31 Burst results for "Cintas"

The Difference Between Apple and Spotify With James Cridland

Podcasting Essentials

02:26 min | 3 months ago

The Difference Between Apple and Spotify With James Cridland

"The single biggest topic in recent months has been the announcement by both apple and spotify of the paid subscription offerings for podcasts and cintas lost episode apple has released their version. We've mentioned it he previously but now that it's live. What does it look like. And what does it mean for. It's well it looks very smart and very happily and it's all over the apple. Podcasts app as you would kind of expect because for the first time apple is actually making money out of podcasting which is really good for them and i have to say i've looked at it and i think apple has done a great job. I'm not the world's biggest fan of apple. But i think apple has done a great job here. They have pulled something together that works for the majority of podcasters for the majority of publishes and it works in terms of both networks and individual shows. It works in terms of the way that you want to charge people and all of that. I think it's a very smart and well thought-out tool. I think one of the clever things about it is the channels idea of being able to have a channel that you can charge for if you want to. But that's a channel that combines lots of different podcasts from one particular podcast so there's a channel on their called podcast industry news which has both pod news and portland. Which of the two podcasts. That i do is one example. And i think that obviously has some real advantages in terms of people finding great shows to have a listen to now. Obviously the battle between the spotify has never been hotter. But who's actually bigger so in other words which is getting the most downloads. Obviously a metric that brands planning that distribution and implementation strategies really rely on. Yes and i would say that they shouldn't pay. I would say that they should be focusing on people first of all not on downloads. Dan is very different. If you look at people the most popular way of finding a podcast with very loose definition of the word podcast is spotify as number one and apple is number two if you look at downloads. It the other way round and actually apple because people using apple. Podcasts are listening to more podcasts. They typically mean more downloads at the end of the day.

Apple Portland DAN
Christmas in Holland

Travel with Rick Steves

04:07 min | 10 months ago

Christmas in Holland

"Let's start with what the holidays were like growing up in the netherlands. That's where lisbeth enhanced was born and raised. Thank you said. I should go on radio. Yeah i think so. I'd love to hear what. Christmas is like in your memory. Let's pretend your five year old girl in small town in the netherlands and christmas eve what do you what did you just do. What's happening tonight. And what happens tomorrow. Oh well you see for us. Christmas was really a family. Feast because probably you know in the netherlands. Originally we never had gifts at christmas. It was the real religious holiday and a family holiday. In my case. I remember my mother started. Prepare the house to decorate it and she had little planks and we put mawson eat with a wire and then we put all kind of green leaves like hawley and other little objects to decorate the house and we fixed it on the wall and we put it on the table and then of course we made the wreath for the front door and then you were hoping it would be snowing on the right day. Because i remember the connie fear the big tree in our garden when there was snow on each and my father would put lights that was magic and then just before christmas. My mother came up with the real christmas tree. And you know when. I was really very young. We had real candles but the clip ons real candidates under the tree inside the house yes and there was a white sheet on the floor to protect the four and then there was a basket with water in case the tree would be set on fire so it was only allowed to light the candles when daddy nami were there and we hardly moved of course because there could be a fire but it was magic to see all these flames burning and then we got it a beautiful dog and it was too dangerous so we had to put electric lights but it was still very nice now for a little child. Who is there a santa claus figure that brings the gifts that seat because christmas without presents because our santa claus is called sinter glass and he has his birthday on the sixth of december. So that is the real exciting. Feast for gifts. And i really. I would be willing to set up an association to save that son abrasion. Because i think it's the most beautiful feast in the world. Why well first of all as a child. You believe in santa claus. He is bishop coming from spain on the big ship with his assistance. Who are black pitas. They are funny dressed and are doing funny things at croats. They are little bit naughty. And you're scared of him because he is the one who could eventually put you in the sack if you hadn't been a nice job but year cintas class is keeping book and he's writing in the book if you were good or bad sell. It is very well organized into netherlands because about three weeks before the six of december which is his birthday. He officially arrived on the big ship in amsterdam and this is transmitted on television. So you are looking at it because you know once. He's in the country. Your parents will allow you to put your old shoe at the chimney. Of course many people had central heating of a problem. But you find a solution you put your shoe in front of the door or whatever anyway. Some problems for a child to believe in san nikolas because one hour later after yet seen him arriving on television in amsterdam. He's arriving in your village as well and so you say to mother. How is that possible. So then she usually explains you while there is the real warm and he has assistance because there are so many children like you. The real one cannot cope with all that

The Netherlands Lisbeth Sinter Glass Hawley Santa Claus Spain Amsterdam San Nikolas Netherlands
How Airline Pilot Jim Allen Got His Aviation Start In The Navy

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

05:35 min | 10 months ago

How Airline Pilot Jim Allen Got His Aviation Start In The Navy

"Tell us how you got your start in aviation a pay I grew up as an air. Force brat flu beef forty seven feet fifty twos in a one So i was always excited about aviation from that. My dad passed away when i was a teenager so I think that kind of cemented the hero worship for for my dad. You know in those days. And i just you know as always we we moved from you know we were on the air force base for a while we lived in iowa and then kansas after my dad passed away to live where my mom's parents were in a big open skies. And you're always looking up to see what was going on up there because you know. I was just kind of bored in small town. Kansas and My uncle taught me how to fly. When i was nineteen years old Down in rockport texas. What kind of airplane of piper warrior and I just you know even though it was a little stressful because he was kind of a screamer why it was it was i love going flying solo but when he was in the airplane i was just a little bit stressed out but i still have his His voice in the site you know in in my ear every time i'm not lined up for the centerline of it in even in a seven thirty seven. Now it's get get lined up with. What's wrong with you that just use a spring but it was i'm just curious You have a relative teaching to fly when you're not in the airplane. What was your relationship with him like. Yeah so i was staying in his In his house and that was it was just. It was a little stressful. But i in there were. There were times where he was like these. You really want to do this one. She just leave and things like that but when it was all said and done he was really proud. And i was proud and But i was his first and last student because nobody else wanted to deal with them. I guess but he. He came to my winging ceremony when i became a pilot And he was just proud a you know it is just the way life is. Sometimes you know it's not always good. It's not always bad. There's just getting bad mixed in but But i learned a lot. You know and i and i got the i got the license in like fifty five hours. I was there for two months from from zero to two private pilot just in the summer of nineteen eighty five. So that's the way to do a t to go. Full bore fly every day. If you can and get it out of the way right. Yeah and i saw that with the students that i flew with later so a way You go to college. I went to college at the university. Kansas and i was living in kansas can think. And why. why am i here in the first place. That's my mom's hometown. But i found out that the university of kansas was ranked in the top ten for aerospace engineering. And i was like well. That's pretty cool. You know so. That's that's what i wanted to learn. It was a tough program. But i got through it Actually with honors But i decided to join nato. otc The air force at the time was They weren't offering pilot slots Two people who were getting scholarships Be an engineer for the air force. And then you would compete for a scholarship later in a it just seemed a little too much ambiguity. Matt's of navy was saying we'll we'll give scholarship. You can figure out if you're gonna be a pilot toward the end of the program in You know it's needs of the navy. And all that kind of stuff so so turned out. When i got selected if i they told me i was going to be a pilot and then like they. You know four weeks later. I haven't graduated yet. They said well. We're sorry that we were badly in the back sears. Nfo's nfl stance from naval flight. Officer so i you know. Tail between my legs went down to pensacola tried to figure out a way to become a pilot and they said no dice Were just short on. Nfo's and that's in. You have a minute refractory error in your left dive. It's keeping you from minnesota. But i was twenty twenty in gotten in like six months before six months after they probably would let me go to the pilot program but at the time they just they were starving for back. Seniors in that may have been a blessing in disguise. Because like a year after. I got down there. They cut the bottom third out of pilot training navy wide because of the cold war drawdown and there were guys get sent home. We're getting cintas supply or know. They were surface warfare. That kinda thing and so it was. It was kind of an ugly time in the navy late eighties early nineties.

Kansas Rockport FLU Iowa Air Force Texas University Of Kansas Navy Nato Matt Pensacola NFL Minnesota
Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

