18 Burst results for "Chuck Rosenberg"

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

02:28 min | 1 d ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"I do solemnly swear that I will support defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign investor. That I will bear to faith and allegiance to the see that I take this obligation freely any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and fully discharge the duties of the Office on which I am about to enter. So. Help me God help me God. So God. Welcome to the oath I'm Chuck Rosenberg, and I am honored to be your host for another compelling conversation with fascinating guests from the world of public service. This week, my guest, Captain Sully Sullen Burger, the pilot of US Airways Flight Fifteen, forty, nine in January of two, thousand, nine, his Airbus, a three twenty collided with a flock of Canada geese shortly after takeoff from Laguardia. Airport. And lost power in both engines. Thanks to the remarkable work of sully and his co-pilot. Jeff Skulls. All One, hundred, fifty, five people aboard survived an emergency landing in the frigid Hudson. River. Sully was born in a small Texas town Denison. There as.

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

05:03 min | 2 weeks ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Investor. That I will bear to faith and allegiance to the scene that I. Take this obligation freely about any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and fully discharge the duties of the Office on which I am about to enter. So help me God help me God so God. Welcome to the youth I'm Chuck Rosenberg and I am honored to be your host for another compelling conversation with a fascinating guests from the world of public service this week. My guest is has the highest ranking woman in F. B. I. History. Amy Grew up in Jeffersonville Indiana a small town just across the Ohio River from Louisville Kentucky as a child. Amy Dreamed of being an astronaut. She studied `aeronautics astronautical engineering at purdue. Amy is a rocket scientist, but poor eyesight dashed her NASA dreams instead. Amy Got her start in the FBI as As a special agent in Kansas City working violent crime cases, she was one of the first agents in her office to be part of a new evidence response team, and won her first assignments as part of that team was to Oklahoma City, because of the horrific domestic terrorism attack on the Murrah Federal. Building in Nineteen ninety-five. Amy Rose through. FBI RANKS TO RUN THE MEMPHIS AND LOUISVILLE field offices, and to run to large divisions at headquarters where she oversaw FBI technology in one job and the FBI's criminal and cyber work in another. Today she is back home as the Chief of Public Safety for Louisville Kentucky where she manages several vital city agencies and they'll retired from the FBI. Amy Continues to serve Amy Hess welcome to the oath. Thank you great to be here well. It's great to be Anura. Town Louisville Kentucky welcomed local. You grew up right across the Ohio River in Jeffersonville Indiana now. I did suburb of level located right across the Ohio. River, so tell me about that. Jeffersonville is a great place to grow up. I had a I think basically idyllic childhood. I went to Jeffersonville, high school public school. Yes I was fortunate enough to grow up on the end of cold sack, surrounded by neighborhood, full of boys who like to play football and baseball and basketball, and all those things and my dad was lawyer..

Amy FBI Jeffersonville Ohio River Amy Hess LOUISVILLE Amy Dreamed Amy Rose Kentucky Indiana Chuck Rosenberg purdue Ohio Chief of Public Safety Murrah Federal Anura NASA Kansas City Oklahoma City F. B. I. History
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

03:47 min | Last month

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Investor. That I will bear to faith and allegiance to the scene that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the Office on which I am about to enter. So help me God. Help me God so God. Welcome to the youth I'm Chuck Rosenberg and I am honored to be your host for another compelling conversation with a fascinating person from the world of public service my guest this week. Is Jim Miller the former under secretary for policy at the Defense Department in that vital role, essentially the number, three position in Dod Jim was at the forefront of some of the nation's most important and most difficult national security issues, but I'm getting ahead of the story gyms path to the Pentagon began in the middle. He was the only boy in a household of five children in a middle class family in the middle. Middle of the country in Waterloo Iowa, a brilliant student and superb athlete Jim made his way to Stanford or a mentor, real name Lincoln Moses inspired him in guided him into public service. Gyms work at Pentagon included some of the most challenging national security questions that confront our country as a key advisor to three secretaries of defense. Bob Gates Chuck Hagel and Leon Panetta jump guided reviews of nuclear weapons, policy and ballistic missile defense policy and led the formulation of National Defense Strategies for Space and cyberspace recently, and after my interview with Jim was recorded, he resigned his position on the prestigious Defense Science Board. In an open letter to the current Secretary of Defense Jim noted that peaceful protesters exercising their first amendment rights outside of the White. House were disperse quote using tear gas and rubber bullets, not for the sake of safety, but to clear a path for a presidential photo op end quote. Jim also wrote that though the defense secretary quote may not have been able to stop this appalling use of force, you could have chosen to oppose it instead. You visibly supported it and quote. Jim is a deeply principal and thoughtful man, and his story is engaging and inspiring, a boy from Iowa from the middle, the middle, serving his country at the highest levels of the Pentagon Jim. Miller will come to the oath. Chuck great to be here with you. I appreciate your time today. You grew up in Waterloo. Iowa, the fourth of five children. Tell me about that. CHUCK GROWN UP IN WATERLOO I. I had a pretty idyllic childhood. This is post World War Two America middle of the country middle of the middle class walk two blocks to school as an as a grade schooler. Three blocks to junior high four blocks to high school so I worked my way up. Now you were one of five, but the only boy you have four sisters, three older and one younger. They treat you okay, Jim. Well. I think a couple of them would say I was treated more than okay. Period of time went by the moniker King James with a couple of my sisters. I felt that that was a little overstated. Prince probably would have been more appropriate. You said growing up in Waterloo was idyllic, but there were quite literally two sides of the river, the west side, in which he lived in the east side, which was primarily African American, talk a little bit about the two sides of the river. That's absolutely right. Waterloo was significantly still is a racially divided town African American predominantly on the east side, predominantly white on the west side. He's tied. West high would play football games there at almost always be fights. Now when I was in sixth Grade Waterloo was integrated..

Jim Miller Waterloo Jim Pentagon Iowa Chuck Chuck Rosenberg Defense Department Defense Science Board under secretary for policy Chuck Hagel Secretary Prince Bob Gates Lincoln Moses football Leon Panetta advisor
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

02:44 min | 2 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Domestic. That I will bear to faith and allegiance to the scene that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the Office on which I am about to enter. So help me God. Help me God so God. Welcome to the oath, I'm Chuck Rosenberg and I am honored to be your host for another compelling conversation with a fascinating person from the world of public service. My guest this week is Maya widely a brilliant and compelling woman who has spent her professional life at the intersection of law, education and policy. Mile was born into both privilege and poverty. The child of two prominent civil rights activists. She grew up in a loving an intact home and in a broken system, and if these things privilege and poverty, intact and broken seem to like they are contradictory. Maya will explain why they are not. Educated at Dartmouth and Columbia Maya served in city government and in the federal government. The United States Department of Justice Her most recent turn in public service put her in charge of the Civilian Complaint Review Board. The Independent Oversight Agency of the New York, City Police Department the largest police force in the nation. This gave Maya. Perspective on policing in America, particularly what we need to do as a nation to address police misconduct to improve policing, which is a dramatic improvement in many parts of the nation and to build bridges between police and the communities, they are sworn to serve. Maya's moving story is one of struggling success of love and tragedy of friends and mentors, and always of the pursuit of justice, dignity and equality. Continue both it's great to be here. Check was a real privilege to have you on the show. Thanks for spending some time with us. I know you were born in Syracuse, but you didn't live there very long. Did you know we moved to Washington DC when I was two years old so I really only remember Washington as a hometown. Although we did visit Syracuse a couple of times, it was interesting to me. You've said elsewhere that you did not grow up. Up in a disadvantage family, but that you spent much of your childhood in a low income neighborhood and an inner city schools. Well, you know honestly the balance of my time was living the privilege I was born, too, but the formative years is how I would describe at the formative years. My family lived in the Dupont circle area of Washington DC which will shock people to say well. What do you mean you said? You lived in a low income black neighborhood?.

