foundation in Houston, Texas, where the Manila family oil barons who loved the arts acquired buildings in a neighborhood built a small museum. And they made those neighboring houses available for was that was that the similar vision when we worked together on the door Chester yet in a way when we think about Dorchester Arden house and collaborative I was trying to create an affordable a mixed income community where creatives could choose to live there. People who identify as artists. And it was like in thirds, a third low income a third mixed income and then a third like market rate or third affordable housing market rate and finding these creative families who are already living in the neighborhood all black, but like we're maybe living in an in affordable housing or low income housing that didn't have an artist's bend info could just super happy to be there. So it's one hundred percent occupied. We have really good managers. And it was like we were starting to rebuild community. Like those granny flats they call him on on seventieth. They used to be really dangerous places and now like violence. Does it happen? Really cool. When I try to describe you tell me and be honest that I like, I'm missing it. Even though I've been to now seventy year shows they go that they asked her gates reappropriate things from the neighborhood around and beyond just neighborhood. Brings back their original. Meaning but tells it in a different context, that's what I'm like. I take a look at the fire hoses? Yes. Which is the first kind of piece I got here is a fire hose to put out fires. But you re appropriate it, and then told a different story. It's also a fire hose that like not black people down in the. Yeah. Right. Right. So I think your definition is a good one. But if I were to kind of connect missing something if I say, you're missing something. But, but if I were to if I were to kind of shift this little it could be I believe in the inherent power in people and things even when others don't see the inherent value. Right. So let's say there's an old building. Like, I remember before Bloomingdale's home was Bloomingdale home. It was the masonic temple the masonic temple had these huge. Dj wooden beams that they had to get rid of because Asif said that they needed to be mental strength in order to kind of meet fire code. So these beams came out of the masonic temple amazing, raw material that could never be made again because the beams are too big. And I remember thinking there's another life in these beams besides going to the dump or being too. That's the reappropriation that's the reappropriation. But I also think a little bit like like Japanese animism like there's power not only that the beams could be reappropriated, but the beams had power in them. And I think the difference there is that then it's not like, oh, this beam could be a it could be a table. It's like I this would has power in it and then power in the spiritual power year. Like, there's there's something living in the material. Right. And so in that sense. Like, that's how I felt about the Bank building what you going on Stony. Yes. I don't know what the arts banks economic potential is. But I know that the Bank still has power in. There's still good Kami. Good energy in just requires someone who's willing to wake up the power remove all of the weight of the stuff. So that the power becomes evident to others. Right. So then while some people in a conventional business situation would say there's no foot traffic on Stony island. I don't see how you're gonna make money that would be the person in my buildings permanent zoning department that wanted to tear it down. Correct. Let's say just if we wanted to be. A theoretical might be somebody in a bureaucracy says this is unsafe. Let's tear that down when you would say, Mr Mayor. I would not. Let's that could happen. Absolutely. Could happen. Let's say that in your team. You had a a Bilger. You had a buildings advisor that was a Buddhist. Right. Advisor could say to the buildings team team, again, this is all just made up as if we were in Hollywood writing script. Because I really do think that there's a criteria. That's not considered with a buildings in black neighborhoods, which are these were buildings that were built with a lot of love a lot of integrity by really skilled people who are coming from Italy, and Poland and Ireland, and and it's like, and these were these were black hands that were also touching these buildings. Is there not something left to do the challenges is often? And I think about the uptown with this. The challenge is often. There's no one who spent enough time considering the spiritual life that continues to dwell in a place. And so if we think that a place is bankrupt of spiritual life, then we won't invest in infrastructure. We won't invest in healthcare. We want invest in new schools. And so I'm saying, oh, this isn't just about would this about have we given up on black and Brown people. Like is it possible that we believe that like, oh, nothing could happen on the east side? Side and thirty three hundred east ninety third street. And if you believe nothing great could happen there. Then you want invest people say oh