35 Burst results for "Churchill"

President Trump’s Lawyer Alina Habba Shares an Update

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:15 min | 4 d ago

President Trump’s Lawyer Alina Habba Shares an Update

"Joining us now is president Trump's personal lawyer, Alina haba, is with us right now, Alina. Thank you for joining the show. So I have so many questions for you. Let me just ask first one more generally, what is the president's spirits right now? How is he looking at all of this? So I always say this, but I think spirits are the same as any other day. I will say he has been really impressed with the amount of support, the outpour of support that has happened after Monday, which is not a normal situation for him when he's in this under siege situation with the raid. But what that actually did, I believe, and if you look at his donations, just that night and Eric mentioned it, I think, on the news as well. But he got so much support because it was to such an extreme that what they've done, I think, has just empowered the base. Has reminded people, I mean, you've got Cuomo tweeting that he's completely appalled by what happened. So I think his spirits are generally great right now to be honest. We got through a tough deposition yesterday as I'm sure you know. And you know, he's a fighter.

Alina Haba Alina Donald Trump Eric Cuomo
A Rather Suspicious IRS Job Posting That Has Since Been Deleted

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:05 min | 4 d ago

A Rather Suspicious IRS Job Posting That Has Since Been Deleted

"So yesterday, there was a job posting that someone found on the wet on the Internet. Now, it seems as if there's a lot of enthusiasm going on at the IRS right now. The IRS is really excited. They get 87,000 new IRS agents that would never have happened if we would have won the Georgia Senate runoff. There would have been blocked. But the IRS decided to post a job opening. Now remember, the IRS has a weird and bizarre amount of ammunition and bullets. They've been buying up ammunition all across the country. The IRS is now posting jobs that says the following. In order to get this job, you must adhere to the highest standards of conduct, especially in maintaining honesty and integrity. Okay. You must be able to work a minimum of 50 hours per week, which include irregular hours, and be on call 24/7, including holidays and weekends. Okay. Maintain a level of fitness necessary to effectively respond to life threatening situations on the job. Wow, wow wait, wait. The IRS? I mean, that audits people and tells people they're late on their taxes. That's weird. Continues. In order to get the job at the IRS, you have to be able to carry a firearm and be willing to use deadly force if necessary. This is it right here on screen. This is on the IRS's website, everybody. They just scrapped it as soon as we and many other Sean Davis, the great Sean Davis, started the publicize it. The IRS then says be willing and able to participate in arrests, execution of search warrants, and other dangerous assignments. That's the internal revenue services new job posting. 87,000 new IRS agents made possible by kyrsten sinema and Joe Manchin and Mark Kelly and Raphael Warnock, the house has to still vote on it, but the IRS is now advertising. You have to quote maintain a level of fitness necessary to effectively respond to life threatening situations on the job and carry a firearm. Again, this is these are the tax people.

IRS Georgia Senate Sean Davis Kyrsten Sinema Raphael Warnock Joe Manchin Mark Kelly
Are You Wartime or Are You Peacetime?

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:37 sec | 4 d ago

Are You Wartime or Are You Peacetime?

"You see, there's a great quote in godfather and we'll get it and Kurt schlichter mentioned it yesterday. Are you wartime are you peace time? When I say wartime, I do not mean physical or violent. That's where the media is sloppy and they are imprecise intentionally. I am of course talking about metaphorically. Now the other side I talk about this stuff all the time and no one ever calls them out. Everything I talk about in those terms is metaphorical in the sense of we will beat you at the ballot box, even though you want to beat us with bullets. As Abraham Lincoln famously said, he said, if we no longer able to resolve our differences with ballots, unfortunately, we'll descend into bullets. I refuse to let that happen. I know you do too.

Kurt Schlichter Abraham Lincoln
John Ondrasik Wants a Live Aid-Type Concert, Tell Russia They're Alone

Mark Levin

01:27 min | Last month

John Ondrasik Wants a Live Aid-Type Concert, Tell Russia They're Alone

"Well look you tell me when appeasement works in history and it will be the first time And I think there's a reason I put Winston Churchill in this video and thank you for the phone call and directing me to some great footage about that shot that we used And yeah it's very similar And I think like Churchill I think zelensky is trying to drag the rest of us to the right side of history but right now the prognosis is not great And you know that you talk about that every day on your show Russia is now basically controls 20% of Ukraine And if there's not a dynamic change they're probably going to lose the war And that's what this song is and that's what this video particularly is with this orchestra It's a cultural salvo Look Russia has been economically isolated politically isolated But the Russian people need to understand that they are cultural pariahs They have been told they're the heroes in this but I'm calling for a Live Aid type concert with all the biggest bands in the world You have Live Aid yet some city to let the Russian people know that they are alone in this And they have a choice They can topple this tyrant or go down in history on the dark side So we have to as artists we have to stand up for freedom We have to stand up for liberty We have to stand up for Ukraine because as you said we're an inflection point in history And if Ukraine goes backwards I don't know I don't know what the next 50 years look like but it's not good

Zelensky Winston Churchill Russia Churchill Ukraine
Author Deborah Cohen Describes the 'Big Get' Interviews of the 1930s

History Unplugged Podcast

01:55 min | 2 months ago

Author Deborah Cohen Describes the 'Big Get' Interviews of the 1930s

"The journalists in your book are interviewing the most important political figures of their day. Hitler Mussolini Franco Trotsky, Gandhi, Churchill, FDR. Could you describe some of these encounters and also, how important were these interviews? For example, would this be as high profile as if Anderson Cooper, Chris Wallace, were interviewing Vladimir Putin right now in the day of this recording his early April as that Russian Ukrainian war is still going on, or would it be more of a puff piece? Could you talk about these encounters with these world leaders? These are the analogy that you draw as exactly right. These are the big guts of their time. And in part, the reason why these interviews are so significant in this analogy with Putin brings this is that there's a sense that these are the figures who are determining history. So history is being made by them and also through them. So actually getting to sit down with them allows a reporter a kind of privileged access into the psychology and to the intellectual thought process, you know, it's not the same, you know, you could sit down with my career or Ramsay MacDonald or any number of kind of normal political leaders. And you've got, you know, some of their spend, you got maybe a little bit of a glimpse, but fundamentally you didn't think that their personality was making history. On the other hand, once you're dealing with a Trotsky or a Mussolini or a Hitler or Stalin or a Putin, it's certainly the case that they are outsized figures who is Jimmy shin puts in our managing to channel the tide of history, quite literally. So how important these are and what you get from them really does depend upon who you're talking

Hitler Mussolini Franco Trotsk Chris Wallace Anderson Cooper Vladimir Putin Gandhi Churchill Putin Ramsay Macdonald Jimmy Shin Stalin
The Four Biggest American Media Celebrities of the 1930s

History Unplugged Podcast

01:33 min | 2 months ago

The Four Biggest American Media Celebrities of the 1930s

"In the 1930s, the biggest American media celebrities were four foreign correspondents, Dorothy Thompson, John Gunther, HR knickerbocker, and Vincent Shea. They were household names in their day, and just as famous as their novel writing lost generation counterparts, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. These reporters helped shape what Americans knew about the world between the two world wars by landing exclusive interviews with the most important political figures of their day, including Hitler, Mussolini and Franco, as well as Trotsky, Gandhi, nehru, Churchill and FDR. But they also went beyond state press releases and listened closely to the dissidents in Europe and heard alarming reports of violence against anyone who opposed these authoritarian regimes. The reporting made waves at home and abroad. HR knickerbocker was the only foreign reporter whose dispatches Mussolini bothered to read. Joseph gobel is called knickerbocker in international liar and counterfeiter. John Guthrie shot to fame, but the book inside Europe published in 1936, arguing that, quote, unresolved personal conflicts in the lives of various European politicians may contribute to the collapse of our civilization. In the face of increasing violence in Europe, these reporters had to decide whether they would remain on the sidelines or advocate for their readers to respond. They were the readers of the dictators wouldn't be satisfied with their territories they conquered, and the objected to the policies of appeasement and predicted the coming of the Second World War. Putting together the stories they covered, the Italian invasion of Ethiopia in 1935, the Spanish Civil War broke out the next year, the German annexation of Austria and the karma book Czechoslovakia, and made very accurate judgments about what would come next.