Software Engineering Daily

15:08 min | 1 year ago

Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

"Welcome to the show. Thank you. You're on the Internet Archive. What does the Internet archive do. That's a great question. Deterrent archive is the world's largest digital library, and whereas most people may know of us because of the way back machine, which is this really rather needs tool that allows you to go back in time and kind of see what web pages used to look like. We really are fully-fledged online is the library and that we have different types of media types. We hold texts and television and audio images, movies, all sorts of things and yeah, the introduce archive you can think of as this huge repository of Internet. When did you start working there? I started here in two thousand sixteen. So. We've been yeah for years. And what do you work on their today? Well, I work on the books. That's mostly what I would I have always been on. I'm spending the bits inside of this. So usually when we think about our media types, we think of in terms of bits and bits out how we procured them, and how we distribute them. My specialty is working on the book bits in saw in order to build up our collection of almost four million books we have Candan, and my job is to sort of keep running the whole pipeline that allows us to do that. So over the last four years, we've my team, I built it. And now we achieved over our objective of being able to digitize million books per year which we're doing, and it's pretty interesting challenge so far. So you work on book digitisation and I WanNa talk about that. But first, let's talk more about the Internet archive at a high level. He told me about what is being stored across the Internet archive and who pays for it, and how do people use it just share a little bit more about the Internet Archive. Yeah. That's a great question. So I'm going to start from a WHO pays for it because I think that's the result of depth and that question Internet Archive. If you think about it as a repository, it's just essentially a bunch of hard drives spinning connected to the Internet. Somebody's GONNA. Pay For both danger and connection and hard drives and the electricity and all of that largely you can think. Of of our revenues in treated front weight. So we're a nonprofit and we don't really run for profit businesses. We don't benefit in any way of the data that comes on on our servers. We do benefit from your donations and so by and large, we are a community funded effort, and so if you type slash donate, we actually just added integration with apple pay so people will not help us. That'd be great. So we receive a fair amount of money that we we need to run from patrons, Cintas like people who supported us. On the side, we do have some some small some businesses. So we have our archive it. Our arm where essentially contract alto were machine capabilities and we we are maintaining a very large amount of curated website collections. In fact, we I, think we have about seven hundred can ization that are that are partnering with us to create these collections and if you tens of billions euros that have been collected for for our partners, and so they pay us to do the service and we do it for them and same is true for books. digitisation. So as we have built up to large infrastructure that is required to do this kind of tasks, we have to an extent, the ability to contract out to third parties, and so we do get some some revenue streams that way not anything particularly substantial in terms of like our ability to to sustain ourselves. But you know every little bit helps and then obviously throughout the twenty twenty, five years of our existence, our founder Brewster Kahle has. Chipped in here in Deir a significant amount, I guess over the years to to keep us running. So we have donations we have a little bit of our non for profit business, and then we have brewster who is there so This is in terms of who pays for it, but the question would be I guess who benefits from it. Right and that's a very, very large segment of the Internet. We're not the biggest website on the Internet. They think we are. We're ranking about two hundred and something the Alexa rank. But since we've been around for a long time, the users that that lovers the Lavas like I, every day I am in contact with people who tell me their story about how they use the Internet archive for their specific need always always amazed by the depth and breadth of. The of the use cases user spring to us. So it it spans from teachers to researchers, journalists to lawyers Theresa very, very large diversity also in terms of the country's from the backgrounds from from when users from. So it's kind of hard to to to paint them with the same brush but in general I want to say they are people who have some degree of laugh for knowledge and you may know our our motto, our slogan our mission is Universal Access to all knowledge, and so I guess people who have an interest in that eventually land on on our website. Okay. Well, let's talk about book digitisation as a particular project that is under the auspices of the Internet Archive. What is book digitisation? So, books digitisation is the effort of transforming physical books into digital artifacts. So that's the definition can take it forms. You know if you are if you have a scanner in your home and your scanning document in a way, that's obviously that's digitisation if you take pictures of the book. That's a book book digitization. So the definition that needs to be applied to the use case at hand, there have been other efforts at large scale of books. This decision famously Google had one but dare. Different From Ours, for instance, where they did distractive digitisation so they would pull the spines from books and and turn dot process into a sort of sensitive. Kind of problem we do non destructive book dissertation and I think non-destructive bit. It's just a little bit as important in the Beth nation as the fact that we're these books digitizing them so that we can keep them so that we don't destroy them. So the process by which we turn books into bits and then returned books to wherever they came from or wherever they need to go. So Why would I want to digitize a book and how many books get digitized each day just tell me more about the volume that's going through this. I'm very happy to answer this. So the reason why you would want to digitize book there's multiple. So think about for instance, the first thing that comes to mind is obviously preservation if famous birtherism is that accessibility drives preservation so if you don't have something. It's almost like it doesn't exist especially in this age of information, we do have immediate access to all of all of these resources and so if we if you actually think about this, if you have to go to the library to to procure a certain book chances are you won't, and if the if the record of that book actually doesn't exist, you may never get to it and were. This is a problem is for all of this huge amount of books that were printed in the twentieth century for which there is really no digital equivalent books nowadays that are published like currently obviously, they have a book artifacts. That stuff is not to get lost. and. That stuff is searchable and it's reachable but we have. Tens of millions of books that are unaccounted for and as time progresses getting lost, and if we if somebody doesn't save them, they will be lost forever and that's that would be a pity and huge loss of human effort and so but first of all, I think important to scope the problem I think the D estimates that there is about one hundred, million books out there. Give or take unique unique books and. Scanning them we're, probably not gonNA scan all all one hundred of them first of all because. You would be able to source and that's my fire the hardest thing. So we tried to scope down the problem and trying to figure out. Okay. How can we do this in a way that is useful for people so first of all, I think we had to come up with a list of books that we wanted to get into we knew. Books that are important and we need to can these first so that? We'll. We'll get. We'll get into to people and this will be evidently immediately useful and a good place for us to start was freaky Pedia, which is collected. A long list of SPN's the where commonly cited in Wikipedia compiled the list came out to a few hundred, thousand books, and so whenever we we come upon one of those sourcing process, we make sure that we get. We can talk about the senator sourcing, Proxima, little bit later but in general, we do have a little bit of a concept of priority or at least we did this was the first million million and a half. And then the problem was that we started running out of books you would be surprised how hard it is to source books by by the half a million you know and if you if you do it by your smaller scale, it doesn't really make sense to to us in terms of maintaining our our economic scale. So the whole system works only if you scan at huge volume and time and but huge volume, we're talking about a million bucks a year, which is about three thousand books day some things some days we'll do thirty, five somedays. We'll do twenty five on a seven days week averages houses about. Between Twenty to twenty, twenty, five, thousand books. Every book is about three hundred pages so that. COMES OUT PRETTY NEAT about million million pages per day five to seven million pages per week and you know that's not a huge amount of data in total. I wouldn't be surprised I. think like last time I checked it was about between ten and fifteen terabytes of data week. So we're not talking about huge amounts but it's not a small amount eater and we can talk about the challenges of Piping data over the Internet in a reliable way later but it's a significant volume and this operation is running you know twenty, four seven. And so. In terms of why even do this? So I called for the first part, which is obviously people want to get to the books. There is a second benefit in having digitize books, and that it's a wholly new format, it allows you to interact with the body of knowledge in a way that you never have before if you have. A physical book artifact, it has some very desirable properties, for instance, very low random access time and doesn't depend on the battery. It's very, very hard to censor, and these are not properties of digital artifact but this is the active factor searchable, and in fact that we have like it's pretty amazing next search engine where you can instantly search all forty million text items that we have. So that's a million books plus all of the patents papers I'll all sorts of stuff and you can search that instantly that was just not possible with the previous format. So I don't think this is dwell ISM in any way I think books. Digital format and books their physical format will continue to coexist. They just help each other out, and in fact, if we are able to digitize them in the first place is because of the properties of. Physical artifacts that they don't just disappear. If we find one, we can scan it. Well. Those are great summary of what you do and I can tell how excited you are about it. Let's talk a little bit more about the high level, and then we'll get into the engineering. So can you describe the steps of digitisation in more detail if I have a book how am I digitized it? Yeah. So, the books that position pipeline is predecing people and it's like in a way if you're an engineer I think is kind of what to expect so I D-. A physical sorting. Step where your book is ingested into the system. It's given ID and it's it's placed in a container. So we know that the the exists. So to speak the second step is it gets to a scanner. The scanner picks it up within the in the machine loads up the data necessary whereby The books method data we can. We're going to have to talk about that. I, guess it's pretty interesting facet of it all and then proceeded to actually scan it, which means they turned the pages page by page and they take pictures of the pages, and once this process done they click upload and the book vanishes into the ether and so at this point, we have a fork the digital artifact goes into our servers divisible artifacts either goes back to the person who gave it to us in the first place or it goes into our warehouse. and. This largely depends on what kind of book it is. So obviously, the recent larger conversation to be had about copyright and like what books is it is it okay to scan and under what guys it is but suppose we are just you know scanning Yearbook Jeff and you you just wrote the book and you want to have it digitized to risk no claim on it just wanted back at the end. So after we're done scanning it, we're handing it back to you with slip inside which will tell you the Internet archive identifier and the. Or is just the name of the item on the Internet Archive. Everything is an item and you're just going go to type slash details, slash your identifier and a few hours. Later, you will find her book. Wile you wait the second part of the pipeline is GONNA kick off. So That's the digital server side stuff and it's divided essentially three phases. We have a first phase which it's a preprocessing stage where we get a look this images that came raw from the camera we'll look at them crop firm we discovered them and we just make sure that everything is is ready to go. There was a second phase of Manual Review Sa- currently all books that we upload have to be checked by a human for correctness, and so this is a step were. Reviewer just goes through the images in shorts that everything is fine and then when this is done, they kick off the third stage of the pipeline, which is A. Is the real processing stage where we take all of these files and compiled them in such a way that they are suitable for consumption by our web front end what we call book reader and from their wheel derive. We call them to rotate formats such as PDF, Abi e POB and either a text file. So CR it all happens at at this stage. This is kind of like the bird I view of the of the books that decision pipeline.

