35 Burst results for "Chung"

"chung" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

04:56 min | 2 months ago

"chung" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"My mom was like, where's that? I told her this question city by Oregon, and the moment I said Oregon, I thought tears just roll up in my mouth's eyes. And the moment I see that, I broke down, I broke down crying, and the guy next to me was watching gang member. He's watching me cry. He's probably thinking all this guys. We can, I don't care. I didn't care about that. I'm just sorry that I brought so much shame to my family. I guess set up state to pelican based prison very violated, very high level of respect. So everything is just very respectful. The officers are very respectful. And when they got there, we were all locked down because somebody got stabbed and officer got there, the right just happened. So stuff is always going on. So I'm like, nah, like, what did I get myself into? This is the end of the line. It's raining, 9 months out of the year. But that's where I met a brother named Mike Anthony. He was a Christian man. He was serving life without parole. He's half Japanese half white. He was a Christian. He was the pastor on that yard. And he showed me what amount of God is to look like, because in my mind, you know, at that age, I'm thinking, oh, you still got to be hardcore gangster or whatever, right? So when people ask you what you're in here for or where I'm from, I'll represent this is what I did. With arrogance, but just watching him just observing how he carried himself, he was respectful to everybody, but he didn't hang out around with the Asians. When people would talk about him or the cops gave him a hard time, he wouldn't back by. He would just be humble about it. And then I realized, man, even in prison, you could really turn the other chicken and level humble life. So that's what I strive to learn to be like, to be humble. And eventually, I moved in with him, so dealt with him. And he discipled me what it meant to be a man of God in prison, to have a prayer life, have a disciplined life. Wake up early in the morning. He gets up four 35 in the morning to pray. I'm observing all this. I'm like, man, we're locked down. You can pray in the middle of the day. But he's getting up early in the morning to pray. After his prayer, he works out, he eats, he cooks. He watches his clothes. He studied for two, three hours, and then watch his TV because that was our only one of our only four 7 entertainment. So I learned that early on, so I took a lot of college courses, there are a lot of theology schools, that's the program that I've checked up with until the day I got out, just work out, study, disappoint myself, read, and then watch TV at the end of the day. Maybe your favorite show, so that's what I learned. Of course, there's many years of testing where people want to fight. I saw other rival game members pull up. They're disrespecting me. But at this point, I've matured enough or this is all meaningless because we have to stick together. Prison politics, there's a race war going on. He could be from another rival gang, but we have to become best friends because if I don't have your back, nobody else will. So there was another guy another Korean guy that I met in a pelican bay, a rival gang member, at first he wanted to fight me. Same thing. He disrespected me and everything. And I was like, are you done? Let me get your name so I could. I could take you to church. And we became very close. Our moms became very close. They would drive up together to come to earth. And we still keep in touch to this day. Wonderful. Is he out or is he still in? Oh, he got out. He got out too. Yeah, he was sentenced to 40 to life. But based on other law changes, his sentence was reduced to 15 years alive. Back then in California, if you're near a crime scene and you are there, be able to charge everybody the same, even if you didn't do it. So now a lot of laws are changing that if you didn't do the crime, you were there, you're going to get a lesser time. Obviously, they're from the same one of the similar group of friends. They're all going to be charged, but not the same crazy life sentence. I ended up dropping points. I go to a lower level. I go to another level four prison, which is corcoran, and that prison is more violent, more active, and it's not easy to stand as a man of God, because you're sick, you're sticking out like a sore thumb. There's violence going on. And if you're not with the violence, you're dead weight, you're no good. I'm useless. What are you here for? Because each race and functions as gangs too, they might not be specifically, but the Asians, the islanders, were considered other the other car and the function of the game, so when I went to cork and I told them I'm a Christian, I'm not going to get involved with the riots or anything. And one of the guys told me, well, then you know what time it is. What you got coming.

Mike Anthony Oregon pelican bay corcoran California
"chung" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

07:02 min | 2 months ago

"chung" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"To my attention as some of my friends were telling me that he is an example of someone who went to prison and I'll explain a little bit briefly why, but having come out because he wasn't born in the United States, the federal government says, all right, well, since you went to prison, now we're going to deport you and he's one of those examples that actually came to this country at a very young age and so the idea of sending this American back to his country of birth where he has to start completely over, it's really mind boggling. And so let me just briefly tell you just what his story is and then I'll give him a chance to tell us himself. But first of all, Justin, welcome to my podcast. Yeah, thank you for having me. It's an honor. So you were in Fontana. I'll let you tell your whole grown-up story, but you were part of a Korean American gang and you were arrested when you were 16 for shooting, killing this person that you guys thought was in a rival gang, but it turns out wasn't by 18 you had been sent to federal lockup and you were given a sentence an unbelievable this number, 82 years to life. Why do you even have to say to life after that? Every 82 years, that's just like, it seems like forever. While you were there in prison, you really stayed out of trouble, which I understand is not an easy thing to do. You got your high school diploma equivalent. You found faith in Christ, you got involved in ministries there. And basically, governor Brown, commuted your sentence, and there's a whole lot of stuff that goes into that. But you're out, okay? And on the one hand, it's a miracle that you're 82 year to life sentence was commuted, but now you're facing a final deportation order of being sent back and they put air quotes on back. To South Korea, a place you haven't been since you were two years old. And so I know there's been a lot of people not just Asian Americans, not just Korean Americans, not just Christians who are trying to get the word to the powers that be to get you a pardon so that you don't have to go through this other terrible uprooting. And so I invited you here on my program Justin because I think your story is a story that needs telling. There's so many aspects to it that a lot of us are not aware of is going on out there in Asian American world. And so I would like for you to start us with just the whole journey from Korea as a toddler with your parents as the only child coming here and then just take us forward. Okay. So I was going to Korea for South Korea and I came here when I was two years old. My family wanted a better future for us. I grew up as an only child. And my family came here because my grandma and she said, there's a lot more opportunity to America and we came to San Fernando valley. That's where we started off in northridge. I remember the earthquake back in 92. Oh really? Yeah, I wasn't 94, but I was a toddler, but I remember like, you know, my little table being flipped over. So I remember that. But ever since I could remember my parents, they worked multiple jobs, my dad worked two jobs. My mom worked three jobs and a video store at a hamburger place in the fashion. So they were just doing everything to support me and ever since I was young. I was always at a neighbor's house or sometimes even at a day care. But my parents they placed me there while they worked hard. And then eventually we moved to Orange County, that's where I started going to church. And then my cousins, they moved from Korea to Orange County. So all of that their care, but growing up, I felt like my parents were always working too much, and I colored up this belief that they didn't love me. And that wasn't the case. At that time, I didn't know there were working so hard to provide the best for me, but to me, it was like, I wanted them there. I wanted them to be physically present. My cousins came home from school, my aunt picked them up. She had Capri sun and piece that they were vice waiting for them. Wow. So I wanted that. Yeah, yes. Your parents were showing Asian immigrant love by working hard to provide you with stuff. But by doing so, they weren't present in your life. That's what you're saying. Yeah, and I wanted some affection a hug or how a school, but they're always at work. So I can't even remember just sitting down and having dinner with them or even breakfast with them because they will work 7 30 in the morning and come back 9, ten, sometimes at night. Who's serving you the meals? How are you eating? So at that time, it was my aunt. She was like my second mom. Okay. But eventually they ended up moving to Virginia. Oh boy. Yeah, I was like 13, 14, so I was able to take care of myself. They gave me a 20 bucks here, 20 bucks there. Food ready for me to microwave, so a lot of my time was spent just at home, playing computer games or just making friends at the park. Because I live next to the park, but sometimes there's older guys over there, they will pick on me, the bully me, make fun of me, and I don't know how to react to that. I don't know how to talk to my family about these problems. And if I did, they were like, oh, just grow up. Don't cry, be a man. So it was difficult. I didn't know how to manage my emotion. And then in 6th grade, I got in a big fight with one of my best Friends. His name is John. And at that time, my family was looking to move into a house. It was an apartment. So they were looking into moving to Fontana, which is about an hour away. And they asked me if I wanted to move. And I was like, yeah, because I just got on the fight with my best friend. I don't want to see him ever again. Just give me far as possible. Of course, after like three weeks, we made up. And then I regret it. You're a middle schooler. So this is where your buddies, your Friends, being around, versus being the new kid in school and in the neighborhood. That's the worst. Yeah. Going to isolate a place because everything in Fontana was far away, they're building new homes. So the only way to get to places if you had a car. I didn't have a car. I was just isolated at home. So I would take the school bus to my school, come back and just be at home by myself in a big house. And I remember my dad's cigarette sling around and I was like, oh, let me try this. And I would take a puff of it, get light headed and pass out. And wake up and just be by myself, I'm like, man, this is kind of sad. I couldn't wait till the weekends because that's when my mom was able to drive me back to Orange County. And that's where I will go to church and meet all my Friends again.

