26 Burst results for "Citron"

Michele Mouton, Queen B of Group B

Past Gas

04:12 min | 2 months ago

Michele Mouton, Queen B of Group B

"Yeah. So today we're discussing Michelle. mouton. A woman. We've this is this the first time we've discussed a woman on the show. This might be the first episode dedicated to a lady. which is a bit embarrassing. I would say so yeah. But no better woman to start off this trend with and Michelle. She is easily one of the best rally drivers ever. She's a beast. So I'm really stoked that we can tell the story even if it took us a little while to get to it, that's on us but but it's interesting because motorsport is really one of the sports where women and men compete against each other as true like she's not the best. Female driver ever. She's one of the best rally drivers at. Yeah. Regardless of gender she's one of the greatest. and honestly like just watching a video of her rally driving makes me sweat. Over, yeah she's like she's the person who when we talk about. Like rally cars now are all-wheel-drive. Wheel drive. But when Audi showed up with quattro and just started smoking everybody that was Michelle. Meantime that was young Mouton Bay. mouton on the track. Yeah I mean. To your point James like drag racing of course is or was kind of dominated by women at one point all the force sisters were just tearing it up. There's really no reason. For it to be separated by gender in in Motor Sport Really of course right now there's the there's the W. series, which is a like a women's open-wheel series. At I think that's more for them to kind of get exposure and it proved themselves in like a formula car but I'm looking forward to seeing some of those drivers come up in the formula. One. Soon hopefully, it would just make it more interesting for crying out loud if nothing else I agree let's get into it a. all right. Let's fired up. All Right Michelle Mouton entered this world on June twenty third nineteen, fifty one in the French Riviera more specifically the idyllic town of grass cross grass Ross. The Idyllic town of Gross France, the perfume capital of the world grassi surrounded by fields of aromatic flowers and home to Francis. Oldest perfumery GALLIMARD. Look I'm friend by far French is the language that I have the hardest time pronouncing both words and names I apologize profusely to anyone with a modicum of sense of how to pronounce stuff I. Think you're doing great. I think I think here like right there. Thank you, Joe, unlike many drivers whose family have a history in the sport returns family made a living growing roses and jasmine for the perfume industry mouton spent her youth skiing doing ballet and excelling in school. But just beyond the flower fields sat the mountain. Stages used for local rallies and wouldn't be long before the engine notes trickling down into the valley beckoned to Michelle mcgann discovered her love of cars at fourteen years old when she would steal her father. Pierre's Citron to seavy and take it out for joyrides. Quote for me at the time a car always meant freedom and independence she said but driving wasn't something she could possibly see a future in it for anyone to envision that path for mere enjoyment to making something your life's purpose but you could argue this especially from. Models for women on the racing stage were few and far between. So after graduating high school Bhutan took up odd jobs working as a ski instructor, a Care Assistant in a home for the disabled and eventually at her father's insurance company until she began studying to be a lawyer but something unexpected would quickly put an end to that career path her entry into a competitive rock and roll dance contest.

Michelle Michelle Mouton Michelle. Mouton Michelle Mcgann Audi Bhutan Pierre French Riviera Gross France James Gallimard JOE Citron Francis Instructor Care Assistant
"citron" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

08:44 min | 11 months ago

"citron" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Harms including or concrete harms that include privacy invasions and that exclude satire and parody. And that do deceive the reasonable an average person Those are what we bear types of speech that we've think don't even fall within the boundaries. Right they're not protected by the First Amendment and free speech values because they essentially are tantamount to defamation defamation impersonation because we have we have In law allows us to prescribe all sorts of lies that caused ause cognisable harm and that includes perjury impersonation of government officials and other damaging falsehoods and deep fakes. That caused these kinds of tangible harms constitutes speech that we don't think is either covered by the first amendment or it doesn't receive the kind of important protection and where we agree there should be Limits is when when deep fakes involve satire and parody that would be in poor and concern public figures and officials that we would say this is important Horton for public discourse. This is not the sort of thing that should be banned. That law provides a lot of give within the First Amendment to Bandy fakes. And also let's just talk about free speech values right For the person who's being impersonated rate it they have their speech is being co opted and often the net effect is also also silencing to them so you're not only stealing someone's words and images right. You're you're expressing in a nonconsensual way and pretending ending to be saying something that they never did or said And so it has zero evidentiary value at its undermines the notion of self governance because the deep fake we can't assess the credibility of what the person is saying because they didn't say it right so as we think of notions of self governance of why we think why we care so much about free speech because it lets us figure out the kind of world we wanna live in right. It helps us make informed decisions about our democracy and more more broadly about our our culture deep fakes under map project right. We can't figure out in a credible way there isn't ferocity behind. Who's speaking and talking right? And certainly if we think about the marketplace of ideas metaphor which doesn't mean it's always about the pursuit of truth but the notion that we could interrogate truths will deep fakes. are positively false rate. They undermine a marketplace of ideas and distorted with falsehoods so even with our our strong commitment in the United States and To free speech under the First Amendment as well as our own free speech values. I think this is speech that is harmful full to the marketplace of ideas. It's harmful to our system of free expression and that's why I think we feel comfortable bobby and is we talked about our legal solutions about proposing laws on the books that exist now and the potential for laws that could ban harmful impersonations of of individuals individuals that we think we can and should ban them. Let me just put stop all of that. I don't do this in any way. Having to be ineffective free speech in in I'd be upset about that if it if it were I think the idea is to insofar as we're talking about any interventions that would tend to punish or deter speech speech we're talking about punishing they're deterring speech already unlawful. That's already perhaps It's a civil liability issue criminal liability issue and it's presenting in the particularly dangerous technological format which gives rise to all sorts of complexities in the interesting question is in what is it. You want to try to remove the marketplace of ideas because it's so fraudulent which is basically talking about That shouldn't be controversial. It's just a question. How do you come up with levers it actually do this effectively without out being over deterrent in this very complex intersection of technology and business in communications? So let's close by talking a little bit more about those potential legal solutions. The two of you both addressed this in in some depth in your original paper What do you have in mind in terms of levers that the legal system can provide to address the problem? We do have civil towards so we have you know defamation and other kinds of intestinal flora emotional distress. We have tort claims. We've got potentially some state criminal laws against impersonation the problem album though with either using sort of the civil law system and So lawsuits as well as prosecutions is that we have a bunch of barriers are going to make them difficult which is finding the perpetrator right. Identifying the person having the resources to bring lawsuits if you can find them having them be in our jurisdiction jurisdiction so that we can bring them into our courts and so they're so many barriers. I feel like Oh you know bobby as we talked about it. The the number of barriers to adjudication adjudication that is a civil arena as well as prosecution seemed almost insurmountable. We laid them out in an endeavour to be clear and comprehensive but we also contemplated the notion of the cheapest cost of order as the platform and so and right now especially at the content layer sort of social media companies. That will be of course. Involved in the viral spread of deep fakes that are harmful and not satire and parody their immune from from liability They enjoy legal shield under the communications decency. Act That's very broadly interpreted and so we sort of as we think of if it's now that there aren't legal claims under tort law under you know potential for criminal prosecutions but we also wanted to think hard about those gatekeepers I because they are so important to the spread of deep picks and so we consider the possibility of changes to section two thirty. That are in line with. I'm something that Ben and I witness I of argued Sort of approach that would condition the immunity reasonable content moderation practices in the face of illegality that causes causes clear harm as we keep the immunity but condition and we also added and I thought was really helpful and thinking through with bobby additional requirements the conditioning section to thirty immunity as well sort of pairing it with an anti slapp a federal anti slapp provisions. So that we wouldn't have sort of strike abusive lawsuits and Also considering a possible sunset provision. So I'm GonNa let Bobby takeover here but we we sort of thought through not only the potential for going after the individuals else but the platforms. I don't have anything to add to that Other than there is an element when you look at any one slice of the solution sets. We examined an element of despair. Hands up in the air That that didn't seem very satisfied. That didn't silver boat. Let's move onto the next one. All right what. What looking business offers is there? A business model solution to provide security from deep bakes as a solution and and bear. That leads down a path. It's invasive of of privacy but we may well go down that path at some point if that's what the market starts to demand what about education while we talked about that already in the liars dividend is the cost in. When you get to the end you want as paper author you want to either be able to identify something that looks like a silver bullet perhaps or at least a slew solutions that though individually inadequate they're all bricks but maybe they make a decent wall when all combined together we come to the end and we say like some of these will help a little bit some of this? We're going to have to get used to in this is the world woman into and there isn't always some Hollywood ending to these types of problems on that terribly. cheery note Let's leave it there. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US thank you so much guys. You've been listening to the ninth episode of Arbiters of truth. The law for PODCASTS. Miniseries on disinformation. You you can find past episodes in the locker. PODCAST feed and we'll be back with another episode next Thursday. The Lover Podcast is produced in cooperation with the Brookings Institution. Thanks this week to Bobby Chesney Daniels. CETERA are music is performed by SOFI again. Our audio engineers were Michaela Fogel and and Jacob Schultz and our producer Gen patch. Hal Please ridden review the law fair podcast and as always thanks for listening.

