19 Burst results for "Chronic Disorder"

"chronic disorder" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

05:57 min | 2 months ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Available more bioavailable and more biofunctional at those different environments. And so the more biodiversity you can get in that communication network, the more effective you're going to get lacing all of this together. And the striking thing is just how little soil is left on the planet. We are now calculating that 97% of the world's soils are severely depleted. And it's just jaw dropping, how much damage we've done in such a sort of time short period of time with chemical agriculture as we scale that globally. And so it's really, you know, at 50 year story of chemicals, but interestingly, it was over plowing that destroyed the soil infrastructure before the chemicals. Yeah. Tilling. The tilling is really damaging to the you mentioned mycorrhizae, which are totally bizarre structure, but mycelium is the root system of the fungal world. And then in this bizarre quantum relationship group 5 rolls, they inspire this totally new structure called the mycorrhizae to appear and nobody understands what mycorrhizae and no one knows how mycorrhizae knows how to be mycorrhiza because it doesn't exist as an anti if you have lots of mycelium around. It doesn't exist if you have lots of plants around with root bibles. You have to have the combination of the fungal world complex multicellular plant world before you can get mycorrhiza to form. And so some bizarre exudate or hyper intelligence between these species systems that will create this new structure that interestingly is a bio photonic structure. And so what's really happening when we talk about plants or soil or humans or corn is we're talking about a photonic phenomenon where you have solar radiation coming in with all of its energy potential hitting the surface of the earth and its plant life or microbial life within the soils. And then there's an intelligent process in which that file photonic energy is transmuted to ATP or in the plant, it's different little things like chlorophyll and adult phosphorescent plasmids that create energy within the plant. Bio mutating bio transmuting the biofilm energy of the sun into soil energy. And the soil energy is picked up by this interesting mix of microbiome between bacteria and fungi that's been passed into this electrophonic transfer mechanism of the mycorrhizae that will then go into the root system of the plant and take that back and plant it will then go into an animal consumer human or otherwise. And so that's this beautiful complex system and then you take roundup and it functions as an antimicrobial at every level. And so it's been patented as an antibiotic and patented as an antifungal anti parasite. And so it starts to come into this chemical, this beautiful array of bio photonic transformations through all of these species interaction and starts breaking the cycles. And so what we've achieved through a very short period of time is a soil that's devoid of the nutrient and energy density, the little photonic energy that it would get from the sun because it's lost its workforce. And that workforce can no longer translate that information into something like a plant. And so we grow through petroleum inputs, green plants that are devoid of nitrogen. Nitrogen is MPK so it's nitrogen phosphorus and potassium. And so the MPK fertilizer will be used to create green plants that grow fast and have high yield, but they're lacking that intelligence of that whole system that we just described. And so not only are our soils depleted, they've lost the mechanisms by passing energy on through from sun to plant to human and so this is why I believe we look like we do as a society right now where recent Medicaid screenings are showing 52% of our children with a chronic disorder or disease by the time they're 16. That's compared to 1.2% in the 1960s right before we date and viewed these chemicals. Wait, wait, wait, you just had one and two kids or have a chronic disease? Chronic disorder or disease. So someone we don't call diseases, but we call it asthma or immune sensitivity to their food or the air they breathe or whatnot. So some of our children by this experience one and two kids and at first when you say that statistics and you're like that can't be right. Until you walk into an elementary school and take a look around the room and you can immediately see kids not only with eczema, you can see kids with full blown psoriasis and elementary school now. And so the amount of gut disruption that you need to develop an autoimmune condition near psoriasis is devastating. So and then you see this explosion of leukemia lymphomas and weird sarcomas in children that we appear in 80 year olds are showing up in children under the age of two now. And so we're showing this just decimation of biologic youth or regenerative capacity within human biology in this most recent generation. The scary thing is right now we're looking at generation number two of roundup babies. In our road and studies that we just reviewed for the EPA, the third generation is where the devastation really gets out of control. I saw never seen that generation. The epigenetic effects, which generation three, so the grandmother gets exposed, the mother may or may not get sick, but the grand little grand rat gets sick. And like a kidney disease and cancer and all sorts of hormonal disruptions and endocrine things, which is kind of scary. And they've never been exposed. So it's these transgenerational effects that actually have have consequences and things that we can't even imagine on our children. And I think that these dots are not getting connected. Why do you think there's so much resistance to actually looking at the science around this? Because there seems to be ample science. I mean, the EPA has said it's safe, Trump said to the makers of roundup, don't worry. We got your back during these lawsuits..

Chronic disorder or disease chronic disorder autoimmune condition near psor asthma eczema leukemia EPA kidney disease cancer Trump
"chronic disorder" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:20 min | 8 months ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Stop to opt out Check up on health with Chris winning Substance addiction is a major problem across the U.S. There are about 22 million people in the United States with a serious drug or alcohol problem And only one out of ten goes for help That's a sad fact And Fletcher is the author of inside rehab and she says addictions are often misunderstood We need to view serious drinking and alcohol problems Serious addiction as a chronic disorder that goes in and out of remission just like diabetes that people don't just have 30 days of treatment that they have ongoing care somebody that they can touch base with for years or maybe even for the rest of their lives She says most people kick addictions on their own Or through a self help group like alcoholics anonymous For checkup on health I'm Chris woody This is a W CPT veteran minute When Pearl Harbor was attacked men of all races across the country volunteered to join the fight despite the United States Army being heavily segregated Black and listes were mostly assigned to combat support rules But this didn't stop lieutenant colonel Paul L Bates who knew of the racism and pushed his soldiers to achieve excellence The 761st tank battalion was formed in the spring of 1942 It contained 30 black officers 6 white officers and 676 endless dead men The unit down the nickname the black Panthers wearing patches on the uniforms of the panther on it and the slogan come out fighting And in 1944 the 761st was assigned to general George Patton's third army in France General Patton gave a colorful speech to his crew and a black Panthers became the first African American squad in World War II And by the end of the war the black Panthers had fought further east than every other United States unit receiving 391 decorations for their heroism Chicago's progressive cock 8 20 where facts matter rating state of our planet where the dynamics and environmental economic and population change are boiling over the limits within which society can function I'll be busting the myths and ideologies of religious fundamentalism.

Chris woody U.S. lieutenant colonel Paul L Bate Fletcher George Patton Panthers Chris Pearl Harbor United States Army diabetes France Chicago
"chronic disorder" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

04:08 min | 9 months ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"Even in the british medical journal de personalization disorder is referred to as the as if this order. Because we're so reliant on using metaphors to try and explain what symptoms are but essentially it falls on the spectrum of associated disorders and it can affect different people differently but the core symptom of de personalization is essentially a disconnection. It's the manga metaphors. We typically use as it feels as if withdrawn all time or as if we're living life behind the pane of glass is essentially a constant dreamlike state. That makes you feel as if you'll removed from both yourself that's de personalization and also the world around you which is derail ization and generally the to come together but for some people d- personalization can be transient and it can come and go but for others. It can be much more long term and it can affect you for months years decades or even more. but that's essentially what d- personalization disorder raises a chronic disorder. That will go on for usually a good amount of time and can be quite difficult to treat. Unfortunately but it's that dream like state the ties pretty much. The defining characteristic there are other things that exist. On the periphery and people can go one way or the other with certain symptoms but overall it's that detachment form yourself and the world around you. That defines de personalization. I notice the said constant. Is it a persistent thing or there. Any moment that people can get relief. A as i said it affects everybody very differently some people it can be a transient thing and it can come and go. Depending on another sort of underlying problem appears as reactions fat so for example it could come about as a result of a panic attack. So if you have a panic attack deep personalization like come along with that and when the panic.