Korea Justin governor Brown Fontana United States Orange County federal government San Fernando valley northridge earthquake Virginia John
"chung" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:15 min | 2 months ago

"chung" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"I dreamt last night that I'd been mysteriously transported and transplanted to China, the home of my grandparents, but a place I've only visited once more than three decades ago. My parents were second generation, so they spoke fluent Cantonese to talk to their parents, and flew in English because they were born and educated in America. So by the time they had me and my three siblings, they spoke only English to us with an occasional dropping of a Cantonese term. Maybe to add emphasis to their point. As a result, to this day, I know how to say things like bad boy or dirty old man in Cantonese, but I still can't converse in it, let alone read or write it. So in my dream, I felt utterly lost, even though I was surrounded by people who looked a lot like me. And since the setting was modern day China and not the remote village of my ancestors, everyone in my dream was speaking Mandarin, not Cantonese. So not a single person I encountered was uttering the few words that I barely understood. This wasn't so much of an adventure with a storyline as it was an experience of feeling completely isolated and lost. I couldn't read any of the signage or understand any of the conversations around me or announcements. I couldn't express my thoughts. My needs are feelings to anyone. And the culture there was completely foreign to my Asian American sensibilities. It was indescribably awful to feel so helpless and powerless. Now I'm pretty sure that my subconscious treated me to this dream because I've been working on and thinking about Justin's predicament. Legally, he's not an American citizen, but he is an American if you know what I'm trying to say. He certainly is not a Korean. That's for sure. Which is why I hope you'll empathize with his plight and sign the petition for him to be pardoned. I don't know what the families of his two victims think about his being paroled after his 82 years to life sentence was commuted to time served. And I wonder what they think about his facing deportation to the country of his birth, instead of being allowed to stay in the only country

China America Justin
"chung" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

04:49 min | 2 months ago

"chung" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Everyone and welcome to Asian America the Ken phone podcast where my mission has always been to spotlight Asian American culture makers and shapers by having them share their remarkable journeys and stories with us. And as of 2022, we've proudly partnered with UCLA's Asian American study center, which will eventually archive all of our episodes in perpetuity. And of course, as always, I'm your host Ken fong. Welcome to episode 378. My guest this week is Justin Chung who needs our help to stay in America. Justin is the only child of Korean immigrant parents. He eagerly joined a small but violent Korean American gang in Southern California when he was only 16. As the youngest and newest member of the gang, he knew that he needed to impress the others. So when an opportunity arose a few months after his brutal initiation, he didn't hesitate to seize it. As a result he murdered an Asian American young man from Arcadia and shot his friend in the jaw. For those crimes he was given to prison sentence of 82 years to life. Justin entered pelican bay state prison in Crescent city, California at age 18. After spending 15 years in several state prisons, Justin applied for and was eventually granted parole, with governor Newsom, commuting his sentence to time served after concluding that he was truly remorseful, had redeemed his life and had a solid plan to pursue a meaningful life beyond the prison walls. However, ice agents were waiting as he stepped into freedom, and today he is on the verge of being deported the South Korea, a place he left when he was only a toddler. This happened because Justin committed what is known as in aggravated felony as a non lawful permanent resident. Aggravated felony is a term used to describe a category of offenses caring particularly harsh immigration consequences for non citizens convicted of such crimes. Regardless of their immigration status, non citizens who have been convicted of an aggravated felony are prohibited from receiving most forms of relief that would spare them from deportation, including asylum, and from being readmitted to the United States at any time in the future. Despite what the ominous sounding name may suggest in aggravated felony does not require the crime to be aggravated or a felony to qualify. Instead, in aggravated felony is simply an offense that Congress is fit to labor as such, and today includes many nonviolent and seemingly minor offenses. As initially enacted in 1988, the term aggravated felony referred only to murder, federal drug trafficking, and illicit trafficking of certain firearms and destructive devices. Congress has since expanded the definition of aggravated felony on numerous occasions, but has never removed a crime from the list. Today, the definition of aggravated felony covers more than 30 types of offenses, including simple battery, theft, filing a false tax return, and failing to appear in court. Now, I didn't ask Justin why his parents never tried to make him a lawful permanent resident as he was growing up. I'm wondering if they were concerned maybe about revealing their own status, which would make sense. Now all of that is moot in light of what Justin is facing, which is being sent back to a country and culture, he barely knows to start his life all over again, possibly even being required to serve two years in the military. He knows why this is probably going to happen, but he, his parents, and all his supporters believe that he can make a much better contribution to society if he is allowed to stay here. So this episode is to allow him to share his redemption story. Still acknowledging the horrific nature of his crimes and the indescribable losses that his crimes have caused to the families of his two victims. Justin is hoping that enough people sign the petition for a pardon from California's governor Newsom, he will be allowed to remain in the U.S.. The Orange County justice fund has organized a community campaign launch for Friday August 12th, starting at 7 30 at justice church onis ministry in Buena Park, California. I was hoping to be there, but unfortunately I am conducting a wedding rehearsal that evening. But I will certainly be praying for that event to elevate his case and motivate more people to sign the let Justin state petition

Justin Asian America Asian American study center Ken fong Justin Chung governor Newsom pelican bay state prison Crescent city UCLA U.S. Arcadia Southern California South Korea Congress California Orange County justice fund justice church onis ministry Buena Park
"chung" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

03:14 min | 4 months ago

"chung" Discussed on DNA Today

"How is it that we find ourselves surrounded by such complexity? Such elements. The genes of you and me Jesus a few and they're all made of DNA we're all made of the same chemical being we're all made of being a heartbeat high you're listening to DNA today, a podcast and radio show where we discover new advances in the world of genetics. From genetic technology like CRISPR, to rare diseases to new research. We have you covered. For a decade, DNA today has brought you the voices of leaders in genetics. I'm curious, I'm a certified genetic counselor and.

 US, Japan, South Korea meet in Hawaii to discuss North Korea

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 8 months ago

US, Japan, South Korea meet in Hawaii to discuss North Korea

"Secretary of state John speaking can met with his south Korean and Japanese counterparts to discuss North Korea Lincoln met with Japanese foreign minister Yoshimasa Hayashi and south Korean foreign minister Chung Yeung to discuss the threat posed by the nuclear armed north off to Pyongyang began the year with a series of missile tests all three leaders condemned the recent missile launches and in a joint statement urged North Korea to engage in dialogue Blinken assured North Korea that the US means it no harm we have no hostile intent toward the DPRK we remain open to dialogue without preconditions if Pyongyang chooses that path North Korea has a long history of using publications such as missile or nuclear tests to seek international concessions the

Secretary Of State John North Korea Yoshimasa Hayashi Chung Yeung Pyongyang Blinken Lincoln United States
"chung" Discussed on Power Flow Podcast

Power Flow Podcast

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"chung" Discussed on Power Flow Podcast

"They had Absorbed the risk of the spikes of demand and trying to you know operate peekers to meet demand at almost any cost to keep the lights on. And i think there's been this cultural acceptance that like it's okay that we don't know how that works someone else is taking care of it and what we're seeing with this like revolution of clean energy electric vehicles of like people saying no. I really liked to take responsibility for my own consumption. Your i think we're seeing a big transition of like wait a second. You guys wanna know about that like you wanna be you wanna know. What the risks are you. And so i think. I think it's part of the tidal wave. Yeah yeah and. I think what's interesting too is that there's another company startup that we've talked to. Before in their focus is on helping companies or companies like consumers. You know in the event of a power outage and they sent that they had a hard time at first because power outages happened on time but people just for some reason. Just don't remember them and like it's almost like a blackout in to knock it right out. Yup and sometimes if it's short obviously like it was just a split second or maybe even our may be like okay. I'm just on our read or take a walk right But i actually got a message from So we're doing a deployment at two different sites and i was talking to the tendency for one of the sites in she said like hey we actually had a blackout in our area for seven hours for some reason we were impacted but we opened up to our community. Says she's like yeah. You're definitely on the right track in terms of helping us deplore the battery storage. Because like can you imagine like a seven hour blackout And like this was just like this week so this is like the middle of summer in. La like being like eighty without a see like it can be unbearable so I'm sure that that would make me more memorable. Yeah yeah well. That's a really great place to take a break here because we're going to be transitioning here to talk about the new new clean energy economy. So we'll do that after we come back back here on the powerful podcast. Today we're talking to zora chung of residual battery diagnostics optimization looking at enabling the circular economy for batteries. But here we're going to start.

La zora chung
Wholesale Prices Hit Record 8.3% In August

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:39 min | 1 year ago

Wholesale Prices Hit Record 8.3% In August

"It's been kind of a hodgepodge week to be honest for those of us. Whose specialty is this economy here to help. Sort out are k. davidson. She's at the wall street journal. Also brian chung-hee's at yahoo finance hayatou. So kate i'm going to start with you and with his observation of the news of the day. The producer price index came out this morning. That is of course Prices at the wholesale level up eight point three percent in a year. Do you suppose anybody at the fed or more accurately at the white house walked over to j pals office and said hey. Jay highlight transitory. Now pal well. I don't know about the the white house. Because they they're sticking to the transitory story They they put out some new forecasts. I think it was lat late last month. Essentially showing that they they still think prices are coming down this year by a lot So they they more than doubled. Their forecast for inflation. This year back in february they thought it would be just a little above two percent now. They're at four point eight for the year. That's fourth quarter over compared to the fourth quarter of last year But you know even to get to that point as you pointed out. Prices are so high in consumer prices last month or in july rather consumer prices were five point four percent over the previous twelve months. And that's the highest. They'd been On an annual basis since two thousand eight so their high and to get to the white house forecast they'd have to come down a lot. So i think that they are feeling the political heat over rising prices right. Republicans are really hammering them on this. But i think that they economists there and even at the fed will find out on a couple of weeks. The fed might mark up their forecasts but so far they continue to think that these price pressures will fade

Brian Chung Hayatou White House HEE The Wall Street Journal Davidson Kate FED Yahoo JAY
Why ARiMA Is Not Sufficient