Internet Archive Twenty Twenty Brewster Kahle Cintas Internet Google Alexa Candan Apple Theresa Manual Review Sa Senator Wikipedia Founder Engineer
"cintas" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"cintas" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You doing good morning Bob how are you doing you know what I'm I'm doing better because in you'll be very proud of me god is I am navigating my way around soon like a pro now I I've moved from zooming on my phone to zooming on my laptop I think I've figured out which way to swipe and all that stuff how about that I will be calling you Cintas Yarim press I don't think so let's talk about I mean we were all on social media more than ever now and we're also getting a lot of our information that way I know you have some info on a new survey what is this telling us yeah this is this is really interesting so this is a study from slicks which is a cord cutting and streaming video blog which I agreed all all the time and they did a study of over a thousand people and they're all all ages from generation Peter Beattie Bloomberg and it showing how people are consuming their news during this whole pandemic and the data is showing right off the bat that Facebook is the clear leader when it comes to news distribution now a lot of that has to do with course with Facebook site but it also has to do with the fact that a lot of your friends and your family are sharing things on Facebook and that's just you know just the way it goes but what's really interesting is that it turns out the most popular social media platforms such as Facebook is number one about thirty six percent of people said that that was number one followed by Twitter which is seventeen percent which is you know pretty big difference but still seventeen percent and then you too which I found really interesting at sixteen point three percent and a limited which is a you know it's a platform we don't talk about all that often but they have twelve point four percent and the thing that's really interesting about all of the is you have the whole problem where you know people are spreading misinformation you have to be careful about that so you have Facebook you know where they're doing a really really good job in trying to keep this misinformation at bay Twitter is doing a hi I think a much worse job when it comes to that and that could be why their numbers are down a little bit so it's really interesting and then read it is the place traditionally where people go to try to solve problems and that Wesley source the information very well so that's the place that I worry about when it comes to honest information but it's really interesting to see those numbers for those platforms and throughout the whole process of this they reported fifty three minutes a day that they're spending fifty three minutes of their day consuming news coverage about corporate nineteen now what's interesting about that is before the pandemic the average was twenty two percent twenty two minutes shorter so you know list thirty one minutes before this whole thing started and now it's fifty three minutes of course a lot of people are stuck inside but a lot of people are really really concerned about what's going on so it makes sense that you know people are spending more time with the news so as far as going on social media to find out about the virus Facebook is the leader Facebook is a leader with thirty six point thirty six percent and and keep in mind that because that's really what our habit is you know you want to find out what's going on in the world what do you do you go on Facebook you find out what your friends are talking about what your family are talking about and people like to share on Facebook to your Facebook is number one double of what Twitter had seventeen percent well even if you're going on Facebook just to catch up with other people you're going to get the news by accident even if that's not why you went on Facebook right exactly right you're gonna get that news by accident but then you have the decision to make are you going to share this information with other people that you know and what I find that I mean this is a pandemic or otherwise it kind of more difficult these days to go on Facebook if you something and not share I mean it used to be where you go you drink something you'd be like oh that's interesting you know maybe I'll share that now you know that's more the fault and anything else that you're going to share what's on there so I think those numbers are skewed in that way but I think it's still accurate to say that you know we spend so much of our time on Facebook that it makes sense by extension that that's what happened yeah good point and as always be careful before you share check it out and because I don't we don't need misinformation think before you link is my favorite thing to say so I could not agree more I like to think before you link and we were talking earlier about the graduates it's kind of rough because they don't get to participate in the usual in person activities these days but Facebook has got an interesting project what are they doing yes Facebook is working with Oprah for this graduation project and I know you guys were talking about Chicago which is a different initiative she's like really really busy but she's working with Facebook for this thing called graduation twenty twenty so it's hash tag graduation twenty twenty and that's going to be broadcast both on Facebook and Instagram because remember they are the same company and it's going to include appearances by you know a lot of celebrities Jennifer garner Stoll Simone Biles and OPR is going to do the commencement address then there's going to be a special performance musically by Miley Cyrus so heated knowledges high schools and colleges in the U. S. by name state by state it includes photos and videos of the class of twenty twenty and there's messages from teen principles all over the country if you picture what your graduation would be like if this wasn't going on and you combine the graduation with everyone else's graduation added a whole bunch of celebrities and broadcast the entire thing over social media you know in a lot of ways this is like a dream come true kind of graduation in the worst possible way you know kids are going through such a hard time you know not getting the graduation not getting the senior year that they're entitled to have and if they spoke is really trying to come together they're calling it a weeklong graduation celebration so they get to you know have all the stuff going on in the spring time they're putting together tools where they can host a virtual parties have their own Instagram will have special stickers for story so you can share it in different ways it's really an example of making because this is obviously a social media generation and they're really taking advantage of that which is really really cool yeah I'll at least there's something I mean that's that's about all anybody can do right yeah exactly and I've seen I've seen you know I've seen some really cool stuff going on on line like for example there's an easier you know all projects that are not necessarily related but they're tied together by social media they're kicked out there and they're having family take their graduation photos keep her inside their homes you know whether isolated or maybe in their driveway by their cars they're all dressed up in their speeds in their tight knit dresses need look great you know it's just like it would be if they were given for the professional photographer and then they're taking these photos and they're sharing it on social media so if we go back to what Facebook and Instagram were doing where you can do all the special things you know you take a photo like that you add the hashtag graduation twenty twenty you put the special occur on apartments to Graham and you know before long you're tying people together that wouldn't necessarily be tied together not locally in their school but over social media I think it's a really positive thing to do and you know nothing will substitute but at least it'll it'll make a dent you know like say it is a social media generation but do you think the kids are gonna be happy with the tick tock prom really you know what a lot of kids are pretty happy with tick tock I think you know if you're going to do a promise of social media you might as well do what on earth but yet they held up from last week I I looked around and you know I'll tell you Bob you know years ago I didn't even go to my problem I would not have gone to a chick flick yeah you know the put your people dancing there's a hash tag yet that it wait way over my head but Hey you know if they're happy that's what counts yeah thank goodness for the technology today Scott Kleinberg working on and we'll talk about something interesting with Instagram and also I have a couple of questions about zoom so we'll get to that in a minute here first up.

Bob Cintas
COVID-19 Escalates but Biotech Bright Spot in Trillium Therapeutics

Breaking Biotech

09:31 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 Escalates but Biotech Bright Spot in Trillium Therapeutics

"So again. I'm glad to be back and appreciate everybody's attention today. And we have an extensive show ahead of us so I'm going to talk about a variety of different things. I WANNA touch on some latest biotech news a menu to talk about the vijen earnings report that. I said I would get to so. There's a few interesting tidbits. There have to talk about the covert nineteen story because that's been really blowing up and I think there are significant implications for the market. And then I'm GONNA finish up by talking about the latest in the anti CD. Forty seven technologies and specifically. I'm going to focus on trillion but also gonNA touch on T. G. Therapeutics so at that. Let's just get right into it. And the first piece of news I had to mention. Is that a sperry on recently. Heard News that they're two compounds. Were approved by the FDA. The one is just the paddock acid pill which they've named it next next little and the dog acid is it. Ahmad Combo pill was also approve. Called next Zet so good news for them. They finally breached the finish. Line are GONNA be able to sell these products. The stock did KINDA BUMP UP AFTER. This news came out but then with all the News Cove Nineteen. The stock did sell off. And I think it's hanging around fifty bucks I still have ten shares. Probably GonNA sell relatively soon just to you know take the prophets and look for more opportunities that have larger chance of bringing a return on my investment but great news for them. The next piece of news I want to talk about is and we heard that they are exploring a potential buyer according to Bloomberg. We haven't heard too much confirmation since then but in the past week we've seen the stock runup quite significantly and it looks like there's a good chance that somebody could pick them up. I'm still holding only about ten shares unfortunately but I'm probably going to sell them just because I feel like we've heard a lot of these rumors once in a while. And often times they don't come to fruition Annan. Pretty happy with the Prophet made so far and given it's only ten shares. I think I might again sell these enda and look for other opportunities. That are coming around the next piece of news. I want to talk about his ammon. And they have been all over the place lately We heard that they released some post trial documents. Because they're undergoing this litigation right now to maintain exclusivity for their patents and you. I kind of glanced at them. I don't really know what to make of them. We're still waiting for a judgement to come down and we'll see that. Relatively soon I think and negativity around the stock. I think is going to be uplifted once that goes through. And we should see a return. All-time highs I've been adding the stock as it's been down and it's pretty heavy in my portfolio now so. I still think that they're goodbye here. The next piece of news on touch on is the latest from the American Society of Retina specialists. And this is because I have touched on wet. Amd in previous videos by interested in this space and they announced that Bayview patients and this is the drug for wet amd that was recently approved by Novartis and this a s R s society issued a warning about fourteen cases of retinal vascular disease with eleven of those being occlusive retinal vascular. Now this can be actually pretty serious condition. That can lead to permanent blindness. So it's It's fair for the society to to issue a warning to people who are considering this therapy especially given that. There are other therapies. That don't have this risk that have been approved in in circulation for awhile now. Nevada stands by view. And they said that. There's been an estimated. Forty six thousand injections done a bill view so far and they did not see that this happened in their phase three trials they did mention there were sixteen cases of ubiquitous and nine cases of Iras. But they still stand by their own compound and they're saying that they're doing post market surveillance to see that's going to be a problem but When this news came out we saw that Novartis Kinda dipped and regeneration stock increase quite a bit just in the expectation that more people are gonNA stick with Lia which is the drug that was approved. That's been approved for a lot longer than bayview and there are more frequent injections. But it's obviously more safe. So all of this could be prevented if re-genesis BIOS drug there gene. Therapy for wet. Amd can hit the market and then patients would only really need one injection hopefully to To prevent Amdi from happening. So that's kind of an interesting thing going on with the amd space so to hit the major stories that I want to talk about today though. We're GONNA talk about biogen. The cove in nineteen esscalation. And then I have here. That Gilead announced that they're going to buy the company named forty-seven for four point. Nine billion dollars and this is worth mentioning because the company talking about which is trillium also has an anti CD forty seven antibody in hopes of using it for hematological malignancies but also potential in solid tumors. So we're GonNa talk about that as the feature story but first thing. I want to talk about his budget so I went through the earnings report and I have touched on by. Jin on a number of different occasions in this podcast. And I think it's a really interesting company being in that kind of mid to large cap space what they announced that their revenue went up seven percent year over year. And amongst all of that the MS franchise was actually down four percent year over year. But what they did is they included cruise. Which is an anti CD. Twenty compound but it's also used to treat ms so they included that in the press release to make the overall year over year revenue increase by two percent. And I think they did this. Because the franchise itself up sixty percent of by toll revenue so to show that that franchise is actually increasing has kind of beneficial from a PR standpoint. They also announced that verity was approved for relapsing. Ms And we did hear that last year. Visionary is similar detector but it has fewer Gi side effects so this was approved it was shown to be non inferior to tech Videira so this is just adding to its. Ms Franchise is going to be continuing to prevail in being a large revenue generator. For by. John. I believe we also saw and I mentioned this last time that the Texas air decision was positive for biogen. So that compound is can also be protected. Biden's going to maintain its exclusivity. So that's good news for that. I don't see the franchise decreasing substantially. It's probably only going to increase with the vulgarity. Approval there are competitors coming on the space but given that by agendas so many MS compounds right now. That are pretty effective. I think it's going to be a continual driver of revenue for the company now in terms of the upcoming revenue generator spin. Rosza is is one of those that's done in the market for. I think almost a year now and revenue increased nine point three percent year over year which is great and this franchise makes up fifteen percent of total biogen revenue so that has increased over the past few quarters. I think as I as I looked at this and they did mention here that we expect the rate at which spinner is a revenues will grow will moderate in twenty twenty compared to twenty nineteen primarily due to a lower rate of new patients starts combined with the impact of loading does dynamics as patients transition from dosing every four months so the way the payment system works for. Spin Rosza is that it costs seven hundred fifty thousand for the first year and then subsequent loading years just cost three hundred seventy five thousand Subsequently so we see this big boost in revenue. When there's a lot of new patients starts and then it Kinda tapers off as patients or just getting that loading dose. So I think that's why they're saying that. Revenues will moderate because the amount of new patient starts is actually decrease and I think this is due to vexes. Launch of excess Novartis is launch of their own therapy for spinal muscular atrophy. So I think as that competition continues the amount of revenue that's generated by spin. Raza is GonNa flat now and patients who likes Raza will probably stay on it but I think that that increased competition. It's still going to harm the new patient start so I don't see this space necessarily increasing too much now. Other things to consider is the repurchase program and this boost the stock price pretty substantially in the last year they repurchased twenty four million shares and that was a cost of five point nine billion dollars and by my calculation that means in the current repurchase program they have about twelve million shares to continue to buy and their net. Cash is still three point. Five billion dollars so they have a lot of cash on hand to buy current shares that are outstanding which is only going to support the price of the Stock. Moving forward another thing. They announced is the commercialization rights to idea as well as loose cintas. So going back to what I said about the wet. Amd space these two compounds are the current kind of establish treatment for wet amd with view just recently being added the size of the market for I league in Los Angeles is eleven billion dollars but these are going to be biosimilars and as we know. Biosimilars don't generate nearly as much money as the actual panel drug the current by similar. That biogen has day only make about one tenth of the revenue of the panel