british medical journal chronic disorder panic attack
"chronic disorder" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

07:16 min | 9 months ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"You can be angry divisive and run or fight right exactly so so. That's not good. I wish it wasn't that way. But you look at these long term studies in humans who have undergone chronic stress. And you see that. The prefrontal cortex is smaller. You can actually physically see that. It is smaller than people who have had these life experiences. This chronic stress overtime getting outside for twenty minutes. A week has been associated with lower levels of stress. Doesn't take that much. We said you can just put a plant in your home. You can even put a picture of nature in your home and be getting these benefits. Dr hammond also spoke to doctors. Zack bush about nature's ability to create health in their discussion about the challenging problem of life assay in our soil and in our food. I'm just literally blown away in an odd. Because this is this is a such a untold story. That within the soil itself is the answer to the damage that we've done to the soil and ourself through the chemicals we've used in our agricultural system so glyphosate around up like you said it's four billion of six billion pounds. it's the most abundant agriculture chemical. It's been used in the world. It is used on seventy percent of crops. It's abundant in things that we wouldn't even think of the top. Two sources of glyphosate are dider hamas mexico bonds oh beans and lentils which you think of a healthy. That's a plant based diet but unless they're grown organically it's not just the gmo. Soy beans and it has vast effects on the soil. Which i want you again. To including key leading all the minerals the plants get the minerals. It destroys the microbes fungi. Which of the. This network of fungi. When the soil that are necessary for the plans to extract the nutrients this so complex. What you're saying is is that when you look at these ancient soil you're able to extract compounds and then you can use to fix the damage done to humans from the glyphosate which is just my long when you think about it and i think when you're talking about leaky gotten in the gut permeability and tight junctions. I mean this is really the foundation of functional medicine which looking at the gut and how the gutters led to so many chronic illnesses. So when you look at the microbiome. It's linked to reading from depression to cancer to heart disease diabetes obesity to alzheimer's to autism to. Add to you know you name it. Autoimmune diseases allergic disorders and a lot of it has to do with leaky gut. And it's not the only reason but life is clearly is a factor in driving this and so many broad Haitians for how we treat our ourselves. How do we then begin. Shift the agricultural system to one that actually gets rid of these chemicals that actually helps to restore soil. It helps to solve some of these problems at the root and actually deals with human health problems by fixing the soil you. Yeah i think you know to begin with the mind-blowing card. You know the the reason we're going to sixty million-year-old soil for our sources because again the the more by diverse you haven't bacteria and fungi in soil system. The more diverse you have these carbon molecules and the importance of that is that in differ ph is indifferent oz moralities different changing environments throughout your own gut or throughout organ systems as they change. There's different carbon molecules. That are going to be more available more bioavailable by functional at those different environments and so the more diversity you get in that communication network the more effective. You're gonna get lacing all of this together and the striking thing is just how little soil is left on the planet. We are now calculating that ninety. Seven percent of the world's soils are severely depleted And you know that it's just jaw dropping. How much damage we've done in such short of time period of time with chemical agriculture as we scale that globally and so it's really a fifty years story of chemicals but interestingly it was over plowing destroyed the soil infrastructure before the chemical tilling then you take roundup and it functions as an antimicrobial at every level. And so it's been patented as antibiotics then patented as an adzic fungal ends up parasite and so it starts to come into this chemical this beautiful array of bio tonic. Transformations are all of these species interaction and starts breaking the cycles. And so this is why. I believe we look like we do as a society right now. Where you know. Recent medicaid screenings are showing fifty two percent of our children with the product sorta or disease. By the time they're sixteen that's compared to one point two percent imagine sixties right before we debuted these chemicals. Anyway when you just had one and two kids or having chronic disease chronic disorder or disease so someone we don't call diseases but we got asthma or soma or immune sensitivity to their who or the air they breathe or whatnot so staggering some of our children by two kids now. And and i when you say that statistic that yet you're right until you walk into an elementary school and take a look around the room and you can immediately see kids not only with excellent. You can see his with full-blown psoriasis. An elementary school now and so the amount of gut out disruption that you need to develop an autoimmune condition nearest rises devastating sue. And then you see this explosion of leukemia. Lymphomas and weird sarcomas in children that be severe and eight-year-olds or showing up in children under the age of two now. And so we're we're showing this decimation of biologic us or Regenerative hoc- within numerology in this most recent general rations. The scary thing is right now. We're looking at generation number two round babies in our rodent studies that we just reviewed for the epa the third generations where the devastation really gets out of control. I thought that seen that johnny zafy genetic effects generation three of the grandmother gets exposed. The mother may or may not get sick but the grand grant get sick get kidney disease and cancer and all sorts of hormonal disruptions and different things which is kinda scary and they've never been exposed so it's these trans generational effects that actually have have consequences in things. We can't even imagine on our children. And i think that you know these dots are not getting connected. So this is a lot of stuff that people have to think about The connection between their health and the soil health and the chemicals were using and the need for new form agriculture and the sort of broad implications for our society as a whole but it seems like there is a place of hope right now happening as i see it. There's massive movement. You're part of it. I saw health academy royal institute. You've got you know. Policymaker starring to advocate for agenda agriculture. The you know. The governor of pennsylvania just could for twenty two million dollars to help transform all the local farmers into regina agriculture. Who wanted to do it. And so so there's really movement in this direction How do you see that it. Getting out there. In a in a meaningful way and being cattle is for me and my group. We've decided not to focus any attention or put any energy into conflict. With the firm status quo we would see the current status quo self destructive way. it's a totally unsustainable model for agriculture. Same waiver allopathic medicine..

Dr hammond Zack bush foundation of functional medic heart disease diabetes obesity Autoimmune diseases allergic d hamas chronic disease chronic disord alzheimer autism mexico cancer depression johnny zafy psoriasis asthma
"chronic disorder" Discussed on Your Own Pay

Your Own Pay

04:36 min | 10 months ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on Your Own Pay

"And you will see our archives programs from latest to earliest mayor. Jackie and thank you for all of you. Media folks and for. Tom is a recent past. Many of us have learned more and more about twenty four which is a sleep disorder. But i'm gonna stop there and have our guest. Explain it in a little while even further than i thought i would ask vikki ready. A nurse educator was that the pharmaceuticals to come on the show today and give us a little more information and lightness store there about non twenty four what it is and whether or not it can be treated and force more prone to getting not twenty four and other words but let me introduce vicky vicky welcome to win perspective. Thank you appreciate it. Thank you for having me. I think i will start out by us. The all question. What is gone twenty four vicky. Okay good good place to start. So non. twenty. Four is a short name for non twenty four hours sleep wake disorder and i always like to clarify that. It's the word on an an and the number twenty four. Sometimes people get mixed up and are confused because of the way the word sounds and think it's the number nine but it's it's not in the number. Twenty four and non twenty four is a serious chronic disorder that disrupts a person's circadian rhythms which are controlled by his or her master body clock. Could you explain what a circadian rhythm is sure. Course so it's excuse me minute. Circadian rhythms are activities. That happen inside our body. They occur at a cellular level and they start around the same time every day and then they repeat approximately every twenty four hours. That's actually where the were the with the word circadian.

vicky vicky vikki Jackie Tom vicky
"chronic disorder" Discussed on STEM-Talk

STEM-Talk

04:52 min | 11 months ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on STEM-Talk