want to triple down my vestment. So I'm an invest, and that's why I'm thankful to you to understand that there needs to be a program about neighborhoods. But I think another way of saying like where is the spiritual life of the buildings in our cities where spiritual life in the lakes and rivers and what we call empty. Lots like what happened on those empty lots that might still have a germ of something super special. So the Mojo still MO Jo is still there. So let me as to was it weird having done the air program at sea ta to come back, and then go from running that program to being commissioned to do one of the most unique pieces, I think in that we've ever done, and I don't know of another mass transit what is it a little like out of body out of two. It was so crazy. It was it was amazing because. So I worked under dude named Frank cruzi gave we know. Right. Valerie Jarrett and Elizabeth white than white that was like my crew, right? And then there was a younger brother, Peter fair and Walden and woman Linda fuller. These are all salt of the earth. Bureaucrats right. And I had my dreads. I have my nose ring. And I was not a conventional bureaucrat and the tired of the beam in the masonic temple. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. And I remember Linda would when I'll give her a big idea about art. She used to be an English teacher. She would pull out a red pin? And she would she would spell check and grammar check. My memos like, Linda, what are you doing it? She's like will have great ideas with Typos. This is not a good deliver. I'm gonna give you. Okay. So so you so you don't feel bad felt felt okay? Brother Leon Panetta chief staffer Bill Clinton. What love dearly used to walk around with three yellow legal pads, and he had a blue fill pen. And he would Leon nobody can read this crap. What the hell are you doing? And he would and it was not just on your. But it was in fell pen. And you know, the ease don't have any. And you couldn't go to Sylvia his wife. So it would would Leon say here because I. Yeah. Self a pen write memos in fell Pensa bridges. And so those years I felt like I learned I learned how deals were making a learned how projects were structured. I learned how to read a budget. I learned how to re blueprints. I learned what community process was. And so many artists who asked me about my come up. They don't know that those seven years of being a bureaucrat where actually the things that maybe call it. A public servant, pardon me being a. Here's where I feel like my practice was scaling like say this was big artist. But it was like I was getting the tools necessary to be better bigger. So was a cool like saying, okay? We now want you to actually do it at ninety fifth not just any station. Yes crown jewel. The south side is really sweet. And to also be able to argue that a radio station was a work of art felt very special because I felt like if we're really going to listen to the desires of people, and I felt like I was really listening in those community meetings. Like people really wanted the art to deliver something that was bigger than transportation by like they wanted to give from point to point B, but they wanted to do that in style. They want to do that with comfort with dignity, and I just thought. What can I do that would activate the space in a way that was different? And I feel like what what you got. Then was both parts of my practice, which was an object and a platform the civil tapestries are the object America, America. It's a very rare tapestry at this moment, you know, and then and then on, you know, very red. And then the the platform was a radio station, which meant new information could accrue every day every every week and at the Dow was a real homecoming for the intention in the MVP of the practice, which is make objects because objects are cool people can identify with them. They can understand whole lot. Without a lot of words being said, and then a platform where I could say so raum. How does it feel to be in the last twenty days of your may oral life, and that we can have that conversation? On a microphone and that. It's not just you asking me questions. But it's like a moment where we become citizens together. Ron how you doing this moment? Hey, it's my show. I asked what? Ray for it. The Astra gates Kerry, James Marshall, Nick cave, common chance Connie was. I don't know of another city in just take the visual artists that is on the national and international scene out of one city three dominant African American ours. Three dominant artists and three dominant artists not just in the city nationally, but internationally why and what's your take on that? Why that is? And do you agree with that Chicago missed but now? But now on there. So take those four Chicago is a slow simmer city. It's like because it's a more Ford -able city because there's amazing spaces where artists could do really cool things. And it's a hotbed of political and social contestation. There's just like. On that. I think that if if artist doesn't leave if artists chooses to stay longer there's a way in which you just get to develop a deeper and deeper practice, and I would say that not just for the visual arts scene, but