AMD Novartis T. G. Therapeutics Raza Ms Franchise Annan Rosza Spinal Muscular Atrophy Solid Tumors Sperry FDA Bloomberg Enda American Society Of Retina Texas Nevada JIN Biden
Is the Link Between Depression and Serotonin a Myth?

One Life Radio Podcast

06:56 min | 1 year ago

Is the Link Between Depression and Serotonin a Myth?

"This is from What doctors don't tell you coincidentally it's a magazine from the UK What is her name? Lynne McTaggart founder of it and her husband and I'm sorry I can't think of his name But I I it's in here. That's so disrespectful. Find it hold on. Okay Up Brian Hubbard. Your is her husband's name And so it says in many of the suppressed oppressed studies S. S. R. is performed worse than Placebos. Okay we're talking And and that's just part of it. And then they talk about inflammation it's it's it's as if depression isn't a chemical If depression isn't a chemical imbalance what is it. One theory gaining. Traction is that it has to do with inflammation and I'm thinking of the book the inflamed mind and all these other things that I read everywhere and I do believe that I do and I've seen it firsthand from people in my family that have taking CBD or tumor just lost some weight or started eating better and their mental health improves as well. Absolutely once you mitigate inflammation through diet through lifestyle through sleep then things start to to to even out a bit more because your body's inflamed Cintas fight or flight state as it is so then you couple that with things outside of it in life and it's going to just make it worse and here's here's a little more on the SS ours are is the SS arise. Yeah and they're like what are you talking about. That's an old song isn't it. Never heard of it and the USSR. Billy Joel the Billy Joel. The Beatles back in the. US Bilko. Isn't billy Joel. I may be wrong. Mo Bros out but we'll do a challenge challenge. We'll have somebody google anyway. What made me think of it? I have the worst sense of humor I really do but Bu- back before our eyes antidepressants were developed Just two one hundred people per million listen to this just before they developed are accessorize this which are antidepressants. Before they were developed. Just two hundred hundred people per million were diagnosed with depression but this exploded to a hundred thousand people per million ten percent of the population when the drugs were launched on the back of the chemical imbalance theory of depression. That's crazy right. Okay let me read on. It says in one thousand nine sixty five Harvard psychiatrist. Joseph Shield Kraut Kraut. Put forward the theory. That depression was caused by low levels of neurotransmitter and two years later other researchers singled out serotonin and so it says if a chemical is linked depression than the drug industry could produce another chemical to adjust the balance and so research began to research into SS. Our eyes as began but neuroscientists were doing their research to and they were unable to find evidence that supported the theory. Clinical researchers didn't fare fare. Any better studies have depressed. People found that their serotonin levels were the same as in healthy controls and even when when Saratova Serotonin levels calls were D- habilitated Excuse me I'm really butchering this. You know okay you know what I'm having. I had my teeth cleaned this morning. And what does that have to do it. But I'm having like this is weird thing with my lips. No I'm serious like my lips aren't pronouncing words right anyway. Okay so let me go back. So so even when Serotonin levels were deliberately lowered. The participants didn't become depressed. Convert conversely depress people given very high doses of Serotonin didn't see any improvement in their symptoms. Even the psychiatric profession quietly agrees. It's Bible that the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders doesn't list Serotonin as a cause of depression. While the American Psychiatric Press Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry Sites serotonin deficiency as an unconfirmed hypothesis right. But we also know now about genetic expression how you can turn genes on and off so just because you maybe you might have the gene for depression or anxiety or whatever your your lifestyle your diet your stress levels and you'll recovery can turn on or off those genes in childhood childhood trauma that they address like see. I told you I can't tickets. But that's the thing like they were. They're looking at one thing they're looking at Serotonin. Of course you're not going to fix visit with one with a silver bullet right. The you have to look at the entire holistic picture of this thing. Yeah holistically so under the M. I didn't. That's that's such such such a great point it is because that's what we do here. We talk about holistic and alternative. How so it goes on with this inflammation? Depression isn't a chemical imbalance. What is it one theory gaining? Traction is it has to be inflammation and we already talked about that. But researchers at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana tested the theory that when they assessed early childhood had experiences and depression among one hundred seventy seven young offenders at a juvenile detention center in Russia many were suffering from depression and the researchers discovered vert a correlation between the severity of their condition and the extent of childhood trauma such as punishment hostility parents on justified criticism and lack F- respect. Absolutely that's a subconscious programming especially when your child we don't even realize is happening right. I don't know why I'm depressed. Nawab sad all the time. Well you know so And that goes for For Schizophrenia too. You can be predisposed to that. It's in my family genes. But why did I not get it. And why did my brother My brother Jerome Jerry. Jerry data will. Jerry was sexually molested as a child when he was an altar boy with the Catholic Church and so and that caused a split your body holds trauma holds traumas going and it happened repeatedly. He was an altar boy for many many years. Okay and it was. It was a repeated thing and He had a nervous breakdown when he was seventeen and he and his life immediately you know was he and he's never had a driver's license all these things that we all take for granted And he has suffered tremendously But in one institution after the next now he's in a really great home where he gets great care and Houston and but so many so many people don't understand that those childhood traumas they. Can you carry them with them with you for your life unless they're healed and talked about that so one of the doctors that I'm working with now don would WHO's a neuropsychologist? Has a program program called inspired performance institute he goes back in helps clear. TRAUMAS like that. Childhood TRAUMAS Folks that have been Exonerated from wrongfully incarcerated for murders and such And that's what it's all about is about clearing those subconscious traumas of things. That happened to us. Like it's you your your your brother right might might blame himself for being an altar boy. It's those little things they go back to. They don't think about that. They don't understand it until they go back into it because brain sees it as as if it's happening right now until until they can clear that in reprogram the way the brain sees that event they're going to be stuck in that repetitive

Depression Inflammation Billy Joel Lynne Mctaggart Traumas Brian Hubbard American Psychiatric Press Tex Google Jerome Jerry United States UK Joseph Shield Kraut Founder Ussr S. S. R. Beatles Houston BU University Of Notre Dame Harvard
The Link Between Kitchen Countertops And A Deadly Disease

Short Wave

03:14 min | 1 year ago

The Link Between Kitchen Countertops And A Deadly Disease

"Uh now. You've been working on this story for months. You were joking with me. Recently that you knew everything there is to know about this topic. And that topic is countertops. That's that's right. Specifically like sort of stone. Engineered Stone countertops which is really strange. Because my personal countertops at home are would like. I didn't know anything about this subject before I started looking into it But increasingly people have turns to this product known as courts right so if you go to any sort of lake. TV TV show with remodeling and they update the kitchen. They have these new white countertops it sort of look like marble I know about it I watch. TV All the time but they're often not marble it's often courts it's which is a composite material and it's thought to be a little more advantageous than granite or marble because it isn't ship or stain as easily. That's what the manufacturers say. Stay right and this story is not about home design. It is about something that happens in the process of cutting that material that courts so they can fit in your cool updated kitchen itching right because when you cut courts if you're not careful it can create lots and lots of dust and that dust gets everywhere. Your your nose your ears. You heard all your body close everything everything Jose Martinez did this kind of cutting job for years so waited another guy. I spoke with named one. We just use his first name for medical privacy. I've been CPO. Not No no CINTAS A I. You don't feel the changes a lot then later with time passing your body telling you that you're missing air this you're suffocating and you're tired they filed by Dickens's so this dust damages ages their lungs. Exactly so here's another guy. I talked to play Rodriguez and the beginning. I wasn't understanding why that I was getting tired. I usually I was just thinking about maybe getting older. He kind of took like a big breath in there right so he and other guys they all have a disease called silicosis this as in Silica which is found in all that courts dust it causes irreversible scarring and damage to the lungs. So they're young and they can't run underplay with their kids and you know eventually as the disease progresses. They're probably GONNA need a lung transplant. There's no other Cure for this disease. Here's I Jose again in the when I go to sleep I think about it every night. Depend GonNa die in three or four five years and a half four forgives my wife because to be honest with you every day of your few words so there was a recent report in the MWR. That's this weekly early. Publication put out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and it described eighteen cases including these. These are instances of silicosis in workers. There's countertop workers in California Texas Colorado in Washington and among those eighteen cases there were two deaths so today in the show what we know about this emergence of silicosis and why investigators are worried. It may just be the tip of the iceberg.