Columbia Maya City Police Department Washington United States Department of Ju Syracuse Chuck Rosenberg Independent Oversight Agency Dartmouth Dupont Mile America New York
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this. This amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA Director Leon. Panetta, the toughest job I had as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA. Astronaut Kathy. Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is palpable. Make the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI amy. Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground and he was holding a baby's shoe. I knew he had young children. And I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City. On April Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol. Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek. Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath they still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's..

Lam secretary Hess Chuck Rosenberg MSNBC Oklahoma City NASA FBI CIA Kathy Sullivan Panetta Murthy United States Attorney Director
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA director, Leon Panetta the toughest job I had, as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI. Amy Hess, I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's show. I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth, nineteen ninety-five struck me. Former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me, and then I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's..

Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Carol Lam Leon Panetta Amy Hess Oklahoma City FBI NASA MSNBC CIA United States Attorney director
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta, the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and. And know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess, I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe. I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April Nineteenth Nineteen, ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam. When I walked through that door, they would all look. Look at me and I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's..

General Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta Carol Lam MSNBC FBI Oklahoma City Amy Hess CIA NASA director United States Attorney
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on AM Joy

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had, as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy. Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and. And know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess. I remember, he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe. I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States. Attorney Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's..

Carol Lam Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Leon Panetta NASA MSNBC Oklahoma City FBI CIA Amy Hess Sullivan United States Attorney director
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

02:16 min | 3 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Hi everyone this is Chuck Rosenberg most important. I I hope this message finds you and your family and friends well. This pandemic as you know is hit communities big and small throughout the United States and around the world the number of people who have died or who are suffering from this awful disease is absolutely heartbreaking but together. I think we're making a difference. Thank you so much for heating the advice. Public Health officials listen to the doctors. Listen to the scientists listened to the epidemiologists following their guidance helps to slow the spread of this dangerous virus and keep everybody safe. We have a collective responsibility to each other. You know that and the duty to try to ease the burden on healthcare workers and on first responders. Many of you have written to ask whether the oath is returning. Will there be a third season. Yes absolutely we are coming back in fact. We were working on a terrific third season. When the physical distancing protocols kicked in so we have slowed production for instance no face to face interviews for now but we have not stopped our work. We finished the few third season interviews. And I think they're wonderful. We have more to complete of course when we begin to publish these interviews again. Hopefully in early June. I think you're going to truly enjoy our guests. We have a great lineup. For our third season those guests include Leon. Panetta the former Secretary of defense and director of the CIA and Kathy Sullivan. A former astronaut. And the first. Us woman to walk in space the Vet Murphy. The former surgeon general of the United States and many many more we have additional great guests lined up and some wonderful surprises. So I hope you'll be patient with us. We are coming back. I also want to say thanks to all of you. During the last two seasons I have received thousands of emails from you and I have read reviews and comments on the various platforms. That you use to listen to the oath. You told me that this podcast has reinforced a rekindled in you a sense of faith and trust our government and in the men and women who worked so diligently to protect and serve this wonderful nation. That is incredibly heartening. You've also sent.

United States Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan CIA Panetta Secretary director
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

04:03 min | 7 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Declare war Because they think in part they realized that it was the executive who had the ability to make war And that that and I think more properly coincided with this commander in chief title that the framers gave the president but this is an ongoing debate. And like I said earlier it's GonNa go on long after Donald Trump Is Out of office there. There's another element to all this too. We talk about here As well and that is how the public is processing all of this right now. Their reaction to everything There was a survey last year. Actually it's two years ago now. I forgot that it's now twenty. Twenty two thousand eighteen survey From Georgetown University versity that looked at Americans in their trust in institutions and it actually found there was pretty strong trust in a private company in Amazon But there was very little trust when it came to the executive branch came to the presidency When it came to Congress for that matter probably should acknowledge also very little trust trust when it came to the media? I I wonder listening to you. Describe the oath of office that you took how Salam the occasion felt to you how meaningful it felt to you. Do you sense as the public watches all of this that there is a cynicism that has taken hold that affects the actions of our you leaders. I think that's a fair way to think about it Steve. You know I've always said skepticism is fine and fact skepticism healthy. Cynicism I think is corrosive of and there seems to be a cynicism settling in as really ashamed because those institutions that you just mentioned right the institutions of government and the media via Are Among the most important institutions in the United States. They've kept US safe. They've made sure that we have equal. And Civil Rights enforce the law. They conduct intelligence. They operate the courts. These are some of the most important things we do as a society and for us to lose trust in those institutions Russians for that cynicism to sort of take hold at sad I think it may be deeply unfortunate and I think it can be highly corrosive and I worry About that Chuck Rosenberg. You've made our first crossover episode here in the MSNBC podcasting world a success. Thank you so much for joining us. Oh It's my pleasure. Thank you for having the Senate Majority Leader Mitch. McConnell and minority leader Chuck Schumer both addressed impeachment on the Senate floor today. Senator McConnell argued that the structure of the Senate trial should follow the same format. It was used for president. Clinton's impeachment trial just like twenty years ago. We should address mid-trial questions such as witnesses after opening arguments Sarah questions and other relevant motions there is. Senator Schumer responded. I just heard leader McConnell. Speak for thirty minutes on the subject of the president's impeachment went there was a lot of finger pointing name calling and misreading of history but not a single argument or discussion about the issue. And that's holding up a Senate trial whether there will be witnesses and documents not one mention. He has no good argument against having witnesses and documents so he resorts to these subterfuges. There doesn't seem to be much agreement there. We will see what happens when the full Senate is back in session on on January. Sixth but in the meantime if you want to know more about how the Senate trial might play out. Check out this past. Monday's episode of article two from earlier. This week article. Two inside impeachment is produced by Isabel. Angel Max Jacobs Claire by Aaron Dolan Preseve Orthon Alison Bailey. Adam Adam to Boa and Barbara. Wrap our executive producer is Ellen Franklin Steve Ties the executive producer of audio on Steve. Kornacki will be back on Monday..

Senate Senator McConnell president Ellen Franklin Steve Ties executive Donald Trump Senator Schumer executive producer United States Chuck Schumer Chuck Rosenberg MSNBC Georgetown University Adam Adam Salam Angel Max Jacobs Claire Amazon Congress
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