for the music theater scene. And then I spent a lot of time thinking about why do people leave, and I think sometimes there's not a lot of opportunities when you're at the top, you know, like once you've had a show at this museum or that museum. That's kind of you run the gamut. But I think that in terms of a place where artistic production can happen. You know about my building on the south side for really cheap. I got thirty thousand square feet. I could never do that in New York. I could never do that in LA. And in that moment, where had to decide do I stay here in grow and mature my practice in big space, or do I go to another city where a my have more access to more galleries or whatever. But I would definitely be confined. I chose a bigger Martha Graham breath, absolutely, right. Because because ultimately there were parts of my practice that I just thought even if I if I don't wanna monetize things I don't have the burden of rent. That's keeping me. The market wasn't constantly making me make these things. So that I could just mature things without the burden of thinking a have to sell something in order to pay the twenty thousand dollars rent on my fifteen thousand square feet. So I think one of the assets that Chicago's still has is space. And I think that there's this amazing community of collectors curator's collaborators believers who believe in the arts and his like, I can just remember like being Larry Maryland fields house being Jack and sandy governors house being at Mardian anita's house, and like these people who are like, oh, man. Tell us more about your practice. And it was like it wasn't all transactional. There was also a lot of love. And so I think it's it's the people of the city that that's held me wanna stay when you go around. You say you're from Chicago south side of Chicago, man. I sing it. I'm not a south signer. Okay. I got it. But you, but you work on the site. Do you see yourself as south side or west side? I tell people in from the west side, I work on the south. But all those things as we would say was my grandparents and my mother grew up in north on Dale, it's the vest site. Not the west this. But at this point, I really feel like I I live in black space like uh spent a couple of weeks on the Gold Coast. I, you know, let me though, some money. Seattle spills man, I got on an elevator. And I knew that I was not in my neighborhood. Made it real evidence. Let me say this. It was the elevator part. They. Give me three young artists. And you say keep your eye on these three folks, it could be four could be too. You're going to hear more about. In the next five years. They're they're the people there that the Astra gates of tomorrow. I was say so who are you mentoring today, the calling you regulate you say because you think he or she has something you can see it raw today, but they're in their seats. Right on say public service period or you call it bureaucratic days. But really, I'm serious about this three people. These people are comers. They got something to say you're going to hear more about them. You're gonna read more about them time comes on. No. There's a whole crew. They're really just there nipping at my heels, and they're overtaking me pretty quickly, but we can put some people on them. If you want. There's a brother who works with me. His name's Devon Devon maze. He's just like a good dude who's really growing sculpture chops. But it's like he's growing his good dude chops, and that's real important to me Nate, young cold-blooded craftsmen maker thinker. Tony Lewis Nayyar. Does he do sculpture all sculpture? Okay. And his wife. Caroline there. Cold-blooded couple. And I said in a complimentary way. Yeah, they're they're they're the best because I think of it is complementary co blood, but that may say. And I think about them a lot. I know when I'm thinking about great people. There's a there's a performance in visual artists sister name Alexandria, Eregbu went to the Art Institute. Superfly she's like to me. She's like the grace Jones of our times super unapologetic. You know, does really interesting things her family's of Nigerian descent, I believe, and she's somebody I think about a whole lot sister shayla. You don't know what if you do? She's kind of performance artist and photographer taking her moms close reappropriation them wearing them kind of talking about these past moments DJ, Yana contrarius fool Superfly who's like like learning. How to tell these histories of music from places of empowerment and talking about like, you know, how bands were formed and she's just like a walking encyclopedia of the black musical experience. Yeah. And so I just feel like I'm surrounded by really amazing artist who whatever their craft is. I'm even thinking about chef Eric Williams who just opened the restaurant virtue on fifty third street. Chef Eric is probably younger than me. But he runs virtue like a like the military. I mean, it's like them greens are consistent. Cold blooded. And I just think that if we would expand the Creole. Yeah. If we if we open that up a little bit. There are artisans and creatives who are doing things in the world and finally have a platform. And I think that if there's anything