Dorothy Thompson John Gunther Vincent Shea Mussolini F. Scott Fitzgerald Joseph Gobel Ernest Hemingway John Guthrie Europe Trotsky Franco Gandhi Churchill Hitler Ethiopia Austria Czechoslovakia
Charlie's Top 5 Reading Recommendations for You

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:53 min | 3 months ago

Charlie's Top 5 Reading Recommendations for You

"Someone says Charlie, do you have a reading list or all the dystopian writings that Charlie Kirk mentioned the podcast? One is Orwell's 1984, read this already as required in schools in many years ago. Yes, I recommend rereading it. Okay, yes. So there are 5 dystopian authors, all of whom were somewhat contemporaries of one another. You've heard of all of them, probably one you probably haven't heard of. They're all worth just refreshing as Christians, I encourage us to pursue whatever is true. And I think these 5 books will bless you about what really drives the tyrant. What happens when the tyrant meets technology and how technology brings out the worst impulses of our human condition. So the 5 books, of course, the first is George Orwell's 1984. The second is C. S. Lewis screwtape letters. You can read that alongside mere Christianity, which was actually first delivered as radio broadcast during the German blitz in the early 1940s, late 1930s, through the British broadcast corporation. The third is Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, which is a terrific book and addresses a lot of what we're living through when pleasure becomes the ultimate goal of a society. The fourth book is a lesser known one by Winston Churchill and is only novel. It's called savrola. I've actually not read it, but I'm familiar with it. I took a course by doctor Larry arn from hillsdale college on Churchill, and he talked about it. So that's the fourth. And then the 5th is probably the least known of all 5. And in fact, I plan to finish this book. I started it, but I got little distracted during my mini sabbatical coming up in a couple of weeks here. It's called darkness at noon by Arthur koestler, which is a terrific book. And so I've been finished it yet. So those are the 5 books Arthur koestler was a dissident. And producer Connor says I would include the fountainhead in there as neoliberal dystopian.

Charlie Kirk Orwell Charlie C. S. Lewis George Orwell Larry Arn Aldous Huxley Hillsdale College On Churchill Winston Churchill Arthur Koestler Connor
The Question That Charlie Gets Asked Non-Stop

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:31 min | 3 months ago

The Question That Charlie Gets Asked Non-Stop

"Ron DeSantis runs against Trump, are you going to vote for it? Okay, so I get this. I get this question nonstop. And that really tells you something. It's like a fourth or 5th time I've got that question. Okay, I'll give you the same answer. I'll answer it personally, not on behalf of turning point. Let me answer it this way. So Ron DeSantis very well could be a once in a generation statesman. He could be a Lincoln or a Churchill, and he's been totally phenomenal and amazing. If they run against one another, I'm a loyal person. I'm a loyal person as someone who I've been honored to call a friend who I believe was a great president and would be a great president again. And let me tell you why. And this is not a slide at the Santa, obviously. I think he's wonderful. I think he'd be a good president, but I know Trump was a great president. And I'm a loyal person. I gave him my word that if he ran again, I would support him. I'm not a guy that does that and falters. You wouldn't want me to be that type of guy either, right? He's a person that when I had no following, no credibility. And kind of was just like this 21 22 year old. He saw something special in our movement and spoke at our events and invited me to The White House, and he really poured energy and time and resources into our movement. And I don't forget that. I don't just kind of discard it. That's not how I was raised, and I don't think that would be the right thing to do. And obviously you guys would make your own decisions in that regard, but I would say this, that if you win a presidency once, and then the second time you run, it's the most interfered with election in history with ballots going everywhere and Zuckerberg with $400 million. I believe you have earned the right to run for the presidency again, especially after the mess that we're seeing all around us.

Ron Desantis Lincoln Donald Trump Santa White House Zuckerberg
Harry Truman Would Not Let US Return to Isolationism After WWII

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Harry Truman Would Not Let US Return to Isolationism After WWII

"Isolationist was rampant through the after the World War I up until we actually got into World War II. Roosevelt dealt with this in his entire first part of his terms several terms dealing with rod up until World War II. It is firmly believed and you read the writing, you can see his understanding that Roosevelt understood that by the time Hitler was moving, we saw the occupations that he was making and the emphatic discussions from Churchill is that America was going to be into this war at some point. The question was, is when we would get into it. And I think if politically speaking, he would have probably gotten into it earlier, had it not been for the isolationist sentiment here in America. Now let's think about what this isolationist sentiment in America then. It was led by folks like Charles Lindbergh, national heroes who said, look, we only need to be concentrating on here inside our border. We only need to be a part of what we need to say to deal with our country as it exists. And the rest of the world needs to take care of itself. That was the isolation viewpoint. Frankly, if you look at TV and you look at others right now, you will see that that is becoming the discussion that we have right now among isolationist viewpoints and the effect of that of America not being a active world later. Now, I am of the opinion we don't need to be the America's police force. America is not the world's police force. We don't go into every idea and every part and say we're going to fix the problems everywhere. We're going to be a part of making sure though that the world is kept in check because frankly you can not view America and isolation anymore. Truman understood this after World War I into World War II. You have to be sort of understanding that isolationist viewpoint had a great deal of effect on how he dealt with

America Roosevelt Charles Lindbergh Hitler Churchill Truman
Totalitarianism: How Do You Make a Lie Seem Like a Truth?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | 4 months ago

Totalitarianism: How Do You Make a Lie Seem Like a Truth?

"How do you make a lie seem like the truth? What is necessary for a totalitarian regime to exist? Well, when you study totalitarianism, it's very clear that it's not just tanks in the streets or mass surveillance, but instead it's the totalitarian control of the mind. There were 5 authors in the late 1940s and 1950s that were pioneers on the topic of totalitarianism. C. S. Lewis, of course, with the screwtape letters and lesser known for this category, but better known in general mere Christianity, which actually started as radio broadcast during the blitz of London. Aldous Huxley, who wrote Brave New World, probably one of the most important books that anyone can read to understand the sexual anarchy that we are living through today. And why due to totalitarians and dictators need to decay sexual norms to be able to have monopolistic control over a civilization. George Orwell would be the third, of course, 1984, animal farm. We talk, we talk often here about 1984 about how one of my favorite lines from 1984 is when Orwell says the best way to keep a secret from the government is you must first keep the secret from yourself. The fourth is a lesser known author that we really should talk more about Arthur koestler, who wrote a book called darkness at noon, all about the Soviet show trials and how people who are completely innocent were killed in a public display. And the 5th author, of course, was Winston Churchill, author of over 50 books and talked a lot about totalitarianism. Churchill, in particular, was very worried about how technology unrestrained from human virtue. Could not just result in tyranny, but would automatically result in tyranny. Churchill argued that technology was more than a tool. He witnessed this in the Darvish region where he saw very courageous people going into the battlefield and just being mowed down by machine guns and he realized that war has changed and technology can bring out the worst in people.

C. S. Lewis Aldous Huxley George Orwell Arthur Koestler Orwell London Churchill Winston Churchill
Andrew Roberts: Now Is the Time to Fully Support of Ukraine & Zelensky

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Andrew Roberts: Now Is the Time to Fully Support of Ukraine & Zelensky

"Folks I want to finish this piece It goes Andrew Roberts is a very important figure Who knows Churchill as well as anybody else And he said sometimes I feel that there are some in the conservative movement who enjoy being contrary for its own sake At a perversity or a desire for attention regardless of the cost of the wider movement and how it looks to ordinary people They felt that he the enormous damage done to the right and denouncing mister zelensky in the favorable opinion that is strongly held by many millions Perhaps billions of people around the world have been profoundly moved by Ukraine's plight Consider David stockman Ronald Reagan's budget director who last month wrote that quote we were already getting sick and tired of this zelensky clown that zelensky should resign and make way for a collaborationist government that will sue for peace And the Ukraine's government is made up of anti Russian fascists and oligarchs Lisey didn't mention drug addicts Mister Stockton went on to argue that Ukraine isn't a real country and has no genuine sovereign independence Day after day in their cities suburbs and forests ordinary Ukrainians are showing that it is a real country They wouldn't be fighting and dying if they didn't believe that The European Union is in a real country Knowing what fight and die for its flag and anthem and leaders The Ukraine has proved that it is one The martyrdom of Ukraine and the chair trillion leadership of mister zelensky and his people Are showing has changed the political landscape We believe in uniting the right and especially if you want to do it when the left is so disunited Now is the time for open hearted and full throated support Ukraine in its leader Mister zelensky was a comedian in an earlier career In the one for which history will remember him he is the kind of freedom fighter that conservatives should applaud

Mister Zelensky Ukraine David Stockman Ronald Reagan Andrew Roberts Zelensky Lisey Mister Stockton Churchill European Union
America's Place in the World: The Big Picture