"To do that anyway and if the doctors tell him to do with that way the doctors can have faith. The patients are following their advice. And it makes it easier to dose the patient with insulin year. That's kind of the logic long as they don't change at all you know how to dose tell them to change and you change their dose and then they don't change now you're dosing incorrect play but anyway so we're arguing diets work when they You have some. Chronic disorder intractable disorder. That right now is had best being treated with pharmaceutical therapies. So blood pressure's too high or blood. Sugar's out of control or your weight is out of control. We don't have pharmaceutical therapy. That really works for wait anymore. So you want to reverse that and the fundamental concept and the ketogenic diet low carb high fat approaches at carbohydrates are fattening. So for those of us who fat and easily nine thousand nine hundred fifty zero diet book terminology that i find to appropriate not to use for those of us who and easily the carbohydrates have been linked to the diet through the hormone insulin. And we can talk about that. So if you don't want to be fat now you get two more or less. Rigid abstention from carbohydrates if you rigidly abstain from carbohydrate rich food you will be in ketosis. So now you're eating akita genyk diet if you only not quite so rigidly abstain You can cut back on the carbs. You eat you can improve. The quality of the carbs. And i would improve. I am assuming improve your metabolic health considerably without being in ketosis. So what level do you go to a question. And the argument is twelve at what level. How rigidly do. You have to abstain from carbs to get the benefits if you moderated and don't have the benefits then you have to more rigorously insane. I tend to believe the again based also on speaking with one hundred interviewing one hundred and twenty plus physicians who have now embraced his way of thinking and that perhaps the best way to do..

nine thousand one hundred two twelve one hundred and twenty plus ph nine hundred fifty zero diet
"chronic disorder" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Is normally such a quiet Neighborhood and it's really sad to see this happening in this area. Bodies of the women were found Monday morning at the home on Eighth Avenue. Northwest. Police are still investigating what led to the murders. Wait times at Corona virus. Vaccination sites are much shorter following the temporary suspension of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine because of rare blood clots and women. The Tampa Greyhound site is supposed to administer 3000 doses a day. But they only used about 300 on Monday, and the risks are very, very small. About for having this this chronic disorder, But it is something serious and that's why the CDC took it very seriously, USF Dr Michael Chang says. If you're concerned about the J and J vaccine, you can always get the Madonna or Fizer vaccine. Instead, health officials say another concern is that people who have received their first dose of those vaccines Aren't showing up to get the second Lord is getting another congressional seat. The results of the 2020 cents is Aaron and Florida's among five states, gaining one seat in Congress. Texas is gaining to the seats will be filled in the 2022 election. Seven states will each lose one seat in the House, California Illinois, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Acting senses director Dr Ron German, Florida's 28 seats, the third most in the nation behind California and Texas. Republicans and Democrats in Tallahassee are counting the wins and losses as budget wheeling and dealing goes down to the wire. The approximately $100 billion state budget needs to be finalized today for full House and Senate votes on Friday to end the legislative session, House Appropriations Committee chair Jade Trumbull says We're $22 billion in school spending teachers win. Not only do we deliver on the $1000 per teacher bonus,.

$1000 Monday morning $22 billion Congress Friday Tallahassee House Appropriations Committee 28 seats Eighth Avenue Republicans Jade Trumbull Democrats CDC Seven states five states Senate Ron German Monday Michael Chang first dose
"chronic disorder" Discussed on Words on Water

Words on Water

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on Words on Water

"And, wages would rise households would see two point, eight, trillion dollars in disposable income increases, which translates to about two thousand dollars per household, and as we know wages in disposable income are of web of interrelated factors that affect health over lifetime. people with lower incomes tend to have higher risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke, chronic disorders, and other. Studies have shown that his jobs and wages in other indicators of economic prosperity improved. So does public health so I think the bottom line here is that adequate investment in water infrastructure protects public health directly by maintaining safe water quality, which is our core business. That's what we do, and also indirectly by creating economic conditions that enable our communities to thrive. It really jumps out at me when you look at the kind of like the big total cost of inaction which was in the trillions but then look at the economic benefits of investment which was in the trillions you know and you add those up and you've got. Two very different extremes You know it's a it's a stark choice. Read that lays out. I know one of the things that they have water campaign and those other partners focus on his putting out tools that can be used by the water sector and infrastructure sector to try to address some of these financial challenges. How do you all recommends that that this this particular report be used So, we want everyone to take the findings from this report and reach out to your elected officials at your local state and national levels and tell them This is what we stand to lose. This is what we stand to gain. Our water systems are the lifeblood of our communities and is not an issue that can be left off the table so far all the conversations that have been happening on the hill around stimulus in relief as a result of corona virus Structure Investment hasn't made it through. into any final economic stimulus or relief bill, and that is clearly a lost opportunity. So what what we'd like everyone to do is to take these findings and put them in front of your elected officials reach out to their staff. For members of the value water campaign, we have additional materials, including templates, message framework slides, and social media content. That we hope that they'll, they'll utilizes well. We have. Our annual signature of action coming up on October twenty first, which is imagine a day without water and we plan.

"chronic disorder" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"And I dubbed it the gas leak which everyone in their family thought was hysterical right now. That's just plain old funny. Yeah that's that's not narcolepsy at all. That's just You know at what age does that start happening is what I want to know. 'cause I'm creeping up there twenty one because I can still jam late into the night. I'm still you know I might be sleeping the next day. But that's my only time when I don't have a five year old So I use that time. I can stay up still till midnight one in the morning if I am doing something. That's really neat. You must have a lot of testosterone left. I don't think so. Well I mean well no I mean Like to have energy after a certain time of day is is I think I think you have a lot of testosterone chuck. I would be. We're GONNA take you in for a test after this. Well I feel like it kicks back in like I'm sleepy sometimes during the day but then when the night comes at my daughter's asleep I'm like all right. This is my. This is my time to shine. Now that's very fortunate man that you're not just like this my time to Netflix and chill like you're getting stuff done. I'm envious of you for that because I get a little tired but I definitely don't have narcolepsy. I'm just kind of like I'm somewhere between you. An' emily's family guess yes so Narcolepsy is It's a chronic disorder. It's a sleep disorder and I know we talked a little bit about this in some of our other sleep disorder episodes So much so that. I thought we might have actually covered this. But I'd quadruple checked and we have not but It's characterized by a few things one of the main tenants. The basically everybody that has narcolepsy has what's called excessive. Daytime sleepiness right. That's what everybody thinks about. When you think of narcolepsy somebody just falling asleep. The can't help it. There's just suddenly out that's right. Yeah they also call those Sleep attacks it's pretty cute In no matter what variation of narcolepsy you have you have excessive daytime sleepiness. Eds right that's right and This is not. This is nothing new. We're just now sort of figuring it out a little bit since the nineties which will get to but obviously this has been happening since there have been people they've probably been suffering from narcolepsy. Small percentage of people but it was first described in eighteen. Eighty by a French physician named Jean Baptiste. Edward Gila now not bad. How would you have said it? Jean-baptiste Edouard Jerry. No Gela no is that. Is it a little uptick on the in? I think it's called an excellent Dogu right right. So yeah that's how I started but either way I think we basically got it across the a French physician from eighteen eighty. That's the that's right. Yeah in the origin of the actual term is from Greek Which is numbness or stupor? Stupor is one of my favorite words and Lexus To attack or to seize right so it's as an attack of Stupor. Basically is what they what he meant when he coined that term and The reason Giambattista Ward Jedi knows came up with this is because of thirty six year old wine casks maker came to him and said Hey I think there might be something wrong with me I fall asleep suddenly.

narcolepsy excessive daytime sleepiness testosterone Daytime sleepiness Netflix Jean-baptiste Edouard Jerry chronic disorder Jean Baptiste Edward Gila emily
Dr. E of Highway to Health Show: Living Ageless