I wish I could do more is like take some of these young creators and give them a better platform. We work in stone wood metal a lot of different. What's the one? Material. That's been the hardest for you to kinda. Not not a particular piece, but the heart is material for you to kinda get comfortable working with. Yeah. So I don't wanna get all crazy rom. But as opposed to the last forty five. Thanks. If I if I were to say, the the material that I've that's caused me the most. Yeah. Ang's consternation would be. Learning how to work better with people that like clay, I can handle it would interesting almost come finger off. But like, I'm not that man. Okay. Got that. But Bradley, but there's a way in which so much of the work. I do depends on my capacity to be level with people and sometimes the people park can be really tough. And so I feel like the better I get at humility, which is not something that comes easy and duly overvalue. Of course. For child goal of patients. So every day you have to say that word I say patients so wasted time. So I feel like being that. Mallory intrigue my team teaching me is like sometimes better to take a longer route in care. I can't say I really really know you. But I think I know you around I can't believe that given how many people are in and around your life coming out that that would have been the material that is hard for you. Yeah. I think I spend spend the most don't ever read a book by its like, the relational part is the part that matters the most even giving example the arts Bank to me might be my my most significant material achievement. But if I have two neighbors who feel like they can't have parking spaces. And that that when we bring two hundred people to the Bank don't ever run for mayor. Okay. Taking off your. Right. But, but you know, but those moments where in the effort to do good for many. Kind of in a situation where you're where where your challenge do? You know what I'm saying? Really? I mean. I'm with you. Okay. We got rapper and I could tell everybody stag got it. Okay. Ready? Yes. Cubs or socks socks thicker, thin pizza thin. These days. Sixteen inch twelve in softball. Sixteen inch Sears are Hancock. See Laker river river you have four or five. Vote twice next election. Folks, we got the Astra gates here on Chicago stories. Thank you so much for making time, brother. You've been listening to Chicago stories with mayor Rahm Emanuel. You can subscribe and leave a review on apple podcasts and tweet your guest ideas, using hashtag shy stories. Thanks for listening.

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Willie L. Brown Jr.

PODSHIP EARTH

29:53 min | 7 months ago

Willie L. Brown Jr.

"Welcome to Japan. This this is your host. Jared Blumenfeld I and each of us. There are those who have lifted us up those who have helped us become who we are personally and professionally when I walked into room. Two hundred of San San Francisco City Hall and met Willie L Brown junior for the first time he was the man and I was the third year old radical environmentalist. It was two thousand and one and he hired me on the spot to lead. San Francisco's Environment Department. He took a big risk on me but more than that as a bus. He backed up every decision. I ever made both good and bad. And I'm glad to say we've been friends ever since in California and beyond Willie Brown is a legend. He is and will likely remain California's longest serving speaker. Andrew San Francisco's first African American Mayor Willie Brown was born in the East Texas town of Mineola where mob violence often prevented African Americans from voting. Willie's first job was as a shoe shine boy in whites only Baba shop. He later worked as the janitor. A field hand and as a fry cook and in nineteen fifty wanted the age of seventy. He went to San Francisco to live with his uncle and in in order to pay for college at San Francisco State and then Hastings Law School Willie to the Doorman and as jeter Willie Brown was first elected to the California. The phone is state assembly in one thousand nine hundred sixty four nine thousand nine hundred seventy five brown authored and lobbied for the successful passage of the consenting adult sex bill that legalized is homosexuality in California and in Nineteen Eighty Willie Brown became California's Assembly Speaker. And according to The New York Times became one of the country's most most powerful state legislators in addition to all Willy Brown's accomplishment. He's also got impatience of Huma. An amazing sense of style a love of of Great Food and watches no less than four movies a week. Maybe that's because in the ninety s Willie played himself in the godfather part three had roles in Georgia the jungle. The princess diaries one of my favorite movies and in the hope where Willie played the Mayor San Francisco which he actually was in the real world from nineteen one thousand nine hundred sixty two two thousand and four today among the literally hundreds of activities that Willie Brown engages in each week. He helps oversee the Willie. L Brown Junior Institute Institute on Politics and Public Service at San Francisco State which trains Juden for careers in Municipal County and