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:20 min | 5 months ago

America's Place in the World: The Big Picture

"Ukraine conflict drags on and I want today to step back from it to try to get a little bit of a bigger picture on what all of this is doing to America's place in the world. Now America's place in the world hasn't been that secure for a couple of decades. It's always more insecure under Democrats. For reasons I'm going to go into, but it was going down even before Ukraine. Biden has been, you may say, unwinding America on a number of different fronts. Continuing in this respect, something that Obama was doing for two terms. And but I think the Ukraine conflict may be the turning the inflection point. And I'll say a word about that in a moment. Now here is Vladimir zelensky, the president of Ukraine, who seems to be trying to whip everybody up into a kind of, let's call it a World War three frenzy. And he's doing it by using World War II rhetoric. Let me just quote him here and I have a tendency here to chuckle a little bit, which I guess is not appropriate. But here he is, we will fight till the end at sea in the air. I mean, this is a kind of pathetic evocation of Churchill. Who in the dark days of Nazi advance said in effect, we will fight them in the hills. We will fight them. Here and there and everywhere. And here is a guy zelensky, you know, an admirable fellow in that he's fighting to defend his country, but let's just say he's no Winston Churchill. And more importantly, the analogy is a false analogy because even though the United States was very slow to get into the World War II. In fact, it took a Japanese direct hit on America on Pearl Harbor for America to get into war. That was a war that did directly engage America's vital interests. Why? Because after all the Nazis were overrunning pretty much all of Europe. It's almost a miracle that they didn't crush a British opposition. They did, of course, overrun France. They overrun a number of other countries and the United States, I think, could and should have gotten into World War II even even earlier.

Ukraine United States Vladimir Zelensky Biden Barack Obama Winston Churchill Pearl Harbor Europe France
Mark Levin Reflects on Latest Abraham Lincoln Documentary on HISTORY

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 6 months ago

Mark Levin Reflects on Latest Abraham Lincoln Documentary on HISTORY

"There's a documentary that's on about Lincoln And eventually this before on the history channel And what's remarkable is that documentary its first night was up against my show on Sunday And yet we had over 2 million viewers which is massive for a Sunday Night at 8 p.m. eastern And yet I DVR didn't watched it After my show and I watched it the next night When you watch a show like that you watch the show on Churchill or you watch a show on Washington and so forth You know why these are great men These are great men that make extraordinarily difficult decisions while all the men and women around them are running around like chickens without a hit While they're getting all kinds of static all kinds of input all kinds of competing ideas and contradictory ideas What the people will and won't support and on and on and on and you have to mentally push your way through all that to try and figure out what the right thing is to do and how to get in front of the situation Lincoln insisted on keeping the union together And he eventually came to the position always opposed to slavery always That slavery had to be a rallying cry as well And no better man than Frederick Douglass Embraced him Be signed the Emancipation proclamation Was extremely unpopular in some quarters including in the north among so called moderate Democrats who had sided with the union

Lincoln Washington Frederick Douglass
Medina Spirit stripped of Kentucky Derby victory

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

Medina Spirit stripped of Kentucky Derby victory

"Medina spirit finished half a length ahead of manned the loon at Churchill Downs last may giving trainer Bob Baffert what was then his seventh Kentucky Derby title but after the race Medina spirit or derby horse had been tested positive for twenty one Pico grams of betamethasone steroid is legal in Kentucky but banned on race day Medina spirit collapsed and died in December of a heart attack Bob Baffert plans to appeal the ruling by Kentucky racing stewards he's been banned for two years by Churchill Downs Mandel loon has been declared the winner of the derby I made

Bob Baffert Kentucky Churchill Downs Medina Churchill Downs Mandel Loon
Axios: AOC, Squad Politics Backfire

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:02 min | 6 months ago

Axios: AOC, Squad Politics Backfire

"Axios inside the beltway publication I read every morning kind of gets me and gives me an idea of what the mainstream media and what the beltway folks are talking about. You know, whether they're talking about Ukraine and Russia or I don't know, even Henry the 6th in Churchill. Here's actually the hard left politics of representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the so called squad reports axios once a dominant theme for a vast amount of elected Democrats is backfiring big time on the party in power, top Democrats tell us. The latest sign of the backlash was the landslide recall this week of three San Francisco school board members. Who were criticized for prioritizing issues like the renaming of 44 public schools, I can not get over it, including ones honoring George, Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

Alexandria Ocasio Ukraine Churchill Cortez Russia Henry San Francisco School Board George Washington Abraham Lincoln
Larry Taunton's Friend Paul Reed Is in Twitter Jail

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:34 min | 6 months ago

Larry Taunton's Friend Paul Reed Is in Twitter Jail

"So we're going to go first to our guest, Larry Taunton, my friend Larry welcome. Hey, it's great to be with you and tell John, I hope he gets himself together. Yeah, he's messed up. The dude is messed up. No, it's just that it's some kind of a tech issue. But what do I care? I get to talk to you either way, I'm thrilled. You I want to talk to you about this monstrous monstrous article that poor David French wrote. But before we get to that, you have a friend who is in quote unquote Twitter jail right now. When I heard your story and you wrote about it at Larry Alex Taunton dot com, I said, we've got to talk about this. So tell my audience the story. Yes, Paul Reed, many of your viewers, listeners will be familiar with the trilogy. The Winston Churchill biography by William Manchester called the last Lion. Well, Paul Reed, who is a West Palm Beach, posed reporter. He wrote that third volume defender of the realm. Paul is not a conservative as you and I think of it, but by the standards of today, Paul looks like a guy on the right. But isn't this the beauty of it? The shifting and the sifting that's happening. I mean, here's a guy, he's obviously somewhat pro Churchill. Absolutely. No, you'd love his book. I mean, the last Lion series, the trilogy is wonderful. And Paul's a bestselling author that book received rave reviews. And so what happened is last week, a tweet appeared with an Iranian man parading his wife's head through town he could beheaded her. Let's be clear, folks, in case you're having issues listening, maybe there's noise in the background. I just want to be clear. What my friend Larry just said. Last week there was a tweet. Where an Iranian man. He put this on Twitter, correct? Absolutely. Holding the head of his 17 year old wife, whom he had just murdered, that was posted on Twitter. Isn't Twitter wonderful that they're allowing freedom of expression because listen, there are some people who think that beheading your young wives is a good thing. And Twitter doesn't take a position on that, so they let him post

Paul Reed Larry Taunton Larry Welcome Larry Alex Taunton William Manchester David French Paul Twitter Winston Churchill West Palm Beach John Larry Just Churchill
"churchill" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

05:51 min | 6 months ago

"churchill" Discussed on Between The Lines

"Which by today's standards is undoubtedly true, particularly given his views towards India. But what do you make of this campaign to cancel history after all? Isn't Churchill honored because he saved Britain from a much worse righteous, in Adolf Hitler. Well, of course he is, and that's why I deplore the ideal movie his statue. I'm not particularly keen on the whole council culture of taking down statues and renaming buildings. We can not go through the whole of history, trying to find out what the individual failings work, at the various historical actors, and then try and erase their names from history. I mean, I'm opposed to strongly opposed to this idea of cancellation. Now, I am in favor of what the Germans call their gang and heights gravity or making a reckoning with the past, which is what my humble way I've tried to do with my book, which is to look seriously and hard at history, and at least write a budget honestly without trying to undo all of past history, which we can't undo. Yeah, and that brings me to my final question, Jeffrey. Given everything you've just said and your book and despite the Andrew Roberts spectator review and I think a Columbine neoconservative in The Washington Post. It's generally been well received particularly in The New York Times. But can we ever escape Churchill's shadow? That's the question. Jeffrey wycroft. Well, at the moment, it doesn't look like it. I've done my modest best and have you say to my age interesting that my book has been better received in America than it has in here in England. And it's just possible that the American cult of Churchill, which is the most extraordinary for woman. It might just be fading but after all the failures that it's led them into. But I think the immediately see any sign but honest reckoning with Churchill as a real historical figure. If you could have a movie called Lincoln, it's a sentimental anterior worshiping, as you might expect from Steven Spielberg. But at least it sticks quite close to historical fact. If you go to a movie called Churchill, which was came out about four years ago and didn't make much impact. Or darkest out, which was a huge success about 1940. They are complete fantasies. There is no pretense whatever but Churchill is anything other than a creature of mentioned. And you can write anything you like about him and turn him into justice that English school trip one sort. And his thick strong character, and nobody seems to mind. Trying to get to grips with the historical reality of Churchill remains very difficult. Well, Jeffrey, it's been lovely as always to be with you again. Thank you so much for being on between the lines. As always, it's very good to talk to you, Tom. That was Jeffrey wycroft all throughout Churchill's shadow and astonishing life and a dangerous legacy and we'll put the link to the book on our website. This is between the lines with Tom Switzer..