Bobby Chesney Daniels perjury United States Brookings Institution Bandy Horton SOFI Hal Hollywood Michaela Fogel producer Ben Jacob Schultz
"citron" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

08:44 min | 11 months ago

"citron" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Harms including or concrete harms that include privacy invasions and that exclude satire and parody. And that do deceive the reasonable an average person Those are what we bear types of speech that we've think don't even fall within the boundaries. Right they're not protected by the First Amendment and free speech values because they essentially are tantamount to defamation defamation impersonation because we have we have In law allows us to prescribe all sorts of lies that caused ause cognisable harm and that includes perjury impersonation of government officials and other damaging falsehoods and deep fakes. That caused these kinds of tangible harms constitutes speech that we don't think is either covered by the first amendment or it doesn't receive the kind of important protection and where we agree there should be Limits is when when deep fakes involve satire and parody that would be in poor and concern public figures and officials that we would say this is important Horton for public discourse. This is not the sort of thing that should be banned. That law provides a lot of give within the First Amendment to Bandy fakes. And also let's just talk about free speech values right For the person who's being impersonated rate it they have their speech is being co opted and often the net effect is also also silencing to them so you're not only stealing someone's words and images right. You're you're expressing in a nonconsensual way and pretending ending to be saying something that they never did or said And so it has zero evidentiary value at its undermines the notion of self governance because the deep fake we can't assess the credibility of what the person is saying because they didn't say it right so as we think of notions of self governance of why we think why we care so much about free speech because it lets us figure out the kind of world we wanna live in right. It helps us make informed decisions about our democracy and more more broadly about our our culture deep fakes under map project right. We can't figure out in a credible way there isn't ferocity behind. Who's speaking and talking right? And certainly if we think about the marketplace of ideas metaphor which doesn't mean it's always about the pursuit of truth but the notion that we could interrogate truths will deep fakes. are positively false rate. They undermine a marketplace of ideas and distorted with falsehoods so even with our our strong commitment in the United States and To free speech under the First Amendment as well as our own free speech values. I think this is speech that is harmful full to the marketplace of ideas. It's harmful to our system of free expression and that's why I think we feel comfortable bobby and is we talked about our legal solutions about proposing laws on the books that exist now and the potential for laws that could ban harmful impersonations of of individuals individuals that we think we can and should ban them. Let me just put stop all of that. I don't do this in any way. Having to be ineffective free speech in in I'd be upset about that if it if it were I think the idea is to insofar as we're talking about any interventions that would tend to punish or deter speech speech we're talking about punishing they're deterring speech already unlawful. That's already perhaps It's a civil liability issue criminal liability issue and it's presenting in the particularly dangerous technological format which gives rise to all sorts of complexities in the interesting question is in what is it. You want to try to remove the marketplace of ideas because it's so fraudulent which is basically talking about That shouldn't be controversial. It's just a question. How do you come up with levers it actually do this effectively without out being over deterrent in this very complex intersection of technology and business in communications? So let's close by talking a little bit more about those potential legal solutions. The two of you both addressed this in in some depth in your original paper What do you have in mind in terms of levers that the legal system can provide to address the problem? We do have civil towards so we have you know defamation and other kinds of intestinal flora emotional distress. We have tort claims. We've got potentially some state criminal laws against impersonation the problem album though with either using sort of the civil law system and So lawsuits as well as prosecutions is that we have a bunch of barriers are going to make them difficult which is finding the perpetrator right. Identifying the person having the resources to bring lawsuits if you can find them having them be in our jurisdiction jurisdiction so that we can bring them into our courts and so they're so many barriers. I feel like Oh you know bobby as we talked about it. The the number of barriers to adjudication adjudication that is a civil arena as well as prosecution seemed almost insurmountable. We laid them out in an endeavour to be clear and comprehensive but we also contemplated the notion of the cheapest cost of order as the platform and so and right now especially at the content layer sort of social media companies. That will be of course. Involved in the viral spread of deep fakes that are harmful and not satire and parody their immune from from liability They enjoy legal shield under the communications decency. Act That's very broadly interpreted and so we sort of as we think of if it's now that there aren't legal claims under tort law under you know potential for criminal prosecutions but we also wanted to think hard about those gatekeepers I because they are so important to the spread of deep picks and so we consider the possibility of changes to section two thirty. That are in line with. I'm something that Ben and I witness I of argued Sort of approach that would condition the immunity reasonable content moderation practices in the face of illegality that causes causes clear harm as we keep the immunity but condition and we also added and I thought was really helpful and thinking through with bobby additional requirements the conditioning section to thirty immunity as well sort of pairing it with an anti slapp a federal anti slapp provisions. So that we wouldn't have sort of strike abusive lawsuits and Also considering a possible sunset provision. So I'm GonNa let Bobby takeover here but we we sort of thought through not only the potential for going after the individuals else but the platforms. I don't have anything to add to that Other than there is an element when you look at any one slice of the solution sets. We examined an element of despair. Hands up in the air That that didn't seem very satisfied. That didn't silver boat. Let's move onto the next one. All right what. What looking business offers is there? A business model solution to provide security from deep bakes as a solution and and bear. That leads down a path. It's invasive of of privacy but we may well go down that path at some point if that's what the market starts to demand what about education while we talked about that already in the liars dividend is the cost in. When you get to the end you want as paper author you want to either be able to identify something that looks like a silver bullet perhaps or at least a slew solutions that though individually inadequate they're all bricks but maybe they make a decent wall when all combined together we come to the end and we say like some of these will help a little bit some of this? We're going to have to get used to in this is the world woman into and there isn't always some Hollywood ending to these types of problems on that terribly. cheery note Let's leave it there. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US thank you so much guys. You've been listening to the ninth episode of Arbiters of truth. The law for PODCASTS. Miniseries on disinformation. You you can find past episodes in the locker. PODCAST feed and we'll be back with another episode next Thursday. The Lover Podcast is produced in cooperation with the Brookings Institution. Thanks this week to Bobby Chesney Daniels. CETERA are music is performed by SOFI again. Our audio engineers were Michaela Fogel and and Jacob Schultz and our producer Gen patch. Hal Please ridden review the law fair podcast and as always thanks for listening.