Data Skeptic

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Why ARiMA Is Not Sufficient

"Name is chung show carney associated professor and the southwest johnson university in trump province in china. And can you tell me a little bit about your specific research areas. What do you study my research areas. Congress daytime my machine learning and data analytics gender most specifically focused on forecasting demand focusing in retail and time series focused sich of sees. So the main pay for. I asked you on to discuss. Today is wire arena and serena or s arema not sufficient. You'd mentioned you have a good background in machine learning. I don't necessarily think of a reema as a machine learning technique. How do these two areas fit together in your mind. Actually because the site focused teams all problems and can be served by machinery and when the approached this focusing problem with fines and attorney time service models are very important solutions to forecast team problems. Other side focused is very important in today's areas because you're low many many data so always Focused in problem. We find penser is very important and we also find iron man. Sarah map and armagh. Those are very classic. Run divided news time service motives and when we do couldn't this i remind saruman model. We're fans than actually the classical extre nation or classical. Modern for iran. serena is northern sufficient sarichichekli. Either way actually approach. I remember sarim from elisa angle which is spectral lenzi's digital delivery and in your system theory so we use elisa angle to do countries a romance. I remember motive defines onto loads dench a sufficient from the rich porno view. So this is the whole ground

Southwest Johnson University Carney Chung Penser Sarah Map Congress China Saruman Sarim Elisa Angle Lenzi Serena Iran Elisa
A Look Back at the 2001 Film 'In the Mood for Love'

Filmspotting

01:54 min | 1 year ago

A Look Back at the 2001 Film 'In the Mood for Love'

"Let's get to that review of in the mood for love the sixth and final film our world of car marathon. This marathon has been inspired by wong's recent restoration of seven of his best known films. All of which are included in the criterion collection's new world of car. Kawhi box set. Thankfully these are also available. They're currently streaming on the criterion channel. Right now in the mood for love debuted at the two thousand canned film festival where it was nominated for the palm door and start tony. Leon won the fess best-actor prize. It opened here in the states in march two thousand one to pretty universal critical acclaim. But maybe this is something we can talk a little bit about josh. My feeling is that its reputation has only grown over the last twenty years for example back at the end of the last decade in late. Two thousand nine. The guardian had in the mood for love as it's forty eighth best film of the decade fast forward ten years later for a best films of the twenty first century list mood and moved up all the way to number five and then in two thousand sixteen. The bbc pulled over a hundred critics for a best movies of the twentieth century. Lists and in the mood for love landed at number two right behind no real surprise to me. My beloved mulholland drive from director david lynch and other films that is probably only grown in esteem over the years quickly. The plot it set in early nineteen sixties hong kong sort of picks up where days of being wild left off josh. It's part of an informal trilogy with that film and wong's later film twenty forty six. Tony leon and maggie cheung our neighbors in a cramped boardinghouse. They're both married. They're both lonely and they soon realized that their spouses are having an affair with each other. Leon chung bond over this betrayal and eventually do get quite close but never act on their feelings for each other this being a one car y movie after

Wong Josh Leon Tony Mulholland David Lynch Tony Leon BBC Maggie Cheung Hong Kong Leon Chung
Toxic Algae Blooms Eyed in Deaths of Family of 3 on Hiking Trail

Joe Pags

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Toxic Algae Blooms Eyed in Deaths of Family of 3 on Hiking Trail

"Looking into the mystery of what killed a family found dead on a hiking trail in California's Sierra National Forest. John garish. His wife, Elin Chung, their one year old daughter and their dog all dead. ABC's Filipov, investigators are stumped. Family members are desperately waiting for answers, which will now come in the form of toxicology reports from the medical examiner's office. Potential cause of death being considered toxic algae blooms.

Sierra National Forest John Garish Elin Chung Filipov California ABC
BioEnergy Healing for 5th Dimension & Beyond

Merkaba Chakras

01:57 min | 1 year ago

BioEnergy Healing for 5th Dimension & Beyond

"Podcast episode of kaba chaka's. I'm your host savan gulf and today we talked to author and bio energy teacher chung gore daniel about how to use bio energy healing for overall wellness in our bodies and in direct connection to the christ consciousness of source itself. Though with that. John gore welcomed in makamba chagas. Thank you for having me. Thanks that they can imitation. I love energy. Healing is one of my favorite topics. Talk about And connecting to crystalline consciousness of stores. So before we dig into your work Can you tell us how you even got into this in. The first place is now normal career path. I'll try to make it fast. As the long story all started in yugoslavia born and raised there in a hungarian family man consider it kind of normal bad was in a chemical engineer. Mom was a teacher and so i liked both directions. I actually went to study engineering in college and about halfway through. My dad's friend was visiting and It was an editor for a magazine. He was very much into all kinds of weird stuff energy and the crystals and whatnot and he was telling my dad's something and i thought it was a joke because my dad was laughing but he was showing him the energy how he could feel it And so i. I dropped everything and i'm like whoa wait a second you know. Let me see this. And there was something i felt my whole life but i never knew what

Kaba Chaka Chung Gore Daniel John Gore Makamba Yugoslavia
"chung" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"chung" Discussed on Asian Enough

"Okay so it's now time for our weekly segment called asian enough. Confessions formerly known as bad asian. Confessions where we share a time or things that has made us feel that. We're not asian enough although we've done a lot of that already on this episode But it's so that we can all unpack these things together. And i am going to go. I with something that i kinda thought about as we were talking in this conversation so my confession is about how for a really long time in my life even through young adulthood. I did feel this. Need to have a sense of humor to placate other people's feelings about my otherness sir. May and i mean My white friends or even strangers or my friends parents in love parents. A love people's parents. So i would have this inclination to sort of lean into humor and be like. Hey yeh asian friend. i'm the asian friend It's not something. That i still feel ord really do anymore. But it's definitely something that i think that i leaned on to make it easy for everybody But also i think maybe i was really presumptive about the need to do that kind of thing. So that's what. I'm here to invest today in to sit and think about accommodation is like so real. I don't know like. I'll laugh until this uncomfortable moments of me feeling like passes. That's relatable to all right confessions. I've done so many of i feel deep ones. Here's what i've been holding onto when i speak in japanese. I speak in the third person because japanese language is so gendered like there are ways that girls say i am. There are ways that boys say i am. I did not like it. So as a kid i would just refer to myself by my name and i have never grown out of it like i am almost forty in what i'm speed lebanese to like actual respectable. You know like people. Like oh. I just talked to myself about myself in third person. Come love that yeah. I made that choice for yourself. Yeah from a young age because there's so much that we don't think to push back on you know when we're younger but he did. That's i think that's cool. Thanks for sharing both of you. I mean there are like so many moments. I can think of anytime anyone is going on about like. Look i referenced. Before like asian traits or common asian experiences. I'm like well like going to the list like nope. Nope nope i will say like. This wasn't even a negative experience. It was kind of a positive one but like when i started to correspond with my biological sister. I have a sister a full sister. Who was who is also korean-american unlike kneeboard in korea came here but she spent most of her life here and is also what she would describe as very americanized. Whatever that means anyway. When we first started talking it was long distance because we were across the country from each other and we were not ready to leap into like an in person meeting. We pen pals more than anything else. We were both really comfortable in writing so we wrote almost daily to each other for like a year and then like one of our first phone conversations. When we hadn't had many yet she was like. Oh my god you you sound so american like you everything about your voice. In the way you talk to screams like american and like i did feel that moment like oh god like even my sister who did not mean anything cruel but issue was not trying to keep. She was not trying to make me feel any way. And i did not feel bad It was more like. Oh look you've noticed. And i had never before occurred to me that like the way i spoke or moved or talked and she later was like get your body. Language is also very american. It never occurred to me that that could be something that she would automatically pick up on. I share it because it wasn't like a negative experience. Because i love my sister and she loved me it was just oh. I had not thought about that before. That's so interesting. Because i felt kind of a version of that i went to japan because i don't speak japanese and i've always felt like a terrible japanese american person for for not speaking japanese. But i did go once with family in walking through crowds. I felt they can tell they can tell them american. They probably can. I'm i'm scared to without my sister. I'm like i'm gonna need you to come and it's not even about lake language or whatever i just i'm gonna need somebody like i dunno can like pass because it's going to be very obvious to everyone that i can't i mean my birth father's also commented on how american i am and i kind of want to. That's a little bit rich coming from you. Like you know exactly why and like even if i were not adopted like you moved here so i would have grown up here anyway. He he thinks he thinks both my sister. And i are like very slush to. I don't know american. And i'm kinda like well. What did you expect to happen when we moved here and also pleased me for adoption. Now that you've heard our asian enough confessions we want to hear yours. Call us at two one three nine eight six five six five two. That's two one three nine eight six five six five two. And that's a wrap for this episode of asian enough. Thank you to nicole chung for joining us and thank you you out there. You're the one you're the one. I'm talking to thank you for listening. Asian enough is hosted by me january motto and by me tracey brown. Our producer is assault on a poor and our executive producer is abby swanson our engineers mike huffman and original music was composed by andrew. Even special. Thanks to julia turner. Geoff berkshire james reed and matt brennan. This podcast is dedicated to the memory of our founding producer. Line on more and come back next week for another episode of asian enough. We'll be revisiting last year's episode with vice president kamla harris co hosted by myself and asian enough co creator. frank shaun. I've never had an identity crisis. I haven't like literally. I didn't go through some evolution. About who am i. What is my identity. And i guess the frustration i have is if people think that i should have gone through such a crisis and need to explain it but i didn't an remember support your local donut shop. And if you've got that asian discount never take it for granted there. Was this couple who worked at the donut shop. They probably owned it and they used to give me what my friends and i would term asian discount of like i would get a dozen they would throw in an extra like one or two and only happened.

matt brennan abby swanson korea nicole chung mike huffman julia turner japan andrew last year frank shaun next week tracey brown kamla harris both Geoff berkshire james reed today forty korean-american couple
"chung" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"chung" Discussed on Asian Enough