Moving2Live

08:04 min | 2 years ago

Dr. E of Highway to Health Show: Living Ageless

"I'm a physician I specialized. I've really went to school for for jetty and the anti-ageing and that led me into medicine and stem cell treatments. So I've been doing that for for quite a number of years now but really if I had to define myself I am. I'm more of an educator. I believe that health is an active pursuit. The dead. It's it's our responsibility and there's no better way to do it than if you're well equipped with the right knowledge and education. So that's what I focused most of my time at right now and I know one of the things I've often commented people across the years is a lot of people. Spend more time looking for a good mechanic for their car than for good medical advice. They assume well. This physician is on my medical plan or a friend of mine said that this was a good physician and they don't really for lack of a better term. Do THEIR DUE DILIGENCE. Find out you know as this physician is somebody that I can communicate with. Is this somebody who you know understands. What my goals are and I know. You mentioned that really. Nobody wants to be sick. Nobody wants to be ill and I know in the movement field. There's a tendency for People kind of lower down on the educational ladder. That's a bad terminology. Maybe not physicians but personal trainers People in the group fitness say more is better go hard and I think in this time Corona nineteen. The Nice thing is a lot of people are kind of stepping back and say you know movement is good but we know that if we exercise to intensely too long too often in effect immune function so. I'm curious with your background in medicine. How did you gravitate towards regenerative medicine? And this is a catch all term which will correct beyond and I'm saying it purposely anti-aging which is not what you actually you're doing. I think a better term is what well when I when I so. Here's the thing when I graduated graduated. Two Thousand Eight and for medical school and when I was looking for my for my for my specialty training it was cold anti aging of course that term as you very well know gut prostituted and now literally everyone who does a cream or who wants to get rid of Broncos or who anything of the sword they just call it anti-aging so really a one of the concepts that I that I picked up in the way that I like to refer to it as h management on because we all age. But it's just a matter of of of maintaining and avoiding the typical downfalls that we see with our physiology as we age in truth matter is as scientists. We very well know why. A lot of the typical symptoms of aging don't necessarily have to do with aging they have to do with neglect like that neglect. I know I've got a client. Who's in his early sixties? He likes to run likes to bike. And one of his comments is after doing a heart heart bike ride or two or going on vacation biking for three or four days harder than he typically does he goes. You know this crap when they talk about aging and recovery taking longer. It really is true so I want to touch a little bit on that neglected. You're talking about if you could kind of expand out out more on that. I know it probably encompasses many things in my specialty. The field is a lot of people. Don't like to move but it's not just movement. It's other things if you could kind of talk about that. Well so movement is very important as you know you and I. We've we've spoken about that and I know that that's that's literally what your what your career is about. And and in your whole mission in. Here's the thing or the recent why movement is so important. I mean it. It does have a lot of other benefits as well like cognitive benefits in such. But one of the main reasons I in terms of longevity and h management that who've been the so poor just because it helps maintain muscle mass if we think about our bodies as as these as these machines that they are muscle is a very expensive asset to have right. It does require a lot of energy. It does require a lot of maintenance that does require a lot of input so in order for for for us or for body to considerate. S an essential asset to maintain. We need to make sure that we're using it. If we stop using it our bodies going to say why the Hell Am. I leaving aside all these all these resources all this energy all these nutrients all these different things if we're not using this it's literally cutting costs if you. WanNa look at it from from an economics perspective. It's it's cutting costs so when that happens we start losing muscle and when we start losing muscle all lot of other metabolic changes start happening in our bodies and today we know very well. That maintenance of muscle is one of the most important markers of longevity people who live the longest. They keep their lean muscle the longest. It's as simple staff and I think one of the things that's very interesting having grown up in a rural area and living in a semi rural area. Now that having lived in the city is for people who grow up in a rural area if they grow up where there are war manual labor jobs. They happen to have a family. Farmers acreage that muscle. Mass maintenance may not consist of going to the gym or lifting weights at home. They may actually get that doing their yard work on their multi Acre yard or maybe they have horses or they have beef cattle or they have a vegetable garden. I know for my Pittsburgh podcasts. I interviewed a gentleman who owns a restaurant in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania Reading Co and when I asked him why activity was so important to him. He said well. His parents were always very active. Not as foregin is activity but he grew up on an organic vegetable farm and I think he said they had fifteen or twenty acres of vegetables and that gives the movement. How hard is it for? People who near experience who don't live that more agrarian lifestyle or more rural lifestyle to maintain that muscle mass versus may be people who the idea of going to a big city like New York City or Pittsburgh is like Oh my God. I don't WanNa do that that that that was me and I grew up in Mexico City. So you know you talk about large cities. That's that's literally the definition of fake chaotic city When we're you need to get in the car two go anywhere were. Your commute is on our. If you're lucky doesn't matter where you're going You're just not used to doing that. You're absolutely right a lot of times. People who live the longest and and who the healthiest the WHO have the law. The lowest indexes of chronic disease. These are the people that have a lot more outdoor activities as we start moving towards sedentarism and as we start spending more time endorsed and we started moving less it becomes harder and it becomes an effort in for those of us who were raised in a city in an urban environment. We do have to make that conscious effort and part of what we're currently seeing right now is because we have gotten to that point and I'm not just talking about the problem and and how how fast Gobert is spreading and whatnot. But I'm talking about a lot of other conditions that were seeing a lot of chronic disorders even fertility issues. Even a lot of things that we're starting to see more of it has to do with the fact that we're spending more time to endorse unless time outside and less time moving and it's a combination of both one is movement and activity and the other is is simply being outdoors being out in the sun being out in fresh air being out in nature. Because there's there's more and more research that suggests that we you know we. We need that. Our bodies evolved in nature so we do crave and need those

Pittsburgh Broncos Mexico City Pittsburgh Pennsylvania Readin New York City Sedentarism
Panicked Over Finances? Why Money Influences our Mental Health