09:38 min | 7 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"A whether or not it's impeachable and whether or not he'll be removed moved again is a political judgement that the senators will make in. There's a point that the president has made in other contexts as well specifically. I think the molar report and in the conversation around. But it's also something that Democrats have referred back to During the impeachment drama in that is the president talking about article two of the Constitution giving him the breadth of power. He has basically allowing him to do just about anything. Also take a look at one other thing. It's a think world's else article too. Nobody ever mentions article too. It gives me all of these right at a level that nobody has ever seen before. We don't even talk about article article. It's an argument. The president has made those powers those article to powers. How do you interpret the limits on them given what's in the constitution article two does confer broad powers on the president but certainly not unlimited? Let me just give you an example. Steve no question that the president has the authority in fact the constitutional authority to grant pardons or to nominate men and women to serve as federal judges or ambassadors. But I don't think anyone believes that that power power is unlimited meaning for instance if he wanted to make Steve Kornacki The United States Ambassador to France. Fine have at it. That's great But he couldn't and do it in return for a five million dollar cash payment that would be corrupt and so whatever. The contours are of presidents power under article two of the Constitution. Shutian as commander in chief or to exercise pardon authority or denominate men and women to the Federal Bench. It has to at least be constrained By the notion that you cannot act corruptly and it's also balanced by other powers that you find in the constitution ascribe to other branches of government. And there's always a fight over that by either way between the legislative branch and the executive branch often with the judicial branch. You know trying to weigh in and Determine the contours of that authority but it is absolutely absolutely not unlimited For the record I would decline the nomination to be ambassador to France. Too much travel for me. I'd hold that for Canada. I think I could probably handle. Oh that one let me follow up on that though because I think that you raise an interesting hypothetical there you're painting a scenario where okay five million bucks in cash. President gives out an an appointment clear clear corruption there but it does point to some pretty significant grey areas. Here doesn't it thinking of not five million bucks give into a president by an individual but five million bucks given to the campaign given to organizations supporting the campaign. That seems common when we talk about Ambassadorial appointments other appointments. It's in government. It seems to be a gray area there. Well look. I think you're right. I think all this behavior that we're talking about is on a spectrum from surely innocent to purely corrupt and the example. That you've just drawn I think is a great one steve. Because it shows you that it's not always easy to determine You know the difference between Corrupt Behavior And behavior that we think of as unseemly and behavior. That's perfectly okay in the eyes of just about anybody right. It's all on a spectrum but but You know the example. I use the five million dollar cash payment to make you ambassador to France even if you would turn it. Down is clearly clearly corrupt. An article article two cannot possibly be read. Not by any sane person to permit that you know where it really comes into play the article to authorities of the President and and the contest with Congress over whether or not it's legitimate is in the power as commander in chief right to make war to launch airstrikes to sending troops hotly debated During World War Two in the Korean War the Supreme Court granting a lot of authority to Franklin Delano Roosevelt With his article to Commander in chief hat on But actually restricting Harry Truman in some important ways when he tried to exercise similar powers during the Korean Rian War so this is a long standing debate it will go on well beyond the presidency of Donald J trump. We're GONNA take a quick break chuck but stick with with us. 'CAUSE WE'RE GONNA be right back. Pay Everyone Steve Kornacki here I wanNa tell you about an NBC news podcast. I'm hosting uncalled article. Two inside impeachment. It's exclusively dedicated to bringing you the latest developments on the impeachment of president trump. I talked to NBC News reporters who are closest to the story to break down. What's new? What matters what it means for the twenty twenty election and our country new episodes drop every Monday Wednesday and Friday search? Now wherever you're listening to this podcast subscribe for free. Willie geist here this week on the Sunday. Sit Down podcast. I sit down with rapper. Actress Comedian Aquafina Vena to talk about her huge year with roles in crazy rich Asians and oceans eight. The podcast now for free wherever you download yours. I WanNa talk about how the idea oaths has played out in other impeach. We don't have many examples from the past but we do have one we reference it here frequently Bill Clinton and in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight nine hundred ninety nine back then. With Bill Clinton. He was impeached. One of the charges. It was perjury. It was that he had lied to a federal grand jury about an extramarital affair with Monica Lewinsky. Henry Hyde the judiciary committee chairman back then Republican from Illinois. He made the case back then. That Clinton had violated waited the oath that he took when he gave that testimony with the office of the president of the United States. The personal fate of the president is not the issue. The political fate of his party is not the issue. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is not the issue. The issue is perjury lying under growth that oath constituted a compact between the president. The American people that compact has been broken. The People's trust has been betrayed. It's interesting to look at. How oath were invoked back then chuck into remember that certainly in in public opinion and as it turned out in the Senate that argument we did not carry the day back then? No it didn't You know sometimes where you stand depends on where you sit. And you're seeing some of the arguments advanced today by Republicans Skins Echo eerily arguments advanced back then By Democrats when Bill Clinton was president. What's disappointing to me? Is that the president's conduct president trump's conduct seems to be Very much like what. The Muller team found with respect to Russian interference in our twenty sixteen election by that. I mean an attempt by president trump to get Ukraine to interfere in the twenty twenty election and that goes to the heart of the president's public conduct or if you will misconduct. I don't in any way condone. What Clinton did I thought his behavior was awful? Awful and lying under oath is not something I would have tolerated as a federal prosecutor. In fact I prosecuted people for doing exactly that but Clinton's misconduct act Didn't go to the heart of our electoral system as bad as it was again. I don't condone it in any way. It didn't go to the very fabric of our electoral taurel system. And that's what's so dangerous about President Trump's behavior now senators can decide whether or not that's impeachable. They ought to decide it in in a fair and impartial way. That may just not be happening. There's also we mentioned Clinton there's another parallel here with where the news is right now in in an where. It was back during his impeachment as Bill Clinton was impeached by the House. In December nineteen ninety eight. He launched Operation Desert Fox airstrikes in Iraq Iraq. Their purpose is to protect the national interest of the United States and indeed the interests of people throughout the Middle East and around the world now now two decades later we've got pending Senate trial and military action the president authorizing military action drone strike. That killed the Kassam Sulamani. Top Top arrhenius general. We took action last night to stop a war. We did not take action to start a war. Flinty of Democrats out there right now saying the president had an obligation to consult Congress on this that he couldn't and shouldn't be doing this unilaterally You've got Republicans out there A saying he had the right to do that. He's got the the right. Under the two thousand one and two thousand to a military authorizations in the wake of nine eleven that Congress never pulled back in and I and therefore citing an imminent threat from terrorist he can he can authorize it. I'm curious what what would you make. Yes so this. Is that age old debate Under Article One of the Constitution Congress has the authority to declare war and also to appropriate money for the Department of Defense for our Armed Services under article Michael to the Constitution. The president is the commander in chief and when I referenced earlier you know what. The Supreme Court did with respect to Presidents Roosevelt giving him free rain or largely free rein and how the Supreme Court sort of restrained or reigned in President Truman. That goes to the very heart of this question. In fact when the framers were considering that power of Congress to declare war one of the debates they had in the constitutional convention mentioned was whether Congress could make war or declare war and they settled on.

president Bill Clinton President Truman Donald J trump Congress France Steve Kornacki perjury Supreme Court Senate United States Constitution Congress Federal Bench NBC News Willie geist Canada United States Ambassador to Fr Monica Lewinsky
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