"They're scary definitely for sure. Yeah i know. I mean i think as someone who like is an editor has been now for many years. I mean i started hyphen actually and then moved to the toast. Him now catechal. I think maybe that has actually played a big role in wyatt. I'm still writing in this genre. Because i do work with. And edit and publish writers sharing personal stories all the time. And i think a lot and have a lot of conversations with my writers and my fellow editors about you know what are the responsibilities would've ethics of that those from a writing and publishing perspective one thing. I think about a lot and something. I tell students when i teach workshop is like we all do have a tendency to write about like our trauma also and like it's very common to have like a an essay that is about your very worst or most painful experience. And it's not that that's not valid and it's not that it can't really help someone who's reading it because i think memoir and personal writing justifies its existence by making other people feel less alone but that said you don't owe anybody like your painter your trauma thinking about just this past year alone. And all the trauma and the loss disappointment the fear that we've all experienced during the pandemic. The raiders response does not have to be to take all that and make art for consumption. And i'm very grateful. In my case that i did kind of take the time between i guess my of my reunion starting to write about it. I was ready to write this when it was all happening. I will say like. I've had wonderful generous feedback from a lot of people but i hear from haters and i hear from people telling me that like i clearly. Don't love my adoptive parents and i'm ungrateful and like i bet there are ashamed of you and if i got stuff. Ten years ago or fifteen years ago. I think it would have been deeply devastating for me as it is. I don't like it. It doesn't feel good but it doesn't make me wanna stop writing. It doesn't make me ashamed. It doesn't get under my skin and make me think like deep down. Oh god are they write about me. I'm not a place in my life. Where i wouldn't say it rolls off my back but i can. I can cope with it and it doesn't make me want to stop sharing or writing lady. Sometimes in some cases would it does take his time and who you trying to reach. I guess just remembering that when you share stories whether it's on this podcast or in writing you're never sharing them for the haters. There's always gonna be people who don't care. Don't get it but you are writing or you're talking or you're producing work for the people who will get it and they're always going to be people like that out there but it is it's terrifying. I don't think it ever. It will ever not be a little bit and to this day. If i have an essay going the next day like it's really hard to sleep. And i know the day of the day of i'll be running on coffee and adrenaline and my stomach will be upset. That is on is what happens. All say like it gets easier but it doesn't. I'm right there with you. That's a nerve more of our conversation with nicole coming up after this short break. Stay with us in twenty seventeen when a trans woman disappears from the village alarm bells. Go off missing. Rose end up dead so her friends. Decide enough is enough. This is the story of what happens when sex workers and trans people stand up to fight the system that failed them. I'm justin laying and misses the village season two available now on the cbc. Listen app and everywhere. You get your podcasts..

fifteen years ago Ten years ago justin nicole Rose twenty seventeen next day one thing trans this past year village season two
"chung" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"chung" Discussed on Asian Enough

"You chose to how you chose to right right and that was all new to me because i was so used to having this narrative imposed on me and feeling like i had to answer questions or like defend my family or explain it to other people and i was called to do that from like probably when i was very very young and you mentioned like those heritage projects in school tracy i to remember vividly like in first grade having. I think i was like person of the week or something. And when you're a person of the week he brought in this poster with like your family tree and pictures of you and your family. And of course i did this without thinking much about it but as soon as i sat down to share in our morning circle all my classmates were like. Why don't you look like your parents like what's going on here. And so the whole thing became another exercise in like explanation. It was so much a part of my life those explanations telling that story and then all of a sudden it wasn't meant so that was probably the biggest change you know in terms of like when i left home if i thought about it if i talked about it it was my choice. I will say you just mentioned this term of being called a banana for those people who do not know what bananas yellow on the outside white on the inside in these terms that i heard a lot too because i grew up with a lot of white friends or heard twinkie. You know all these very reductive food products for some reason that become these terms. There's another thing that you have written about doing since you're a kid which is like coming up with this game that you kind of termed count the asian With something that i have. I have a thousand percent done a we all. Have i still do that. When i go to places as an adult like i've traveled to states in the us and felt like. Oh i feel like. I'm must be the only asian person in this entire state right now or you make eye contact with the people who work at the local like asian restaurants in. You're like okay. Those are the only other asian people in this town absolutely. Yeah and like growing up where i did mean. I wrote this in the book. But i could go years without like clocking in new asian. I'd be like these. Are the asians i know about the there. Was this couple who worked at the shop. They probably owned it and they used to give me what my friends and i would turn the asian discount of like i would get a dozen donuts and they would throw in an extra one or two and it only happened with me so they would always send me in and i had a few asian friends in high school but i was the only korean stone that like i knew so yeah i mean i was always really conscious of being the only one very conscious of when i was not and i still. I still find myself doing that when i go home. And one of my kids has also done the same thing like the first time well and it was the first time but i'm going to talk about race with my kids from a young age and so i went home with my older daughter and i like see her looking around a little one room airport at home and she likes suddenly announces to me. Like you and i are the only people of color here and i was like surprised and then surprised that. I was surprised that she was doing that. Because of course. I grew up doing that and you do that same thing. When you're watching shows. I mean i feel like i've joked to people that like if a show has at least two asians and will probably have to give it a shot and i don't know i don't know if that's something you grow up doing it. I don't know but at least as an adult you can kind of understand better why he ever did it. And maybe find some different kinds of purpose for it. i want to ask your memoir you released in twenty eighteen. All you can never know. It's about your experience as a transracial adoptee And you've said before that you wrote it partly because there wasn't a whole lot out there to read about the adoption experienced period let alone one That is of the transracial experience and you also wrote that part of the catalyst for starting the search that you write about the search for the story of your adoption was Because you had become pregnant with your first child some curious then. Why did you decide to write about it. What was the catalyst for turning that journey into a book. That's such a good question. I mean why ever writes in publishes a great. I should have a great answer. I mean i will say it was not expecting. I would write about it at the time. I was searching for my birth family and there was a gap of several years between my search and my reunion. And then like when i started even thinking about writing about it writing about adoption always really scared me. Actually i guess the first time. I really wrote something about it. It was in this little writing group. That i was part of in durham north carolina where i was living at the time and i'd never written nonfiction before and i felt like some peer pressure to try to write about myself for the first time. Even though i was like sure it wouldn't take and it wouldn't be interesting to me or to anybody And i was like well. I'll try writing about adoption. And i will try writing a very honest piece so like not doing that. Thing where censor myself or try to like be the good adoptee or reassure people or make anyone feel comfortable like. I'm just going to say what i want to say. For like this audience of serious four people and even those only four people. It was terrifying to me and like every draft. I wrote felt like i was scraping a little deeper and it hurt like so much hurt and then i was terrified to share it again for people but just the thought of sharing it with them was overwhelming. I think i ended up reading. Some of it in our group voice was shaking the whole time. And then i put that. Sat drawer. and i you else. And when i did eventually start writing about adoption a few years later i think my next one was maybe when i was working at the toast like i just been hired. And one of the editors like by the way if you ever want to write about racing adoption feel free. You can write about anything you want here. And then. Whenever i did write about adoption i was sort of topical a different issue. I wrote a piece about why adoption crowdfunding kind of weirds me out and i. I mean i wrote another piece about the first time. I met my sister and each time. I would get this like remarkably generous feedback. Look a few haters enlarge. What i was hearing was people are interested. They're curious and it is an underrepresented perspective and eventually just telling the story. Piecemeal was very difficult. And i decided. Okay like maybe it's a maybe that's the only way that actually do justice to the whole story and all of its nuances and all the people involved but it was definitely like a very gradual process I'm still sometimes really surprised that i ended up writing memoir all actually and then that this was the book that i wrote and at the same time i think it would have been hard for me to write. Any other memoir. I might options story is my origin story. You know it's the foundational narrative of my life. All you can ever know is certainly not the story of my whole life. That wouldn't have been interesting. My mother pointed out. I'm not famous. Nobody would read that. But like i just feel like if i had tried to tell any other part of my story i it would have felt off to me. I really felt like. I needed to make space for myself in for and adopting narrative not the narrative but a narrative and i didn't see it a lot in mainstream publishing and so this was sort of the book i had to write. I can i say just. It is scary to write about identity. It is still frightening often for me to talk about identity and race and self reflection in a public way and it's often really hard. I super relate to because like this podcast is probably the first. I'm having like public conversations about the asian american part of my identity. I've written stuff from like the queer perspective before that one's easier to like scream loudly and it's easier to turn things around against the haters. I think or has been for me so these conversations and.

first child four people first first time two a dozen donuts each time one room twenty eighteen one first grade durham north carolina couple thousand percent a few years later one of my kids korean asian asian american at least two
"chung" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"chung" Discussed on Asian Enough

"Thank you so much for joining us to call. Thank you tracy john. It's good to be here. Let's are at the beginning. You were born to korean immigrant parents. But you're adopted. As an infant into a white catholic family in a mostly white rural town in oregon. So how did you first start developing your own sense of identity. Sure sure so. I will say i lose the only korean that i really knew until i left home and it was formative and ways and at the same time. That's really hard to see when you're growing up there when you're in the midst of it when whiteness is just kind of the default around you as it was for me and did grow up in a very white area and it wasn't just like my family. It was my neighborhood. It was my school every school. I went to pretty much. you know. It was definitely the church we went to. It was one of those things where i definitely noticed from a young age. I noticed i didn't look like everyone and also like it was pointed out to me and like many different ways by different people. I will say that i. I don't think. I began really noticing a lot or feeling self conscious about it until i was old enough to go to school so my early years and how many of us has that many memories of our early childhood right but the memories i do have. It's like well of course. I knew that i was adopted. I don't remember being told so. I must have been told like around the time i was two or three. Is my gas like when i was actually verbal and i remember a few discussions like my. My main memory is asking my adopted mother. My mom likes to tell me the story of my adoption. And i would ask for this over and over when i was a kid and i remember like sitting in her lap and hearing the story and it never changed but growing up for me it was so impossible and honestly still isn't possible to separate like my asian my korean identity from my adoptee item. They are so bound together.