Jose Martinez Centers For Disease Control An Rodriguez MWR Dickens Washington California Colorado Texas
Jalen Ramsey isn't backing down off trade request

NFL Live

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Jalen Ramsey isn't backing down off trade request

"The Jalen Ramsey. AMC Trade Watch continues yesterday jags head coach Doug Marrone said Ramsey will play in tonight's game against the titans. The road was also asked about his relationship Cintas all pro corner. I've always had a good open relationship where we always been able to thought we sat down yesterday. We talked about what's going on as far as he. I don't like anything else in this profession behind us now his focus is on plan. You know my job being able to do the best job for the team right now. Well see now start with you I. I don't know how far we are past it but anyway. There's a game tonight and that certainly matters for both these teams. What's the latest with regards to Jones. Future will literally just talking to people around this situation within the last ten minutes and we all know that Jalen Ramsey is a hot topic because everyone's trying to figure out where he wants to go specially when he's demanding a trade and once out of Jacksonville so literally within the last five minutes I just tweeted that he is fine with playing tonight but does not anticipate -ticipant that he will be a member of the Jacksonville Jaguars by next Sunday because obviously he cannot play two games in the week per. NFL rules my understanding in terms of the teams that have made substantive inquiries for Jalen Ramsey include Baltimore include the cheese Eagles include Minnesota Seattle and Oakland but also that at least every team in the NFL outside of obviously Jacksonville have at least placed the call. There's not a team that wouldn't want somebody who's probably considered a top ten player in this league in a top corner corner in this league when you look at two of the teams that I mentioned within that tops six the chiefs and the eagles those teams that have allowed the most passing yards within the last two years since two thousand eighteen and certainly could be a final peace when you're talking about going to the postseason and doing beyond anchoring that secondary so there's been some discussion about this you know we're two games in confrontations as you both know perhaps get overblown but in fact happened on every side line probably every week or we are we. Are they moving on too quickly as everybody overreacting or is this a situation that simply has no other resolution think it's up to Jalen Ramsey. I think he's made a decision and his mind what what he wants to do and how he wants to move forward with his career and I think he's you know we know Jalen. Ramsey stands by his word right he when he says something about how he feels about whether it's about his play whether it's about another player whether the whether it's about his own respective situation you've taken for his word and you take it as the truth and I do believe that he'll be on a different team. Come next week in this whole situation isn't resolved with the Jacksonville Jaguars and Doug marrone and that he'll be and he'll have to figure it out elsewhere interesting words that he's been resolved because I think we can probably all agree that no in fact it hasn't especially if if if trade is the ultimate resolution and then it's not over yet. It's hard for me. I mean when I'm listening to this. I just want to say what what what's going on. It's two weeks into the season and I know you've been in situation. I know I have when you're playing football. There's always it was going to be heated exchange with a coach because they expect you to do one thing and and you're playing and you're doing your best and you're trying to do exactly what they want you to do but guess what you don't put your hands. Manzana coach you don't instantly say I want to be traded because it sends a message to everybody else in the locker room. That's aligning next to you that you don't want to be there so it'd be hard for me to go play tonight with a guy that says look yeah will play tonight but I won't be here next week and look when you get straight and it's not easy for you to go to a new place. Learn of defense live in in an apartment for months and just say yeah. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA come in here and I'm just going to be a key piece to you. If you're a winning team and you can go somewhere else to lose to no one's going to say he's going to go to a team and they're going to win so for me. It's hard to digest the whole process of look. Everyone has a platform. Now you have cell phones. You can say I want to be traded instantly and you know who's running the Jaguars up at the top. You know who's running that right now. I'm very well and he's old school coughlin. He's not going to say okay. I'll put up with this. He'd be happy right now. He later jalen would definitely one hundred percent selfish. She could not play tonight at all and just be protecting his self interest by protecting his body so that's not you know clearly the case if he's going to play tonight or do like the fact that he is playing shows that even though there may be some differences within the organization. He's still there for his team would agree with that. We're willing to play play. You know anything could happen in terms of getting at least we could certainly see a scratch as we get close to game

Jalen Ramsey Jacksonville Jaguars Doug Marrone Cintas Jacksonville Titans NFL Chiefs Jones Baltimore Football Seattle Minnesota Oakland Eagles One Hundred Percent Five Minutes Ten Minutes Two Weeks Two Years
 Sudan protesters begin 2-day strike to press ruling military

BBC Newshour

06:03 min | 2 years ago

Sudan protesters begin 2-day strike to press ruling military

"The sound of protesters, taking part in a two day general strike since mid January Sudan has been in turmoil. Persistent demonstrators demanding a revolution in the way politics is done. Have already achieved a huge amount President, Omar al-bashir stood down in April having held onto powerful three decades with the army's full backing a military council took over and that council, and the opposition protest movement have been in Tokyo about the future of the country. But those, those talks have stalled throw into this mix Amand cooled. Yes Amman, who has just returned to Saddam to try and help. He was a rebel leader, who has been living in exile, his return to Sudan comes despite having been sentenced to death in absent you. So when did he decide to return to Saddam against oats, I decided to come to them because I'm sentenced to this and the this cintas has been repealed, but you're doing. All that for the sake of peace combines abyss was set. The organization social Justice on it was citizenship for all students. The death sentence that you mention was passed on you in obscenity. Did you have any conversations with anyone in already before you made the decision to return? No, I tried. But it was not successful, but I decided just to come because I'm coming by the mission of Sudan, Stephen or visions, and I'm still here. I'm going to continue never go outside, Sudan. I don't have much. Ability, only from this soil of sedan. Are you expecting to join those currently stalled talks between the transitional military council and the opposition alliance. Well, I'm looking for that. But from wherever I am. I'm ready to help the bottom line that I'm ready to offer whatever we have a four divorces of democracy and change. We are part of them, and we was going to a building a coalition that can lead the interim period. And we're looking for at the creation of intent to end wars, all of Sudan we out of forms of pretty. You were of course, parcel of an armed struggle against President Omar Al Bashir in the Blue Nile state, but will you continue to do an armed struggle against the Sudanese government in, in relation to the Blue Nile state. Only blue line is that forages Nova mountains is everywhere. We need that strategy exit from almost into politics, lives. There is a just cause for those people are fighting, and they have an issue that needs to be addressed through causes causes that can bring stability to Sudan. Ready to do anything that will help an strategic exit for Amstrad into a political historian time for it. Okay. So given your own personal experience involved in an armed struggle against the Sudanese authorities. How much do you trust those who all sitting at the table in the transitional military council. Well, we can build trust. Trust is visible, and then what I came here on the ticket or Sudanese people. I trust is people have confident umbrellas and I'm in very emotional yesterday, when I visited I doubt me, and I believe those people that was deserve better. And Sudan, neither news cubic adding that we everybody that will have a professional our the era of the sun. Has they voted to destroy Sudan, Africa? Because Africa is diverse continent. And when you talk about political Islam, being something that should be eradicated in Sudan. I wonder about the role of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Egypt inside Sudan, and in particular, on the Sudanese military bullet get has ruling Saddam for years. They destroyed the Sudanese social fabric because one dimension it. And they build a db state, we need to deal with this d state for the suit, Geremia Emirates and Egypt and all of them were already to deal with them on an equal footing. And from there we can do relation. We can do business with all other countries. You say you are impressed by the, the meetings that you've had with people who are continuing to demonstrate is there, any sense that you get there is a loss of momentum that people all getting tired that they are less willing to continue the protests. I'm basically impressed because they have resulted in their faces in the is in their the way they did it me. And. And especially the user doing courage in me, not to their issues aside, and they said, we they need a new society. They need a new country. A new social political decision and I'm committed for that. Did do you support the general strike that is taking place today? Absolutely. We supported the strike because we need to send one message that people's need change. This change should be expected, and we need to encourage everybody gritty literally council to speed up Shane's and Kuta civilian government, which is among, and it is a need, because there is a vacuum now is country. And we are supporting but as same time, we're supporting speeding up negotiations with literary.