08:54 min | 7 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Chief Justice of the United States John G Roberts Jr. who'll administer the presidential oath office everyone please stand from NBC news this article too inside. Impeachment Steve Kornacki. Today is Friday January. Third please raise your right hand and repeat after me I Donald John Trump do solemnly swear I donald John trump wipe flab solemnly swear solemnly swear the presidential oath of office article two section. One of the constitution requires that every president elect complete complete at thirty five word oath before taking office that I will faithfully execute faithfully execute the office of President of the United States and I will faithfully fully execute the office of President of the United States the office of President of the United States article two of the Constitution also outlines impeachment impeachment situation. We find ourselves in today as the forty fifth president of the United States. Donald Trump faces potential removal from office. You'll do not uphold in your oath of office. Well I will tell you this I will uphold mind I will vote to impeach Donald Trump. Nobody ever mentions article article then. I have an article to where I have the right to do. Whatever I want does president but I don't even talk about that that's not what our founders owners had nine that's a president king? That's not what we're about here. So what did the founders have in mind and will to the best of my ability. The ability preserve protect and defend Deepak protect and defend deserve protect and the constitution of the United States Irvine protect and defend the constitution of the United States. Constitution of the United States will help you God so help me God today. Article too will explore the oath of the highest office. And what happens when it's tested. Chuck Chuck Rosenberg served as a career. Federal Prosecutor in later as the United States attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia. He has also served in senior positions at the Department of Justice in the FBI BI and as the head of the Drug Enforcement Administration Chuck is currently in MSNBC contributor. End the host of the PODCAST. The Oath Shock. You've got a resume that puts us all certainly only meat ashamed but welcome. Thank you for being here. I think the only thing that proves Steve is. I can't keep a job okay. Well that's one way of looking at it I guess The theme today a oaths the theme of your podcast. Obviously I'm curious. Every four years we watch the president of the United States. Take the oath of office from the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. If if we serve on a jury we maybe we'd been sworn in as a juror. Maybe we've seen a witness sworn in on a in a movie about a courtroom scene we've seen oaths and I think at least again against speaking from my own experience that they often seem very sort of ceremonial formulaic. I I wonder about your experience. You've taken I think ten oaths In in positions of high public trust. What is your experience like being administered one of those oaths and is it something that lingers with you once? It's an office But what are the mean to you. Yeah I I have taken it I think ten times. I've also administered Steve. Perhaps hundreds of times. I'm most recently when I ran the. Da To new special agents to new diversion. Investigators to new intelligence analysts and two chemists And I gotTa tell you it is is a very solemn moment it may seem formulaic But it's not and something that stays with you and stayed with me all of my professional life. I remember number where I took it. I remember who administered it And I remember thinking this is a big deal can you think of one of those Maybe the first time what what that experience was like. Take us back to it very first time. I was a new graduate from the University of Virginia Law School. I had joined the Department of Justice through the attorney. General's Honors Program And with a group of ten or twelve brand new colleagues in a small conference room on the fourth floor at the Department of Justice The Assistant Attorney General At the time Shirley early Peterson swore Sahlin. I'll never forget it but I also remember Taking the oath when I became. US Attorney both in Virginia and Texas. I remember Bob Muller administering the oath to me when I returned to the FBI in two thousand and thirteen is he was just finishing his twelfth year as director. It's like I said a solemn moment and it stays with you. Do the words come to you at at critical moments when you have a decision to make when you face a dilemma. Emma at all are you. Are you thinking back to the words. Well I don't know that I ever sat down and said you know this is tough decision that I have to make. Let me pull out the oath oath and read it again. I mean it's what you really making is a promise to be diligent to be faithful to the constitution and to the rule of law. But I'm hoping for people who are drawn to this type of work that they don't need an oath to remind them of the importance the sanctity of the positions that they hold that this is who and in what they are and the oath is really a way of reaffirming that publicly. So let's talk about the oath in the context of this impeachment drama. The oath the president of the United States. I mentioned every four years January twentieth. We all watch on television. A new president or reelected president puts his hand so far some they'll ib. I be a her hand on. The Bible takes the oath of office from the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Talk about the contents of that oath. I think we all know no the words but what do they mean while. Interestingly Steve The oath that the president takes upon assuming office is the only oath in which the Constitution specifies the precise words that have to be used That's not true for the oath. I took it's not true for the oath that members of the House or Senate take only for the president and it's really rather simple. It's three dozen or so words. It's not extensive. It's not detailed. It's not specific. It's very sort of high minded. Its promise to faithfully execute the job and to preserve protect and defend the constitution of the United States. I think by design It's is not specific. We expect a lot from our president's Some of them have lived up to the promise. Some of them have not yet so in this current moment. You've got. The United States has been impeached. Democrats say he has violated his oath of office. It's a broad oath. Does that make it difficult for Democrats to make an argument or for anyone to make an argument about any president that they violated their oath. Sure because it's really not a legal promise as much as a moral I promise That presidents are making when they take that oath and so what may appear to be You know a violation of that oath to one person may not be a violation elation to another these are political judgments that members of Congress will make about this president or other presidents whether he has Committed high crimes crimes or misdemeanors whether he should be removed from office upon trial in the Senate. These are in the end political judgments. What the president promises to do when he takes the growth and what senators are assessing? Now are really much more in the realm of political judgments. We're all very familiar. Obviously with the basic the case that Democrats have made against trump. The idea that he for a period held up aid to Ukraine that the purpose of holding up that aid was was to try to get Ukraine to launch an investigation or at least to announce launching an investigation into Joe Biden. The argument that that is a violation of the oath where is is the violation of the words in the oath there right well it would be arguably that he didn't faithfully execute the laws of the United States that he didn't preserve protect protect and defend the constitution again. It is not necessarily a crime that the house has to prove that the Senate has to judge its conduct conduct now the conduct could be criminal but the founders were reasonably clear at least if when we think about what they were drawing on when they formulated our the constitution and came up with the phrase high crimes or misdemeanors to describe one way in which a president could be removed from office. High crimes and misdemeanors didn't didn't mean criminal conduct per se. It meant public misconduct. And what you just described Steve. What the president did with respect to Ukraine to try to to get it to at least announced an investigation of a political opponent? I think clearly constitutes misconduct..

president United States Donald John Trump Steve Department of Justice United States attorney Supreme Court Senate Steve Kornacki Virginia FBI Chuck Chuck Rosenberg John G Roberts Jr. trump NBC University of Virginia Law Sch MSNBC Ukraine
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