Frank carson Nicole frank carson nicole chung Carson eight episodes california christopher northeastern ontario Today korean Both last year tracy brown nicole catapults melanie one september nineteen ninety-six asian american
Interview With Writer, Nicole Chung

Asian Enough

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Writer, Nicole Chung

"Thank you so much for joining us to call. Thank you tracy john. It's good to be here. Let's are at the beginning. You were born to korean immigrant parents. But you're adopted. As an infant into a white catholic family in a mostly white rural town in oregon. So how did you first start developing your own sense of identity. Sure sure so. I will say i lose the only korean that i really knew until i left home and it was formative and ways and at the same time. That's really hard to see when you're growing up there when you're in the midst of it when whiteness is just kind of the default around you as it was for me and did grow up in a very white area and it wasn't just like my family. It was my neighborhood. It was my school every school. I went to pretty much. you know. It was definitely the church we went to. It was one of those things where i definitely noticed from a young age. I noticed i didn't look like everyone and also like it was pointed out to me and like many different ways by different people. I will say that i. I don't think. I began really noticing a lot or feeling self conscious about it until i was old enough to go to school so my early years and how many of us has that many memories of our early childhood right but the memories i do have. It's like well of course. I knew that i was adopted. I don't remember being told so. I must have been told like around the time i was two or three. Is my gas like when i was actually verbal and i remember a few discussions like my. My main memory is asking my adopted mother. My mom likes to tell me the story of my adoption. And i would ask for this over and over when i was a kid and i remember like sitting in her lap and hearing the story and it never changed but growing up for me it was so impossible and honestly still isn't possible to separate like my asian my korean identity from my adoptee item. They are so bound together.

Tracy John Oregon
"chung" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"chung" Discussed on Asian Enough

"The joys the complications and everything else that comes along with being asian american. I'm one of your host genu- motto and i'm your host tracy brown. Today we're joined by the writer. Nicole chunk you may know her from her writing on life identity parenting or from her social media presence. Both of which have helped me get through this last year. Particularly her work examining racism grief and asian american identity. Her two thousand eighteen memoir. All you can ever know chronicles nicole's upbringing in a white catholic family her adoption story and her journey to learn more about her korean birth parents. They're just all these. Little cultural touchstones dagan small. That don't necessarily apply to adopt so then we're left wondering you know we're clearly not wait. I think most of us know that. And so what is it that makes us asian. Or what is it. That connects us to other asian american communities. Nicole is also an advice columnist at slate a former editor at the toast. Rest in peace to the toast and she is currently the editor. In chief of catapults magazine. Our conversation with nicole chung coming up after this short break dope do go anywhere just kidding. I'm david ridden and this is the next call in september nineteen ninety-six melanie. Fda disappeared from northeastern ontario. Her mother's selene is still searching for answers. I can't let it go. I need to find her. She deserves that much. I follow every tip and every theory investigations that could break wide open with the next call available now on the cbc. Listen app and everywhere. You get your podcasts. Frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher offered writer and host of the la times podcasts. Dirtyjohn and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law in california's central valley new episodes of the trials of friend. Carson are available to find them. Search for the.

Frank carson Nicole frank carson nicole chung Carson eight episodes california christopher northeastern ontario Today korean Both last year tracy brown nicole catapults melanie one september nineteen ninety-six asian american
"chung" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

08:48 min | 1 year ago

"chung" Discussed on Skullduggery

"With us christine chung a former prosecutor in the southern district of new york the same office. That rudy giuliani headed. Us attorney many years ago and she helped draft the letter from the lawyers defending american democracy group. That led to this remarkable decision by the new york state courts. Appellate division today christine. Welcome to skulduggery. Thanks mike i'm happy to be here and you must be feeling pretty good. Seeing this decision about a process you helped put in motion. It's a result that we asked for. Which is that. He be suspended even while he was being further. Investigated by the court system for ethics violation. So i'm very pleased at the result. But i would also say it's a result that i believe others asked for in addition to l. dad. We made a public complaints. We know of others and they're probably were many others so it's a victory for all lawyers wanna police their profession. So one question. I want to drill down on. Because i looked at the decision and one thing that left out at me is the complaint filed. Said that he didn't just make false. And misleading statements about the twenty twenty election. He made knowingly false and misleading statements about the election. So just explain how you know and the court agreed that these statements about fraud. That rudy giuliani made all over the place after the election were knowingly false statements. Well one part of the answer is that we know that rudy giuliani knows. What a false statement is. He used to prosecute people for making false statements and for lying or misrepresenting themselves to is. There's never been any basis for what he was saying. There was never any grounding for saying that millions tens of millions of votes were were miscounted or that. There was fraud behind them. He alleged a massive fraud enough to change the election. Even he didn't have the proof of that so the other thing is as it went on as the administration then administration said that it was the cleanest election in history as court after court ruled after him. If you didn't know it at the beginning you knew as you went that what you were saying was false so you know another gratifying aspect of the decision. Is they say that even though it sort of an open question whether in new york the law requires a knowing lie they find that there should be that requirement a higher requirement and the requirement is met here but look as a former federal prosecutor. You know if you're going to prove a knowingly false statement which is perjury you have to get inside the guy's head you have to have some evidence that he knew what he was saying was false and here yes. I get the point that nothing supported. What rudy giuliani was saying. No evidence was coming forward. But how do you get inside his head and make a determination that he knew what he was saying was wrong. You get inside people's head to fraud. Every single day of the week. It happens every day in court and this court said just to give one of their examples. You were saying that there was a big enough that you were alleging fraud saying the pennsylvania case and then when you were really pressed. You admitted you weren't alleging fraud. Okay one hundred and eighty degrees so they did a very good job of in my view of breaking down to a number of statements and saying to these statements. These were the knowing falsehoods. And that's what you need to do. One another really. I think wonderful aspect of this is how fact-based the decision is. It really is a diligent examination of what was said and picking out of the examples in the places where rudy giuliani did make intention allies christine. Let's step back for a second. Just how big a deal is this. How important is this decision. We know giuliani himself is a pretty big name. But how often does the new york court do things like this. you know. i'm not an ethics expert. But i would guess that if you looked for decisions in which lawyers were temporarily suspended from practicing law they would tend to be much more small bore things like where there's rock solid proof that a client was stealing from his attorney and continue to do so. Because there has to be incontrovertible proof and it has to be an ongoing threat to the public so in terms of the the the consequential listen like everything else in this instance. The context and the consequences are potentially really important. I mean you're talking about somebody who you know. There are other investigations that are being talked about. You know the majority of republicans still believe that there. No big lie that it wasn't a lie at all. The election was stolen. So where the repub reprecussions go. Is you know that's part of why it was so important to us to make complaint in the first place christine. I have two questions. One's a kind of a process question and then it kind of a bigger picture question. The process question is he is now been suspended and cannot practice law in new york but he has not been disbarred yet. Is that typical that you'd be suspended and then disbarred later after there's been a hearing and you've been allowed to to tell your side of the story or is this an extraordinary case because the concluded that he's a clear and present danger to republic. That's actually that's actually the bigger picture question. I was going to get at but you can take the first part of it and then we can get to the second part. Yeah the answer is the latter. It's it's unusual just because the standard is so high and you think they did that. Because of the second thing that i was talking about which they they talked about him. You know these attacks on the public that is he's an immediate threat to the public. The country is being torn. apart by these continued attacks. Is that y you think. The court felt that it had to actually suspend him even before he was disbarred. We may be saying the same thing. I'll put a slightly different angle on. I mean i would unpack it a little bit to this one the lie. He told the ethical violation that he engaged in is probably the most important consequential one that you could engage in. This is not lying about something you're is or this is saying that the election was stolen. Presidential election was stolen and then too. I think if you remember back in time. Even after january sixth even after biden was declared president rudy. Giuliani continued to disseminate the big lie. It continued to lie about things. Like dominion to maintain that the right president wasn't sitting in the chair and that has now become the basis for these voter suppression efforts. So something that. Even we didn't know at the time that we filed our complaint. Which is that the big lie would continue to live on that at least in my view is the clear and present danger. They have a slightly different take on it. But i think overall they're right he did not stop saying. What are we saying even today. Even today daniel and mike. I mean he's saying you saying this is evidence that i live in an authoritarian regime. We should be very clear on who is promoting an authoritarian regime. Yeah and it just among the particulars that the court analyzed was. Giuliani makes the claim that in one of the court filings and That in pennsylvania. More absentee ballots were returned than were mailed out. He claimed two point. Five million were returned. Only one point eight million had been mailed out in fact over three million had been mailed out that was available information on the pennsylvania secretary of state's website and i guess in his defense Giuliani claimed well. That's what a member of my team told me. So i guess is defense would be. I was just relying what somebody told me. I guess you would argue and the court concluded that. That's not good enough. If you're a lawyer making snell mike. It's a little different than that. What they say. Especially in footnote four is. They gave him the opportunity to prove his assertions and.

daniel Five million giuliani rudy giuliani two questions mike second part eight million two point republicans christine chung one point new york over three million january sixth christine second thing Giuliani today first part
Hong Kong Newspaper Editor, CEO Denied Bail

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Hong Kong Newspaper Editor, CEO Denied Bail

"Two senior employees of Hong Kong's pro democracy newspaper Apple Daily have appeared in court charged with violating national security. Both the editor in chief Ryan Law and the Chief executive, Chung Kim Hyung, were denied bail. And he, Vincent is in Hong Kong. Dozens of Hong Kong residents lined up outside West Callaloo in court to support the Apple daily executives on Friday night. Three of the five arrested were released on bail. Today. The court heard that the chief editor and CEO of Hong Kong's most popular newspaper stand accused of conspiring with the paper's owner, Jimmy Lai, in requesting foreign nations to impose sanctions against Hong Kong. And the Chinese government. Mr Light, is already serving time in prison for his involvement in the 2019 protest movement and is awaiting trial for national security law charges.