regional governments. I need up with Willie. Brown at Cafe de la Presse on Grant Street in San Francisco recalled this Christmas special. This is the Willie Brown Christmas special. So Willie Christmas present for me exactly original original scrooge opposite the opposite screwed. You're the most generous person I've ever met. I remember like literally the first day I started working for. You gave everyone a bottle of dom perignon champagne for Christmas. You are the most generous Christmas ever. I love Having Fun with people and I want everybody to be happy and so therefore if I can share in bring that joy and that smile I do you really do I think about you said jared two things one come and join me for for these meetings and at the end of the meeting you said what do you notice this and I said actually. He didn't say anything in the entire meeting. And you're like that's the nature of really really is i. Hi developed the ability along time ago too. Listen and I think jared I came from my mother. She told me in Texas years ago zero before she let me fly on my own. That you really better off. If you hear everybody out you learn a lot more than you trying to share. You're you're limited wisdom with them and that has parlayed into a successful career. Not only did he listen to. People came into the room. I bet you did something that I didn't think any other mayor of the politicians do on Saturdays like the first Saturday of the month. You'd open up City Hall and you'd sit down with people and listen into them and literally from crackpots geniuses and then you'd send them my way I sent them your way but it was not exclusive. I'd suspend them the other people as well I wouldn't overload you. But clearly people who live in a city where they have elected elected representation that elected representation needs to afford them an ear whether you can do anything about their problem on not having having somebody to at least listen to it is almost as important as an answer. We had a lot of fun one of the funniest things we ever did. was someone had the segway and they brought it to city hall and I just happened to appear in the moment that you had two of them I and you and I went all the way around on the marble floors of these segues. An I remember the very well because I had no idea there were no breaks and that you really had to figure out how to use your body. Wait till stop that segue and John Door who apparently had been the silicone valley financer of that instrument of that. Obviously that environmentally sensitive instrument really wanted to highlight it and he had not been able to get any way to highlight it. You and I robbing around City Hall highlighted Segues more than anybody in the airport who uses it currently as as a means of transportation for security purposes. I've kind of get to see how different Sacramento is compared to the Sacramento. That you you described to me I mean the Sacramento you describe to me was like very orderly what's happened and kind of reflect back on the Sacramento that the you helped oversee well. The voters in nineteen ninety pass something called term limits in. It literally meant that after six years every member of the lower house of the legislature would be out for life every senator after two terms eight years would be out for life so people no longer considered being in the halls of the legislature as a legitimate career option. Where they would what I learn and then they could execute and they could really do something about addressing the needs of the people of this state that that has plagued the legislature till this day not until about two thousand twelve that they're get to be any light as to why I you ought to last more than six years when they went to a twelve year Max by all the members of either house us in that too has not yet been a real blessing for what we need in terms of getting back to the stable relationship that I enjoyed in my experience for more than thirty years of being state elected official state of California no longer has access to that kind of expertise? It may eventually develop that kind of expertise. But in the meantime there is a major handicap. Because you do not have skill management theory a Titians who we'll have real beliefs other than that pushed by their party. Label or by whomever may have sent them there. I suspect that Washington suffers from the same illness that the state of California suffers from and that is that people do not fill the need to really be career oriented in every aspect of what they're doing one for public policy purposes that means you're RMC is and your advocacy may not stand the test of time in the measurement nation man by fellow. Legislators you no longer have that now. It's just quick dry intolerant around differences of opinion. And that's heard in this democracy one of the things that I know you for is you're incredibly responsive if someone someone phoned back if someone sends you note you send a note like that also seems completely out of vogue. How do we bring back some of that? Some of that humanity not to politics. It'll come with new people being elected to public office who are not burdened with answering only to a very limited constituency