12:50 min | 10 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"The of I'm Chuck Rosenberg and I am honored to be your host for another thoughtful conversation with a fascinating guest Jim stavridis retired from his beloved united states navy as a four Star Admiral in his storied Navy career Jim held some of the most important and sensitive posts in the military in his last post however he made history Jim Service was the first four star Navy admiral ever to serve as the supreme allied commander of NATO every one of his practice assessors dating back to Dwight Eisenhower was an army general on the oath Jim Discusses The history structure and purpose of NATO and why it remains so important today to the safety and security of the United States and to our NATO allies a graduate of the United States Naval Academy gyms to Rita's had a tree really remarkable life at sea in service to our nation his tales of sacrifice humility and leadership are important and timely Jim Survey this is also the author of four books his most recent book sailing true North Ten admirals and the voyage of character has just been published Jim Cereda's welcome to the oath it's an honor to be with you chuck thank you for having us to your beautiful home in North Florida is we are recording this we are of course watching a hurricane season Oh my major question for you is do you know how to fill a sandbag I do and I'm willing to work let's hold that thought depending on how the season unfolds congrats relations on your brand new book so in North I'm very proud of it it's an interesting book I think it's not about leadership which a lot of people assume but it's a book about character her about how we lead ourselves there are so many books of leadership or awash in leadership books I think we are overweight in thinking about leadership and underweight in thinking about character that's why I wrote the book you come from a military family your father was a marine officer talk a little bit about your parents and the reason I ask is because in your new book you make a list of your heroes at the top of that list are your mother and father did they are in the book is dedicated to them my parents were a classic American Love Story Got Married in the nineteen fifties I came along in the mid fifties and we promptly moved Athens Greece or greek-american that's a big part of our culture my father as you said was a marine and so he was assigned at the US embassy there so we moved you're in the in the mid fifties and lived in Greece for three or four years and I came away with a love of Greece and Greek culture but also just a d respect for my father and that continued through my life and when I went off to Annapolis Chuck I went with the intent of becoming a Marine infantry officer Sir just like my father what happened the first year everything was great I was kind of working out with the Marines in the class and then the navy sent me out on we call youngster cruise so at the end of your freshman year you are assigned to a US Navy warship so they sent me to the US Jewett in San Diego California and the ship got underway as the sun was setting I walked up on the bridge I was like Saint Paul on the road to Damascus I just knew I wanted Nia sailor so I went home and told my dad that and I thought he'd say Oh that's great son you know Beena sailor no he was kind of upset he got over it about the twenty five years later when I got my first star he forgave you he did in all seriousness he was one hundred percent supportive but what he wanted and this is really the essence of the oath he wanted me to serve in felt very strongly about that is I do for my children how about your mother my mother came from Pensilvania never went to college yet is among the most intellectual people I know she reads to three books a week she's eight eighty nine in perfect health in the other day I called her up and I said Mama reading this really interesting novel written by Hungarian Officer and before it could say a word about it she immediately identified the author and then recommend two more books for me to read by Hungarian writers oh it's a good example the fact that you don't have to have a glittering disagree in life you can educate yourself in that's really what my mother did so from her got my love of reading and books in for my father I got my love of services serving the country did you know you wanted to go to the Naval Academy was at a goal when you were a kid it was as soon as I was old enough to understand how you became an officer in the Marine Corps I knew that I would wanna go to Annapolis in and partly it was just the glamour of the Naval Academy it's a beautiful campus anybody who goes walks there is going to want to go to Annapolis I always say each of the military academies kind of reflect the character of the service Annapolis is on the Severn River it's got sailboats going by it's full of light it has a big open beautiful maritime field to West Point is forbidding it's a little dark it's dark in its sits up on a bluff above the Hudson River and lastly the Air Force Academy is just this gorgeous of postmodern architecture that you feel when you walk in the campus you're gonNA literally go flying up into the Colorado mountains before the day is over and so I went to Annapolis that put me on the path to be either marine or the officer as we all know ultimately I chose the C- living in Annapolis and being in San Diego will do that to somebody wouldn't it will and of course we're in my home Jacksonville Florida which is another major naval concentration beautiful mayport naval station Norfolk Naval Station Pearl Harbor Yakutsk Japan my point is the navy is going to send you to beautiful places on the coast the army is going to send you to dusty forts somewhere in the interior of this land for it was an easy choice you're right I think charmingly in your book the accidental Admiral About Your entering class in nineteen seventy two at Annapolis that there were fourteen hundred plead listen Taylor listeners would have played this is a freshman at the Naval Academy there are fourteen hundred leaves only two of you became four stars in your book you say one was obvious the other was not the obvious was today General John Allen who is a six foot two inch scrapping strong blackbelt karate marine you would have picked him out of that line up fourteen hundred immediately on the day we walked in you would have picked me out and you would have said don't they have height requirement in this place I am a man of I would say normal height others would say modest height but in all seriousness Jon Allen I became the closest of friends at Annapolis in our careers intertwined again and again and flash forward thirty years sure so in general John Allen is working for me as the commander of our mission in Afghanistan he's in command of one hundred and fifty thousand NATO troops I'm his boss so we we swam together in the C for thirty plus years I had the most enormous regardless him many of our listeners will know this some will not how extraordinarily rare it is just to get a fourth star in our military can you talk about that a little bit most people would say that Steph Reid is probably got a four star due to some kind of computer but just to do the numbers let's take the navy there about million people in the navy and we have twelve four star officers typically maybe ten the odds of even becoming a one star Admiral are extremely small and I will say this I think making oh sex which is captain in the Navy or Colonel in the Marine Corps is a totally do due process kind of event if you're good and you deploy in you take the risks you will Mako sex beyond that is kind of a random walk it has to do with where you get stationed who gets to know you whether your ship deploys into combat or it it goes into a shipyard just matters of timing and lot begin to play so I always say actually there are three random things in the military one is this flag selection as just described one is deep selection which is getting picked up a head of one of your classmates that happens very rarely and it's kind of random walk in the third thing is the awarding of medals at times appears quite random as follows you will look at the rack of ribbons you're wearing on your uniform in every officer if he or she is honest can look at one of those metals and say you know oh I got the bronze star for that operation but really wasn't me it was really the colonel who was putting the plan together in every officer will also Oh have a metal that got away that they feel as a wait a minute. I should've gotten the Legion of Merit for that tour but I just didn't there's a lot of random built it into that and it's a good way of saying that in all of our lives so many things are a matter of luck and chance and also of good mentors and teamwork is another way of saying there isn't typically a lot of me in public service it's a team exactly and again if there's a theme to this podcast the oath it is all this is sometimes people say what was it like being away from your family so much because I pulled out my logbooks the other day and totaled yep I know you did a calculation was which is a remarkable I did of all the days I spent on the deep ocean outside a land you know most people go on a couple of cruises surface warfare officer Cold War a war on terror it's probably on the high end but not remarkably so so nine and a half years in people would a you miss so many Christmases and in so many birthdays in so many come with your daughter to school days and I would always say that's the price you pay for the right to serve in I think that's what the people who take the oath are all about in the end so how about the beginning of that nine and a half here's when you're a brand new second lieutenant fresh out of the Naval Academy where did you first serve what ship ship was a brand new sp- ruins class destroyer called the USS Hewitt I was the antisubmarine warfare officer which is a very kind of cool glamorous job especially during the Cold War this was in nineteen seventy six when I graduated from Annapolis and I just loved it it was fabulous it was all the new technology it had guests turbans and missiles and torpedoes had a highly trained. in crew working for me did three years there chuck and loved every minute of it and then I thought okay now the Navy will send me graduate school because that's sort of normal career path a call from my human resources professional we call them a detail in the navy and he said stubbornness you got a really good record coming off this destroyer I've got a great deal for you we're GONNA send you to the oldest aircraft carrier in the fleet you are going to be the boilers officer on US forest Rian new frontline gas turbine dust royer to be buried in the engineering department on this cranky old aircraft carrier and.

officer Navy united states Chuck Rosenberg Jim stavridis Annapolis Naval Academy one hundred percent twenty five years thirty years three years four years six foot two inch
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