Hong Kong Ryan Law Chung Kim Hyung Apple Daily West Callaloo Jimmy Lai Vincent Chinese Government Apple Mr Light
Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Press Executives Charged Under New Security Law

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Press Executives Charged Under New Security Law

"Two senior employees of Hong Kong's pro democracy newspaper Apple Daily have appeared in court charged with violating national security. Both the editor in chief Ryan Law and the Chief executive, Chung Kim Hyung, were denied bail. And he, Vincent is in Hong Kong. Dozens of Hong Kong residents lined up outside West Callaloo in court to support the Apple daily executives on Friday night. Three of the five arrested were released on bail. Today. The court heard that the chief editor and CEO of Hong Kong's most popular newspaper stand accused of conspiring with the paper's owner, Jimmy Lai, in requesting foreign nations to impose sanctions against Hong Kong. And the Chinese government. Mr Light, is already serving time in prison for his involvement in the 2019 protest movement and is awaiting trial for national security law charges.

Hong Kong Ryan Law Chung Kim Hyung Apple Daily West Callaloo Jimmy Lai Vincent Chinese Government Apple Mr Light
2021 Oscars Best Director Predictions

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:37 min | 1 year ago

2021 Oscars Best Director Predictions

"Let's dive right back in with best director. Nominees are thomas winterberg for another round. David fincher from bank. Lee isaac chung for me. Ninety eight clue how for nomad land and emerald. Fennell for promising young woman stephen thompson. Gimme a will win and it should win in for will end. Should i'll go with clue jal i think she does beautiful work in. No maitland. I do wanna put in a good word though for emerald fennell and promising young woman. This film is so interesting and juggling so many tones this movie could have flown off the rails in so many ways and at the same time. It is absolutely gorgeous to look at what this movie is doing with. Color is so striking an inventive. It has an electric movie and when a movie feels electric off the way through you can often give the director a lot of credit for that. So i do want to put in a good word for emerald fennell but for will end should in this category. I'm going to go with kobe. Zhao all right fair. Enough i show. What do you think should win. Khloe joe will win. Make big mac. Yes so i think it's going to be david fincher because let's not forget that so few years ago. Even though moonlight wind up winning damian chazelle one for la la land and this is the category especially as director where they love to see the flashiest most technical intricate. Booby win So i think it's going to be probably david fincher. Although i would love to see joao went jau did win at the directors go to war so maybe that will happen. But i still think it's gonna be all

Emerald Fennell Thomas Winterberg Lee Isaac Chung Stephen Thompson David Fincher Fennell JAL Maitland Khloe Joe Damian Chazelle Zhao Kobe La La JAU Joao
WHO Urges Pause in Market Sale of Captured Live Wild Animals

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

WHO Urges Pause in Market Sale of Captured Live Wild Animals

"The W. H. Chung who is urging a pools in market sales of captured live wild animals the U. N. health agency says countries should suspend the sale of live animals captured from the wild in food markets as an emergency measure saying wild animals are leading source of emerging infectious diseases like the coronavirus the WHL backed by key partners has issued a new guidance saying that animals particularly wild animals of the souls of more than seventy percent of all emerging infectious diseases in humans many of which of course by novel viruses I'm Charles last month

W. H. Chung U. N. Health Agency WHL Charles
Why Does My Mouth Like Sugar but My Body Doesn't?

Imagine This

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Why Does My Mouth Like Sugar but My Body Doesn't?

"Old a lot to know my mouth. Love took about my body today on imagine this. We're wondering why suga tastes good. But mon- up your good for us bags all moi ada but jane might. Jane freeman is from the dietitians association of australia. Dieticians are experts on food and our bodies. He she is now. Hi jane hi everyone. Hello timely again. I know it's good to eight lots of veggies. But i really feel like something. Sweet cake and cupcakes crane so we wondering what amounts love suga but our bodies dying. It's a really great question. The shown answer is suga. Isn't all bad for you but too much sugar can be a problem. It's a bit tricky to explain. It's easier if i show you but we're going to have to use our nation's on imagine this no worries. Take this walkie talkie. We'll be needing it later. And can you open your mouth. Nice and wide sure. Perfect is all right with you. If we go in for closer look go for it. Say our shrunk. What in your mail. It feels like coming to people if we want to understand. How shook a wicks in buddies. The mouth is a good place to start. Chung zal bumps.

Jane Freeman Dietitians Association Of Aust Jane Chung Zal
Congressional visit to Atlanta spa shooting sites decries anti-Asian hate

AJC Briefing

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Congressional visit to Atlanta spa shooting sites decries anti-Asian hate

"Outdoor vigil at mceachern memorial united methodist church in powder springs celebrated. The lives of dana johnson. Patrick he and cynthia lindsay key died on christmas day. Johnson and lindsay died within hours of each other on january twenty first. The ninety minute ceremony was filled with tears. Laughs and calls for those gathered to live with joy and to take the pandemic seriously. Cobb education leaders have been criticized for the districts response during various moments of the pandemic including some. Who didn't wear face masks during a january school board meeting. I want people to know this isn't a joke. And it's affecting people lindsay's daughter lindsay cows said about the pandemic during an interview after the vigil. Meanwhile members of the congressional asian pacific american caucus traveled to metro atlanta on sunday to visit the sambre sites of this month's deadly spas shootings into call attention to hate crime laws and growing anti asian hate in america the visiting lawmakers who were joined by members of georgia's congressional delegation and state representatives followed the deadly path from march sixteenth. That claimed eight lives with six of them. Being women of asian descent. The trip paid respects to the victims of the tragedy. She ouseba tan. Tao fong delina. Leon and paul. Andre michaels were shot and killed at a spa in cherokee county. Young a au soon chung park soon. Chalk him and young grant were shot. Later at to atlanta's pause the first stop for the chartered. Bus tour was young's asian massage in acworth and finally three dozen people were displaced sunday morning. When a fire swept through lawrenceville apartment complex authorities said the blaze ripped through all three floors and the attic of a building at the anzio apartment. Homes on sweetwater road. Gwinnett fire department. Spokesman lieutenant justin wilson said investigators were sent to the complex about six thirty. Am after nine one. One caller reported smoke coming from their neighbor's apartment on building eighteen. When crews arrived at the scene they saw smoke and flames in the center of the building. One of the occupants of the building told investigators he was asleep when the fire started but was startled awake by his smoke alarm after he noticed the fire on the back side of the building. He escaped his apartment through the front door. That's all for today. Check back each weekday morning for more from the atlanta journal constitution or go to ajc dot com. Have a great day spoken layer.

Mceachern Memorial United Meth Dana Johnson Cynthia Lindsay Lindsay Cows Lindsay Powder Springs Tao Fong Delina Andre Michaels Chung Park Cobb Atlanta Patrick Johnson Anzio Apartment Gwinnett Fire Department Spokesman Lieutenant Justin Wi Cherokee County Acworth Leon Georgia
Eastern Australia Is Facing Worst Floods In Decades

Environment: NPR

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Eastern Australia Is Facing Worst Floods In Decades

"Less than two years. After bushfires blazed across australia the countries east coast is seeing its worst flooding in decades. Some areas accumulated over yard of rainfall since downpours started last thursday. Tens of thousands have been ordered to evacuate on sunday alone. Five hundred giga leaders of water. The same volume of water and sydney harbour spilled out of sydney's largest dam even as rain subsides. The floodwater will still post trouble for weeks to come joined now by laura chung who has been reporting on all of this for the sydney morning herald. Welcome thank you for having me. Thank you for being with us. So what are you hearing from people on the ground there. Can you talk about the scope of the damage that they've seen so far of course say unlike the bush fires. We don't actually have a clear image of how much has just been damaged or destroyed. We know it's significant part of the state but what we do know is there has been water. Everywhere we've heard and seen houses just picked up floating down rivers that used to be farms and paddocks we've heard of livestock just being completely washed away their videos and of cows and horses just trying to make it through these really heavy floodwaters and what used to be straits and headaches just now yet completely flooded with water right up to where the pow lines off so if you can imagine that it is very striking image. What about people who didn't weren't able to evacuate and are now stranded. I mean how are rescue operations going right now for a lot of people who live in these low lying plains. Floods aunt anything new to them. They've lived with them before they know how to prepare for them. But there are a lot of people who would just not quite ready for how quickly the water would come up So we've got thousands of volunteers from the state. Emergency service who out there along with police on an interstate help as well. Who are rescuing people in. Bart's people saint helicopters being deployed to try and aol if people out of certain areas. And you're not only are off volunteers having to deal with the really intense flooding conditions. They're also having to deal with the wildlife. That's coming their way as

Laura Chung Sydney Morning Herald Sydney Harbour East Coast Sydney Australia Bush Headaches Bart AOL
Steven Yeun first Asian American nominated for best actor

The Takeaway

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Steven Yeun first Asian American nominated for best actor

"This morning. The oscar nominations were announced and some of them were particularly notable late. Great chadwick boseman was nominated for best actor for his final performance and bahrainis black bottom nomad land director khloe. Zhao became the first asian woman and first woman of color period. If that ever to be nominated for best director and promising young women's emerald fennel was also nominated for best director making this the first time that two women will ever compete in the same year in that category. Also the movie monari directed by lee isaac chung received a bevy of nominations including best picture best screenplay and best director. It's a long list. The film follows a korean family. Who moved from california to arkansas where the father played by stephen struggles to fulfil his dream of starting a farm. Yon and you junk. Who plays his character's mother-in-law both nominated for their performances as well they're nomination stand in contrast to a long history of asian and asian american actors getting awards. Us even when the films they star in recognition in more technical categories