Bobby Chesney Daniels perjury United States Brookings Institution Bandy Horton SOFI Hal Hollywood Michaela Fogel producer Ben Jacob Schultz
"citron" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

12:08 min | 11 months ago

"citron" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Allies dividend and one of my favorite moments Daniel when you testifying before Congress about this one of the questions came about what is the live dividend in your face just lit up Vedrinne paying attention so if you could please tell us what is the lies dividend and I like. I'm going to bobby. I'M GONNA call on you because I I want to make clear that it was determine bobby coins in our what our drafts and and I had written to bobby in the comments this is. This is such a beautifully captures. What we were what we were worrying? Worrying about. And Bobby's response in the in the draft back to me. I WANNA get rid of this. I don't like it it's cheesy and I thought absolutely not it and that's why I do I light up because I think it and let you explain it but I think it really. Beautifully captures the kind of trust and troop decay. That profoundly only worried us well that was characteristically to kind of IT IS I. Think one of our our favorite elements of the project was zapped taking her inside and it is a you know it is completely a joint product. Other you're right. I did try to advertise the name after I specified it and just feeling like somehow is it was is too on the nose or something but boy it seemed to work and it came up again this afternoon. I drew Harwell in the Washington. Post had a piece just re tweeted that where he was making use of it which I really appreciated so the liars dividend this is a straightforward idea that when we think about the fakes threat Very often were drawn to the possibility that a major part of the solution will be education if we could just get people to be better critical consumers of media that will at least ameliorate the problem setting aside. How we've already got ample reason to what people to be critical consumers of media and we haven't yet figured out how to actually move people in that direction through any level of education? Gatien setting that aside even if we could do it. It's not clear that the benefit we get on the deep fakes. Immunity Front would be worth the cost because is inevitable correlated aspect of that sort of educational impact would be people becoming inherently skeptical. That what they're seeing or hearing is legitimate or real authentic and correspondingly that people who are liars people who want to deny something that they really did say or do. We'll take advantage edge of that by saying not fake news but that's D.C fake news and I think we're already beginning to see indications of this. It's a it's a real dilemma. I don't think there's much we can do about it because there has been so much attention paid to debates. The idea is circulating very widely that there's all sorts of stuff you can fake with with the right technology and liars are going to try to take advantage of that in courts of law in court of public opinion that it's something that I I think is really important about this idea. which is that defects are sort of inherently scary You know the idea that you you can't trust what you're seeing right in front of you but I would argue that. This idea of fakes has been particularly powerful right now. Now at least within the United States probably within any country that sort of dealing with this problem of the Internet kind of gone wrong. Where're her and over to the United States? Here on the one hand were sort of facing this crisis where people feel like. They can't trust what is in front of them From social media from public figures. I'm thinking obviously of the president but also that we don't know if education occasion on these issues will make things any better that you know. Bobby you and I right on law fair every day about you know various legal issues. And at times I say to myself I think this is really helping and just being for myself here at times it just feels like banging my head against the wall. It is is there. An extent to which sort of anxiety about deep fakes is really a projection of anxiety. Bill other things. I think it's maybe the tip of the spear for this larger set of problems. I share that feeling of wondering whether the only people listening are the already convinced. We have general provident society in our information in space of people who aren't already convinced not wanting to hear what others have to say it stems from the same sets of cognitive ICIES and by the way while we're in the business of giving credit where credit's due in the paper that Daniel Nike Co authored I really wanted. I would really want to allocate credit for the outstanding survey of the cognitive bias. Type problems problems. That fronts a lot of the paper to Danielle who really had such a keen grass with all the different dimensions. That were coming into play is very depressing. Article Michael to work on As you fight imagine but it was offset by the joy of working with her. Yes I think he fakes and the attention. It's getting is in some ways of bright right shiny object in some ways because it's not fully present yet as a threat by the way. We're really clear I think in all our writings about this to underscore that. We're anticipating the problem and forewarning of it and so it gets a little worrying when people say you know you talking about this but we have different problems I know. I know that we do have a really serious problem album in nothing. We say about deep. Fakes is in any way to detract from the currently preposterously. Bad problem of disinformation and cheap fakes. We've I got and just one thing to add that I find also really depressing. Is that so free of me. I'm always here with the sad stuff stuff. That an often the response to to bobby I is video and audio have had their day. They are no longer going to be helpful. As has privacy and that in some sense we should just get over it. That is the notion that video and audio is useful and helpful whether it's it's evident matters or the way in which we understand our TV culture is just. We're going to get beyond audio and video and I find that a bit depressing in part because we have often seen the story of a human rights and our understanding of of real suffering is is we have. The public often gains attention into those issues because of photographs because of video that brings alive meaningful human suffering. And so the idea that someday video and audio don't matter is to belie the fact that it's really incredibly important to document human rights abuses and to bring alive suffering so I find the notion that we should just get over over ourselves and just give up on the project of having any uses for audio and video. Both I think unrealistic troubling right and that of course the notion that we should get it over our privacy that the deep fakes isn't a new problem that it's not going to present new problems for privacy and there is no privacy. Anyway you know we. Are we fighting against that tie. Hi but it's certainly one that I think we have to. We have to press hard against so you gave me the invitation welby and I might accept it to play the skeptic of why I should we be particularly concerned about this threat I mean especially given the two big examples that people worried about recently have not been deep faked so so the first one was the Pelosi video which was slowed down to make her appear intoxicated and that was just using very standard video editing technology technology and the second one more recently was video of Biden with comments will take a dramatically out of context to be extremely misleading. So neither of those date fake attack -nology that nothing particularly new but they are still using images and those cognitive bias to sort of motivate and enacts people. So why should we worry particularly about the date fake threat perfectly fair question. Elliott Elliott the challenge to me by adding further that friends like Sam Gregory. A witness one time observed that some of the the worst harms don't require changing the media at all just change the caption just describe it differently and and And then people will believe that. So where's the negative value added if you will the deep fake trend and I would argue. It's GonNa be this. Because of of the substantially in qualitatively higher degree of difficulty of both detection and persuasion wants detected persuasion of others. Something's fake so the the the inherent credibility of it's it's a higher level of magnitude and the quality of it being above the threshold of what our eyes and our ears normally really can can detect a matter of centuries of evolution. Entrusting what they tell US looks authentic. I saw it. I heard it getting above that threshold matters because that can make inroads amongst the audience that isn't disposed by prior belief conception echo chambers. They live in. It'll make inroads it's with the people who the cheaper stuff might not so for example when the when the Pelosi video and the Biden Truncated video went around. I don't I feel like I was particularly inclined on the friend to believe him and I was pretty ready. My first thought was like this. This looks like it's been doctored. This seems like it might have been. This seems unlikely because my own insider preconceptions didn't include policies trucker or Biden sickly saying crazy. Things there other spur homes ready to believe that For someone like me in a scenario that afraid of US necessarily that something that looks really legitimately real might have more purchasing. Gotcha so you're gonNA drive the wedge further with these once they're deployed effectively technologically. But there's there's an art to it right to really do it effectively actively what is that caption you put in there. Just how bad you go with the fake crews apple. I would argue that you'll be far more effective as a malefactor if you use a fake to put it in a pretty bad light the not in outrageously bad light originally bad light. It's GONNA set off red flags people wondering if they possibly are that stupid. Did they really do that. If you just go for a little bit of damage people not may not thank to ask so. We've talked about the Nancy Pelosi video and into that Joe Biden video which brings us inevitably to the twenty twenty election. We're obviously Evelyn. And I along with K clinic and the Lena Polyakova. I started this podcast in part to talk about this information in the run-up to the twenty twenty elections and I think deep fakes are particularly interesting in that context. Just as well you wrote in your original paper that elections are vulnerable to deep fakes and a separate and distinctive way. Can you talk a little bit about why that is it to be clear. It has a lot to their number of things not just elections that it has particular vulnerability to but at all to do with sort of decisional chokepoints. That is if you release a deep fake at a very very sensitive moment in time where we're making important decisions and those doesn't decisions Sion's and in some sense are irreparable. You can't turn back and election. You can't turn back an IPO. If a deep fake is released a just lost the right moment whether it's two days before an election the night before an initial public offering and the deep fake then can tip tip how people behave can tippin elections that deep fake. That bobby was mentioning about showing a candidate saying something really inflammatory right. It could change. How the voters? Maybe the voters don't come out to vote because they think well. Gosh if my candidate who I believed in said X Y and Z. I don't WanNa come out and vote for to them doesn't necessarily mean they'll they'll you'll flip their vote to the other side but it can fundamentally change the result the same is true of course with an IPO with a the head of the bank. Saying let's over the head of a company saying and doing something that was despicable or suggesting their business models a fake the IPO could crash and.