08:24 min | 11 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Welcome and for so many of you welcome back to the oath. I'm your host Chuck Rosenberg. We begin season two of the oath with an important reflection and in a compelling story eighteen years ago this week al Qaeda terrorists hijacked four planes crashed them into the north and south towers of the World Trade Center Manhattan into the Pentagon and into a field in Shanksville Pennsylvania and killed almost three thousand innocent people men women and children on those planes in those buildings and on the ground it was a horrific and devastating attack. It was a tragedy we lost so many good and decent and caring people including leading hundreds of first responders many first responders to this day continue to suffer from and die from illnesses incurred during their heroic rescue and recovery efforts nine eleven was an inflection point in American history and change the way we think about terrorism and our own vulnerabilities as a nation our guest this week on the oath is Rob Spencer Rob led the team that prosecuted the only al Qaeda terrorists ever face justice in a US courtroom for his role in that nine nine eleven conspiracy the story of that investigation and the prosecution of that terrorist Zachariah Sally is both important and Fascinating Rob Spencer the former criminal chief in the US Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Virginia who long handled national security cases in that district knows this story as well as anyone he lived it Robs Spencer welcome to the oath. Thanks Chuck. Thanks for having me happy to be here. Where are you from was born and and raised in Hanover New Hampshire. My father was a professor at Dartmouth College. He was a chemistry professor. My mother worked at the hospital there as a cardiac technician. There were four kids three siblings. You're the second oldest correct I have two younger and one older sibling Karen. I know your older sister because we were classmates in college but your two younger siblings took a very different career path than you did. I ended up as a lawyer. Both my younger siblings. My brother's still isn't musician. Shen and my younger sister was a musician but my brother John has gained some following a sort of post punk kind of hard rock musician the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion was a fairly well known banned yeah. When did you figure out rob that you wanted to go to law school. And when did you figure out you wanted to be a prosecutor. Her will always kind of thought I'd go to law school like history and politics. I liked arguing with people I always kind of figured I would end up going to law school actually worked as a paralegal between college and Law Oskoui that didn't dissuade me from going to law school and I also always had in the back of my mind that I'd like to work as a prosecutor and work for the government why particularly being federal prosecutors gators Roy the best job you can have while still being lawyer. You're on the for me on the right side of things. It's full of human drama. There's a lot of interest in doing it. It moves more quickly than civil litigation so there's a beginning and an end to a lawsuit. You actually get to be a real lawyer. It's like the lawyers you see on TV. You're standing up trying to convince Vince a jury of of your case. It's fun you get to hang out with the F. B. I. Agents and people like that for most of the time you're trying to protect society to playing hockey and Lacrosse at Amherst Morris College you eventually went to the University of Chicago Law School. That's correct. Yep and what happened after that I went and came to Washington. DC and took good job a private law firm and worked there for three years to pay off few loans. I had from law school and try to get a background in litigation but always had in the back of my mind that I would go and work for the the Justice Department. How'd you eventually get in in nineteen. ninety-one the fiery the law was passed financial institution something something something act it was a an act passed in the wake of the savings and loan scandal in among another things that provided for the hiring of a number of federal prosecutors to pursue bank fraud claims and that's what I was hired outside in the criminal fraud section of main justice and at this was after spending a couple years trying to get into a US attorney's office somewhere but I was hired at the Criminal Fraud Section Main Justice and started working on bank fraud fraud cases and they had at that point to task forces out of DC one in Texas and one in New England was assigned to the New England Bank Fraud Task Force. Did you like like that work. I liked it at bottom when you get to look at the documents and talk to witnesses and realized there were people who were lying and cheating to steal money from mortgage holders in the federal the government but it was slow moving there was not a lot of work for a lot of new prosecutors and so in nineteen ninety two. I got myself assigned as a special assistant the US attorney to the Eastern District of Virginia Alexandria which is where we first met which is where we first met and it was just an eye opener is fast moving. It was fun you got to stand up in court at least three or four times a week if not every single day and then I spent the next several years trying to get back there permanently and finally got hired magazine Assistant. US Attorney in the summer of Nineteen ninety-five remember your first trial efforts trial is a special was a guy name Moma's Aku he was a west African immigrant granted. He was involved in a scheme to sell false Liberian birth documents because at that point if you're of Liberian origin you're eligible for what was called temporary protected acted status and so along with a gentleman who ended up pleading guilty who worked in the Liberian embassy. It was a scheme where every immigrant of west African African origin who wanted to get into the United States suddenly showed up as Liberian and was granted temporary protected status so massacre was part of that scheme and he went to trial Elon Musk convicted what happened to him. I did some time in jail and then I assume he got deported but I had no idea I know in your career because we worked together for so long that you had some of the most interesting important cases in the Eastern District of Virginia on particularly when you started a little bit later in your career working on national security matters including espionage wanted ask about a couple of those if you don't mind as you know well the Eastern District of Virginia includes the CIA the Pentagon John and a number of other national security installations and so we naturally got a bunch of espionage cases including the the largest naval base in the world in Norfolk which is also part of the Eastern District of Virginia right. You had a couple of espionage cases that I think are fascinating but not well known. I was wondering if you might tell us a a little bit about the squillacote matter so Terry Squillacote and her husband Kurt stand and a friend of theirs named James Clark were ideologically motivated evaded spies who were originally recruited while they were in college in Wisconsin by the East German security service Stasi when there was an east Germany and then after after the the wall fell and there wasn't an East Germany the US obtained the Stasi's file agents in the United States and on that list was Terry Squillacote coat and so the FBI started watching Terry Squillacote and there was no east Germany but then at one point she took out a post office box in a false name in wrote to the communist leader of South Africa pledging that she that she wanted to get back in the in the espionage game and the FBI set up a false false flag and met her at the time she was working in the Pentagon and had recently obtained a secret clearance and showed up to a meeting with someone she thought was a South African intelligence agent and actually was an undercover FBI agent by false flag. You mean a lawful undercover sting operation correct and what about her husband and Mr Clark so Jim Clark had worked for the State Department for many years our state our State Department and he actually would send information nation to his German handler and he ended up pleading guilty and testify against the other two trial. He never had much of access to national social security information. He didn't have a security clearance at least at a at a at a high level but he's still trained and sent information to his East German handler. Kurt stand that was Terry squillacote husband. His role was a recruiter and he was the one.

Virginia United States Chuck Rosenberg Terry Squillacote US attorney Pentagon Rob Spencer Rob Rob Spencer professor east Germany fraud FBI prosecutor US Attorney State Department Liberian embassy
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

02:48 min | 11 months ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"When someone takes the oath they publicly affirm their allegiance to the constitution of the United States said another way we do not pledge loyalty to a person interparty not in this country and think about that for a moment our is a promise to protect and defend our constitution. It is a promise to faithfully serve the United States dates and our fellow citizens. Our is ambitious and it is principled. I'm Chuck Rosenberg and I have had the privilege of taking that oath many times throughout my career in federal law enforcement and now on my podcast the oath I speak with others who took an abided by that same promise my guests decades in public service people like deputy Attorney General Sally Yates. FBI Director Jim Komi United States Attorney Preet Berar and White House Homeland Security Adviser Lisa Monaco among others. If you have not heard those interviews abused from last season. Please go back and listen. I think you'll enjoy them coming up on this and speak with other talented and dedicated public servants such as Rob Spencer the Federal Federal Prosecutor who led the nine eleven case we needed to treat this as a regular murder case except with nearly three thousand victims retired Four-star Admiral William mcraven a navy seal zeal for thirty seven years and the commander of the US Joint Special Operations Command send. Me Send Me To Iraq semi to Afghanistan semi to Somalia to North Africa. Send me where the nation needs me just sending Cathy Remler Enron prosecutor and White House counsel to President Barack Obama when you are the White House counsel. Oh you are representing the office holder the person who embodies the presidency the office itself. You're you're not representing an individual person. MSNBC's own Joyce Vance the United States attorney for the northern district of Alabama good prosecutors understand that we have to always be open to examining our behavior to make sure that the system works the way it's intended to retired four star. Admiral gyms to read us. The Supreme Allied Commander of NATO people would say you know you away. Oh you miss so many Christmases and that's the price you pay for the right to serve and I think that's what the people who take the oath are all about Indian. So why did I start this podcast well. I wanted thoughtful insightful conversations with fascinating people from the world of public service. I I want conversations at generated less heat and more light. I think these conversations are more important now than ever before and I wanted to share these conversations with you. You please join me for season two of the oath. Our first episode is available on Tuesday September tenth. We will publish new episodes every Wednesday after that

United States attorney United States White House commander Chuck Rosenberg Admiral William mcraven White House Homeland Security Supreme Allied Commander Preet Berar deputy Attorney General Barack Obama FBI MSNBC Sally Yates Jim Komi Cathy Remler Rob Spencer
"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