Churchill Jeffrey wycroft Adolf Hitler Andrew Roberts Britain Jeffrey India The Washington Post The New York Times Steven Spielberg England Lincoln America Tom Tom Switzer
"churchill" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

04:12 min | 6 months ago

"churchill" Discussed on Between The Lines

"And at least two of them had busts of Churchill in their offices and George Bush had a bust of Churchill in the Oval Office which he liked to stand in front of while quoting Churchill, Benjamin Netanyahu Israel has had a portrait of Churchill in his office. There's very low catalog of people who kept portraits or busts of Churchill and hasn't necessarily done them much good. If you just change in, this is Tom Switzer from Arians between the lines. And my guest is Jeffrey wheatcroft, author of Churchill shadow and astonishing life and a dangerous legacy. Jeffrey, there are other examples as well. I think Margaret Thatcher, for instance, she embraced Churchill, if you like during the Falklands War and 1982, that was a victory, you mentioned Iraq and of course Tony Blair was in his shadow and you make that very clear. But what about the Brexit referendum in 2016? I was quite struck by the Brexit referendum in the sense that Churchill was actually invoked all too often by both sides. That's quite right. I mean, the Brexit's the brexiteers, the levers. Inevitably, paraded Churchill's name Nigel Farage, who is the I will have to say clever, but demagogy leader of the football, the former you can party. The Brexit party, which it was to all intents. Like nothing more than to be photographed with a pint of beer in one hand, a cigarette in the other hand, and a portrait of Churchill by the invocations of Churchill and of course the Brexit referendum could almost be summed up for some people by a famous cartoon after Dunkirk by low the great cartoonist was incident in New Zealand by birth. And it showed Tommy on the tips of Dover with his rifle beside him and his fist shaken in the air and the word very well alone. We in England have been completely amused and baffled ever since by this myth that we fought on our own, which obviously isn't true in itself because we had not only common empire, but we had very many other countries supporting us. There are not as it happens in the United States. A bit of a bit of a problem there for the American neocons churchs. Yes. On the other hand, it's true as I think mentioned that they've on both sides. Yes, the remainers embraced him as well. So Nicholas and the present duke of Wellington wrote letters to the newspaper saying that illustrious forebears, the duke of Marlborough, who was Churchill's former in the first duke of Wellington and some instant church for himself, would all have supported remaining in the European Union. Well, actually, they didn't know that. And I don't know that and you don't know that. But everyone felt that to win an argument, you had to say which side Churchill would be on. There are some American politicians who tell us that they address every political problem with the question. What would Jesus do? Well, I think that's particularly good practical approach to politics of day to day, but asking what would Winston do is scarcely any better. Yes. Now there's obviously a new highlight this point that few nowadays speaking of Winston Churchill, all these political leaders and the latest who invoke their idol have ended up making terrible decision. But is there a danger if we want younger people in Britain and indeed around the world might be going? The other extreme, I was struck during the activist campaign in 2020 to tear down statues, a Churchill's finest statue outside Westminster. That was attacked. A racist, we were told..

Churchill Tom Switzer Jeffrey wheatcroft Brexit party Benjamin Netanyahu Oval Office Nigel Farage George Bush Margaret Thatcher Tony Blair Jeffrey Israel Wellington Iraq Dover Tommy football New Zealand Marlborough England
"churchill" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

03:16 min | 6 months ago

"churchill" Discussed on Between The Lines

"He was Home Secretary. He was first ordered the advantage and he was colonial secretary of his chance for the exchequer. And yet, it's very difficult to point to his real achievements of his when I talk about his failures and fodders. What are the most conspicuous? Of course, resonates for Australians, was Gallipoli. And Churchill was not the only author of the Gallipoli campaign with the anzacs made the heroic name, but he was one of the chief authors, and he ever after continued to insist that it was a brilliant enterprise, which was ill start and just went wrong, but that's nonsense. I mean, you really only got to do what I've done and many Australians have done but Churchill never did, which is go to Gallipoli, and when you go there, you see for yourself that it was a completely hopeless campaign. Even if it had succeeded the original landing, which it didn't, and its objectives, and even if turkey had been knocked out of the war, it wouldn't have won the war as church and insisted, rather weirdly. And that was typical of his strategical misjudgments, which persisted in the next war. Yes, well, I mean, back to Gallipoli, though, I mean, he was the first lord of the admiralty. And as you say, he helped orchestrate these disastrous landings at Gallipoli. Now, the prime minister asked with he brought Churchill into the cabinet several years before, and he could say brutally about Churchill quote, Winston is far the most disliked man in my cabinet by his colleagues without a friend or follower in the world, a tragic figure of failure and folly. Jeffrey wake rof. It is an amazing thing for the prime minister to say about one of his own ministers and under his former minister, I then, because as we said that, I think in 1916 and Churchill had resigned with great acrimony from the government in the autumn of 1915 in a consequence of the failure at Gallipoli. And he then went off to try and tone by serving as an infantry officer himself. At the age of 40, he commanded a battalion on the western front for several months. And yet still, even then aroused suspicion and disdain to quite remarkable degree, which has been washed away by the astonishing story of the finest art in 1940. My guest is the distinguished English author Jeffrey wycroft. We're talking about Winston Churchill, the wartime prime minister. He was undoubtedly a hero, but his career was characterized by failure. Now all that changed Jeffrey when Churchill defied Hitler in 1940, the darkest hour that period in 1940 when the Nazis were attacking Britain after they'd conquered and occupied France. Now, this is a very important period in understanding Churchill, this period in his first prime ministership from 40 to 45. Now Andrew Roberts is obviously one of the most sympathetic biographers of Winston Churchill past guest on this program..

Gallipoli Churchill cabinet Jeffrey turkey Winston Jeffrey wycroft Winston Churchill Hitler Britain France Andrew Roberts
The Forks (MM #3972)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 6 months ago

The Forks (MM #3972)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. For as long as I can remember, I've seen people flash the peace sign, but I didn't realize there was a protocol to flashing the peace sign. When you put up a peace sign, if your fingers are out, so people see your palm, looking at them, that's acceptable. If you flash at the other way, seeing the back of your hand while in England and in Australia, that's basically giving somebody the middle finger. It's called the forks in Australia. When you throw up the peace sign backwards, if you will. I never knew this. I never knew there was a right way or a wrong way to do it and come to think of it. I don't even really remember, however, I've thrown up the peace side. I saw somebody the other day comment that somebody had thrown up the forks. I didn't know what the forks were. Then I read the history. The first person who got in trouble for throwing up the forks, and it wasn't called the forks in England, was Winston Churchill. During World War II, when he flashed the V for victory sign, which became the peace sign, except he did it backwards. I didn't know there was a protocol. I didn't know what mattered. That's not like I walk around throwing the peace sign a lot. I've thrown it up in pictures because everybody does that. Who knew?

Kevin Mason Australia Nasa England Winston Churchill
The Forks (MM #3972)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 6 months ago

The Forks (MM #3972)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. For as long as I can remember, I've seen people flash the peace sign, but I didn't realize there was a protocol to flashing the peace sign. When you put up a peace sign, if your fingers are out, so people see your palm, looking at them, that's acceptable. If you flash at the other way, seeing the back of your hand while in England and in Australia, that's basically giving somebody the middle finger. It's called the forks in Australia. When you throw up the peace sign backwards, if you will. I never knew this. I never knew there was a right way or a wrong way to do it and come to think of it. I don't even really remember, however, I've thrown up the peace side. I saw somebody the other day comment that somebody had thrown up the forks. I didn't know what the forks were. Then I read the history. The first person who got in trouble for throwing up the forks, and it wasn't called the forks in England, was Winston Churchill. During World War II, when he flashed the V for victory sign, which became the peace sign, except he did it backwards. I didn't know there was a protocol. I didn't know what mattered. That's not like I walk around throwing the peace sign a lot. I've thrown it up in pictures because everybody does that. Who knew?