bobby I Joe Biden United States Nancy Pelosi Daniel Congress Washington president Harwell Bill Danielle Sion Michael Elliott Elliott Lena Polyakova Daniel Nike Co
"citron" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

01:30 min | 11 months ago

"citron" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"Knocked shit but the smell of stuff happening in the room and I screamed through. I couldn't help it. I tried to imagine there were other people in the room who wanted to watch the show but I I couldn't believe it and this woman at the end came up to me and rich and went the most entertaining thing about that entire show was your reaction. Ford actions is actually time travelling in time the fourth dimension his time so if it's in four d than should have come out in a different times of the year three size by state but I so we love to share ourselves up here. We drove so we like drove to the enfield a high square the Infield Holdings and we like the House numbers on the Internet so we looked at the house and then we find it and then we were like sat outside in our in our like Citron with sat there and stared at the window for ages. People live in that House that normal normal people live in the NFL. Not We just sat there way in and we were there for so long that we both I went curtain switch and then he said yes. Yes it did. It didn't switch. And then and then we sold together the other curtains screens and then ran off. And it was exhilarating it. It was someone just looking at the camera.

Citron Infield Holdings NFL
"citron" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"citron" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Now back to the episode was speaking with Daniel citron of the university of Maryland Danielle got interested in how fake video could increase the forces of hate exponentially there is a whole reddit thread devoted to depict sex videos of celebrities female celebrities like Emma Watson Anne Hathaway and others he went through the thread which I did you can see the conversation moving beyond Emma Watson to my girlfriend or that woman I hated in high school and I was close all the conversation that women you know what I thought was like the evil cyberstalking was all based on crude doctored photos of someone naked but if you work at it you could figure it out now we can put people into **** in ways that aren't devastate their career is the car I do see it says something of this new technology is being used to target women and these conversations are happening on the same forums on reddit when at the in cell movement was born right so I think this is especially important when we talk about famous women and their likeness a lot of men on the internet want to see their favorite actresses in positions that they wouldn't be able to see those actresses in and so with this technology it's quite easy to put someone's face on somebody else's body without the consent of the actual actress and actually SAG the Screen Actors Guild held a panel a few weeks ago to bring this up that like yes we're we're talking about this in terms of democracy and our political system and the upcoming election but we also have to talk about this in terms of the livelihood of women who make money on their likeness and his likeness is now being misappropriated yeah because they can destroy their careers and silence them there's actually case in India when people attempt to use deep fate **** to intimidate and silence a journalist schools run I you've I spoke about that case with Danielle the Indian journalist who had been very critical of Hindu politics nationalist politics and deep fake sex video sort of was spread basically to discredit her and spread through texting networks and went viral and she basically was devastated and went offline stop writing for like three weeks she's a journalist this is what she does for a living right so imagine that kind of granular individual harm and compare it with harm to CEOs the night before an IPO it deep fake is released that shows this person taking a bribe or doing drugs or whatever making it up but that tanks the IPO right this kind of media manipulation used to be confined to places like Disney and the output was blockbuster movies that a fictional but not fake now a I is being consumer ized and the tools to create convincing video spreading and that means creating the kind of chaos Daniel describes is also more and more accessible that threatens all of us one person working on the issue is hardly for read of Dartmouth university who's been called the father of digital forensics I'm concerned that once we know you can create fake content there's nothing stopping anybody from saying that any video is fake everybody has plausible deniability to rewind two years ago when the access Hollywood tape came out of president trump saying what he does to women the response from the campaign was not this is fake it was we apologize this was the locker room talk they found ways of trying to excuse it if that was today one hundred percent guaranteed he would have said it was fake and in fact a year ago after having apologize for the for the audio recording he said it was fake and so now politicians have plausible deniability and a time when our U. S. president is demonizing the pricing telling everybody that you can't believe anything that credible deniability hold some weight and so I'm extremely concerned now how do we distinguish what's what and that I think for democracy is going to be incredibly challenging so when nothing is believable the mischief do our can say it's a lie giving like the person who commits the crime where does something and says something incriminatory contained that's the fate the.

Daniel citron university of Maryland Danielle one hundred percent three weeks two years
Generic drug price fixing under investigation

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

02:26 min | 1 year ago

Generic drug price fixing under investigation

"Has learned new details about a federal criminal investigation into price fixing in the generic drug industry. As follows a sixty minutes report on a new lawsuit accusing generic drug makers of pushing up prices by billions of dollars. Here's Jeff gays. CBS news has confirmed that the antitrust division of the Justice department is an -ticipant in criminal charges as it continues to investigate whether generic drug companies engaged in a conspiracy to raise prices. The federal investigation has already led to two guilty pleas on Friday, more than forty states filed a five hundred page lawsuit, alleging the biggest and Eric drug makers had built consumers out of billions of dollars where blowing the lid off this whole thing on CBS this morning, Connecticut, Attorney general William Tong accused the companies of jacking up some drug prices. Nearly eight thousand percent really what blew this whole thing might open is are the phone records, and we've gotten I think eleven million phone records seven million documents. We can see that competitor is talking to competitor be five times on one day. Connecticut. Prosecutor Joe Nielsen told sixty minutes phone logs emails and text show generic drug companies. Communicating before raising prices in one text a heritage pharmaceuticals executive wrote to a counterpart Citron, we are raising the price right now. Just letting you know tebow says they will follow drug makers have denied an overarching conspiracy and the industry trade group told us generic prices have declined for three straight years hard to watch someone that you love literally dying in front of you nine Hartwig told sixty minutes that in two thousand thirteen she and her mother Molly were both prescribed the drug Ursa dial for rare genetic disease, but Molly didn't have prescription drug coverage. And after the price went up, she stopped taking the drug. It's disheartening to think that somewhere in some corporate boardroom. A group of people decided it was a good idea to raise the price because it was better for their pockets. Mouly died three years after she was diagnosed, no one can know erstwhile would've extended her life. But what angers ni- Hartwick is that her mother never got the chance to find out. She says because the price of the

Price Fixing CBS Molly Connecticut William Tong Mouly Hartwig Hartwick Justice Department Jeff Joe Nielsen Prosecutor Citron Eric Executive Tebow Attorney Sixty Minutes Eight Thousand Percent
Shortsellers Citron, Ellen And Four Percent discussed on Rick Hamada

Rick Hamada

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Shortsellers Citron, Ellen And Four Percent discussed on Rick Hamada

"Economies and shares abroad, Ellen company lived getting a lift today on Wall Street and rising punches four percent setting the stock on track for its best day since its market debut. Last Friday, the comes after shortsellers Citron research advised investors to hold

Shortsellers Citron Ellen Four Percent
Peugeot set for return to US roads after absence of three decades

WBBM Late Morning News

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Peugeot set for return to US roads after absence of three decades

"New Peugeot vehicles will eventually be showing up on American and Canadian roads. The French automaker PSA group says the reintroduction of the Peugeot brand in North America is. Part of a ten year plan PSA, which also makes the Citron cars did not set a date for the return