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

07:56 min | 2 years ago

Panicked Over Finances? Why Money Influences our Mental Health

"Everyone and welcome to this week's episode of the not crazy podcast. I would like to introduce my co host Jackie Zimmerman who with major depression and anxiety disorders. And you know this guy gave Howard who lives with bipolar disorder. Jackie we've been friends for a while. Now we've been doing this show for several months and I decided that I want to risk all of that by talking about the one subject that causes more fights than any other subject known to man. And what would that be money? I want to talk about money. Money money money so in a recent poll. The three things that married couples fight about more than anything else are family religion and money and I would argue that money is at the top. Because nobody's taking people like onto the People's court or Judge Judy to sue over political and religious differences. Money is everywhere. If you talk to anybody literally just go grab a stranger on the street and be like. Hey you ever lost a friend over ten dollars. Almost everybody will have a story of a friendship. That just imploded over what we would consider a small amount of money. Money just creates an intense amount of anxiety in our society and the thing that I think is unique about money and anxiety is that it's something that I would assume everybody experiences not just people who are prone to anxiety not just people who live with mental illness but everyone has had some kind of issue with money that is given them anxiety. When I was younger I used to watch golf with my grandfather. And do these expose on the on the multi-millionaire golfers and they were interviewing one of them and they said. Hey when you have a PUTT and if you make the PUTT you win. One hundred thousand dollars and if you don't make it you lose one hundred thousand dollars. Does that caused you anxiety? Does that make you nervous? And the Guy said you know the most nervous I've ever been playing golf is when I bet another golfer a hundred dollars that I could make this. Putt and I didn't have one hundred dollars in my pocket. That really spoke to me because it wasn't the amount of money anymore. It was the awkwardness of discussing the money. Finding the money figuring out the money like this is what gave this guy anxiety and again. He's famous I don't know maybe he was just a cute story. He was telling bit. But that makes sense to me. You ever been in line and a dollar short. Like how embarrassing is that when you thinking that everybody in the store is like over on register five. There's a tall fat red head that does not have one dollar to pay for his groceries. I can feel that because if you've ever had your credit card declined for any reason your debit card and you WANNA justify it. I know there's money on there. That's so weird. I just used it like I just got paid. I swear I'm not a poor person race. There's this like panic where you want to justify. Why didn't work and my assumption is all of. This comes from the scarce any model right. We're all afraid of not having enough what happens when we don't have enough. So how do we have to work to get enough? What if we're working really hard and we still don't have enough and the anxiety around all of that of how much do you have? What happens when it's gone? I think is something that is underlying in our society and in everybody but amplified for those who live with any kind of illness because for me specifically when I worked at a big fat corporate job and I made all kinds of money all I thought to myself was. I'm staying here forever. So that way I make so much money that never have to worry about what happens if I actually can't work again because I will just bank so much money. I'll have so much I'll always pay my health insurance. Always have all of this stuff and spoiler alert. I don't work there anymore. It didn't make any money when I did work there. But when you have an illness whatever kind it is you're worried about money nitrous because of normal reasons but you're worried about like what if I can't work forever. What if I can't pay my health insurance? What if I can't afford to be healthy? That works its way around the Internet. That always says that. We're all three bad months away from being homeless. I don't know if that's true for all of us but that really spoke to me because it took about three bad months to really put me in a bad way where I started to need help on an interesting side note. None of us are three months away from being millionaire. So I think that we need to take that into account when we're determining how to like maybe structure our health insurance and things like that but but wrong wrong show. We'll just put that aside for a moment but think about this. The whole world is discussing being three bad months away from homelessness whether or not that holds up is really irrelevant. I think that does speak to the majority of people now. Let's apply that to people living with mental illness. People managing a lifelong and chronic disorder. Because I know that if I couldn't afford my medication if I couldn't afford therapy if I couldn't have afforded hospitalizations and on and on and on Gabe Howard would not be sitting here. That's just a hard fact. Yes I worked hard. Yes I have a loving family but you know what really saved me resources and that resource all boiled down two hundred dollar bills and that's sad. The catalyst for this was episode was from about a week ago. I sent Gabe text and basically I had a full blown anxiety meltdown because my husband had called me and said Oh my God our health insurance doubled on my last paycheck and I said wait. What do you mean it doubled? They didn't tell us that like they obviously would communicate that because that's what normal people think happens in the world But they didn't they just took it out of his check and it was doubled and I panicked and I have not an actual panic attack. I can't tell you how long but I felt it was the heart racing soul crushing. Can't breathe like Oh my God. What are we going to do because we are people right now? Who ARE LIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK. And that is even questionable. Because I don't know when my paychecks are coming in because I work for myself and I don't have regular paychecks and my husband took a pay cut a year ago to take the job. He's at now so all of this spiraling around my head and I'm like how are we going to do this? This is four hundred dollars. We didn't know we needed an. I could just work harder. But where am I going to find the client? Just you know. Anxiety spiral talk in your head and I reached out to Gabe because we were already talking to said. Hey I know you're telling me something important right now but I'm not really listening honestly because I'm worried about this health insurance thing and I realized in that moment how money is something that can cause high anxiety and within a split second like he sent me that text about our health insurance doubling and almost immediately. I was in a full-blown panic about it. There's so many directions that we can take this and that makes me excited. I love it when Jackie says. Oh my God ex and I'm like Oh my God. We can do Y. Z. Bat Symbol. So we might have to create multiple timelines. And let me ask you multiple questions about this because the first question that I'm going to ask you is if your health insurance would have doubled and you had a million dollars in the bank. Would it have bothered you at all me today? Thanks no but I also think that people who have a million dollars in the bank are really good about money and any sort of unexpected expense. That comes up. They're upset about it. Also I understand what you're saying because paying attention to our resources is a vital part of money management but a year ago. I was sitting on my couch at like two in the morning and it was storming and I felt a drop of water on my head and I looked up and the roof was leaking like leaking a lot and I saw all of this damage and I thought oh well. That's a bummer. And I went to bed. I just went to bed. That's it. There's nothing I can do about it. I couldn't stop the rain. I don't know how to fix a roof. I don't know how to fix a ceiling but the reason that I didn't freak out panic is because I had the money I flat out had the money. I knew that I could afford to fix it. There was nothing I could do and I slept well

Gabe Howard Jackie Zimmerman Anxiety Golf Judge Judy Bipolar Disorder Putt Chronic Disorder
"chronic disorder" Discussed on The Non-Prophets

The Non-Prophets

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on The Non-Prophets

"Tell me about the involved orgasm and sexy panties though. I mean should some nights, you know to marijuana if he's a regular user dumped him as above oh, but it's okay if he's pop in fucking Xanax like Eminem's wise down and write songs. It's not that hard drugs. I don't see anything about alcohol in this list. What the fuck alcohol? Oh, well number one. Sorry, my bad. I do like that. He can play with alcohol and hard drugs and not fetal alcohol or hard cuz you know in my opinion is more that we'd is is a completely separate categories. Yeah, that's kind of weird. Right illness. Yep. Got a what if he's got a chronic disorder a mental illness depression or some rare disease dumped him. He's probably it's probably not his fault. But especially if he goes around telling people he's ill or has caused this or that disorder. He's defined himself by his disorder or he's looking for sympathy and if you give him some you become his nurse instead of his partner. Yep. Yep. That should be under ISM right there. That was the fucking annual right fucking hell and you're going to be a nurse that's different. Never mind. I'm like say that was the only reason like bouncing back me or something. Is that a reason to drop somebody city? Are you like your your disabled in some aspect? I can't fucking date what the fuck right they capped handicapped. No long-term member. His daughter is meant to be put on this Earth to breed perfect stock have a mental or physical illness, right that breed their stocks humans wants to marry her fucking brother like the goddamn laughing. Thursday the same. You're a fucking asshole. All right so number for if you find yourself aware of his faults and problems and figure that Love Will Conquer All the test of your love is to love the guy in spite of all the reasons not to forget it. A partner is not a fixer-upper. I will have to agree with a little bit. I will agree with love does not solve everything down Fixer-Upper kind of thing, but it's there's going to be a adjustment time and someone may not be quite so right and on the way to find somebody who doesn't have at least one fucking thing. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. I'm sorry. No, I want to be with you for you. Not because I see a fucking actually you're not a box for my Kia. You're not a fucking Jordan body sofa mix up and reupholster. Right right and number five and if you think you should choose someone that would never dump you grow up..

Eminem partner marijuana Jordan
"chronic disorder" Discussed on Zane and Health: Unfiltered

Zane and Health: Unfiltered

12:11 min | 2 years ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on Zane and Health: Unfiltered