11:26 min | 1 year ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Welcome to the oath. I'm Chuck Rosenberg. And I am honored to be your host for a series of fascinating conversations with interesting people from the world of public service today. Jim Komi the former director of the FBI is back. If you haven't heard my first interview with Jim, please go back and listen to learn more about his formative experiences as a young prosecutor in the storage, southern district of New York office in Manhattan, where he prosecuted, the mafia today we pick up with Jim in nineteen Ninety-three. He has just returned to public service this time in the US attorney's office in Richmond, Virginia, where he confronted one of the highest per capita murder rates in the nation. I was on my way to breakfast with the deputy chief of the police department one morning and he got a call over the radio and asked me where I would mind stopping at a crime scene with him. So I said, sure, and we stop an intersection Richmond, and there's a new pickup truck sitting at a stop sign, and as a woman in the driver's seat looks like she's napping leaning back against the headrest as we closer. We see that she has a small hole in her left temple and a much bigger hole. On the other side of her head where the bullet exited, she had stopped on her way to work to buy drugs gotten into some sort of argument with the dealer who shot her in broad daylight at his spot. Makes no sense for all kinds of reasons. But these were the kind of killings were seeing all over Richmond, and it was murder at as an afterthought. And so I was part of an effort with federal state, and local law enforcement to see if we couldn't change the behavior of criminals in Richmond to drive down the murder rate, and it focused on trying to make them think more about their possession of firearms because they're no carefully plan murders in Richmond. It was all what you say, would you do, and in a shootout, we were trying to use federal sentencing to scare them into being away from their guns. Keeping a distance from their guns. And we thought that might drive down homicide, call this project exile. Yep. Where do you get the name from the notion that this was about taking criminals who terrorize in the community and removing them from the community exiling them from the community and a big part of the? Campaign was to scare them. And one of the elements of that scaring was the prospect of going far away from where you would normally go, which is the Richmond city jail. We're gonna send you to South Dakota. We're gonna send you to big bend, Texas. So as the notion, even though you're working with a state and local partners of federalizing gun violence. Great using federal punishment for gun possession crimes to impose stiff penalties which they weren't getting in the state system, and to remove them from the community physically in a way that was a source of deterrence. It scared people, do you think it worked? I think it surely contributed to significant drop in Richmond's homicide from the kind of cases that the Richmond PD was reporting where they were seeing a drop in homicides. It was all of those happenstance homicides, but the drug related crime, dropped significantly not all of our federal judges were enamored with project exile. No, some of them, embraced it and understood. Good though. These weren't the typical cases that would be brought in federal court, these were still federal crimes, and the goal was one that there wasn't any more important than saving human lives, that was at one end of the spectrum. The other end of the spectrum was open hostility to it in a sense that this was a failure of the local courts and prosecutors to handle this. Well, and so it ought not to be the problem of federal judges in federal prosecutors, but they have sort of less to do with how you charge. And so, in the end federal prosecutors if they perceive, a particular problem in a particular jurisdiction have enormous power to address it. Yes. And the decisions in the federal system about what to investigate what charges to bring are all in the hands of the prosecutor and although I was probably a little bit arrogant in agglomerated, the importance of the personal relationship, especially in a small jurisdiction with. With the judges, because they can bring you pain, if they think you're not treating them with your procreate, respect is I if I had to do over again, I'd be a little more attentive to that. Because my attitude was look, we're trying to save lives here. Screw them and not every federal judge reacts well to that. Kind of approach. Right. A second problem that you confronted in Richmond was a public corruption. And you tell very interesting story about the former mayor of Richmond gentleman named young ki- talk a little bit about that, and why that troubled you so Leonidas young was the mayor of Richmond. And the senior pastor at one of Richmond's, most important and largest historically, black congregations, and he was also simultaneously carrying on multiple sexual affairs with people not his wife and the costs of that dinners and hotel rooms and gifts was overwhelming him. And so he decided to use his role as mayor to try and get some money. Illicitly and one method involve the privatization of city cemeteries. And so they entertain bids from companies and the companies were told on the side, if you want to get this contract, you need to hire consultants the following people. And these were people who are simply fronts for mayor young, the company would write a check to the consultant who would cash it and turn the money over to mayor young. One of those consultants was a junior minister who worked at Young's church and young him to be a consultant on the cemetery deal. And we brought him in to talk to him about that. And we had the, the goods on, and we could see where he cashed the money. Then we could see deposits at Young's Bank close proximity. We could almost draw dots on a map to connect it. And the guy knew nothing about cemeteries, and he started to lie to us, and I begged him not to lie. What did you beg him not to lie? Because he seemed like such a good person. Look, sometimes good people. Do bad. Things, especially when they're under the controller in the sway of powerful figure. They look up to and here was the senior pastor the mayor told him to do this, and so he did. It felt like he had to protect this mayor. This minister this boss. He was getting very little of the cut he was getting nothing. He was doing it because this was something that leonide as young wanted him to do. And, and I just thought the guy's going to ruin his life for this, this corrupt mayor. We're gonna make against case against the crap mayor anyway. And I told him and you know what's going to happen? He's going to sit in the same cheer year in and tell me the you lied today. And then you know what I'm going to have to do. I'm going to have to prosecute you because lying in a federal criminal investigation must be taken seriously. So I said, please, please, please just tell me the truth. We're not going to prosecute you just tell me the truth, and he wouldn't. And unfortunately that future I've. Predicted came true. We indicted, Leonida Xiang for racketeering, all kinds of corruption offenses. He played guilty. And he cooperated against the junior minister flipped on the junior minister as we predicted and said, of course he lied. Of course he didn't. He wasn't a consultant, of course, he gave me the money. Yes, all these deposits, you see your for the money, he gave me and then we prosecuted that union minister, and he went to jail for fifteen months. And I don't use his name use it his name now because I hope he's made a good life for himself. But to me, illustrated, a lot of things, but the most important thing is our criminal Justice system. Our investigations are based on an honor system that witnesses will tell us the truth, the witnesses when they're giving subpoenas. We'll give documents even those documents may hurt them. And because it's an honor system when this violation that we can prove beyond a reasonable doubt, as prosecutors. We have to bring those cases too. To send a message of deterrence and reinforcement to that honor system, or the system doesn't work, right. But the odd thing here is that you're cooperating witness was senior to the person who was cooperating against usually we work in the other direction. Ideally. Yep. Did that trouble you? Yeah. Which is why I was trying so hard to get this guy just to tell me the truth, because I knew there would come a day when to try reduce his sentence mayor young. We try and offer us all kinds of information. But I knew one of the things he would tell us is this guy committed a crime in your office, and we couldn't let that go. You later moved back to New York City you in fact, became the US attorney for the southern district of New York, storied office, a legendary federal prosecutors office, and you had the biggest job in it. I know it's a great honor because I had the privilege of doing something like that. And the point in my career. How did it feel to go back to New York as the boss? I felt like an impostor which I think is a healthy reaction that I kept thinking, what am I doing here and I would actually refer to the US journeys private bathroom as Rudy's bathroom and I would tell people you want us Rudy's bathroom, and it's just hard to realize you're not only grownup, you're now, the boss of this place where you came up. And so it's a it's a bit disorienting and leaves you with a sense that they're all gonna figure out that I'm not what they think I am. You've spoken eloquently about the impostor syndrome, in many different contexts. In fact, you speak about it later in your book, and I'll ask you. But when you do you say it's something that leaders should have at least good leaders in your experience. Do they? All good leaders, I think all people except for very small slice of unbelievable jerks. Feel a sense of the imposter complex that is the notion that if you really knew me the way I know me you would think, less of me that's healthy. It can be disabling because there's some people who, who are who are Phil themselves such impostors that it hurts them. But that sense that I am not all that. I'm not as cool as everybody thinks. I am. That's humility, and that's really, really important in a leader. And how do you overcome it? Then when you are, perhaps Charing meeting, and people are sitting around the table waiting for something brilliant to come out of your mouth. How do you how do you surmount that imposter syndrome by not trying to be something other than what you are? That is by showing them yourself by giving them transparency into your strengths and weaknesses. Sure. They, they may think less of you in some senses than they did. They may realize you don't speak seventeen. Languages or something. But they'll come to realize you're comfortable enough in your own skin to talk about yourself in an honest way. And that creates an environment of extrordinary.

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"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"chuck rosenberg" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Hi, I'm Chuck Rosenberg. I spent most of my professional life in public service. I was a federal prosecutor I worked at the FBI, and I ran the DA since leaving the Justice department I've been distressed by the level of discourse in this country. These days there seems to be more heat than light. And so my new podcast the oath with Chuck Rosenberg is based on a simple premise. We're going to have thoughtful conversations about difficult topics with interesting people, I'm sure you've heard of some of them like pre Pereira, the former United States attorney from the southern district of New York you'd like to think not only is known above the law. But also like to think that every victim no matter what their social standing there ocupation to they can be vindicated in court too. And Lisa Monaco, homeland security advisor to President Barack Obama you were part of a mission to work with the president's national security team to help keep the country safe. That's the job Jim Komi. The former director of the FBI specifically in institutions like the FBI runs down into bedrock. Those values are at the heart of that place. And no president serves long enough to screw that up and ending McCabe. The former deputy director of the FBI your job is to think of others I to think of the safety and the wellbeing and the security of your community of your country of the people around you before yourself. Each of them took an oath as I did to support and defend the constitution of the United States. You've seen them on TV. You may have read their books. Now hear them in long-form right here on the oath. We start on may first you can find my show on apple podcasts and everywhere else said you get your podcast. Thank you. So very much for listening.