Kevin Mason Australia Nasa England Winston Churchill
"churchill" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"churchill" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"A chauffeur driven bentley. flowers Drink key when he stayed in a hotel heat. Stay in the mazda swayed and this went wrong side like a ferocious appetite for drink and sex and eating there's extrordinary descriptions him always grubbing he score pope chopping brought the typo and he keyed with. He never stopped talking when he was Eaten at high school there were other people that actually throw him out of a window to see if he would stop talking. And i love him out the window so in crashed to the ground and he just carried on talking but mostly it was arguments was arrogant. He was clever and he thought he knew better than anyone else was. Never afraid of speaking up. Which is a really admirable quality sometimes but kelly cook him to of trouble and this also he starts seeing like what people described as those bloody rose between winston and ran off. What kind of arguments would they get in. I mean basically it would be a yelling matches essentially. Yeah i mean the team loved each other mean really deeply loved each other and i think that love meant that. Oh that affection commotion meant that most time they would like adoring couple. You know they tell each other how wonderful they were They spend they spend weekends in each company that go on holiday together. They go drinking together. They eat in restaurants together. They plot together. They'd go hunting together that close proximity meant that when things went wrong that was so charged they went really really wrong and they with two men just got gun show in tempus netted run of control himself when he lost his temper in Chaz he stole winston had exactly the same folds and the arguments they had wherever tiny things. They were seed slights. They were like you sort of tumultuous romantic relationship that they could be jealous of each other. They could be jealous if they could be disapproving of his behavior and then very often. Winston was brilliant bringing about together He founded his son's friendship and his sons love couldn't bad the anything could stand in the way ostrich huge document winston would bear found gang. Cartier's the by a bracelet or watch for his son to try make up but there were times when their kids precise face. The pain winston's wife and run. Those mother refused to be in the same room. must have been terrified to say it by bake banned by drank a by loud voices thereby sure of themselves and they didn't care what anyone else thought about them or speed of clementine. Like this was another this added to the tension between with churchill randolph. Because clementine was extremely protective of winston churchill. She even said that. Like my whole life now once they got married like devoted to churchill winston in his career. And like randolph. Got in the way of that in clementine. I mean she it kinda. i mean. She didn't really like her son. I mean not that i like. She didn't like randolph at all. I mean what was that relationship. Like between randolph clinton's randolph resented his mum mother for pouring everything she had into his father and it was very leftover for the other children and i don't think he ever favor for that and as far as team is concerned. I think she sold randolph. Incarnation build west parts for her husband. She admired winston immensely but she listen knew that he was susceptible to extravagance gambling and drinking and anitta. She thought run. The was a bad influence. Have his father which is sort of a strange way behind the world. And i think She was deeply jealous of him. Because winston in brenda for years clearly privileged him over anybody else including her she. She thought that she was at the center of his life. And then as randolph twenties. She realizes that she's being pushed to its edges. And i think she found that very hard and so they win in a sense. They are in constant competition for winstons affectionate. Love and attention on that mended. That relationship was incredibly uneasy suspicious. And did it affect the clementines and winston's marriage like was there tension there because of randolph. I think for longtime because winston unin in what was going on and in anyone else's head or heart apart from his own i think he didn't notice but as time went on i think became. Maybe the only significant argument that he and had you know they this. This was the one thing in marriage. The friend to push them apart. Because i'm has long successful bond Fifty years but randolph was the anything became between them because clementine The rundle could potentially be the end of winston. The with randolph could be the reason that winston wouldn't go onto to achieve over his dreams until she did everything she could to try and protect winston from his son was. Winston was obsessed with randolph. He wanted to spend as much time as he could with them. He wanted to do everything he could to help. Run off and so they two views. They couldn't be reconciled. Quick break for words more sponsors using talks based feels a little like having a therapist in your pocket being able to reach out to your therapist or psychiatrist anytime from anywhere makes taking care of your mental health easy. It'd be more relaxed when traveling knowing that.

Winston Fifty years two men each company two views randolph randolph clinton winstons couple one thing winston Chaz churchill ostrich each years Cartier twenties
"churchill" Discussed on The Patriot 1280 AM

The Patriot 1280 AM

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"churchill" Discussed on The Patriot 1280 AM

"Time flies when you're having fun, so we don't have a lot of time left. I wanted to ask you tell the story of meeting hanging out with John Cheever is a kid. You have such a storied life that it makes your fiction seen. Almost dull on your fiction is not even close to dull but it but you really do have in. You're aware of that having an outrageously storied life and of having met The kind of people when you were already a kid that most people don't get to meet in their life with Winston Churchill. You met Churchill. Yeah. When I was very little like an ISI in. I think I was 1951 or whatever. My father who had worked for him in the war. Was we were in an ISI Tu and my father was taking something to him from Alexander Korda with my father's business partner. And I wrote on my father's leg. We waited in an anti room with a stone floor with a lot of other men, most of whom were British in suits and the doors open and Winston Churchill came out on Guy was still writing my father's standing on his shoes holding onto his leg, but Wanna buy achiever? I can tell you about you, huh? Yeah, quickly because I want to ask you about winter's tale. This is gonna kill us. Go ahead. I Actually, it turns out the theater, Roosevelt invented this thing called straight lining. Sag more hill. He would have his kids go in a straight line, No matter what, you know, Climb over a wall crawl through a swamp or whatever. I didn't know this. I invented it for myself. When I lived in Eagle Bay. This is costing me about 1000 2000 acres of more or less forest and I've had the idea just independently, but I would go in a straight line. So one day, you know you're nuts, right? Yeah. Uh, I was walking to school used to walk five miles school five miles back and later I had actually got weird. That it was five miles..

Winston Churchill Roosevelt John Cheever ISI Tu ISI Alexander Korda Eagle Bay partner Guy Wan
"churchill" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on WTOP

"Thanks so much. Mike. It's 6 51 here on Double D t o p. Here's some irony for you. After months of downplaying the severity of Corona virus, the president of Brazil is now tested positive for covert 19 gyroball Sorrow has said his history as an athlete would protect him from the virus, man. If he did get it, he'd be nothing more than a little flu, was it You? Suppose it was Boston Roo tells reporters. He does now have it confirming a positive test while wearing a mask ball scenarios often gone into public without what shake hands and mingle with crowds. Brazil has more than 1.5 1,000,000 confirmed cases and 65,000 deaths, both second in the world after the U. S. Both numbers are considered undercounts with a lack of widespread testing. Sagar Megane Washington United Airlines has told its 96,000 employees that tens of thousands of them could be furloughed or laid off. Some of those notices could go out as early as this week. CBS transportation correspondent Chris Van Cleve tells us the airline is being hammered by virus related quarantine orders from some northeastern states. New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Tristate TRAVEL quarantine on More than a dozen states. Experiencing a surgeon Corona virus cases is not helping the tepid travel recovery United Airlines setting a filing today it does not expect a linear recovery and has seen a marked decline in bookings to the New York area. Since that quarantine went into Effect. United has said its passenger volume was down 88% in June compared to last year. At this time, and it'll projects projects It'll be off by 75% this month. 6 52 students in Montgomery County have gathered more than 1000 signatures on a petition to rename Winston Churchill High School in Potomac. Bethesda, beat reports the petition claims Churchill stole grain from India to feed British soldiers during World War two enforced Kenyans into camps where, in their words they were subjected to severe torture, malnutrition and beatings. Churchill was, of course, the prime minister of the United Kingdom during World War two from 1942 45 again from 1951 to 55 students have put for three alternate names for the school. And the school system says about 47% of Churchill High students are white, 30% Asian, 9% black, 8% Hispanic professors at Washington and Lee University and joined the student government and asking the school to drop Lee from its name. It's the first time the faculty has recommended the name of Confederate General Robert E. Lee be removed. The recommendation now goes to the board of trustees. Almost 80% of the faculty voted in support of the motion to drop Lea's name. But emotion to drop George Washington's name did not pass. Next in money News, Wall Street lost ground today. A long distance and track sail with Abed. I'm Jeff Level 6 50 for your home Is your castle, your refuge, your.