"It does because one to go. I want to start by saying that one is bigger than the other I re- I really just realized I think that's with every every guy I feel like every guy has one a little bigger and a little bit lower than our number mine is like bad mine is like where's the nut. Why aware is the way so one is like really high not even dropped? Its Up puts weird. I think I have something wrong. It's like yeah it's like a non descending testicle or only you've never seen it specialists about it right. Yeah when I was young it was a nut lower specialist list person. You know doctor you've seen I. Oh no I mean like I don't know I bet there is a doctor who specializes socializes. Your testicles urologist physical doctor yet right your doctor. Checks gives you a checkup every once a year. They like Benue over and they pull it from behind to take on it. I actually grabbed my copy. Copy Tahu ooh baby. Welcome back to Zane and Heath unfiltered on your show. We gotta come up with something that we say every single. It's got to be a solid solid goto and it. Just what's up guys. Welcome back to sending Heath unfiltered. I'm your host Zane and I'm your host Heath and today we're bringing the juice and the funny honey like we do everytime I good. Yeah I like that but we have to be more like smooth. You'll be a little more than that right to what we were talking about before when and I went to the doctor that told me something on my now. You also told me that. There's a chance that I may not be able to have kids. which which is which is crazy? I don't know how new that or how he was like no no I don't I don't need to work on my gosh. You're just I've been your friend. We've we've been your friend for years and we've never heard of that I don't I don't believe it i. I don't think he was right. He's a doctor he went. It looked at my nuts and goes you might be able to have kids. How do you fucking how can you say that? I was told that I might not be able to have kids. You wouldn't hear the end of it from me without affecting me you. You really are up every week and fucked them kids. I don't even see. Maybe it's a good thing that can have. I'll just adopt great for my son. I don't believe it though. I need to go one more time and see how much like I've always wanted to know how much it is to like like store your sperm like what's storage. I'd like one of threes my sperm now just in case not able to have kids in the future. But I'm like off good thing stored board. You can do yeah bridge. I shouldn't have to win all seven. All the freshest can and you can you bust another seven. I don't know I think the first one was Mike. Sorry Oh my speaking of the bus and not I think I have someone my shirt. What are we is it toothpaste? It's we did you get toothpaste like on the couch or something. Oh Mike Bryson his teeth on the couch man on the couch today there was tastes all over. It probably probably just his zipper is possibly technical. Difficulty grows guys. Look I WANNA share some. I want to share something with you guys. So I have a chronic disorder. I have echo echoed Echo Echo. Oh Khalia I'll go. I'll go call. Ya is where you repeat some you win something so someone will say something. You always have to repeat repeated. The meaningless repetition of another person spoken words as a symptom of a psychiatric disorder. But but what is in like. But it's not always like a disorder. It's just this habit of speech. Where like if your friend says something funny Zane usually what you said back? Do you do audie mean though like you'll say imagine you say something like the you'd be like Nah not today insane. We'll go no in that. I feel like everybody does. Everybody does it with like she looked like every other business. Every everybody in the room will repeat it. It'd be like the PELICANS sounds like the mind of mine. Mine every other beat. WHO's saying though? Does it like you do it a lot to get called holdout for an a lot. I wasn't conscious of it until people started calling me out. There like is just marches. Repeat everything everyone said. The verb is a like one of my girlfriends and I had like seventh grade. She like would do it all the time. Like repeat everything I said because he was just like trying to be cute and flirty back but it would drive me insane like I would just be like. Oh my God that cats fat. She'd be like that cat so fat. That is weird but it was just she would do it all the time. You're like awkward and young. It's like your first little relationship and then you realize you kind of don't like them anymore and you start focusing on all. They're like annoying things. That would drive me insane. I'm like all she does is repeat what I say. I noticed I noticed like stuff like I just because I mean we don't do it a lot but like what are we watching the podcast and I catch myself doing it like twice somebody else do it. Oh I don't know not as much as Zane noted you've I notice it because of that girlfriend. I hadn't seventh grade where I like. I just know it's like one of my gosh like a meam if somebody's being funny like I'll repeat what they said had a natural thing. kind of like a tic. Yeah like like a tick but it's it's not even a tick. I also but I do think like it makes you feel like Ah yes related or on the same page as like another person like it is so funny. In your firming that was funded by experience in your own words. Just laughing isn't enough enough. I want them to feel really good. I have a hard time. I don't know what it is like. I used to laugh at like every and now I just feel like not that. I don't think something's funny. I'll think it's funny. I just I don't know I have a hard time like vocalizing. A lot of I find a lot of shit funny but I do I do. I do a lot of fake laughing to do a lot of fake laughing. I do it for all of these logs. I think maybe the best fake laugh in the world. Oh bill talking to somebody he hates. I'll be like what are. Why are they so funny to you? He's just like flaw too but like if I'm watching a comedian it could be somebody that I really really lake and I could sit there and not laugh the entire time right like if I smile. Yeah I'll like force myself to laugh but if I'm home alone watching a comedian I went. Oh I lay only laugher Sebastian. Basha MANISCALCO that's the only one hilarious. Oh my God you'll you'll love him. He's bashing his face but yeah I just don't I don't know why I appreciate stuff. That's of course what like me. Mariah and carly is at the four of us. We have chat where we send each other like funny means and I know I would never I would never send you something like that. I only send you cars and invites cars like for some reason we even. I love watching Susan. My least favorite type of what crazy is they're like they're like forty five minutes long and you'll just like sit there and just the next one and I'll just get hooked like like Idaho. Money is I don't know what it is I. I don't like watching like boxing matches. I love watching those streetlights because it's it's so real. I just know talent behind doing everything they can to try to knock somebody out and it's so funny is enjoy watching battle bots. When let me show yeah? So that's my type. I would go and watch watch in person wants us it we put on like jerseys like the battle on each end just like all right. Let's go we should check them building. Attleboro never mind. We could barely. We barely Tuck in setup. We go rent one. We Oh by the way did you guys here on our last podcast I saw saw in the night went and watched it as soon as we started talking about China and take talk like what did you hear the static. who was crazy enough? You could tell in my face but I was trying to low key figure out what was going on but I heard it in my headphones. You heard as we're only but the only thing I did to get to stop there there was me and Matt's phone or here so I slid them over and then it went on for a while and then it stopped so I don't know if it was too much electron ix but it was weird that that was at the same. Sometimes I think they'll listen all the time. Hey we got fans in China. Alexa started taking pictures of me in the kitchen. No no way dead ass. I was literally in the kitchen. I was on a phone call to go on a phone call and I was looking out like the window. Oh to the backyard and I was sitting there and I turned around real quick and it was taking a picture of me and I was like what the fuck was that like. The sound went off. Free Yeah and like I walked over and there was a picture of me and I was like trying to get the picture I was like. Take a picture and it didn't like wouldn't open up. The picture and I was just took biggest by wasn't storing him. I wouldn't even know the thing could take a picture or have like a camera roll of picture. So do you think it's someone on the other end taking these no the pictures on there. I can put it up. It is really weird. Was it like back of him. The back of he was like an Amazon. Or whatever being like nice outfit fit today but maybe you could use this try this out you know it was just like I would never say Alexa. Take my picture like there's no remotely Moley heard anything close to that. which is by the way? I really weird day the other day. It was just like an off day on in the end of the night David. I tried to pretend David was running over my foot. I took off my shoes just threw it under under his wheel and I missed it so I went down to ground my sue. I grammar back up. And he was still bagging fast and his hit the shit out on my fucking heard they could top. He was going faster back past but it was just so funny. That Zane was trying to joke around and act like he got his homerun over. Does that bends over to pick a shoe back up and just get slammed in the hope. I hope that because David is a Webcam out so outside of his house caught but we still need to memory because it looks it looks so funny. Your blood is still on the really funny. You were like oh it hurts and you're like check it out. Can you see if it's bleeding. And I jokingly was like Oh my God yeah he league in just because I didn't think it was going to be bleeding leading..