Chadwick Boseman Monari Lee Isaac Chung Khloe Best Picture Best Screenplay Zhao Oscar YON Arkansas Stephen California United States
“Mank” leads Academy Awards nominations with 10 nods

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

“Mank” leads Academy Awards nominations with 10 nods

"The Oscar nominations are out in the history of the Academy Awards only five women have ever been nominated for Best Director this year alone though there are two women in that category they are Chloe's out for no man's land what the numbers are doing is not that different than when the pioneers and emerald fennel for promising young woman can you guess what every woman's worst nightmare they will compete against Lee Isaac Chung foreman ari Thomas venter Berg for another round and David Fincher for Manx make is the overall leader in nomination had just picked up ten usually the Oscars would be all done by now but because of the pandemic will push back by two months this year's ceremony set for April twenty fifth I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Academy Awards Lee Isaac Chung Oscar Ari Thomas Venter Berg Chloe David Fincher Oscars Oscar Wells Gabriel
Chloé Zhao, Emerald Fennell lead historic DGA nominations

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Chloé Zhao, Emerald Fennell lead historic DGA nominations

"The directors guild of America is making history with its latest batch of nominations there's been times when the DGA has nominated a woman for outstanding achievement as a director but they have never been to women nominated in the same year until now Chloe's Allen emerald fan along the list this year zao is nominated for no man's land and fennel for promising young woman also nominated the Isaac Chung Aaron Sorkin and David Fincher the DJs are considered a strong indicator of how the Oscars might go in the past seventeen years fifteen DGA winners went on to win at the Academy Awards the DJ's April twentieth it will be held virtually because of the pandemic I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

DGA Allen Emerald ZAO Chloe America Aaron Sorkin David Fincher Oscars Academy Awards Oscar Wells Gabriel
Cheng Lei, Australian Journalist for CGTN, Is Arrested by China

BBC World Service

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Cheng Lei, Australian Journalist for CGTN, Is Arrested by China

"Says the Australian journalist Chung Lee has been formally arrested in China on suspicion of illegally supplying state secrets overseas. Chung Lee worked as a high profile presented for China's state run English language news service film MERCER reports John Lay has been held in custody in Beijing without charge or access to a lawyer for six months. Australia has insisted it expects basic standards of justice and for Miss Chung to be treated humanely. Family has called on China to show compassion and allow her to return home to Mel been to see her Children. Relations between camera and Beijing have deteriorated in recent years because of various political disputes. World News on the

Chung Lee John Lay China Miss Chung Mercer Beijing Australia MEL
"chung" Discussed on Human Factor Security

Human Factor Security

07:28 min | 2 years ago

"chung" Discussed on Human Factor Security

"Order companies that are not as lean. Like. Stuck in their ways me will probably still insist on certain jobs being onsite. By, Jesse some of the time right, and that's the thing I was thinking. I was thinking yet most of the truth yellow. Now and again even no matter what happens next right? Yep, so I think all. This is back to to -nology transformation so. As more companies see the value in the cloud go to the cloud I do see more cyber jobs being remote, but the hardest rocked move is course. The players in the. CYBERSECURITY leaders, these companies convincing them to change how work is done. dowse hardest rock to move. Inches that you say that because. They the Vati people that you see will be the most progressive, but obviously. Not always the -cation. Know say maybe some of the bigger companies, maybe smaller ones or SME's. We call them in the UK. Yes, the same thing in the states but. Maybe not with the same resources in the saint insight into what's happening in the shaggy. And you're absolutely great because. I can see. Companies with legacy application that cannot move the clouds governments. People know. The government is very slow to adopt new technology So they'll. They'll probably do the greatest. High Sade outliers. Slow that down. Who is still insist on being in the office? But A. Startups and Comey's are more leaner and quicker to adopt a new technology the way. Do you think they'll lead the way with? You know diversity as well. That's a mixed bag. Because right now all with pandemic, there are a lot of job losses. Whole industries are being. Disrupted and lock. With big name that are going out of business and traditionally when? Economic Times are not as good women do bear the brunt of the lay offs and job losses unfortunate, but there's also a possibility to put the competitions in that sense, because women traditionally if they're not impeded in a traditional on premise workplace, it is possible to thrive if they can work online more. That's the thing that I'm. I sorta sold. And I wondered and I hope that that'd be the case that it's kind of in some ways this remote way in Nathan. It's kind of a great leveler. Yes hopefully UST. Essahafa Tunis's so geographically as well as other reasons. You might see that come through some of the in in. Waste and stuff I. Don't if that's the best way to say. Because I would say women cybersecurity I recall it, but maybe. Maybe say. Maybe, you'll see that consumed some of the conversations. Maybe some of the feedback. He'll get move ecstasy monsell sort of like. You know if that's the case. I mean they the kind of conversations that you have in. Society. I think. The hard part though is also change changes, all always very hyper people. Companies a national governance resemble even in the UK. When there was a big buyer in London that destroyed a lot of. Most of the city back in the old days. Centuries ago I think people would say. Let's use new technology and build better, but. In a game in the end now we just just knowing what's. But that's it's so cheap. That would change though I mean that's the thing with changes and and I wonder you know if I people say to me that the situation that the world in now I am not just the pandemic was sort of some of the politics that are coming off. You know in the UK immediately before that we obsessed with Brac says and what the jazz just brexit. We're going to be and then in the states we've had you know. Obviously you've got the elections coming up. Yes, fall and and very controversial president. Empower. We've got the the black lives. Matter Movement the METOO movements. Sometimes, you look at these things than how painful some of these changes are. She feel like that. How would you feel about all of this? It's such a turbulent time, jess, it is. Optimistic face. Look at all of these. I think I do see. Yet a lot of a similarity. Larry's thoroughly light. That's my point. Where is race on the road? Warriors yesterday changed stopped ringing and. Yes way through a global. Global? Event in our history. which about you I would never forget? But when we should, we should also error that. Clients History we have always stepped up. We have always moved on and became better for it. The black plague. Disagreed with the black pay, plague and a swine flu, and all these other viruses. We will. We will become overcome it. And you'll all be better for it and when all this will be just another patient history book. But. We're living at Nathan I mean that's the thing. I feel like every day when you online. You think this is historic. It's a historic day for this reason. Authors! Of. Example many months ago with the IT uncertainty of my friends even were leading the UK because they feel that. With all the chaos, the restricted, but now now that there's new leadership there and things are slowly moving forward. There's opportunities. To. Pretty UK took the lead again. Hopefully. It strange because of all the things to happen in the middle of this brexit transition. Complexity to old, but yeah. I mean it's an what you said earlier, just your earlier point about. You know government being slow to adopt change I mean need. We thought this. Technology sort of. Trying to address some of the problems in the track and trace. Yup Up in the UK is being very controversial. G See that's what from your point of unit America is the the Saint Controversy, but those type of APPS I didn't read it. You guys all with all of that made. Yes it. Is Pretty much the same. Contact on security attack on trade contact tracing where. where I strongly were see that LOB garments and Pie Force that upon us to track where we go, we see we contact. She reminded compulsory. Is that what you mean? That's that's is a genuine. Fear is similar to after the nine eleven attacks, and all these barristers tax where security will trump. Will Override Privacy, NC and overall people's rights. Were GonNA. Say we have to do this for the sake of security and..

UK Jesse Vati Comey Essahafa Tunis London Nathan METOO America NC president jess Larry Brac
"chung" Discussed on Human Factor Security