Sudan Omar Al-Bashir Saddam Amand Sudanese Military Sudanese Government Africa President Trump Amman Blue Nile Amstrad Tokyo Geremia Emirates Stephen Egypt Saudi Arabia Shane Kuta
"cintas" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Those who fight those were wounded and today, a grateful nation says, thank you. I'm Hugh Hewitt. Sponsored by lightning invasions insurance solutions. Hey, it's great Talbot. We lifeline innovations with another platform to offer you, what would it look like if you participated in the five seven five fund number one five percent, annual return with monthly interest paid for five years, number two seven percent annual return deferred? For five years, number three, fifty thousand dollars is required. And you must be an accredited investor to participate if this meets your conditions of satisfaction, and you wanna piece of the five seven five fun thing. Call eight hundred five one six four seven four eight that's eight hundred five one six four seven four eight. Listen to the prerecorded message, the five seven five fun five percent for five years with monthly income or seven percent deferred for five years or visit the website, the five seven five dot com. See them all around town, cintas trucks, and their service, reps taking care of customers. When companies use cintas, you know, they're confident and ready cintas helped with their fire protection, and I ate and safety programs handles, their peril solutions, and helps keep their facility and restrooms, clean stock, so, you know, those companies care about their employees facilities and image when all those things together, they're.

cintas
A radioactive waste standoff in Malaysia

Science Magazine Podcast

07:03 min | 2 years ago

A radioactive waste standoff in Malaysia

"Earth minerals are e east for short are essential in a vast array of technologies from your smartphone all the way to electric vehicles, but the processing to extract these minerals results in radioactive waste. I'm Meghan Cantwell. And I'm here with science order. Yahoo. Allow to talk about how this radioactive waste has created a standoff in Malaysia the state of the only sizable R E processing plant besides China. Having me, of course. So what elements are considered R E E is Zora of elements. Are are ES. You mentioned is about fifteen elements in what we called the letter night series. Oh, e element of ETA MC number fifty seven to seventy one. And they're actually not that rare. They are over eight hundred commercially viable deposits were white. So these oars are coming from Australia. Why are they processed in Malaysia the reasons given by Linas is that it? It's for economic purposes there say that it is she and then the site where the chose Kuantan is the industrial park. You get chemical plants to get tro Cam on the things that line assay the need for the processor, the heavy in Kuantan, another reason that the gave is that relationship on the major economic trade routes closer China closer to Japan, which is a major of Linus Proser to Europe environmental groups in Malaysia have opposed Linus cintas started. Why is that the main concern at the time was the radioactive waste that Linus produces in the processing once you take the rare of ascites, you're left with are the solid strike at it has Tori and uranium. So it is real active Molly radioactive, and so can imagine locals immolations having this imagery of light one point. Five million tons of major sitting big number value, but not one point five million tonnes reader at. So the radioactive ways up to the end of two thousand eighteen is more than four hundred fifty thousand tonnes how is it currently stored? Well, it starred in what line is caused a residue storage facility. Basically, it is powered up there just above ground. So they do cover a black lining. The lining is way not as effective at blocking the radiation. As compared to if they just seal it away in a permanent disposal facility like underground sealed off that recommended way one of their commended ways to do this radioactive residue. This temporary storage is exposed to natural elements and the area is prone to floods about every four to five months of the year, the north eastern coast of peninsula Malaysia. But one is is better. By monsoon storms. And when it's very dry the area is a some forest, and so it's also susceptible to fires. The government changing over. They've tightened the regulations online. Is there a chance if they don't comply with this that the plant will be shut down as the situation sense? No, if they do not ship reductive ways of Malaysia, it will not get operating license, renewed, and Linus will have to shutdown and they've said, this probably isn't feasible. So it's kind of at a stalemate. Yeah. Foam one angry looks like a steam, it doesn't it? But they are definitely actions behind the scenes just a few weeks ago. The ministry has said that they have established a pass fos to facilitate the removal of radioactive waste from Malaysia to Australia and response to that command from the ministry Linus that they knew nothing about it. The knew nothing about this. Action or this task fast. So where are they now they're kind of saying to the sink, but they really think behind the scenes, we don't know. But there are other countries involved in this whole scenario in this whole dynamics, one of those countries is Japan because Japan, they have a very strong electric vehicle industry and electric vehicles require permanent, magnets, and Pullman, magnets require rent of oxides, and the majority of the rare of oxides for the permanent nets come from Linus. So Japan has provided I think two hundred fifty million two hundred million loan to Linus a few years ago, Pol the deals as that Linus has to provide a certain amount of bread of oxides to Japan. So without crushing Linus supply is crucial for Japan. And so in disaster. Amber. If I remember was in December, the Japanese embassy here in Malaysia has been come out to say that they would take action to intervene. If necessary in this dynamics that's going on between liners Emily's array strong words, isn't it? If Linus were to have to shutdown how would this impact other countries, so Linus processes and producers like ten percent of the worst Ray of oxides now, but for the countries involved, for example, Japan they would have to turn to another sauce in the case, moose likely China? So if you don't have liners Tenet becomes in all sense, the only other supply of of oxides so flying this goes down the rest of the has no choice as of now, but to buy from China interesting, why can't they build a permanent facility nearby in Malaysia as Malaysia not want a permanent silicon store? This underground this like the central question. I don't know why Linus is not building permanent disposal facility. In fact, they were supposed to have located the place to build the permanent disposal facility that longtime ago like within ten months of their operations, but have not done it. And as to whether Malaysia one set. Yes, up to bay two thousand eighteen before we had a change in government who has always been very clearly, in fact in the contracts and in the conditions for Linus to operate here that you try to recycle if you cannot then Bill a permanent disposal facility, and you have to start looking for it. Now, the previous government did one disposal facility if recycling did not work. But now the new government and the new ministry is requesting that Linus remove all of its radioactive ways of his one hundred and fifty thousand. Tons of radioactive as note redo not wind Bowman disposal facility, just remove all the radioactive waste.

Linus Proser Malaysia Japan China Kuantan Yahoo Meghan Cantwell Australia Ascites Europe Linas Tori Bill Emily Four Hundred Fifty Thousand To Five Million Tonnes Five Million Tons Five Months Ten Percent
Chelsea's split season is a concern for Maurizio Sarri

ESPN FC

03:48 min | 2 years ago

Chelsea's split season is a concern for Maurizio Sarri

"Murcia sorry. And it's funny. There's this. There's this kind of like inflection point as to whether or not sorry has done a very good job so far for Chelsea or whether or not he's turning into a disaster. Not just with performances on the field, but probably more. So with with comments that he's making and just like bringing so much of whatever sort of backroom strife there is just like thrusting it right out into the public. And you can only do that. Once if you're looking for a reaction, a manager can only do that once right? If he keeps doing that. Well, at that point dressing room is known to I it's time to bring a new players right that that's it's just as simple as that so gap Marcatti was defensive of sorry, and what has gone on so far and Steve Nicol was not. And here's some of their conversation. Pep Guardiola finished fourth in his first season, you want something funny. Go look where you're gonna call up was when he'd have more time at the end of his first season Liverpool. This always happens if people do things differently sometimes they work, sometimes it works. And then we applaud them sometimes it doesn't work and then they lose their job. And that's what's going to happen to Saudi it doesn't if us job. But to go out and dismiss it. It didn't come on. You want pets? Name cintas, focus. It took responsibility spoke sensibly in through any of the boss. He didn't he didn't. Steve get away with this spoke sensibly thing about pet. God y'all because remember when he came out, and he said, what is thing China, we entire everything thing? Pet monkeys. Do you go? Football men, proper managers. Just get works. Great doesn't it? Yeah. That's right. That's right. Well. I agree with gab to the extent that somebody comes in football and those things differently. You're told conform straightaway. Pep didn't conform, although he did go out and spend three hundred million dollars on like fullbacks. But there is a certain on gab references. They're a proper football nine the guide the way to do things, and he has veered off it, and he's kind of cues and Stevie Nikola bean that guy I would say that gab is the very man quoted on this podcast last week who said the following the siree system works. Are you look for new manager meaning siree plays this way? It's not changing. That's just an inflexibility not so much that he's trying new things rather that he's committed with the old thing, and he can't change anything new. But that's way, you'll get the sack, but the problem I don't think is even necessarily if everything was the same like Chelsea right now are sitting fourth and they're preparing themselves to take part in a in the League Cup final. Like if all of that was the same and sorry was just behaving normally off the pitch. Then I don't think we'd really be having this conversation but St.. You heard Steve Nicol, they're referencing. The fact that sorry is turning them into a circus. That's where the problem is. I think people would be understanding of Chelsea situation. You know, a new manager he came in late doesn't have as players and yet look what happened. He just brought in Gonzalo Egoyan. They went five nil over the weekend and wing scores twice. So people would be understanding of Chelsea, and maybe even maybe even praised on after defeating Spurs over two legs to richly Cup funnel. But it's the fact that sorry we just played Craig Burley talking about how this managers come in pushed out arguably the best not arguably the best player on the team.

Steve Nicol Pep Guardiola Chelsea Football Murcia Cintas Spurs Gonzalo Egoyan Craig Burley Liverpool Marcatti China Stevie Nikola Three Hundred Million Dollars
Crude Oil Futures Plunge Four Percent

Vegas Never Sleeps

00:48 sec | 3 years ago

Crude Oil Futures Plunge Four Percent

"Futures are heading lower ahead of the expiration of the November US Brent crude contract west Texas intermediate crude for delivery in November falling forty eight cents sixty dollars and sixty four cents a barrel on the nook Mercantile Exchange. Prices heads ready as high as sixty nine dollars and sixty five cents with the expiration of November contract and today's settlement contributing to volatility December west Texas crude which will become the contract, shedding forty two cintas six eight thousand eighty six cents a barrel. Global benchmarks December. Brent crude declining by fifty five saints instead of nine dollars and twenty three cents a barrel on the ICPD's Europe exchange in other energy trade in November gasoline, losing one point four percent. A dollar in eighty nine cents a gallon while November heating oil is less than zero point one percent higher

Nook Mercantile Exchange Texas Brent Icpd Europe Sixty Nine Dollars Sixty Dollars Four Percent Nine Dollars One Percent
A look at the 3 Americans detained in North Korea

The Brad and Dan Show

01:04 min | 3 years ago

A look at the 3 Americans detained in North Korea

"The workday visit cintas dot com there's a report of a south korea that north korea maybe center released three american prisoners moving them to a hotel visit ahead of a planned meeting with president trump after the summit between the korean leaders last week south korea's president thinks president trump should win the nobel peace prize and some republicans in congress agree the letter sent by eighteen house republicans intend to members of the norwegian nobel committee makes the case for president trump to win the peace prize indiana republican luke messer a senate candidate in his home state revealed the letter that says the president's peace through strength policies are working to bring peace to the korean peninsula you have both leaders talking about a united korea talking about ending those nuclear programs than the north korean leader has already ended his testing program there are major steps happening president trump plans to meet in the coming weeks with north korean leader kim jong hoon a summit that could be officially announced what the time and place later this week in washington jared halpern fox news.