Zane Heath Alexa David Mike Bryson China Benue chronic disorder boxing Idaho audie Basha MANISCALCO Amazon Sebastian Susan Matt Mariah carly
"chronic disorder" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Now for optimal health with Dr Christopher Calipari doctor Calipatria is an osteopathic physician board certified in family practice and chelation therapy anti aging medicine Dr calla pace specializes in reconstructive and neural therapy for chronic pain and muscle skeletal disorders and he's achieved fellowship certification for stem cell therapy doctor cal pace office number in Long Island is five one six seven nine four zero four zero four we will repeat that number throughout the show now here's Dr Christopher Keller pay good friends and thank you for tuning into the out to the whole program hope you're all doing well as you know today we're gonna take a a variety of articles that are great you know what I would call the nutritional and complimentary Rome or we're looking at the benefits of nutrients correcting your hormones correcting vitamins looking at peer review studies and journals that are excellent of course and facilities that are excellent showing the benefit of vitamins minerals Orman correction exercise eating right in a wheel covers many different topic this weekend during each program wanted to thank the people for at the Jewish community center in suitors to give lectures here the other day and we had a nice nice turnout fifty some odd people showed up and we were chatting about stem cell therapy for neurologic disorders Parkinson's Alzheimer's MS so lots of great questions I I've done lectures like that over the years I think one of the people there was a director of the program for the radio show when she asked me to come down and speak so we certainly will do that for those people that you know would like me to come down a lecture you can call the office if you're in a support group and again if you have a bunch of people that want me to come down and chat then we can set that up on a day were my schedules not too crazy so if you'd like to come in lecture if you have any of the you know lodge disorders or in the chronic disorders diabetes for groups how some measure of prices cetera Hey miss Parkinson stroke you know I'd be willing to do that okay phone lines are open if you'd like.

"chronic disorder" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on KTRH

"It requires more staff and that means more expense to run the practice which means you have to cram more patients into your day with more people living with chronic disorders this is becoming the status quo Sally Adams newsradio seven forty KJRH in tune into doctor Joe Galardi and your health first Sunday nights at seven here on Katie are rages south five thirty eight well they're saying everything old is new again can you believe it for the millennials hobbies and retail items that they considered vintage are suddenly coming into vogue you mean they're going to keep some of our culture shut up things like needlepoint millennial expert Kelly is set it says divorce is also on the decline when an animal any other generation are taking their time and really looking at the compatibility of the features about someone who's going to be a part of the marriage nothing wrong with that get this the center says she's got two daughters who are millennials we talked to her here live several times they are now enjoying record players and vinyl discovering the joys of an album rather than just downloading a single song how about that that's kind of cool maybe I should be quick them all my milk crates full of them you know I can't get rid of anything is now five thirty eight what a burger rolling out another festive item on its website San Antonio based chain is offering an inflatable Santa emerging from a what a burger cop seven feet tall is sure to be the centerpiece they say of any holiday yard decoration is available online for eighty five ninety nine out we have an orange Cup do we still have a red suit is Santa coming out of it one out yeah pays to be color blind on that one Houston Rockets in Denver looking to extend their a.

Joe Galardi Katie Kelly Denver Sally Adams San Antonio Houston seven feet milk
"chronic disorder" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"It be from a doctor whether it be from family and friends is really key and we can not only reduce stigma but also help to raise awareness around this issue a lot of it is really getting around really there's a population that duration that have you know in that region and I think a lot of understanding not how is and all right you know those are things that we you need we a lot of that a lot of time on for that and we are doing anything for months a lot of all right so just like doctor Patel said and as I was mentioning before if if you own if someone is a physical health issue like you have a heart attack or you break up you break a bone you're obviously going to go to the doctor and there really isn't a lot of you know fear or even shame surrounding that however people might be more hesitant to get help for mental health issues they may be afraid to speak up and and as we said before that's gonna start impacting your life impacting your job impacting your family so Patel so that if you do see someone struggling into to to reach out to them and encourage them to get help because on that that person might not come to you they might not be totally comfortable coming to you and asking for help so if you need help if you see someone that needs help you should reach out to them and maybe even if you if you see somebody maybe even suggested that they go into the emergency room at the console with their doctor and and that they get the help that they need which is of course then facilitated once you're in the emergency room by doctors and by the health care navigators we're gonna help people to get to their appointments to get the medication to contact them like doctor Patel was saying a health care manager might tell somebody if someone doesn't have a phone if they don't have a solid place to live if they're not a shelter at the time they might just tell somebody okay you know what I'm gonna I'm gonna take you to your appointment just meet me at this location at this time and then that's facilitated a lot quicker on a lot easier than having to try to call somebody email somebody your message somebody when they don't have a cell phone or regular access to a computer and this is all about closing that gap in the healthcare system to get those vulnerable populations in to help and as I mentioned before the Massachusetts homeless population is about twenty thousand right now that's a twenty percent increase since two thousand ten that's according to the department of housing and urban development so this isn't an issue that's going away one of the big reasons why we're having this problem is because access to affordable housing is very difficult in Boston I know this is something that I hear people talk about all the time so it's the it is very difficult to find a place in Boston that's affordable to live I think this is an issue that we're working on a lot trying to build more affordable housing and offered this to people who who need it but according to the information I was telling you guys about from the the department of housing and urban development the vast majority of of the homeless population is sheltered we do have a lot of shelters in Boston which is a good thing we want people to get into those shelters because there are also initial if someone is in a shelter they're also going to be able to inquire about seeing a doctor getting answers about their health care needs in a shelter but a lot of times as doctor Patel said the emergency room is the front door where people are always going and just kind of makes sense someone is feeling ill if someone has an issue the first thing they're going to do is they're going to go to the emergency department and that's what happens a lot of the time even though there are some folks who are presenting in the emergency department over and over again with the same issues and that's what we're trying to help out with here and so going back to those twenty thousand people of those twenty thousand thirteenth about fourteen thousand our families with children that you know it's difficult to hear this difficult to know that families are in Boston are struggling the they they have children to take care of in another part of that population is pregnant women who are expecting children so that can create a situation where you know somebody might not have X. affordable housing for themselves and then they're starting to worry about their children they're starting to worry about their families and our health care or getting help for for different issues is getting pushed to the wayside and then again creating that cyclical nature of getting sick going to the emergency department and after that not being able to follow up with your doctor not being able to take the prescribed medications that you need not having the proper nutrition eating healthy and then the person is just going to get sick again so this this is this is the cycle that happens so getting into shelters good presenting in the emergency department is also good is as long as you're you know you are accessing those health care managers that can kind of stop that cycle some other issues that that homeless people experience I are are just chronic pain chronic disorders that on it is hard to resolve when you don't have the proper nutrition or proper place to say they also may experience some respiratory illness some skin or foot problems and just those typical chronic pains doctor Patel said some people will present in the emergency room with a domino pain or chest pain again.

"chronic disorder" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And I'm sure Marcy the work that you've been doing we don't realize how susceptible we really are I took a a pan down from my shelf talking to someone not paying attention yesterday and the pain hit me on the head it with like our. god I got I got it right in the head walking the dog a few weeks ago I bumped my head on scaffolding in a building that the the level of it changed and I didn't realize it dipped are trying to get on to get out of it on a walkway. we as Americans are banging our heads getting out of the car it didn't for none for a lot of reasons. and we don't realize how difficult these these cumulatively these problems can be but more importantly. traumatic brain injuries. our major cause of death and disability Marcy. that's correct and Jake can speak to that as well absolutely. absolutely yes so you're we're spending over thirty three million I mean billion dollars a year our own managing concussion alone severe brain injuries are in and the bay of the higher higher than that probably around the tune of about fifty deaths sixty billion dollars a year on healthcare internet solutions for it and that's one of the things that we're trying to do is create treatment options that you have we reduced it by twenty percent and folks don't end up with chronic disorders are like post concussion syndrome or posttraumatic stress disorder or what you hear in the news with the media for football players and military let's call chronic traumatic himself a lot the also acronym C. T.. but the the the populations that are very vulnerable or the elderly above sixty five the immune system changes so the reaction the brain is much worse if you hit your head I mean the number one cause of death from falls in elderly patients as traumatic brain injury we forget about that and then of course are you mean we don't have a mature fully myelinated or or cover brain if you will that runs electricity efficiently and there were twenty one years old. we put a lot of focus on concussion and trauma I don't own in the NFL and obviously that that's certainly an issue but it's really are used soccer yeah our youth football players are use wrestlers and then I mean we've got military folks join the military when they're eighteen their their friends are not fully developed yet so they're out there in training in operation eighty percent of brain trauma in the military happens here in training at the US not overseas in wartime. so we truly do have something now as a solution that you can take off for the game before the military operation you can take it if you're at risk for fall and it's already in your brain in case you do have a concussion we're going to start we're rolling that out in November and then grinned with FDA regulations now right post concussion nasal spray they can get your brain in less than five minutes and then stop some of the negative cascade associated with the trauma so what we're excited because this of safe I mean it's three hundred eighty folks say time when I was only a hundred so we've got something that can help that can keep our kids graduating with their class they can keep our.