Sagar Megane Washington United Winston Churchill High School Brazil New York Churchill George Washington Boston Roo Robert E. Lee Churchill High Mike Chris Van Cleve CBS Abed United Lee University president United Kingdom Bethesda New Jersey
"churchill" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on WTOP

"New biography of Winston Churchill called the splendid in the file which would make a great father's day gift by the way and number three is one of many books were seeing quickly write a bestseller list about race and racism in the wake of the black lives matter protests around the country this one's called how to be an anti racist by Abram X. candy it's a blend of social commentary and memoir that explains the history of racism and how it functions in society and what we can do to affect change is there a time for sure well what about on the fiction side ever wanted a brand new novel called the vanishing half by brit Bennett it's a new good morning America book club tickets about two black sisters identical twins who grew up in a violently racist Louisiana town in the nineteen fifties years later one of them is still living there but the other sisters passing as a white woman in Los Angeles for the novel is all about how their lives differ and converge number two is our old friend where the crawdads saying by Delia Owens and number three is a charming comic novel called all adults here by Emma Straub about Chile sixty eight year old woman who decides before it's too late that she's got to start being honest about what sort of person she is but that turns out to be a lot for her adult children to handle that's Washington post book critic Ron Charles now to the corona virus pandemic there's still confusion over how many people have had the virus I don't know it's because they didn't have any symptoms that makes it that much more difficult to contain the spread Dr Anthony Fauci director of the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases as initially data from China appeared to show a symptomatic people accounted for about five percent of cases that number looks like it's more between twenty five and fifty percent he says that's made it difficult to fight the spread as we move forward and begin re opening ahead of a vaccine he urges everyone to follow public health advice and those are the guidelines that have been carefully considered and written as for re opening he says if it's done in a way that's prudent we should be fine Mike Morello WTOP news researchers believe then you corona virus has mutated in ways that makes it more easily infect human cells is a more research is needed to show whether the changes alter the course of the pandemic but at least one researcher not involved in this study tells CNN that it likely has the changes may explain why the virus is because so many infections in the U. S. and Latin America the researchers at the Scripps research institute in Florida the mutation affects the so called spike protein the structure on the outside of the virus that it uses to get into cells do you miss attending live theater because of the corona virus playbill is offering virtual ratings of pride plays to celebrate pride month the virtual festival kicks off Friday with wanting to about being black and queer celebrating play right down our loves tenth anniversary of testing HIV positive June nineteenth brings masculinity Max about a trans guy celebrating his transition at a Super Bowl party.

Winston Churchill
"churchill" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Churchill and then later Rahm Emanuel once said never liner crisis go to waste now you and I both know what happens to gold markets when you say have an impeachment a near war overseas an election coming up things become unstable god for bid we have more unstable news in our economy what happens gold go through the roof gold is at its highest it's bad and I don't know how many years because people are sensing Hey there's trouble on the horizon or at least possible trouble will goal line has a special going on their new eighteen eighty gold five and a half dollar liberties they are extremely popular for diversification and protection I have them I love them and there are benefits of collector coins and you can call them for all of the information on that these coins were designed to be used as money and for a hundred and forty year old coins they are in excellent condition stop waiting to make a decision to protect your portfolio as things become more unstable this will become more and more out of reach get your in account executive on the phone now ask you about the eighteen eighty five and half dollar gold pieces they're beautiful get him from gold line exclusively now for a limited time only eight six six gold line one eight six six gold line take advantage of this offer now eight six six gold line or Goldline dot com Ukrainian officials said this morning they are now considering a Russia missile strike is one of the several possible possible causes for Ukrainian passenger plane crash that happened shortly after the flight took off from trans.

Churchill Rahm Emanuel account executive Goldline Russia
"churchill" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on EconTalk

"And and marched into paris su su to lord halifax really was taking the logical and rational view there are other people in government who agreed with him and and what you needed there for was <hes> church churchill as prime minister to put the irrational illogical argument thrown mantech argument and luckily here was somebody who's entirely driven by his passions in his emotions. This comes through. I think more than anything else in the course of me. Researching miss burke was how much of a man driven by his emotions and passions since he was and he was not going to after ten years of ruining against adolf hitler and the nazis and not being listened to finally we be when he became prime minister he was nelson about to <hes> to into peace negotiations so i'm sure you know there's a new documentary out called they shall not grow old which which is a <hes> colorization of or one footage and addition of sound by the director peter jackson extraordinary achievement and it's important for americans to watch it <hes> because i think americans and others have no wariness of the role that were one played in the psyche of europe in general and certainly in england in the nineteen thirties. It would only been a little more than a decade. It was so horrific horrific. The fact that that england had not that france had zero taste for war is totally understandable. They lost enormous amounts of men <hes> in the first world war england as well not not as much as france but england lost enormous if i remember correctly point one million right and it's a big number of the population of the time of what makes less than i would say i'm gonna guess was in the fifty million range. Listen that we're maybe forty yeah so so two and a half percent of the population is is killed in the war and america's never experienced anything remotely like that and i and again having visited england oakland. You'll tell me the name of the day. Maybe it's just veterans day but you know we have a veterans day here. In america eleventh of november <hes> in in in <hes> in england <hes> people make a donation and they they papi. They were busy issue. You give money to the veterans the money where appropriate to show that you've donated and and that's a reference to the accompanies on the on the west of france yes the way in which died and and so in america pays any attention to armistice day november eleventh. I mean it's it's on the calendar but it when i was in england on november eleventh it was it was an enormously focused on experience obviously and so they you know when people complain that everyone was an appeaser and chamberlain was an appeaser yeah and i think as as you're suggesting the the real news there is that somebody wasn't because it was a perfectly natural thing to do not to want to go back to work again that's right and the but he had spotted in hitler and the nazis and was the first person and for many years the only person us to <hes> to make the warnings he knew this because he was an historian and he'd seen previous attempts to geminis europe and destroy the european european balance of power. He was a final see might and he had an early warning system for what hitler and the nazis were like because he liked jews <hes> he he was somebody who had seen <hes> fanaticism up close and personal in his own career fighting in in africa and asia <hes> and so he was able to to spot what hitler was really all about in a way that a lot of the other prime ministers the nineteen thirties the who'd never seen fanaticism and their lives were not able to do but as you say and we had it was only twenty years before that <hes> we had lost if these enormous numbers of men and when i watch you you say that you <hes> rob <hes> emotionally affected going around the cabinet war rooms <hes> i. I actually cried during bring him. They should not grow old. It was a incredibly powerful <hes> movie for me and for most people i know <hes> of because it's not just the first we'll commemorated within remembrance..

prime minister england france america europe halifax burke peter jackson nelson oakland director chamberlain africa asia twenty years ten years
"churchill" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on EconTalk

"That matters to us and and <hes> so it's completely wrong to think of it as a kind of isolation store imperialist impulse at all it's actually much more open free-market kind and <hes> impulsive the fifty one percent who voted for brexit <hes> as far as the forty eight percent concerned. Yes you're right. It's <hes> it's a <unk> sense of being european rather than than britain but i've never really found it very difficult to explain to americans why <hes> i've as to <hes> <hes> have britain go back to being an independent country the ideas it's laws being struck down by a <hes> unelected <hes> bunch of bureaucrats in brussels and the judiciary that they point <hes> is <hes> is anathema to anybody who understands about seventeen independence struck about the churchill ritual war rooms which is my other favorite thing in in london. <hes> these are the below ground rooms that tricia would repair to in the battle of britain when was under air attack <hes> it includes a kitchen includes bedrooms conference rooms for for strategic discussions and <hes> it's one of the finest historical experiences that a person can have <hes> to be able to walk through those this corridors and imagine what it was like in the darkest hour in my view of western civilization <hes> reflect on those that space clash yes it's truly extraordinary and wonderful because it hasn't been changed since nineteen forty five at the end of the possible sociable because they closed the gates and the doors they didn't they were going to open them again if they needed in another world war <hes> but thankfully there hasn't been one and so in the nineteen seventies as they opened it up to turn it into a museum and found absolutely everything exactly where it was down to a couple of <hes> um cubes of sugar that the one of the soldiers there was about to put into his coffee cup and didn't never the sugar lumps and <hes> they say everything is still there and <hes> you have the the bad churchill slept in the room that he spoke to president roosevelt's to from you have the the cabinet room and you can see whereas what he sat around and it's the most of us the maps all over the walls exactly <hes> and it's easy for me the most effective museum in the world yeah. I have to say i'm i'm sure it was close to tears a number of times just imagining what a near thing that was that <hes> that we made it that the allies one because again with the with the opportunity to look back on it people can can say it was inevitable. America's military industrial power was eventually eventually going to be added to the war of course america's involvement was net was always in doubt i if we'd made some kind of ignoble peace with with <hes>. Where would you have <hes> what was the spring ball game to be for you to be able to invade western europe. Where would you have done it from. <hes> you know you pretty much chatou across the entire atlantic because there's nowhere else geographically to <hes> to to launch it from you need an unsinkable aircraft carrier and that of course was the united kingdom and you're right <hes> in may nineteen forty <hes> lord halifax the foreign secretary wanted to enter peace negotiations with hitler one can see z. from the logical and rational points of view with the <hes> british expeditionary force having left all its tanks and it's <hes> weaponry journal yeah and and wool material in the on the beaches of dunkirk with russia on hitler's side as an ally with the united states very much isolationist a not not moving towards bellicosity at one can understand why there seems to be no chance whatsoever of defeating beating germany which was <hes> which was about to knock from south of the war in a few days time anyhow and and marched into paris su su to lord halifax really was taking the logical and rational view there are other people in government who agreed with him and.