and who can actually based on their training and their beliefs managed to get themselves elected and reelected selected on the basis of their performance rather than they're entertaining when young people. Come to you Willie and say I'm I'm thinking of entering politics. How do you help them through that? Discussion eyesight them in my own career. I immigrated here from Texas at the High School went to college and Law. School got credentialed and I tell them right out of the box. You cannot be helpful unless you maximize your training opportunities and your credentialing and then after you've done that you'll be in a position where you can demonstrate service that might it causes you to be rewarded by people asking you the run. It's really better off. If somebody some movement some collection of peoples as I think you would make a good representative this self starting representation. Being the hallmark of what most office holders APP today is ultimately counterproductive. Because usually they stand for nothing. They believe in nothing except reelection. The San Francisco the you when you first came here from the Texas is very different than the one now like. Tell us about like those changes. Are they a positive. Are they negative. Like how do you view the San Francisco Today San Francisco today as dramatically different from what it was when I arrived when I arrived. It didn't take me more than a month to recognize that there was a great opportunity for hard work service and believe ability to be rewarded. That's no longer the mentality of San Francisco. San Francisco is as played. Eight with in EPA Tude among people particularly elected type as is the case with Washington DC Z.. Or as the case with the White House and that ultimately means it's less of an attractive exciting inspirational city than than it was when Iraq is hard to believe. Like I make you two thousand and one which is coming up on nineteen years. It feels like the blink of an eye. I think what one of the things that you'll thinking about as as we enter twenty twenty that give you hope and inspiration when it comes to San Francisco Disco. Well I frankly hope that my own children will start to think positively about participating in the political process and pursuant public office. I would hope that the interns that I am shepherd and Marshall and at San Francisco go state working in city government will translate into people who will contribute one way or another to the operation of the city and I'm hopeful that the radical changes that need to be made and how we govern ourselves in the city. When I arrived here almost every body? He was a citywide elected official. Not a local little district elected official because the city is so small in it of itself. If that process can be changed the results will be. I think again optimism about this city one of the positive things for me about San Francisco as a as they spend more time in Sacramento is. The food is still incredible. Like tell us about your love of food what you find out in this city almost right out of the box his that. You really don't need a kitchen in your house that their kitchens on every block in every neighborhood good and the quality of what's there and the diversity of what's there plus the cultural influence of what's their makes dining dining experience to be explored and employed in enjoyed as much as traveling to the seven continents Of the world. That's how important it is in San Francisco to have an appreciation for good quality taste in in food and drink and believe me coming out of Texas where there was very few options for what you had in terms of food in the get here to San Francisco in one day eat Mexican food the next day. Eight Korean food the next day eat eat food from a prepared in the south where I came from is amazing unto itself but to find it distributed all over the city. Where for every neighborhood has his own indigenous group of restaurants and they're usually populated by people who are not trying to conquer the world world in the in terms of food but they simply work and people producing a quality product that allows their family? They have a a place to live in and in survive while at the same time serving their neighbors and being paid for it it's fabulous to. How do you got which restaurant to go to any time? Usually it's who whomever I happen to be with. Somebody is visiting me from Sacramento in Los Essential lives or from Texas or I will inquire as to what their preferences may be in. Most people. Interestingly enough if they're not from San Francisco us go want to explore something unique about the city in always you start with food the next next thing after food. You're veracious watcher of movies. Like every time I talked to you like how many movies you ought to week. It's incredible AH. I am short on my movie attendance of late because of so many other things that I am mandated to to do. But if I don't see four movies a week I am not satisfied at all and interestingly enough I see whatever is on the screen. I don't really plan to go to a particular movie. I don't say hey I'm GonNa go see star wars while. No that's not true. I'M GONNA go see whatever's take time at this moment that