Marcy sixty billion dollars twenty one years billion dollars eighty percent twenty percent five minutes
"chronic disorder" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

07:04 min | 3 years ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"There's insurance companies deploying outpatient setting that helps them with their their is patients, and they'll call, and you know, work within you have an appointment next week. Let's make sure you get to that appointment. Did you get your medication? You know, you need to do this helping you figure out how did you that? For some patients at how. Or along. Take and things like that. Right. So Dr Patel said as a community we obviously can't help. And one of the main things that we talk about a lot in the healthcare community, but also just on our day to day is reducing stigma. And this is really really important to Dr Patel mentioned that it's a key in helping those who might be a little nervous to go to the doctor who might be a little nervous talk about issues. I it's going to help them to get better. And so we can work a work really hard around reducing stigma around homelessness around behavioral health issues around substance use disorder around things like depression and anxiety that sometimes people are afraid to speak up about in this concert to really impact their lives impact their jobs impact their family, and so reducing stigma around these issues in encouraging others to get help when they need to eat whether it be from a mental health care professional whether it be from a doctor, whether it be from family and friends is really key in we can not only reduce stigma, but also helped to raise awareness around. This issue. Really getting out there and really underscored informs of really working. The population in the challenged population that has. You know, really do driven. And I think a lot of it also understanding that not the house is the health is important even heart attack since I eat those are things that need without fucking. Although on meeting at three different hosting your medicine important journal. A lot of time on advocating for that are doing the same thing. Longtime advocate treatment. Right. So like, Dr Patel said, and as I was mentioning before if you if someone has a physical health issue like you have a heart attack or you break you break a bone. You're obviously going to go to the doctor, and there really isn't a lot of fear or even shame surrounding that. However, people might be more hesitant to get help for mental health issues. They may be afraid to speak up, and as we said before that's going to start impacting your life impacting your job impacting your family. So Patil said that if you do see someone struggling in the to to reach out to them and encourage them to get help. Because the that person might not come to you. They might not be be totally comfortable coming to you asking for help. So if you need if you see someone that needs help, you should reach out to them. And maybe even if you see somebody maybe even suggested that they go into the emergency room that they consult with their doctor in that they get the help that they need which is of course, then facilitated. Once you're in the emergency room by doctors. And by the healthcare navigators who are going to help people to get to their appointments to get their medication to contact them. Like, Dr Patel was saying a healthcare manager might tell somebody is someone doesn't have phone if they don't have a solid place to live if they're not at a shelter at the time. They might just tell somebody. Okay. You know, what I'm gonna I'm gonna take you to your appointment. Just meet me at this location at this time in that's facilitated a lot quicker on a lot easier than having to try to call. Somebody Email somebody your message somebody when they don't have a phone or regular access to a computer, and this is all about closing that gap in the healthcare system to get those Avul normal populations into help in I mentioned before the Massachusetts homeless population is about twenty thousand right now that's a twenty percent increase since two thousand ten and that's according to the department of housing and urban development. So this isn't an issue that's going away. One of the big reasons why we're having this problem is because access to affordable housing is very difficult in Boston. I know this is something that I hear people talking about all the time. So it's it's very difficult to find a place in Boston affordable to live. I think that this is an issue that we're working on a lot trying to build more affordable housing and offered this to people who who need it. But according to that information, I was telling you guys about from the the department of housing and urban development, the vast majority of of the homeless population is sheltered that we do have a lot of shelters in Boston. Which is a good thing. We want people to get into those shelters because there are also in the if someone is in a shelter. They're also going to be able to inquire about seeing a doctor getting answers about their healthcare needs in shelter. But a lot of times as Dr Patel said the emergency room is the front door where people are always going, and that just kind of makes sense someone is feeling ill. If someone has an issue the. First thing they're going to do is they're going to go to the emergency department. And that's what happens a lot of the time. Even though there are some folks who are presenting in the emergency department over and over again with the same issues, and that's what we're trying to help out with here. And so going back to those twenty thousand people of those twenty thousand thirteen about thirteen thousand our families with children. You know, it's difficult to hear this difficult to know that families are in Boston are struggling the the they have children to take care of another part of that population is pregnant women who are expecting children. And so that can create a situation where you know, somebody might not have affordable housing for themselves. And then they're starting to worry about their children. They're starting to worry about their families in healthcare or getting help for for different issues is getting pushed to the wayside and then again, creating that cyclical nature of getting sick going to the emergency department. And after that not being able to follow up with your doctor not being able to take the prescribed medications that you need not having the proper nutrition eating healthy. And then the person is just going to get sick again. So this is this is the cycle that happens. So getting into shelter is good presenting in the emergency department is also good as as long as you're you know, you are accessing those healthcare managers. That can kinda stop that cycle. Some other issues that that homeless people experience are chronic pain chronic disorders that is hard to resolve. When you don't have the proper nutrition or proper place to say, they also may experience some respiratory illness, some skin or foot problems and just those typical chronic pains. Dr Patel said some people will present in the emergency room with abdominal pain or chest pain. Again,.

Dr Patel Boston department of housing depression Patil abdominal pain Massachusetts twenty percent
"chronic disorder" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"chronic disorder" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Struggle in the aftermath feeling guilty that you survived your sense of safety and trust has been stolen from you. You can't sit with your back to an exit. You fall to the ground and fear when you hear loud noises now, you're the girl from Columbine broken. Your coach is gone basketball isn't the same and you're the same trust, your gut. Get help start putting yourself back together before you move on. You will find inspiration. And Daniel you will remember how he was so very shy yet chose to join the debate team will start wearing his shoes to symbolize how you too can overcome your shyness joined this great debate about making stronger gun laws that we need to have changed. Enough is enough. I see. You will make sure the world remembers victims, not the killers. Daniel Mauser was only fifteen years old when he was gunned down at by an amazing kid. Coarser bible will be miraculous team of doctors will create a one of kind plan to use donated cadaver bones to save your arm from imputation still you're now disabled body and mind will cause pain PTSD and paranoia. You have thrive after difficult circumstances before you can do. So again, you'll have two children and be married to love your life. He'll show you a path for where even when you see one and you'll walk it together. The first time you drop your daughter office school, you'll have a panic attack fearing she too will not be safe in the classroom. It's a chronic disorder. You'll battle for years. Tell your kids. Not to worry. We can't live. Our lives in fear will make Daniel proud. Adopting a baby girl from China giving the time you would have given to him to another child. And bring healing to your family. You will marry your prince charming and welcome for beautiful babies into your family. Own your story travel around the country share your story and help others like the kids from parkland Duca. You will learn to use your story as a public speaker and author to purge others and to advocate for bona tissue donation twenty years later, he will now face a painful anniversary this one day is just so much more painful a day. You just can't wait to pass you will look back and be pleased with what you've done to keep his memory alive..

Daniel Mauser parkland Duca basketball PTSD chronic disorder China fifteen years twenty years one day