Psa Group Peugeot PSA North America Ten Year
"citron" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"citron" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Hi, I'm Karen Swisher editor at large of Recode. You may know me as someone who liked the idea of being CO head-hunter better. When I thought it meant literally hunting CEO's, but in my spare time, I talk tech, and you're listening to Rico decode from the vox media podcast network today in the red chair is James Citron someone I've known but not known for a long time, the leader of Spencer, Stuart CEO practice. It's a global executive recruiting firm that has worked with companies like survey monkey Mozilla Twitter. Yahoo everybody. I don't think there's anyone James hasn't recruited in Silicon Valley. He's at the center of a lot of things. But also behind the scenes he is the author of several books. Most recently the career playbook. James welcome to Recode decode I'm so excited to get you here. Thanks. I'm hoping it'll tell some stories, but I don't know if you will let's start talking a little bit at your career. I like to have people's background. You got to what your you done? And especially how you got to the tech sector and how you moved into that area. Because you know, you all have done like a lot of the major placements of major executives. So. Talk a little bit about how you got where you got. Sure. Well, first off I went to Vassar college. And I graduated in eighty one and went to Wall Street as an analyst at Morgan Stanley went back to Harvard Business School, and I had this curious Martin Stanley just corporate finance and different deals, and I was okay at it wasn't great at it. I like the firm, but I was definitely not a killer. But secretly on this Lexi's relevant because one of the things at HP S. I was really good at interviewing I was really good at seeing what companies that were recruiting wanted and getting job offers. I ended up coming out in nineteen Eighty-six and went to Goldman Sachs and private wealth management didn't really like it. But one of the companies that I. Rich people, right? Exactly, right. Actually, the the original thought was I like relationships, and like advising people, and I thought that doing it at Goldman would be a great place, but I actually didn't like investing and all this stuff. But I ended up going to MacKenzie in nineteen eighty seven spent five years and really really enjoyed it and learned a lot and did some media work at McKinsey and love fell in love with media. And this is just consulting strategy consulting to publishing television cabling all the like. I guess thirty years the statute of limitations can be off because MacKenzie never talked about clients, but like timing and I worked in the Paris office for big French media company back then, and I had the idea that I wanted to go into media. And so in nineteen Ninety-two, I ended up going to then a prominent global company Reader's Digest association as director of global strategic planning, and I really did not like it and a year because I actually it was a very much of a direct marketing company, and actually this is quite funny for for your audience, one of the tasks that I had in nineteen Ninety-three was developed the electronic publishing strategy for Reader's Digest and doing a lot of research. I ended up thinking that the right way to go was basically into roms when other companies were investing in and figuring out the internet. I totally missed that. So it was never great strategist, certainly an. She runs but five seconds. Totally totally. But it was great because I called a friend of mine who at Spencer Stuart asking her for some advice because I just wasn't happy. I wasn't really feeling successful. And she said have you ever thought about our business? I was like Erastus. She said sure the executive recruiting business. I think you really be good at it. And you enjoy it. I was like she said the and executive recruiter recruited you to work at it executive on her happens all the time. All the time. And the reason was is it was like all the great parts of McKinsey and consulting without a lot of the bat. And what I realized was the things I loved it McKinsey was working with clients. I loved building the teams I actually had always a good sense for people, and I was always good at the communication side. And I understood the problems, but rather than solving them yourself finding someone else, and it was actually really interesting moment again way before many of your listeners sort of realized, but this was at the time when Spencer Stuart recruited lucre Sner from RJR Nabisco.

James Citron McKinsey Spencer Stuart executive MacKenzie vox media Goldman Sachs Karen Swisher Stuart CEO Yahoo executive recruiter RJR Nabisco Vassar college CEO Morgan Stanley Mozilla editor Goldman Silicon Valley Harvard Business School
Why Twitter Stock Was Slammed Thursday

Motley Fool Money

01:56 min | 2 years ago

Why Twitter Stock Was Slammed Thursday

"Rough week for Twitter. Shares fell twenty five percent after Citron research put out a report calling Twitter, the Harvey Weinstein of social media. Matt Twitter can be a rough place, and especially a rough place for women even for Citron. This seems. Untored? Yeah. It does. And it's shame that something like Citron still has as much influence as they do in the stock market. But you know, we all use Twitter. Chris United we use it pretty extensively the some of the behavior on the platform. Let's say his, you know, not not not all that. Great. And I think the what's Citron was reacting to was Amnesty International study that just showed, you know, how difficult it is really especially to be a woman on the platform, especially if you're a woman in the media, and kind of all the, you know, for lack of a better word hate that you kind of get it on the platform, and it it's troubling, and it should be taken seriously. But I think Jack Dorsey team working hard to curb as much as possible. But there's always a fine line that right? It's your wanna threatened free speech. And you don't want to hurt the anonymity platform, which I think makes it appealing to a lot of users on Twitter, and you know, at the end of the day, I think this is true for all these platforms advertisers, follow audience. I don't know who I said that. But it's true. And I think if you look at Twitter with over three hundred. Active users. I don't think advertisers are going to step away from that. I mean, I think even even today advertisers are looking for platforms outside of Google and Facebook and Twitter and appealing one to look at. So I think the studies troubling I don't think it's going to have much impact on Twitter's business the near term well, and for those unfamiliar with Citron him in this all of the big Wall Street firms. They've got their reports that they put out their upgrades and downgrades. It seems like if Citron is in the news. It's because they basically put out a short report. Oh, that's right. And they're they're most certainly I don't know if they disclosed it, but they're most certainly short Twitter before they've issued this report that's just how they roll. So, you know, take that for what it's worth

Twitter Citron Matt Twitter Chris United Harvey Weinstein Jack Dorsey Amnesty International Google Facebook Twenty Five Percent
"citron" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"citron" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Us the US economy did not quite do. What was expected in this here? Third quarter the third and final reading of GDP for july-to-september reveals three point four percent growth on an annual basis. That's a small downward revision from the prior three point five percent growth estimate, which also was the level forecast by Bloomberg survey the communists, the pullback reflects downward adjustments to consumer spending in net exports that second measure affected by the US trade standoffs with other nations, especially China. We also found out that orders for US Bill. Durable goods everything from appliances to Zamboni is came in weaker than forecast up point eight percent in November. That was half the expected increase stock indicators right now are mixing it. They were lower futures gaining three NASDAQ futures down just six Andrew O'day, Bloomberg business on WBZ, NewsRadio a social media company stock plunges following a report detailing abusive tweets against women, we get more from CBS business. Reporter Jason Brooks. Twitter's stock took a big dive after a Citron research client note, call the firm, they Harvey Weinstein of social media based on a report from Amnesty International covering the group calls a shocking scale of online abuse against women on Twitter amnesty, and artificial intelligence firm element. I claim that one point one million abusive tweets were sent to a group of sixty five hundred volunteer women over the past year, averaging one tweet every thirty seconds Citron says that report should not be ignored by investors. And that Twitter will be forced to clean up the site leading to a swift drop in its user base. Sichuan also predicts that advertisers will soon be forced to. To take a hard look at all sponsorships with Twitter. Well, if you're getting a lot of cold calls lately, you're not alone. If you think you're getting more spam calls these days. You're right. According to a new study there's been a three hundred percent increase in spam calls this year, and that's not just affected the United States, but people all around the world. In fact, the US is not the most spam called country. Brazil is followed by India. The US was second last year, but stopped down to eight on this year's list and it's unclear what's behind the decline. The FTC has launched an effort to crack down on spammers. Jim Chenevey CBS news eight forty one on this Monday morning. High school football team in Texas is a big winner. But for reasons more so off the field, then on it WBZ's. Adam Kaufman, explains WT. Johnston's Newton group won the Texas high school football state championship yesterday. With a nail biting win over Canadian to finish a perfect fifteen or no season and second straight title. But that win football. Secondary to a much more powerful message from the eagles head coach at great.