I haven't to our opening to see I don't care what it is. That's how much I love movies. One of the hallmarks of Willie Brown in which is on display. Even though we're in a CREPE ARY is your sartorial excellent like why is it so important in coming into twenty twenty any to dress pefectly. Well I have always always loved clothing as a matter of fact jared when I lived in taxes X.'s. People now say they shop online. Well you know that was something called a catalog and it was a sears roebuck catalog. In sometimes I'd order from sears Roebuck. And by the time they shipped to me. I'd already outgrown what I often so but it was a preference for clothing that I came from a combination of my uncle in my mother the two of them at all times would be impeccable. They could come to breakfasts and be well-dressed and as a result of that it became a part of who I am and I discovered that it really is a cause for people to pay attention to you when you've paid attention to yourself in every way when you've made it clearly comfortable for them not to have to turn away if there's something about you. That's the shovel. That is very helpful. So you're definitely the as strong and vital as a man half you're age what's your what's your secret. I mean you've told us about food and being well dressed like how do you do it really well. You really do need to physically take care of south. Under all circumstances you really need to be mindful Foale of the health requirements. You need to be mindful of the exercise requirements. You need to be mindful of the fresh air you need debris you need to to avoid things that are detrimental to your physical system whether we smokin war excessive alcohol or any of those kinds they stay away from all those things then no reason to do it and you don't really enjoy it anyway. All those things are true but you must also workout. Well I love frankly. Frankly I love going to the gym. I lived in buildings which they have such a facility and I try to do at least an hour a day one of the things that you notice when I spend time around you. Is you kind of have this very grounded. Sense of calmness. Have many people are losing their head around you so you always keep your com. What's the secret? I am concerned when there is really trauma in the lives of other people but I know to evidence any wall. Inability to be of assistance is counterproductive. So I want at all times to be where that I can actually eight people rather than have people trying to aid me. You've been an amazing mental to to countless people. How do you see mental mental shift as as part of your legacy? Mentorship is a mandatory. Believe me when people talk about what are you want to be a your legacy building named after you. Do you want a bridge named deal. Do you want a program Nam Nam. No I want a collection of replacements. sements who have in one manner or another learned from me adopted much of what I do and and then expand what their own ability beyond where I let them go. I mean that that's an amazing statement of legacy in San Francisco plays kind of oversize role both in terms of California politics but also national politics. The state is the fifth largest. Just Kinda me in the world so even when California's having this big role in the nation why on California issues taking center stage simply flavor. 'cause people do not understand nor appreciate California even the newscasters were unable to penetrate in a way that would allow California to become the issue California's performance in terms of how you manage food production. How you manage water distribution how you address the land issue? How do you address the issue of diversity how you're just the issue of education occasion and above all else how you address? The issue of economics represents a prototype that many of the places in the nation Russian could use yet the California experience in California concept a sometimes demeaned sometimes laughed at and that's unfortunate so when do a mayor And I remember like we created a single Earth Day breakfast with Francesca Veto and it's probably like the nine hundred day breakfast by now in my last day breakfast we did this in cold. How Green is Brown? Aw and his amazing you set this goal of zero waste for trash you put in place. The integrated past management for the city's parks you acquired. New Buildings Be Green. We had the first hydrogen fuel cell Honda. which is like three million dollars? You and I nearly nearly crashed like you did all these green things like how. How do you view the environment now? And at the time. Why did you WANNA take credit? Full the green stuff you're doing well it's important. Frankly that credit not be in the consideration of people engage in an innovative in creative ways. Many people are motivated if they think they're going to be acknowledged as having done it in so if you can get them to infecting gauge and become involved let them take their credit frankly in the halls of the legislature. Sure my goal in life was to have every member have his name on a bill before mine and that was important. And it's the same way if we're going to deal with the issues involved in the environment we've really got to get people motivated. Frankly