South Korea Donald Trump President Trump Congress Norwegian Nobel Committee Luke Messer United Korea North Korea Indiana Senate Kim Jong Washington Jared Halpern
Pope Francis admits errors in Chilean sex scandal

The Norman Goldman Show

01:36 min | 3 years ago

Pope Francis admits errors in Chilean sex scandal

"Francis admitted he made grave errors in judgment in chile sex abuse scandal the pontiff is now invited the abuse victims he had discredited to rome to beg forgiveness in an extraordinary letter francis also is summoning chilean bishops to the vatican for an emergency meeting to address the scandal that badly tarnished his reputation as a reformer francis blames a lack of true and balanced information for misteps among them defending a protege of a notorious predator priest despite multiple accounts of abuse from victims and witnesses i'm jan johnson hockey fans the first round of the stanley cup playoffs getting underway tonight in the eastern conference it's the defending champion pittsburgh penguins hosting philadelphia over in the west minnesota visiting winnipeg and las vegas will be hosting los angeles i'm barbara kusak are we ready to open next month learn how cintas can help you get ready for the workday visit cintas dot com it's the little things like getting flowers for no reason at all.

Francis Pittsburgh Penguins Philadelphia Minnesota Winnipeg Los Angeles Barbara Kusak Cintas Chile Rome Jan Johnson Las Vegas
"cintas" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Semi spoils devas big ten he'll be mickey mantle see said still get it after be to mrs it'll be them seating still for this call cintas okay.

cintas mickey mantle
"cintas" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"Okay also i froze my credit at another place in ovallis if you've talked about that but is the inova cintas so whatever they call themselves they are the invisible player in the credit reporting industry they account for teensy tiny amount of market share i have also frozen my an office report or an abyss however say but i don't ever mention it because they're such a small part of the action okay okay i thought they were like the check cashing people or something like that which i could see where it would dwindle check systems of checks check systems that that is another thing novas is is a form of a of a credit reporting agency that is a little different than equifax transient experience and we can all drive ourselves crazy with all these people track data on us so we did the best we can with all of them bruna is with us on the clark howard show hi bruno how are you doing priok nice to talk to you i've been following you for years well i am so glad and it's great to have you here and you have followed my advice about getting a chromebook walk i have as soon as i read that in your email newsletter i said i just is exactly what i need but in have you liked it i love it i love it i got a good deal you mentioned it and you newsletter that there was a good deal going on and i got it and i got it for half price and it's fabulous because it has a really long battery life which is fantastic and it boosts up right away and i it's just perfect for me and the price you can't beat the price why chromebooks are completely dominating the laptop market in not just the united states but becoming such a huge factor around the world because they're a simple web surfing machine you pop it open and four seconds later you're on the internet it's pretty amazing what they.

ovallis chromebooks united states clark howard four seconds
"cintas" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on Science Friday

"Now amanda i know i understand you are studying cintas these and you need volunteers reich y'all have a date megaphone right here how can people sign up if you experience um connections between the letters and numbers are days of the week and colours um we would love for you to join our study you can start by going to our website at www u dot m p eyes dot nl slash cintas these of and if you click on join the study you can uh learn a little bit more about suna sesia takes some short quizzes if you're not sure and um if fewer types that you experience are the right ones for our tests um we'll send you a genetic test in the mail and you can uh mail it back to us you can participate from anywhere in the world and we pay for the shipping samples died mpi that nl slash sentence these year will try to get up on our website later on in the minute we have to go ahead a you're studying educational psychology now there's this affect the classroom the senate station this is part of what we're looking at now cintas thieves will say that sometimes there colors help them to remember things like phone numbers or math facts they will also say that sometimes they get in the way win for example the colors four three and four don't mix to create the color that seven should be or two plus five which are different colors are supposed to give them the same color for the seven so sympathyd say it helps them and hurts them in all sorts of interesting ways and we're still trying to understand this and so we're looking at adults college students here that have seen as these and also looking at children trying to understand better how these aesthetic associations help and hurt their learning good luck to both of you it hover.

suna sesia senate cintas
"cintas" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"The society us make sure cintas this right societies rosa cruciate shia worship christiana in angola god or the rosa cruzan society of england claimed that where letting was their patron and when he found out about this he demanded they remove his name because he did not have anything to do with that with freemasonry or a cultism on this claims that he was in contact with the occultist ele elphus levy that he participated in evil caytion so there's lots of all of this lore around him um but for the most part it's not provable in any way shape or form but the claim still persist and bouvet ski was one who believed it she was a russian immigrant she was born in what is now the ukraine as she was married in her teens but quickly left her husband and traveled the world uh the details of this is uh unclear at times uh one of the things we can see in the biographies of these people it is that they made up fictitious histories so we can't really take everything they say as fact everything's got to be taken with a grain of salt and then verified and that's hard to do a lot so we have her showing up in america at the height of american spiritualism in the 1870s and already there's issues going on where people are being caught of fraud mediums are taking advantage of spiritual believers there's lots of anti spiritual list activities within the church calling it demonic and you also have people like what houdini would do later of using their knowledge of stage magic to disapproved medium so you have this very chaotic can in um.

cintas ukraine america rosa cruzan society of england bouvet fraud
"cintas" Discussed on Defensive Security Podcast

Defensive Security Podcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on Defensive Security Podcast

"Which is weird addle but unfortunately don't know a lot about how he did this so we can't give much advice on how to stop it but uh may be more will come out yet i it it's some it's a little unclear i i would say that he either retained access or uh or or he he fished credentials the really is not a clear distinction you can read a little bit into the way the indictment is worded it's kind of interesting because it talks about sending out sending code in remember the exact wording they have but no sending encode sending code for the purpose of breaking into a computers i am yet biggest the legal profession and the it screed profession really overlap well in terms of communication well that's fair i mean that could be something like and we sent a cintas script from ah bb cats you know script or or launched on the from medicine blinder who knows what you know that can refer to yeah i i use that he's at the server it's a little unclear to me if he already had the passwords would they have of it that way yeah that that gets that was my point so it'll maybe he did he did this something but uh to me the you know the the one thing i would say is this is kind of the adversarial insider now at the point in time the sky allegedly committed the acts he he wasn't it he he there was an unauthorized person than this let clear that he actually head credentials but he certainly had enough knowledge of the workings of the system that that typically adversaries don't have.

cintas
"cintas" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

Writers Who Don't Write

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

"Two it's very funny that you say that because i i mean you had a section in in the book where you're talking about how um like this recipe is the same as everybody else he writes i urge who who makes that particular dish but it has to do with like the hands of the person who asked wally may end is very similar in that sense i guess he can put the directions on a page but it doesn't mean it's can it become at something yep sutter the reason that the the comment about not being able to teach people how to write is because i've her as a fan of food and now someone who's learning to cook in fits and starts it did not go well first but there is a the one thing i find it extremely frustrating when you come across the recipe is when it refers to things that have to do with the hander the touch and they say to taste when a when you're working through a sort of mechanical paintbynumbers thing and it's it's interesting to think about that concept applied to writing where you can actually break down physically in real life have actual physical components to work with but it takes so much else to actually go back and say here is how you do this at cintas is how i i was talking exactly about this in in relation to cooking actually yesterday evening on i was i was making up the nation that you know what what cooks people would know how to cook and giving instructions to someone else who might not know how to cook they they seem a lot of things that uh that that is not are not necessarily known by the person who's setting out so you know you will certain hacks right so gil and and i think it would be good to write a book with the with all the hacks manged transparent so you know something like you know you have a loaf of bread and he's slice.

sutter cintas wally gil
"cintas" Discussed on One Shining Podcast with Titus and Tate

One Shining Podcast with Titus and Tate

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on One Shining Podcast with Titus and Tate

"Tight end the dirty laundry that's why i think which called the dirty laundry but i like their segment i think that's got stay in power agreed i think that a p please keep sending us a cintas your manager stories will keep reading them on again we we we we like that your we like when players you're trying to throw players under the bus coaches under the bus but uh keep it sort of vague an anonymous because we have more fun that way estate aurora funding for me to get who it is like we as your thomas story i was like what school was that james madison trying to think about the color game that it's more fun that way dover in this yes the poor while the part the part where i said i was a manager james madison probably gave away the far for yet those number they're they're they're right away i guess they're in my head i was like all right per okay definitely rather james madison i was like uh the eu james madison while um um i was going to i was going to close out our friday within another mi dump segment um because the feedback on my credit versus debbie rant was incredible last week noah noah gave me a good answer uh by the way but um anyway the thing i was going to bring up was that i have not seen the room and everybody has seen the room and then t i was explaining this debate as we're about to do the pod in the need to shoot me over like a youtube linked to see this movie the room and olympic over there is that segment so yeah them anyway i felt really stupid though because i don't i this this is a movie i searched everywhere i couldn't find the the room anywhere like have tried to go find in theaters says people like yet shown in some theaters and i can't find it anywhere i can't find it on eight of like the channels i have on roku like it's not on hbo or netflixing the hell hell or people watching this movie everybody seen it and it tastes like yeah yeah hey you dumbest i says what are they martin some and i think the link.

cintas dover eu noah noah hbo aurora thomas james madison mi debbie
"cintas" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Big Interview