US Twitter WBZ CBS Bloomberg Citron Texas high school football Harvey Weinstein Sichuan Adam Kaufman Citron research eagles Amnesty International Texas Reporter
Nvidia shares turn positive after Citron buys stock

Bloomberg Markets

00:59 min | 2 years ago

Nvidia shares turn positive after Citron buys stock

"Of conviction because if one short seller. Yes, I'll be at who has had a pretty good track record if one short seller. Recommends buying this? They've that sends a sock surging that much. It just show you how how sort of skittish people are just trying to find another stock making a move higher. I would add snap that is up about one and a quarter percent. Also, Salesforce dot com up one and a quarter percent joining Invidia, which as you said up a four and a half percent. Although if you take a look at the rest of the market for example, apple shares down three and a half percent. Now, really interesting to see sort of the volatility and to Dave's point earlier. Dave Wilson Oliver sacks editor and columnist. He was talking about how volumes have actually been very high today. So this is not coming on just volumes. Correct. Now, let's turn our attention to the world of emerging markets. And joining us now to help us understand whether they are an investment you want to participate in is

Dave Wilson Oliver Apple Invidia Editor
Tesla to report earnings Wednesday

CNBC's Fast Money

01:27 min | 2 years ago

Tesla to report earnings Wednesday

"Tesla. The automaker roaring back to life soaring, thirteen percent today. Phillip does breaking down tassels bake move from Chicago. Hey, Phil, hey, Melissa tesla usually reports. It's currently quarterly earnings on the first of the month, the second month after the quarter. And so we were not expecting this until perhaps November first. And then tesla said, wait a second. We're gonna report on Wednesday that immediately got people thinking including Adam Jones Morgan Stanley, we'll listen. Maybe they've got some positive news. That's why they moved up the timing of the report. It's possible. They could report a slight profit for the third quarter, which is what many people have been talking about for some time. And we know that the model three certainly helped the performance in the third quarter. And then there was this note from Andrew left at Citron research. Andrew basically, saying plain and simple tesla is destroying the competition. Remember, Andrew left has long, been a short seller on tesla share. Airs and has long said stay away from the stock. Why does he think they're destroying the competition? While there are a number of reports, clean technique being one of them saying, look at the model, three sales as well as my lesson model x. in the United States by their calculation, they are by far the best selling EV's in the US we should point out. Tesla does not break out at sales by country, so there's no way to confirm these numbers. But this is one reason why Andrew left says, we think that this is going to be a great third quarter for tesla and that they are

Melissa Tesla Tesla Andrew Adam Jones Morgan Stanley United States Phillip Chicago Tesla. Citron Research Phil EV Thirteen Percent
"citron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"citron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Business flash. Seventeen past the hour. Let's get you caught up on markets. The equity market does remain on the back foot. Although the major benchmarks are coming off session lows that were put in around ten AM Wall Street time still a lot of concern about peak profit growth, Caterpillar and three and put the Marcus the market, I should say on notice cat warning of rising material costs due to higher steel prices, and those US tariffs, and then three m said that sales at most of its businesses were adversely impacted by a stronger dollar and higher material prices at the same time three am cut its annual profit forecast on the positive side, though, McDonald's and Verizon both beat estimates. Dow industrial average right now down one percent, similar declined for the S and P five hundred and the NASDAQ composite is weaker by a bit more than one percent. We have shares in tesla. Higher by nine percent right now earlier we had news the short seller. Andrew left of Citron, financial or Citron research. I should say made a surprising u-turn, and he is now long tesla at the same time. Tesla is pulling forward. Its third quarter earnings will now be released tomorrow after the closing bell Morgan Stanley says yes, this is suppressing move, and it's more likely positive than adverse signed on the US trade front. The White House confirming that President Trump and president. She will meet next month at the G twenty summit. Crude oil tumbling WTI right now at its lowest level in six weeks. We are off more than four percent right now the active contract at sixty six forty three risk off creating a much stronger. Japanese yen the yen strengthening to one twelve twenty four and in treasuries as well. The ten year yield dropping by nearly six basis points to three point one four percent. You're caught up on markets back to Bloomberg politics policy power. Law..

tesla Citron US President Trump Citron research Dow Morgan Stanley president Caterpillar Verizon White House McDonald Andrew one percent one four percent four percent nine percent six weeks
Cronos stock plunges 30% after Citron short call, report of Trump anti-marijuana effort

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Cronos stock plunges 30% after Citron short call, report of Trump anti-marijuana effort

"As legalize marijuana spreads investors are. Piling into what is now a burgeoning industry of, marijuana growers and sellers but you better hang onto your pot fused gummy bears if you want to take the plunge Cronos group a. Canadian candidates company, saw its shares shoot up one hundred twenty five percent in about two weeks and then plunged twenty eight percent. In one day after, an analyst said the shares are wildly

Marijuana Sales Director Donald Trump President Trump Bloomberg Mark Mills Europe Analyst DOT Asia One Hundred Twenty Five Percen Twenty Eight Percent Ten Years Two Weeks One Day
Volkswagen anticipates a diesel renaissance

News, Traffic and Weather

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Volkswagen anticipates a diesel renaissance

"We've had a just over a week to digest the whole Geneva. Auto show an extremely large amount of electric and future news for cars coming out of Geneva let's. Start off with the announcement by VW that they think that diesel will. Be coming. Back strangely, this is, coming from VW who got wacked really hard for their diesel that's right so Volkswagen of course has been spending the better part of the last two and a half years playing defense. And promising to launch several dozens of new all electric cars over the next handful of years it's brand CEO did an interview in which he basically, said that when you scrape obey the weight of vanities of kind of the electric car fashion he does think that. There is still a place. For diesel diesel Will undergo is said a little. Bit of, a renaissance in just a few short years, time so. One kind of wondrous here and certainly. Can't be faulted for being more than a little bit confused as to what they really believe because there are certainly plowing literally tens of billions of euros several. Tens of billions of euros into a future electric car world while at the same time basically doubting. What the consumer is automatically going to buy so does this mean that. They are. Working on, replacement diesel, engines that they pulled from the market after the scandal well a Volkswagen is one of the companies that never said that they were going to stop developing diesels they of course stopped. Selling them specifically in the US market and in the u. s. market alone but not in other geographies so from that standpoint I have kind of, kept their cards close to the vest I mean I see them Continuing to develop diesel engines the problem that they are facing in part. Is that this sales of diesel engine in Europe has gone down over the last sort of eighteen months it used to be sort of. Fifty two to fifty four percent of their sales mix and, now it's down by about ten percentage points to, something closer to. Forty two to forty four percent of their sales makes in Europe and that's a. Problem but again forty four forty percent give or take it's still a very very large number and if the consumer? Continues, to want to buy diesels from them they will continue to not just sell them but develop