to make it a priority with them for clean air for good quality. Water somehow convince people if we can that the the whole business of what happens with energy must be done in such a way that it improves. The environment rather than adversely personally affects environment the business involving climate. It's clearly some that we need to try to figure out how to get people involved. And the way in which the motivate them to so participate. My goal was always that I did not whether it was the ban on assault weapons that we had Mike. Ross do a whether it was or divestment in apartheid that we had maxine waters does do that free Nelson Mandela whether it was The business of emissions of that we had Byron Sher the come the responsible person for whether it was the business of managing water along before anybody tried to manage water charlie warn Tried to do exactly that and we hope orchestrate that whole business of what happens with reference to on the health L. Standards that emanate from environmental quality and environmental control. We had a number of people trying to put those those programs together particularly interested enough. Legislators from places like Marin County or legislators the ones from Santa Barbara area we at the state level now have a governor who experienced that kind of development in San Francisco as part of all the things that I ever dead dead and with him at the helm now. You've got a better shot in his emphasis on the Central Valley in the way. Okay then he has been playing and his becoming like the governor from the Central Valley. Although he's from San Francisco will cause the farmers is to want to follow his leadership on land. Planning and land use all those things are part of what we call climate control and environment. One thing that you also didn't take credit full but you did which actually has led to the development of the southeast part of the city's you help close down hunters point power plant you you took on. PG early and hod this issue of environmental justice namely if you look at pollution across the United States Cross is California you can find where the pollution is gonna be by wear low income communities of Colorado folk involve. If they're isolated there will not be enough strength politically to achieve anything. So you really need to try to engage and involve and have people not become only addicted to participate in in their short and narrow goal period in. That is how I tried to manage and how I tried operate so as you think about. Willy Brown's Christmas special which is like. What are you hoping for in the next few days like Christmas is offering time anxiety? How how do you manage this time of year mayor? I must tell you that. It's kind of amazing because the recycling of gifts have become the cornerstone of. I'm almost everybody these days and so what I've decided to do. Is I'll give a gift but I take directly to you and make you open it in front of me and and get your reaction because hold on to the return receipt and last night that actually delivered a gift to my lady friend Sonia and she and I said you know the nature of what I'm giving you is usable immediately because it's so cold in in San Francisco and you don't really have a quality code. She opened it and she says you know you. You're missing as what am I missing. Either you can't see a you know remember. I don't like blue. Eyed bought her a blue coke corrected almost immediately immediately back back to the place where I got. It got the same coat but in a different color it was perfect. I anticipate somehow having that become the cornerstone stone of the Willie Brown. Christmas I like re gifting is the like reused gift. Yeah recycle final question is I grew up with two Jewish parents celebrated Christmas and I kind of feel gypped. I don't get to go to Chinese food on Christmas Day. which is like a Jewish tradition of like? I want to do that. Have you ever done that. Well no I have not because on Christmas Day among black people here only black food. You're in trouble so it's GonNa be Christmas Turkey stuff with corn bread dressing sweet potatoes and in this case real yams and obviously sweet potato pie or a a pie that represents something different from what we normally called. Pumpkin feel feel bad they are amendment. Well well yes. That's part of my birthday because I li- and celebrate my birthday more often than most people have birthdays. That's a that's a good trick. I like that it works very well. Well thank you said. It's been a pleasure. I love catching out with you. And I hope you have a fabulous twenty twenty all right. Thank you very much a huge. Thank you to my mental friend and boss Willie Brown. I continue to lend so much from this living legend from the importance of listening a frightening for what you believe in the long game but mostly what I walk away from each each meeting with Willie l Brown. Junior is a sense of vitality of Vega and for love of life. Thank you so much being part of the culture journey from the entire hardship Gotcha as true sound engineer spayed executive producer. David Kahn from me. Jared Blumenfeld I wish you amazing. Twenty twenty

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