britain churchill hitler halifax America roosevelt british expeditionary force tricia united kingdom united states russia germany brussels europe secretary bellicosity london president
"churchill" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on EconTalk

"The appeasement is it was not what the british people needed in may nineteen forty so i urge you speak a couple of weeks ago and i i speak fairly often and i've spent some time thinking about how to deliver speech in particular how much to write down and when i was younger i wrote almost nothing down i would it just have it in my mind my head and i knew how it was going to go and then at some point i realized i was leaving out things now and then and decided my style now is i write i write it out word word for word and i don't deliver it word for word delivered x. spontaneously but i have my notes to go back to and i forced myself to go back to the nick. Irvine left important points out. My understanding is churchill had a moment <hes> speaking in the <hes> in parliament where he lost his train of thought. It couldn't regain it. The same thing happened to his father was the end of his father's career and he panicked and after that changed the way he spoke is that true it was the <hes> trade disputes act of april nineteen ninety four and he'd been in parliament for four years and he was thirty years old and he <hes> used to memorize speeches word for word <hes> four and speeches going for an hour and he had uh he had a phonographic memory which is like a fe too graphic memory but it's for sounds and he could remember phrases and quotations and so <hes> a one point is a boy at school was able to recite twelve hundred lines of mccauley's laser ancient rome without a mistake and so he he was able to do this and then in the on that particular day in april ninety four key <hes> he had to sit down because he completely lost train of tried to help him well a lot of people around him. Were very worried because you mentioned his father had <hes> had died of a rare brain disease and they feared that this was striking the thirty year old churchill talk and say what he did from then on was to us what he sought some form in which they would every sentence <hes> would be the <hes> boil down to five or six words that he would then right out in the form of psalm in that they were in the middle of the page each and he would <hes> <hes> he would he would speak from those kinds of notes and on occasion he would be able to get into our page without looking down but mostly he did look down and he used pregnant pauses to <hes> <hes> rhetorical devices and so on so so he was it was a <hes> <hes> a self tools public speaker and he actually thought about the theory of public speaking and route all school at the age of twenty three before even giving a public speech and his life <hes> about.

churchill mccauley Irvine rome thirty years thirty year four years
"churchill" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on EconTalk

"Meetings. If the defense committee of the war cabinet it was <hes> depression of courses of debilitating militating illness and i didn't believe he suffered from any kind of chemical imbalance. Let alone manic depression bipolar as i've read in <hes> in in some in places so i <hes> <hes> i i'm a believer in this. We talk a lot on this program about the the virtue of humility and and being able to say. I don't know <hes> that doesn't strike me. As a virtual churchill's. At least his public persona was extraordinarily over competent confident and then perhaps overconfident and that was certainly the case during his public persona in the battle britain and afterwards at least as far as i understand it <hes> one could certainly argue that that was appropriate at the time necessary <hes> vials it might be in other words yeah because <hes> his whole demeanor in that at that point was <hes> was resistance and and <hes> courage reflect on his personality. Have you think he had moments where he despaired in. The war took horrible turn for for a long time. It's hard to rush looking back on it or not. It didn't live through it to realize how easy it could have been to give up at so many different times. Yes that's right. I mean as i say i didn't believe that he was depressive but he did get depressed at moments in the second mobile such as the full of seeing portal the fall of tobruk all any number of terrible things that happened and the but those as a moments when any sentient decision maker would have got depressed. He was not a humble man at all no. I'm afraid that side of this program <hes> there's absolutely no example. I can give you of any feeling of himself said i never on the day about the day he became prime minister. He said he went to sleep perfectly calm <hes> because he had never suffered from any feelings of personal inadequacy or anything of that sort food and you know he was the son of a <hes> of grams on the duke he was born in palace he heard had the education of fleet shepherd harrow and sandhurst drummed into him that he was expected to be a great man and he has survived any any number of close brushes with death in his life which gave him a sense of personal destiny and you get this very much and it's the reason i subtitled the book <hes> walking the destiny they you get this very much from that moment the day on which became prime minister on the tenth of may nineteen forty when he said i felt as if i were walking with destiny and the dumai pulse life had been preparation for this hour for this trial and so that is not the kind of remark that any kind of humble person and we'd had enough of humility in the nineteen thirties we kumble before hitler again again in the night during the.

prime minister churchill hitler
"churchill" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

05:32 min | 3 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"Because i i wasn't i wasn't gonna ask aaron rogers the to talk about that element because it there were moments particularly as as churchill has grown as they as they corporate entity in that that that had been difficult i mean i'm not no one's gonna pretend that they're having been moments that that are grimace grimacing wins inducing an john was about is as amiable in an affable of a person descend out to address those kinds of problems and he he witnessed wage those you know those rankle yeah john you know he he he's going to be at home in the corporate world but i never saw him as big a corporate or he he loves the orange buttoned up the backstretch really a bridge all the way she loved the most any love a newspaper colon radio tv people and he got back with a a mood back down they don't overspend and the media all hey john they're just a deadly disease dangerous especially get a tough call and that's great that's a great point and that that he understood the needs of the media the and because of his own background then and is one of the one of the constant themes so far this morning billy is is his earnestness and and how you know how sincere he was when he when he asked you if you needed something in the end he would necessarily be wasn't necessarily in a position to meet every neater demand but he he would try and there i could speak for myself and i'm sure there's there's countless people in in are arena felt the same way john john is the real deal steve he you know he talked all along you're not a you know i think there's there's a lot of other businesses we all call the west her job a travel newspaper a others falls in love with the training or whatever but what that what that does is it sometimes can really a strain any knowledge you're first strong relationship a but john was able to keep things in perspective and fowler a just a bit better than anyone i think saint garbage man why can't they were derby is slow from western kentucky university but but each family like really always came in first dance and a he he conducted himself as as general but in the end really looked up to wants a you know a lot of prior to a show many way short of saying 'perfect say but you know it's pretty close to you mentioned among the things that you know i've i've referenced his love of music and the you talk about the hill toppers and i would call him the king of the hill toppers a whatever whatever they would win a game in a big game in they'd be in the national national collegiate sports news i'd always tax them and then the congratulate him a one of the other things that i can think of he he was the he was the person the brought meta lind's paradise caffeinate for the first time that well he is as heartbroken is eddie buddy went with the sudden with the sudden loss of of lens and i remember him i'm taking me there and and that that's a breakfast i i won't forget i and then i introduced people in fact i took steve asking the you'd never been the lens and and i took him in the john was great free introducing things like that the people he really was in there so proud of the glowing going and a win or cutting all workers would make sure there's a you know they knew they either just whatever they need a s and i think they horsemen sent a trainer every job in the.

aaron rogers churchill
"churchill" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

Uncommon Knowledge

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

"The city is obliterated beautiful baroque city to thirteen February. Sorry, thank you. And and almost thirty thousand Germans villains are killed in his history of the second world for checked on this church passes over Dresden in one sentence almost feel he doesn't really doesn't to go into it. I can you. Excellent. This is good your coiling. So and you quote, here's a memorandum for Churchill to generalize may his military aid. This is in March the bombing run over Dresden takes place in February's. You corrected me February thirteenth by March. Questions are being raised by bishops in the church of England in the house of lords about the morality of what took place in Dresden and Churchill writes to is me quoted here, the moment has come when the question of bombing German cities, simply for the sake of increasing the terror though, under other pretexts should be reviewed the destruction of Dresden remains a serious query against the conduct of allied bombing close, quote, so Churchill's aware of and indeed seems to be condoning the intentional targeting of civilians to increase the terror, and he actually says in that memo elsewhere, and that all we beasts he on this question that in writing he put that in writing. He didn't believe we were beasts, by the way, he thought it worth asking. And the problem with Dresden. Of course was the he himself was at Yeltsin at the time. So it was signed off by Clement actually, his deputy prime minister. It was demanded by the Russians because it was a railway noodle point between transit Dresden's between east and the west, and what the Germans were doing taking troops away from the west to to fight in the east and the Russians wanted this stop. And and say the city was obliterated something..