"This almost reaching position between those who commission buildings some on the society the use them the also the site of the don't use them but have to ashley experience them a quiz i legal his lawyer all trying to actually find a way of civil tennis equations that can never actually be resolved so you have to take a judgment as to way you feel you can never please everyone of realize that so the price is that you asked me about is less important me now than if i feel that somehow what we've achieved is important it's lovely to be recognised but it's it's not smell as important i think let up from richard nestle cintas when you go into office we have 100s of walt's hundreds we don't we don't display them and um i think probably is this basis if you are as good as the last thing you did hits the state of mind in terms of grief watson exwife for terrifying prospect and there are a dozen help at her home prospect but also an exciting one i mean do you still think the next project to recurrent project could be the the best the best piece of work of a done deal and do you does it do you need to have that attitude um some ties moments of clarity a moment serve an idea do you think is a way forward have to say this now filling all earth light up when that happens is nothing like hair it changes your whole demeanor changes everything the suddenly you can see a way forward sometimes it's early times it takes a little time and thus that dis does not feeling like it i have to say bay conscious comes with a color miserable miserable welt w worry about myself sometimes you know it's because it is that he just tried to get some way that you can't quite say and i find out really either that.

richard nestle cintas walt
"cintas" Discussed on Final Games

Final Games

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on Final Games

"And the you know that's great i love it you know when its original people doing epa flashback as game has known for its visuals as well as its worlds and i think they made it pretty much a onetoone with the game but it just did not how cintas has the generic three environment like not really any on direction to it kind of just this this is a jungle gone real yeah they got unreal engine and basically populated with stuff but didn't made it to detailed and i think it's the simplicity of that game there's very impressionistic that's what meter uni skin oic komo like another world this will own press of persia ththey this still hud spikes on yep that that's knives it's such a great game to already be working in automation and to see this game come over the just super raised the bar it so cool cooling to take those things that you like my god how did they do this and then try and recreate yourself and then you know learn via those types of things like i i remember they be young and watching like enemy and stuff like that like trainer recreate by drawing like breaking dan hollywood druid netcutting in the process that they get too for having like those very simple hard colors and you know as you said would like his clothing keeping a very simple but having this little touches that you make you a who did it and then sort of yourself wayne frontline has a break that down you do similar stuff is like incredibly interesting.

cintas persia epa
"cintas" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"They just i think like my main thing when i think about it is late my mom is poet she was a m a schoolteacher was your real poet she's a real she's a big deal she's like a real poet or girls line awards new zealand biker she's lamaze books out she's put books out yet she's puts actually isn't pulling out in a while but they are all like big deals when she put them out she's bad ask here but i think should tough all i can imagine behind it but you're songwriter i mean you do now it's so different i'm writing showed stories reinar any pons but so what what kind of formed hershey issue igf reverse for jewish tightly structured veggies berries she's pretty she's pretty free verse yet anywhere here she surrogate and you're reading or poetry like when you were a kid i wasn't but i think what she really instilled in me was this lake seen sirri kind of like magnifico like iter and such a i'm so governed by all of my seats as an all the way that i make your i have like crazy sentence theater and whenever since seizures icat win like cintas overlaps of me i'm colors in i textures and tones correspond with music and words ends kind of linguistic zaphon oral staff zor has a manifest itself i could do i go into an overrode or like when you hear certain sounds you see things are law it's a lot way too high you have to stop talking sometime i have to come here and medicaid a ball you would may sh i as i do wish sometimes because it is a theory overwhelming got what is it feel like when you it's overwhelming to have the i mean it it it it lake guides alatas the music that i make via or a make very visual music very light colorful via a music so like for me when something is lay just that light peak.

cintas
"cintas" Discussed on Packet Pushers - Datanauts

Packet Pushers - Datanauts

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on Packet Pushers - Datanauts

"That depends on where it's where it's being applied right indie in the infrastructure i mean we can't stop the browsers have decided forest right like aged tdp to is only going to be secure each gdp period so you can't use it without having eight a secured server on the backside so we're going to have to use it if we're going to go that route the question then becomes am i doing end to end encryption in that i'm going to encrypt from all the way from the application to the client so i'm going to have the server actually do the encryption or am i going to have pieces of the infrastructure terminate it or are they going to do rean corruption all these decisions have an impact on the performance of the application some might say the security of the application as well because if you're passing encrypted traffic through a a security device that is supposed to be inspecting the actual payload like a web at firewall you can't it's all encrypted it's gibberish seemed you can actually apply any of that security it just you might as well bypass it so depending on where you are actually applying the the encryption and who is responsible for it is going to change your performance and your security profile as you're trying to deliver those applications it's just a member of uh be against the funny part to me about encryption is i mean cintas now required it with hdp to a part of the logic behind that reasoning as i recall from the people right of the hdp do standards was efficiency in other words life's gotta to be faster if you're encrypting and therefore what is going to require it a deal does that ring true to you do remember that as a as a point i remembered that it was actually in the stack before it was ratified and it was made optional afterwards but the browsers refused to support it and let unless it as encryption so it's kind of a de facto impose standard.

cintas
"cintas" Discussed on Packet Pushers - Datanauts

Packet Pushers - Datanauts

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on Packet Pushers - Datanauts

"That depends on where it's where it's being applied right indie in the infrastructure i mean we can't stop the browsers have decided forest right like aged gdp to is only going to be secure each gdp period so you can't use it without having eight a secured server on the backside so we're going to have to use it if we're going to go that route the question then becomes am i doing end to end encryption in that i'm going to encrypt from all the way from the application to the client so i'm going to have the server actually do the encryption or am i going to have pieces of the infrastructure terminate it or are they going to do rean corruption all these decisions have an impact on the performance of the application some might say the security of the application as well because if you're passing encrypted traffic through a a security device that is supposed to be inspecting the actual payload like a web that firewall you can't it's all encrypted it's gibberish see you can actually apply any of that security it just you might as well bypass it so depending on you know where you're actually applying the the encryption and who is responsible for it is going to change your performance and your security profile as you're trying to deliver those applications it just never ends be against the funny part to me about encryption is i mean cintas now required it with hdp to a part of the logic behind that reasoning as i recall from the people right of the hdp do standards was efficiency in other words life's going to be faster if you're encrypting and therefore what is going to require it a deal does that ring true to you do remember that as a as a point i remembered that it was actually in the speck before it was ratified and it was made optional afterwards but the browsers refused to support it and let in it as encryption so it's kind of a de facto impose standard.

cintas
"cintas" Discussed on No Jumper

No Jumper

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on No Jumper

"Say thing i'm trying to go down and i'm in a power to do their as she sees there she understands and she been ruled for me she called me now the day is to tell me she was prow bats who proud at of music but she proud of the fact that i'm not axa her for money on mad at her house land on her cows taking up space uh i'm not our here spewed own bitch is for money at all had the strip negus for money is not desperate means in desi mc'ing cintas is cool warm legitimate i'll straight on taking care my daughter my responsibilities among main him she sees that and she acknowledged there respect see honoree and she just prouder man as s essay hell of a film strata that's amazing um so can we talk about some of the beefs that you're currently embroiled in goes i was a dollar research onscene somebody for him out on a album cover with you with you dead on the cover on my man that seems like it's crossing the line they know these things va they hate on the success uh a needed just congratulating they gotta uk uk came kengo against was working for yo city mmhmm spark fa city is snake firm as crazy because the say people who make this type of shit a and do interviews and they say proud of a nigger reveal me are but is that you now is that you're due to so much bigger than the scene the you come from the everybody's gotta talk about you event if they wi anybody to pay attention to them.

cintas
"cintas" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"Our coolest is all the time in cotonou accent or you cintas passengers and also jobs or jewsjews be my turn nicknames for lilley and then i'd start doing romeo speech in a company axa in our life for your to win the bright sees the haste atjulius stop and then she said that whenever she was due on stage wherever it comes up but she couldn't stop thinking about the cold so that was a a lastminute not addition it wasn't edition asia yes i'm guessing there wasn't too much about this film because he is up on the likes of its own by written and then there are some sosing is likes of jamiefoxx like maybe like two or three like improvise bits by him a just killer lead that line about that some oscar shit right there in februaryjamie improvise one time the trailer videos is maybe love because he is an oscar winner oscar is like the asia says a big monologue a james us cap against says oh that's of ossetia rather will you are an oscar widow so that makes it very very there's a there's a moment words in which which michelle people times i saw which is a buddy shoots a baby in by the year's end and takes away his love of music and is that his ultimate revenge away way do you think about he was going on to kill baby or was he gonna leave him i think we'll what he says after the aids is a double whammy i w i think he's going to do as he can says he deference him and then he's gonna kill debra in front of yet because he says like soi really wish you could hear a scream i guess you just going to have to watch soi think his plan in that moment is is going to be light particularly nasty is light deafened baby kill debra on fox off as leave lie baby leap ab alive but death soi think that's his front is actual his ultimate revenge is to disaster unlike so leave him like death and without his girlfriend while he was pretty nasty spread nazi non us honor got about another littleknown logistical running thing web abc's launch being courted in movies on tv shows and then yeah feet some back in real life resulting in the amazing kevinspacey line dividing lines from monstersi was so happy when that uscuevathat is the sort of like.

lilley axa oscar asia ossetia debra abc monstersi cotonou oscar michelle
"cintas" Discussed on Kairos Audio Podcast

Kairos Audio Podcast

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"cintas" Discussed on Kairos Audio Podcast

"This is how god showed his level among us he sent his one and only son into the world that we might live through him this is love not that we loved god but that he loved us and cintas son isn't a toning sacrifice for our sins dear friends since god so loved us we also ought to love one another no one has ever seen god but if we'd love one another god lives in us and his love is made complete in us i say the word of the lord if you'll say thanks to god the word of the lord this is love not that we loved god but that god love to us and sent his son as an a toning sacrifice for our sins to be a source of love you need a source of love the reason i can say that is because i know for many of us in this room tonight we have tried to have another source of love and failed miserably some of us have been in relationships and we just decided you know what i got wounded i got hurt so i'm going to give bitter and i'm going to isolate and i'm never going to make myself vulnerable that way again you've cut yourself off from having a source of love and cut yourself off from being a source of love but i would give you one word of warning the very thing that you're trying to protect you're gonna wind up killing.

cintas