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Dozens shot across Chicago in spate of overnight violence

Morning Edition

09:27 min | 2 years ago

Dozens shot across Chicago in spate of overnight violence

"Which Norman Lear produced and wrote Charlotte Rae in a documentary about the facts of life a spinoff of different. Strokes railroaded giant befall. And a rice sense of humor to both shows which helped revive the flagging fortunes of NBC at the time Charlotte raise last screen appearance. Was in the movie Ricky and the flash When she, was nearly ninety shortly before she was. Diagnosed with bone cancer net Libby NPR. News police in Chicago say at least forty people were shot there over the weekend at least four people died the Chicago Tribune, reports the largest single shooting came early Sunday, morning when gunmen fired on a group of people standing in a neighborhood Chicago police chief Fred Waller link most. Of the shootings to. Gang violence I'm korva Coleman NPR news in Washington Support. For NPR comes from tirerack offering a tire decision guide to help customers find tires that fit their car and, driving conditions with, a network of more than seven thousand independent installers tirerack. Dot com helping. Drivers find deliver install You're hearing morning edition. On k. q. e. d. public radio little later this morning on science will hear about the first pharmaceutical drug derived from marijuana which may soon be coming to drugstores near you it's a medication to reduce, seizures in. Epilepsy patients, a Berkeley teenager was the first patient to try the drug, after his. Mom went to extraordinary efforts and risked. Arrest to get it, for, him here, more on science during morning edition this morning at six twenty two. And again eight twenty two here on kqed public radio. After morning edition it's forum this is. Michael Krasny today on forum in our second hour Airbnb strategic advisor chip Conley joins us to discuss his new book wisdom at warp it's all about how to stay relevant in the workplace as you age join us for forum, it's nine to. Eleven here on public radio Hot and dry weather is forecast in the, Sacramento valley with smoke from wildfires affecting air quality. Today's forecast high in Sacramento is, ninety six degrees with very light to westerly. Breezes this afternoon in the bay area sunny warm day is forecast well hot and dry in the inland valleys of the bay area morning clouds along, the coast should burn off by noon today's highs. Will range from the mid and upper sixties at. The coast to the seventies and eighties around the bay eight upper eighties and low nineties bay area inland seven and a half minutes now past four o'clock morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene in, Culver City. California and, Noel king in Washington DC good morning what exactly was the, nature of. A meeting between Donald Trump junior and. A Russian operative at, Trump, Tower in, two thousand sixteen the White House I said that meeting was about. Adoption policy but the president has described it in other. Ways and then yesterday he tweeted quote. This was a meeting to get information on An opponent he said in that same tweet that it was legal but he also. Said, that he knew nothing about it the president's, also been tweeting about his former, campaign, chairman Paul Manafort Manafort is back. In federal. Court this week he's on trial for Bank and tax fraud, his trial comes out of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference Chuck Rosenberg. Is on the line with me now he's, a former federal federal prosecutor he worked in the. Eastern district of Virginia where manafort's, trial is taking place Mr. Rosenberg good morning Good morning well all right so. This isn't the first time that the, president has acknowledged that this meeting. Was affected Lee an attempt to get dirt. On Hillary Clinton President Trump of course. Was not at that meeting why do you think that President Trump is bringing. This back, up now See'ums mightily concerned about it and perhaps with good reason if, you look at the indictment that the Muller team lodged against the Russian military officials. From the GRU we know that in, March and April of two thousand sixteen so prior to the meeting and Trump Tower the g. are you already started to hack into the emails of, the Clinton campaign the Democratic National Committee and the, democratic congressional campaign, committee fast forward to that meeting I. Think, the operative question Noel is what did the US persons Trump, junior Manafort and others attending that. Meeting know, about what the Russians had already done and did? They joined. That, conspiracy even. After it began with the president has said said on Twitter that this meeting was quote totally, legal also though made an attempt or made. An effort, to to, say I didn't know anything. About it I mean could this particular meeting cause legal trouble for president Trump Quite. Possibly it certainly seems like it could cause legal trouble for the Americans who attended the meeting at the very least meeting with a. Hostile foreign power with the Russians should trigger counter intelligence concerns among any sort of savvy political. Person first thing you do is pick up the phone and call the. FBI they don't seem to have done that could cause legal trouble for the president quite possibly as. Well particularly if having heard about the meeting getting the readout from his son about what happened at the, meeting he tries to cover up the intent of the. Meaning he tells false stories about what the meeting was, four and as we know dictates a statement on Air. Force One, concealing the purpose of the. Meeting that's an obstruction of, Justice quite, possibly and it could land the president and others around him and quite a bit of. Trouble let's talk about one person who formerly was around the president who is potentially in quite a bit of trouble palm Manafort since we last talked to you the trial started the government is laid out some pretty powerful evidence for. The jury do you think prosecutors are in a strong position heading into week two or how. Would you characterize your position no I think that's exactly right I think. It's a strong physician and here's why these cases paper intensive document cases tax fraud and Bank fraud. Tender run according to script there's somewhat formulaic the government introduces income they introduce expenditures they put on accountants, to show that the accountants didn't know that Mr. Manafort. For instance had foreign Bank accounts or that he was, concealing income and then unwittingly these accountants help them prepare. Tax returns, that he files with the. IRS which understated income and, omit the, fact that he has control over these foreign Bank accounts all of that is formulaic and. All of that is precisely what's happening in a courtroom in the eastern district of Virginia manafort's case are testifying to These things yeah That's exactly right and so what I expect you'll see in the coming week is a little bit more. Of the same there'll be some summary witnesses from the FBI who will total up the amount of money in the Bank accounts and ultimately will tie those accounts to Mr. Manafort directly will show that he committed income from his. Income tax returns then I expect we'll hear. From, Mr., gates well. Yeah that is that is that is the big, question? This week right manafort's Paul, manafort's longtime deputy Rick gates expected to. Take the stand how does he fit into the? Prosecution, strategy here well criminals tend to. Run with criminals so Mr. gates. Isn't admitted criminal Mr. Manafort is. An accused criminal it shouldn't surprise the jury very much that these two guys plotted together conspired did much of the same thing tax fraud and Bank fraud to fat in. Their own waltz I think the government will put Mr. gates, on the stand they'll they'll have him. Admit To all his wrongdoing that's fairly typical to and then they'll take him step by step through. The indictment having him explain each of the. Things, that, he and. Mr. Manafort did together to cheat the IRS and, to? Fraud banks and just briefly, how do you see Mr. manafort's defense. Lawyers countering the government's case what's your strategy here? Well, they're gonna try and do two. Things one they'll try and say. That Mr. Manafort lack the intent. To defraud the IRS or the bank's perhaps if his income tax returns understated income they'll say it was an accident because he was a very busy man and second I. Think they'll try to pin as much of this on Mr., gates as they possibly can The real one at fault took Rosenberg, was a federal prosecutor in the eastern district of Virginia thanks so much Israel passed a law last month that continues to cause controversy the, nation state law defines Israel? As the, nation state of the Jewish, people critics say this? Law, discriminates against religious minorities like Muslims and. Christians. Who make up about a fifth of the Israeli population as NPR's Daniel estrin reports from Tel Aviv this law is sparking protests, from religious, group that's one of Israel's staunchest supporters the Druze religious minority in Israel. Held an, unprecedented protests this weekend thousands gathered in Tel Aviv's main square chanting the Hebrew word for quality She The you are religious group and shoot of, Islam their ethnic. Arabs but unlike most other Arab, citizens they've committed to serving in the Israeli, army they.

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