Dresden Churchill Germans church of England prime minister Clement Yeltsin
"churchill" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

Uncommon Knowledge

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

"He he practises living. Yes. Got it. Now, we come to that question of judgment again. I've mentioned this to you before I was told a story. But a man who's now died, but he lived deep into his night is and I was told the story when he was in his nineties man called George l z who is in the map room of the White House. He was a Lieutenant he was just there for cables to arrive and so forth to keep FDR informed. This is during Churchill's first or second visit to the White House. There's a an at eleven o'clock at night, the doors open and the president FDR wheeled in and Churchill comes in and George Marshall chief of the army chief of staff of the army and states army and a couple of British generals, and they start fighting back and forth. Referring to the maps on the table over the Churchill's insistence on a soft underbelly approach, you'll tell us in a moment what that meant. And as this man remembered, it all these years later, what was striking to him first of all FDR sat on the side smoking cigarettes and listening. It was Churchill and George Marshall the prime minister Britain and the top. Professional American soldier and Churchill kept emphasizing the aggressive opportunities if we do this. We can get them here. We can cut them off here. We can and Marshall kept emphasizing the logistical realities supply lines will be too long. No ports for resupply. Shipping lanes to exposed. And. Almost sure that Albert weta Meyer who was a pledge chief of the planning staff was in the room that evening as well. In any of it. What am I r- to his dying day insisted the church wasted hundreds of hours of time of the American general staff, forcing them to contend with his bad judgment with all this Whitman was an aggravated and he was in many ways, a great. Snow, but he just didn't like the British in. He always thought that we would trying to attack in the Mediterranean. It was to save our empire rather than rather than the Germans which is role. But nonetheless, this I think you're referring to June nineteen forty two that's the one that makes sense. Because most most of it was in the White House and George Marshall played an extremely important part of it. And yes, we'll what you have that in a microcosm in in. Mr Elles is recollections is precisely what you need it really the politician who was driving forward and had big ideas and big hopes and dreams and the chief of staff of the US army fully backed up in this case say by field marshal nude Allen, Brooke who was the chief of the imperial general stuff in Britain and the chamber of the British chiefs of staff, and they held him back and put the sensible questions about says he say logistics zone. But what you need it. Was the creative tension between these two political masters him and FDR and and military commanders to create from the creative tension a strategy, which was the war winning one where we captured a quarter of a million axes troops in North Africa. Then went over into Sicily and mainland Italy. And the day off to Rome fell we cross the channel and deliver that great punching blown d day and two eight to be able to come together to get that great strategy you needed a lot of arguments. And boy did they did they debate. It's you know, of course, they didn't. And what looks at least to some extent what looks like bad judgment on Churchill's part bad tactical? Judgment is pushing the general company pushing the generals, and sometimes he came up with ideas solely in order. Yes. It did take hours to knock them all down with him. I was rights as far as that was concerned. But if they weren't all being ten. Tested, constantly about the offensive. How important the offensive woes then church feared that they wouldn't take the offensive. And so did require this constant bellicosity from him to ensure that that everybody was on the same page when it came to hitting the Hondas disposable as he put one other question that his judgment. And this this case moral judgment. I feeling that. This is something that's questions that's been raised in the last decade or fifteen years. Maybe for the first time Dresden, February fifth nineteen Forty-five British attack on the George capital of Saxony Dresden..

Churchill FDR George Marshall White House army chief of staff Britain Albert weta Meyer chief of staff Dresden Saxony Dresden Whitman Sicily Rome Mediterranean Mr Elles president prime minister Italy US North Africa
"churchill" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

Uncommon Knowledge

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

"And so I use them the diaries of I've in mice key, the Russian ambassador nine hundred forty three era vailable now, which they weren't three or four years ago. The the beta mccown's of the war cabinet, actually, which I discovered seven years ago. I knew that I would be able to use quite heavily in this as well. Go and health. Made it didn't made any use of those quite extraordinary. So I there was something on pretty much every page of this book. That's never appeared in a church will biography before. Will come in a moment to Churchill and action. Of course, we will. But we need to set the stage. I reckon particularly for an American audience with regard to to particulars. Here's the first Churchill the aristocrat walking with destiny Churchill was the last aristocrat to rule Britain, he possessed the unconquerable self-confidence of his caste background. All right. Make an American audience understand what that means. What did it mean to have been born in Blenheim palace? The grandson of juke. In palace. Of course is the greatest of all the British palaces. Even the royals envy the of over for blend him and the grandson of a but not as any Oji Duke of more bre, one of the greatest grand is people in the country. And therefore he had what today we call the sense of entitlement. That is totally massive. And he didn't care what people thought of him which in his life turned out to be an extraordinarily useful asset because I'm sure we can come onto the nineteen thirties later, but the attacks that were made on him throughout his life. Really you needed to have a rhinoceros hide. And the reason that he did have that was partly because of his agent class and background. He he really didn't sort of mind. What other people thought of him because he was so grand? Sort of been born in Ristic crat in the second. But was we've been the last third of the nineteenth century simply fool, so yes to is to have been born into world of total utter self confidence. That's right. But also, of course, a world where you privilege imbued you with responsibility to give back. All right. And here's the second vital piece of the background that I think takes a little bit of explaining for an American audience the British empire again walking with destiny Andrew here. I'm quoting from nineteen forty one entry with someone you just named the diary of I've in mice Keith the Soviet Basseterre in London, quote, whom he saw as far as I can tell you make out that he saw I've in my ski almost as much as you saw the king. It was it was very close. It happened. Should absolutely handsome, especially after the Russian and the invasion of Russia by Germany, right? So here's Ivan my ski Churchill has told me more than once over the years, and I have no ground. To disbelieve him shrewd old communist there. Is it true? Or not that the British empire is his alpha and omega close quote now today, even in Britain speaking well of the empire is just a nonstarter. So how are Americans to understand this man who had? Who well who's alpha and omega whose lodestar was the defense of the empire, the impove that he wanted to fend was not some evil sinister in Perlis construct, the nineteen sixties Marxist professors talk about it, wasn't fact paternalist concept something that the ninety percents of the history of the empire ninety percents of the native peoples of the empire was a good thing and Winston Churchill soul that himself up in the North West Frontier where he was protecting them path from the payphones in the free day in the Talib tribes. He saw an empire which had given so much to the people of India. That it was entirely different concept from the kind of thing that we're told in our schools today about them somewhere that had brought internal peace for the longest period of time. It had doubled the life expectancy. It had brought the amount of nand under cultivation multiplied by eight times it had given a Westminster style politics. Which course, it still has this day has the English language that is invaluable for an India as the first world language, it abolished evil and sinister things like the Suttie the throwing of widows onto funeral pyres..

Winston Churchill Oji Duke Blenheim palace Britain mccown royals Churchill Ristic crat India Russia Perlis London Andrew Keith Germany seven years four years
"churchill" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

Uncommon Knowledge

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"churchill" Discussed on Uncommon Knowledge

"College Cambridge the historian Andrew Roberts is a professor at King's College London. A lecturer at the New York historical society, and the Roger and Martha Mertz visiting fellow here at the Hoover Institution. He is the author of more than a dozen major works of history, including masters and commanders how four titans won the war in the west nineteen forty one to nineteen Forty-five Napoleon a life and the holy FOX of biographies of Lord Halifax, Andrew Roberts, new volume Churchill walking with destiny and Roberts. Welcome. Thank you. The hurdle question. The first question that the mandatory first question. Before you began work on this book. Hundreds literally hundreds of Churchill biographies were already in existence. You have pulled it off. This book is getting read reviews, but before you began work on earth where you thinking what did you see that enabled the permitted? You to think you could there was an opportunity for something fresh. We will quite right there. In fact, a thousand nine biogas you I've counted them and close and this this is the one thousand tenth. But actually what I realized four years ago when I started to to write this book was that in the in the previous six years also so for the lost decade now there has been an avalanche of new sources about Winston Churchill which want wasn't expecting the Queen allowed me to be the first Churchill biographer to use her father's dyers. And can you get good? Very good tires every he had lunch. Every Tuesday of the second war with Winston Churchill who trusted him with everything nuclear secrets, the ultra decryption so on and the king wrote down everything Churchill said, so we've got a fantastic cornucopia of new stuff, his hopes and fears and his apple soon is jokes every Tuesday of the second mall. I was also very fortunate that since the last major biography of church may feel than forty one sets of papers have been deposited at Churchill archives in Churchill college, Cambridge..

Churchill Winston Churchill Churchill college Andrew Roberts Roger King's College London Hoover Institution visiting fellow Martha Mertz New York lecturer Cambridge Lord Halifax titans professor Napoleon apple four years six years