Europe Anton Volkswagen United States Nick Miles Carlos Davar Tesla Geneva CEO Analyst Komo Jagua Citron Seventy Thousand Four Hundred Nine Hundred Ninety Five Dolla Forty Four Forty Percent Seventy Thousand Dollars Fifty Four Percent Forty Four Percent
"citron" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"citron" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Communities of super fans because it's such a real time interactive place where if you have and we see a lot of game developers doing this, we see a lot of companies doing this as well. Especially start-ups, opening up discord servers, wh, and then posting links on their web page and social media for their for the fans of their companies or products. Who love what they're doing. The most to come and jump in and then you're in a chat room with the people making it and you talk to them. It's like an extension of someone's website, maybe. Yeah, kinda kinda. And so. It's just a really cool phenomenon to to see now. I think there is a line perhaps which is what you wrote about, which is then some companies will then take advantage of folks and have them do like a lot of work and not pay them any money. Yeah, which is not cool. You know, we have some community members that started to contribute to us, and we made sure they got compensated appropriately for it. But generally the notion of super fans, I think it's more just like people who are excited about what you're doing, you know. So we have the whole the sort of whole superfan philosophy inside of discord that grew very organically out of observing people behaving this way. And you know, I remember early on when we when we launched dischord, we used to write these change logs or we still right change like, but we started writing these change logs when we updated the up. So you load discord and say, hey, there's a new feature and we put jokes in the change log. Yep. And we noticed that people would start screen shotting the jokes and posting them on Twitter. And on read it. And we were like, whoa, people like really like this stuff, and they're sharing it and it's causing word of mouth growth. And so we started kind of leaning into this idea of how we can delight folks to get them excited about us so that they would share with their friends and it's it's become imbued and everything we do. So like a customer support team, for example, I view them as like a superfan creation engine, you know, like every time someone writes in and this frustrated about something that's an opportunity to make that person feel special, like your company cares about them and that they matter. And if you can do that, then they become an evangelist and we'll shout from the mountaintops, but how great your company is and how how cool you are. And and like it's such a like a wholesome strategy for for customer support and growth because you're just making people have a good, have a good time and solving their problems and then they get excited about you. Yeah. And so that kind of mentality, I think is so important and we do it in every single area of the company. We're gonna take another break right now, but we will be back shortly with joy. Jason Citron from discord, hey, Recode media listeners. This is Amanda clue, eaters editor in chief, and I want to tell you about a new show that we just launched on PBS with chef Marcus Samuelsson. Every Tuesday, Marcus explores the food and culture of different immigrant community like the Arab American community and their cuisine in Dearborn, Michigan, the Vietnamese community in New Orleans, the Haitian community in Miami and the list goes on and on. I really love the show because I'm learning about new cultures and traditions that I didn't know about in the United States, and I hope you do too. So check out the show every Tuesday night at nine pm on eater dot com. Slash no passport required or on PBS..

Marcus Samuelsson PBS Arab American community Twitter United States editor in chief New Orleans Jason Citron Dearborn Michigan Miami
"citron" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"citron" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"We are back with Jason Citron from dischord. We were just talking about making money which you mentioned dischord as maybe at the very beginning of doing you have some news that you're announcing. I want you to talk about it, but I'm going to try my best to summarize it in two seconds here you're launching a game store. So you have a subscription product. If I may subscriber to discord, I can now also by the games that I play through dischord. Is that the gist of the news? Yes, very close. Okay. Good. Correct. Me. What? What did I miss? So we have a subscription product which we are going to be adding in, kind of like an all you can eat buffet of games that you can play. So in addition to having a store where you can purchase games, so those are two separate things. Okay. So if I am a gamer and my bind, just PC games, can I buy games for my Oculus rift headset like what can I actually buy from you? Yes. So we're starting with PC games. And so the idea is that most people who use dischord play games at their friends and the way that they kind of spend their time as they open up the app. We recently added a new games tab to this kind of like a homepage that shows what all of your friends are doing across all the different places you haven't dischord so I can easily see, you know, if you're playing fort night and my other friends that play league or who's doing what and from there now we're making it super convenient for you to be able to buy a certain games that we have available for sale. So the idea is to make extremely convenient for folks who see their friends playing game to be able to go buy it. So explain to me why that's a big deal as a non gamer. I kind of thinking of this as the app store or the Google play store. Is that the appropriate analogy? Yeah. Yeah, because that's a big opportunities with. Yeah, how big very big. I want some numbers. So my my the number. That I recall. I think the games industry was over one hundred billion last year in total revenue was about a third of that that around thirty three billion. So people are buying thirty three billion dollars worth of PC video games a year. Yeah, you kind of wonder like what people spend money on a fortnight, but there you have it there apparently. So and now you want you want part of that. Yeah. I mean, I think there's an opportunity for us to to advance you to people's lives by helping them discover games that they love to play, right. You know the the the primary way that I figure out what game supplies based on what my friends are doing. Right. And so now I can see that very clearly in discord and I can go buy directly from us. So I think as a business, I think this is a great opportunity for us to generate revenue and become sustainable. But I, I really do think there's a lot of value to be added to our customers lives in removing friction from sort of figuring out what should I play and how do I buy it. So you've developed games before? I'm cure. As a developer, what do you look for when you're trying to distribute your game? Right. Why is someone coming to work with discord versus some other kind of game store? Yeah, that's a great question. So as a developer, what folks are looking for is really the simplest way to get their game in front of the people that will wanna play it. Right. And one of the really cool things that has kind of happened or Ganic on discord is that developers have begun setting up servers, which is the sort of the groups that we call call service. I'm setting up servers that essentially anyone who is a fan of their company or their games can come and joint and they, they showed them off on their web pages and sometimes directly in their game titles in so developers have started building up communities on discord where they hang out with their super fans and have conversations with them about what they're working on and what features are coming next and what their players would like to see..

developer Jason Citron Google Ganic thirty three billion dollars two seconds
"citron" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"citron" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Avella purrs and this was back before apple had their game center and Google their stuff, and that just kind of took off. And so we pivoted the company from the game to that platform building features essentially for other games to build on. Yeah, or add to, I suppose. Yeah, yes. So if you're making a game and you wanted to have multiplayer features in your iphone game early on, you might use a service like like open faint to add those features to your game without having to do all the back end management of servers and stuff like that. Got. And we also provided a social network layer. That that that you could actually show to your players. So as a as a user, you'd have an open fame profile that went across games. And so that that that kind of experience that went from, like we launched to exiting in about two years, like five employees, two hundred. You know, think we launched at ten games and we when we sold my sold the company, we had like thousands of games, thirty percent of the top. You know, the obstacles was using was using open who was a great learning experience for me because I kind of went from being a game developer, and that's that's my background to learning how to be a CEO and all that kind of stuff that you need to do when you run a company. And then after we sold, the bittersweet part was that I really thought I was going to get to go on and continue building the product within the context of this of a larger company. And that'll didn't end up happening thing that rarely does when founder sell. It's pretty rare for someone to stick around the acquiring company for a long time. Yeah, yeah. Perhaps they call it an exit for reasons. Yes, I guess so. So how has that. Changed the way that you think about discord 'cause discords older than I thought, it's maybe what? Six or seven years old by this at this point? Yeah. Well, discord is three years old. Oh, I'm sorry. No, it's fine. The company is six. Got it. That's the pivot happened Three three years years ago. ago, how has that changed the way you think about discord. Yeah. I mean, well, if we can build an independent business, I'd love to. You know, we're still pre revenue of Yep revenue for the most part. So you know, we'll see if we can do it. Part of the news that will share at some point is, is some cool stuff for developing on that for. Yeah, let's get to that in just a second. We are not pre revenue at vox media move. You know that we need to make some money. So on that note, I'm going to send it to CARA to read a word from our sponsor. Okay, thanks..

Avella Google vox media apple founder CEO developer Three three years thirty percent seven years three years two years
"citron" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"citron" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"This is Recode media with Peter Kafka and I am obviously not Peter Kafka. I'm CARA Swisher. The editor at large of Recode and the host of Rico, decode. If you're wondering why I'm here instead of Peter listened to last week's episode this week, you will once again be in the hands of Recode senior social media editor Kurt Wagner. Before we get to this interview with discord CEO Jason Citron here's your weekly reminder. Tell someone else about the show. I have to say that or else Peterkov will. It will be extra grumpy with me when he gets back and Peter Kafka is always extra grumpy. So it's worse. So that's all I've got for now. I'll be back later in the show to read some ads taken away, Kurt. Thank you care. I am here with Jason Citron who is the CEO, discord, Jason, welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. Thank you so much for being here. We're going to talk about a ton of stuff today. US have some news that you're going to talk about around talking about gaming. We're gonna talk about messaging, text, voice, all that stuff, but I have to ask you the most important question gaming right now, which is. How many hours a day are you playing fortnight? Oh, not enough. You know, running this whole company think takes a lot of time. Yeah, his four night. Are you a fortnight guy? I'm really not. Actually. It feels like an I have. I had a ten year old trying to explain to me how fortnight worked, and it made me feel older than I've ever felt in my entire life. Yeah. But it seems like the game of the moment, right? I mean, I'm not missing that. Yes, that's right. That's right. Are your employees playing it or everybody? Everybody's playing at me, I think. Yeah. Well, you need to stop working so hard at your company, apparently. Cool. Well, I think where I want to start today is kind of what discord is and who you are. I think outside of maybe the tech world, there's certainly a large group of gamers who know who you are, but I don't really even know much. We've met before few times and chatted, but I'm when consider myself a hardcore gamer by any stretch..