Human Factor Security

09:13 min | 2 years ago

"chung" Discussed on Human Factor Security

"I am so delighted to welcome Nathan Chung to the show. Hi, Nathan, Hi Jenny, your ear and. Having to me you. Know, I'm so happy to be on a have to say. It's been a while since I wants to get you on the show and managed to to I noticed very early in the morning. If you so thank you so much for. Taking the time to speak to me. Wants say Nathan has a little bit about you. Correa and then some of the things that you're passionate about, and that may be a little bit about. Some of the things that am that are happening at the moment now there may be fattened the industry. If that's okay, sure. Yup, go ahead. Okay, if it festival for those who don't know you, which must be under rock. Do you want to just introduce yourself? Just say what it is she day instead of how people might Nagy assured the problem, so I am currently A. I specialized in cloud security at for Ernst and young the big four. I'm currently Arkansas sent doing lot of audits and its authority architecture to make clouds more secure. And I I work with AWS Azure I am very passionate about helping women cybersecurity. Giving back to the community through volunteer and also. I care about new technologies. You've written some brilliant obstacles unless and I'm GonNa get into these things. Shortly I'm particularly about you. Support for women and awards and things of being an ally, but let's start earlier on. Could you talk to me about? Somebody went joy. Technology is kids that you always like Compi uses. Did! You know that you get a career? And they did it start. You could say. The. The Nasdaq so. I got into genealogy early on and I work my way up through the career track starting off his condition of administrator manager into security, though I had a very full career learning from the bottom up. I'm very excited about technology because. I've seen a transition ever. Since. Ima Stas, days and Commodore people are nap, not only to Windows, and now we out the newer technologies. Of Virtual reality is. Cloud securities like. So many new technologies are al and it's changing our world. I do see that the covid nineteen. Dislike during times of. Road warriors it. It is very much accelerating to knowledge and technology adoption. Because she said that I mean I was just reading some of the articles that you take that it's. The cove. The pandemics opportunities to bring forth the technology renaissance. Really I mean you such an optimistic person. Antibody follows you. And you make me off to miss it. You know there's Times I've put something out to eat. Or does it and it really kind of makes my day so amid I? Know you're an optimistic person and support this, but she really think. I am the pandemic skin you know inspired actually Civis, bring technology. Perhaps that wasn't accelerating so quickly. Do bring it to the fore. Now be adopted that that is that the type of thing you mean, yes, because just like during the road warriors. Yes, we're going three change in rural which. Bringing people are dying by the time to -nology is advancing because it has to. Resemble now we have like. Drills that delivering food medicine and be out. Even A. Cloud Ski, I strongly believe that cloud companies will adopt cloud faster now because we can't fiscally Goto, easily go to a data center anymore right now. Shoppers Like it or not, I rural is change all we can do is. Accept it and just just go with the blow. You spoken about this. Announce goes to sell. You said that like Fukushima in Japan. The they that kind of force. Actually you want just talk about that example that you gave the. Put a link to the article in the show notes, but. A little bit about that because that's a similar type of thing it's. Trades House of problem right? Yes, and I'll forget my. Article was also published in this mackney called Amick, I guess in the Europe somewhere. Okay? The I think a European publication. Okay, we'll take out a link. Gay sold again Cosima that. That's a good example right there. where an earthquake caused massive damage nuclear power plant. So when there's so much radiation, humans cannot safely go in there to help find a problem. sel Is using robots and robots really have helped by going to where people cannot go safely and. Going to small. Small places and that that is a complete example how robotics is is really changing how things are done. The old days would just like if you look at the Chernobyl. He tried relies. Wasn't that. The back so the to do it. The old school way of just sitting people in reactive active suits, but now yep today Italian you that so much that he can use robots and robots is. The Future Dowell Change. Not just. were safety, but also word knife bash rained automation. Yeah, you can tell us a bit about because you work with him. Spark mindset date. And they kind of about using technology for you. WanNa tell us a little bit about what you do, and what they China because they sort of fit this theme of of using technology creatively. Yes, isn't he? So spare mindset is based in Colorado. It's a nonprofit and they. Go. They invited me to join the board. Their mission is to use new technologies virtual reality. To help, train underprivileged workers, who cannot get normal cybersecurity education, so they're learning things like security plus. Base cybersecurity and these are underprivileged kids who? May, not have the opportunity to regular university amazing. So what happens day? Saint many virtual reality to lay in it, they. How is that different from just being online? It's very similar being online, but you're in a virtual world, so instead of. Learning the old school method of being in a classroom and having instructor, you could have the instructor teaching you in virtual world, and using like resembled three dimensional objects, or Luxembourg terminates is learning differently. Yeah, I mean. I guess as well the more exciting and the more kind of and. Cola can make you know the most sort of tie. You can make it the more. The kids will get an enjoy. Yes, the lion is the key is. Because, you're so you so such in Africa for bringing people into the business. The one thing that I would say that makes me wonder about this is. So you advocate technology I need to Hobo and US crazy and I say to Mr Person, but you erase Oscar. Encouraging people into the information security industry and I love the article Nathan I did. Partly because see one of the things is that. You saying that you know you don't always go to the big hockey conferences that you don't have to be a hacker. Gret. That's one of the one of the biggest misconceptions in Cyprus cookie globally today where people think. cybersecurity equals only hacking. Whereas it can reach in multiple multiple in number of areas. When the biggest trends now is the privacy like the GDP are Europe and the new. Privacy legislation in California so that's a good intricate for a lot of people were not tentacle like A. About the legal profession who already know many laws and legislation they would be ideal candidates translators straight to hide the. Yeah. I mean you said that you see? Lawyers and teaches unjust. And analysts. said in the article that just lots of different ways to get into the business for you also talking about in the same article, you said you know you gotta go with jobs on. This is such products. Spies is like there are states that have big am socks, though there's a states that a more privacy focus scholley now the chew. It's of slightly different advice. Nick because the people still do you think physically have to go with those jobs all? Do you think that the way can online adoption maybe as much as it, so the vice doesn even masters much anymore. You know the you don't actually physically after. Go You rob a good point Jenny. With pandemic. It will change how work is done in the cyber security field however..

Nathan Europe Jenny Nathan Chung instructor Correa earthquake Ima Stas California Nagy Compi Nathan I Arkansas Goto
"chung" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"chung" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"They call themselves **** Chung so the name of the band is **** Chung yes and then they sing a song everybody well done to the original everybody have fun tonight it means yellow bell is everything that I yes not everybody did do they said everybody **** Chung tonight they do indeed now what is when Chung mean Donna it means yellow bell in Chinese and it's the first snow in the Chinese classical music scale okay fun fact that's like the this is Steve sorry that was an accident you like the song dance hall days remember that one yeah it's a dance all day everybody instead of the opposite of what you're dialing up what should we do in this hall that stands and then sometimes the days when we come back kind of similar though absolutely you can this is crazy I have a documentary then I think the two of you now we don't want any magic it's not magic good I stumbled on this last night and I think I think it's best to watch this when your bored okay when you feel like I've watched it all I've got the documentary for you when you think you've gone through all the options it's coming up stay right there were coming back on don and Steve on my talk my talkers if you're hearing my voice right now that means you're listening to my talk and if you're listening to my talk that means you've hung with us through some pretty unprecedented times and we thank you we know a lot of you know.

Chung Donna don Steve
"chung" Discussed on SF Ballet Blog

SF Ballet Blog

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"chung" Discussed on SF Ballet Blog

"N I find more now just working with living choreographers that I guess as as opposed to dancing a classical ballet people want to see humanity onstage so a lot of times and I feel so in this production. Know when we're dancing. It's I think we've always been taught to like Present ourselves and express ourselves so that the everybody in the audience especially in this theater. Because it's so big to really lift your face and lift your whole body and everything is kind of for the audience and sometimes at least I prefer kind of feeling that intimacy on stage and so perhaps instead of doing a gesture very grandly for the audience you do it towards your partner. And so as an audience member you're experiencing that intimacy on stage as opposed to just a pure show specifically for the audience. I don't know if that sense but yeah. I really enjoy watching that. Plus sides on for either ways of performing but yeah a lot of it is and Kris really gives us a lot of choreography so that we can show that humanity like a simple hand touch that Cinderella and the prince. You'll see it several times but were the front and center of the stage and we're looking at each other and it's really just two hands coming together and then it magically wraps around here body where you know like just gentle swaying. I mean who knew that effective well speaking of humanity you pretty major life events. Some of our repeat audiences are subscribers. Might have missed you last season. You had a pretty major news and you're back now. Can you tell us about that? I had a baby. He is now five months old. His name is forrest and he's the best. What else is there to say about that? Aside from not sleeping he is the vast. Yeah so you were back in for. Nutcracker and here we are at the start of the season coming out of the gate with Cinderella. How are you feeling being back on stage? You feel good I spent. I took all of my pregnancy off. He told how he really early on. Just because I knew there were some hard ballet's coming ahead and yeah I was pregnant so he's going to take some time off and I have to say when you have danced professionally for so long and I've amazingly of I haven't had any severe injuries. That has taken me out for that long so I hadn't taken that much time off of work in ever since I started so it was such I feel renewed. I while I was pregnant I came in. I took class and I dance just for fun. You know. It wasn't to put something onstage or to get ready for so there was no stress in it and it was. It definitely brought me back to dancing for fun which I feel like everybody needs whether you've been a dancer for a long time. We're not dancing for fun. Is is important but since then I came back relatively quick. I Guess Yeah I've I feel good. I can't complain. I have a Chinese mom that makes me all sorts of soups in bone. Broth and whatnot. So I feel very lucky well-supported. That's good great. I'd love to see if there are any questions for our guest. Principal Dancer Francis Chung question about when there's a stage mishap especially a big moment. How does that feel? When you're there. You know the show continues. You do what you can in the moment and it was really freaking out a little bit in your head and stuff and all sorts of things happen and that is really. I think why we come to live valley. If everything was perfect it would not be interesting and and big moments like that. We I I when I was younger. I probably used to beat myself up a little bit more about it whereas now you know. Kinda gets me a little bit more excited because yeah this is why we're here. So that's a great note to end on. Thank you again. Principal Dancer Francis Chung for our guest today and thank thank you all for joining us today for the meet the artist interview. If you missed any part of today's conversation if you want to listen to this one or any other meet the artists interview. These are podcast. It so you can find him on apple podcasts or Google play and of course our website. Sf Valet Dot Org Thank you again and please enjoy this afternoon's performance of Christopher Williams. Cinderella thank you. Thanks for listening to San Francisco. Bally's meet the artist podcast for more podcasts and other audience engagement programmes checkout. Sf Bali dot org or your favorite podcast player..

forrest Francis Chung Principal partner San Francisco Christopher Williams Kris Nutcracker Bally apple Google
"chung" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"chung" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"And they're like the band's name was **** Chung so I assume broad that they were like everybody comes C. **** Chung tonight but then we never really got an explanation in the eighties nineties or beyond what the hell it meant to **** Chung tonight I hated the song but he too it was just it's so stupid but you were you brought up and I was just was driving I'm actually going into Walmart to buy my own clippers to cut my own hair well thanks for that visual never burn out of our minds a rest of the night and take it easy I have a good one rob we love you thanks tell me what it would mean a way motional connection away John like I do the chorus everybody **** Chung tonight your interpretation of what that means he has got a five presumptuous of these way John **** to put their own name in lights Hey here's how you're weighing chunks were way I think they really were on the branding before branding was branding and if their brand is horrible music juga live hello hello hi how are you as Adam I have over there what's up dude what about blue Monday by new order when you're not gonna sets a bad song of the eighties are you I like it I like the Big Brother battle they happen to be how dare you nor has way more than just to be you tell me just the beat of the song with the lyrics man.

Chung Walmart John Adam