Peter Kafka Jason Citron Kurt Wagner US CEO editor CARA Swisher Rico ten year
"citron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"citron" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Addicted to, drugs tour neonatal intensive care unit. And visit with parents the first lady unveil beat best at the White House in. May saying it will focus on children's well being social media, use an opioid abuse the maker of Oxycontin is bringing in a big name. To overhaul its business and distance itself from. The opioid crisis Purdue pharma as named Steve Miller to be chairman of the board Miller led auto parts maker Delphi through bankruptcy Francis PSA has managed to. Do something with Germany's OPEL car brand that General Motors couldn't do in twenty years make money the maker. Of Peugeot and Citron cars bought OPEL from GM a year. Ago PSA, says it's now. Showing a profit and has PSA shares rising the most, six years I it was driverless. Cars now we're learning that pilotless planes may soon be a reality Airbus says by twenty twenty three they believe they'll have the technology. To start replace Facing cockpit crews or military pilot Colonel Steve gathered spoke to ABC if. You combine the financial requirement of having lower. Labor costs with the idea that humans are making the mistakes you have something that that the airlines and the. Airplane makers think is very attractive the problem is are people willing to have no pilots. In the cockpit guaranteed says cargo airlines will likely take the lead in testing out the. New, technology coming up a. Check on markets Michael Barr this is Bloomberg. Global news twenty four hours a day at Bloomberg, dot com.

OPEL Steve Miller Bloomberg opioid abuse General Motors Francis PSA Colonel Steve White House Purdue Michael Barr Citron Delphi ABC Germany chairman twenty twenty twenty four hours twenty years
"citron" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:51 min | 2 years ago

"citron" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Tom reiss doing the questioning he is a republican congressman of south carolina this is a subcommittee of the house ways and means committee meeting from last week and the pri the questioner answering the question is robert citron and todd owen todd owen of customs and border protection robert cintron us postal service looking at the when you consider diseases and maladies of of humans and you look at the graphs of how they affect people in our life expectancy most every malady that we incur that they are either starting to trend level or down i mean we're we're getting a handle on a lot of these things and certainly we we got a long way to go with a lot of things but we're getting better but with opioids the trend is is startling it's not it's not that it's getting better it's actually getting much much worse and his pass traffic deaths in south carolina over one hundred people in my home county and where he county were killed last year and we've got do a much better job of of dealing with that d the risk of accidental exposure has always been there whether it's fat which has much more deadly consequences now or throughout our history we dealt with narcotics interdiction with the increase in the fence and all in the other synthetic opioids we've now have deployed and locks in or commonly known as narcan throughout our ports of entry so it is readily available for all of our officers as well as for members of the travelling public should they be coming in through an airport or seaport and having an incident with the with the narcotics so we have deployed that we have special equipment at our mail facilities are expressed courier facilities to allow us to safely inspect the packages so i think as an agency we've we've put a lot of emphasis on personal protective equipment safe protocols to handle the fence and all yeah as it relates the postal employees over six hundred thousand employees in the organization so as it relates the keeping them safe we do suspicious package training so our focus really is not just on on any suspicious package that they could come in contact with.

congressman south carolina robert citron todd owen robert cintron
"citron" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"citron" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"You know when you look at gretz if you didn't know wayne gretzky if you didn't know the mind he had for the game and the vision for the game and you just looked at him as an athlete you would never think there was anything exceptional about him at all what was it that made him the best i think his ability to the process his ability to calculate to see the ice he used deception he used he used his god given talent to decipher the game at a different level he was really to me he was like the einstein of hockey and his era and the one question i always always here is who is the greatest player of all time and that is the greatest player of all time has has not been born yet because it's evolution so i always look at who is the greatest player in his generation and the biggest degree of separation from you know the good players and the great ones gretz had a there is a a big gap between graphs and everybody else bobby orr and his era citron's me would be one of them in in in alex in this era so you know the next era is it you know is it a connor mcdavid or is it a austin matthews but there's an era when we got you know ten to twelve year period where players are in their prime how much separation do they have from the field if you then you and i've talked in the past about some of the great young players in the game and in particular about the speed of the game right now so how much has the game changed over the past few years and then how much does that impact how you approach it as a coach.

hockey alex connor mcdavid wayne gretzky bobby orr austin matthews twelve year
"citron" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"citron" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

"Doing facebook now congress doesn't just want to hear from facebook once you're from alphabet wants to hear twitter okay the latter pumped it in torius shortselling firm citron research dish with blistering cell call on twitter according to citron's enter into left twitter's the most loose regulation because of its freely approach to sell your data now the cup denied that it sells anything confidential but left insists that it's the most vulnerable the three because it's runup demus when he was on closing bell kelly evans and wilford frost tried to pin him down about what he meant with these charges giving the twitter questioned their accuracy but by that point to stock was already down more than ten percent left argued the twitter's vulnerability was self evident or else i wouldn't have gone down so much if you made charges wait a second i mean that's ridiculous circular easy thing about it it went down a lot because he made the charges in that for that proves that it's voluble but it worked stock closed down twelve percent ouch were mission accomplished as for alphabet it got double duty as opinion today because frankly you could say that tomorrow is outfits turn on the cross and short seller could make the same argument about alphabet that left just made about twitter it can go down because it's vulnerable no wonder the stock fell more than four percent on top of that alphabets also being hurt by the war of another big theme the driverless core remember this company as usual thomas card division waymo and ever since the fatal car accident involving selfdriving uber now or soda this whole groups been under relentless pressure today and video which makes chips for self driving cars including uber suspended its own testing which caused the stock to fall nearly twenty dollars that's a real pasting for one of the best performing stocks the euro as told you before the self driving car is crucial to the next leg of tech because it uses so many semi conductors but today's reckoning really focus more video than any other we'll have a chance to speak to jensen wong invidious visionary ceo.

facebook citron twitter wilford frost ceo congress torius shortselling kelly evans twelve percent twenty dollars four percent ten percent
"citron" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"citron" Discussed on The Film Vault

"No one almost horrifying things really it looks like a brain yeah i'm going to look at some pictures this number three for me is also practical and horrifying although played for laughs comes up on the show a lot so i'm going to going to breeze past it but number three's the merman the merman two oh perfect damaged well the murmansk pretty great played by richard citron citron's citron all practical baby yeah that's right he is of course the cabin in the woods the merman and cabinet in the woods citron is a stuntman and fight choreographer he's been a stunt double for iron man batman the watchmen and three hundred amongst many many others he's he's also portrayed in this movie cabin in the woods he prayed the merman and the where wolf he's a very very prolific stuntman stunt coordinator stunt double he does all those things he stunt doubles for ben affleck looks like he's a bigger guy like taller fellow and yeah richard citron as the merman the merman and he is the remand is what you think he's a mermaid but a man such a terrible pitch no brian a picture of a hermit crab crap like half crab half booger well does he looks awful what it looks it looks so awful it looks it looks like just hand but it's a full body but like that's just like a creatures claw dismembered claw like they're coming up next we will to add to do i wouldn't come back with that or you can add wherever you want to add twenty twelve.

murmansk richard citron citron ben affleck brian coordinator