17 Burst results for "Christy Turlington Burns"

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on Made By Women

Made By Women

02:27 min | 10 months ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on Made By Women

"Which is maternal.

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on Amanpour

"Are because I never present myself that way. I'm not I've never really the presenting myself in in any kind of way like that. I think with media certainly 'cause I think. Media always cares to have a name. It always helps to have it in fact my legal name does not include Turlington but I cannot shake it because nobody will accept just Christie Burns so I just incorporate it as opposed opposed to you know I don't mind my name. I love my name but it's long and it's at the end of the alphabet so I was you come up. It's really happy happy to have to be well. Christy Turlington burn your mouth. Thank you very much for being with us. Thank you really important important issue then. We turn now to another woman who was a lot of hats so to speak former. US Ambassador Samantha Power has been an activist journalist and author and into policy makeup her first book on genocide a problem from Hell won a Pulitzer Prize but when she served on President Obama's National Security Council and later Zomba's embassador to the United Nations. She found the too often the road to hell is paved with good intentions. She sat down with Walter Isaacson to discuss a new memoir the education education of an idealist Samantha. Thank you for being with us. Thank you Walter. This is an extraordinarily personal intimate memoir and really begins with your relationship with your father and sort of growing up reading mystery stories in Apar- in Ireland when you were a kid good. Tell me about that so the pub in Dublin was called hearkens still exists. It's a bit grimy. It's probably not the not the place I would want my children to be hanging out reading mysteries but there was some. There's something at least in my memory that's quite magical about my father who died subsequently when I was fourteen years old so who I don't have as many memories as I would like to have with but he would bring me to the pub he he would park me next to him that he was such regular of this pob and unfortunately with such a big drinker that the seat at the bar was called the seat of power for Jim Power My dad and I would sit next to him and then I would go down into the basement and I would just while the hours away reading my books and coming up when I was done with one looking for another he'd run out to the car. Get me another one and again no environment for a child but when you're a child the the fact that you can capture your father's attention when you need needed you know can end up being the the only measure of the man and that's how I felt at the time I certainly didn't feel at that time like I had a difficult childhood but what my mother and my father separated and there was no divorce in Ireland back then so the options for her she had met somebody else also an Irishman from Dublin and they wanted to build a life together so they decided to make their move to this country but it ended up in tragedy because after we came to America and really before I got to spend more meaningful time with my dad. My father died to me very suddenly and you talk so much about the anxiety that came out of that and that seemed very useful to readers not to that people like yourself. Yeah can be deeply anxious because yet in some ways choose to move to when you were in America between your mother and your father and then his drinking happened and then you're dealing you with the rest of your life you deal with. It and you don't even know what you're carrying you know. I think it's it's for me. It was years later before it really started to unpack. Just the sense of responsibility wants ability. I felt as often is the case with children who grow up to be adults and look back. They they exaggerate they they impose their adult cells on their a child selves and think that when they were children they had the power in the agency that they have when they're looking back and saw unpacking all that was really important but yes. I was I again whether because of these events or for other reasons but I found myself at different times in my life actually usually when I was in unstressed environments Armaments with just her riddick kind of constricted breathing and and it was often the case that I was this could could free myself these feelings only when I was for example a war correspondent or when I was operating under a deadline or you know even later in life when I was in a very high stakes negotiation whereas when things were still you know whatever lay within would sort of come bubbling up and and so you know I write about trying therapist understand that a little bit and you know. Sometimes you feel very alone when you're going through episodes like that or you're feeling I mean people have M- many more significant challenges I have faced but whether it's that or writing about our efforts to conceive a child and infertility IVF and all of that. It's just just life and this is what it looks like. It doesn't look like the veneer you know of of all these Polish people running around the great saying that I come back to in the book which is never compare your insides to somebody else's outsides and I feel like there's something thing deepen that but part of the open up the insides and then let people know out there that that you know everybody has their struggles. Tell me about getting to know the Obama came about because he read a problem from Hell the book on American responses to genocide and and I was surprised he was the only senator who reached out to me had reached out to me at that point at least having read the book and I thought maybe he'd want to talk about the book and its narrow sense focusing specifically on mass atrocities and what could be done on this or that but in fact he was really interested in it was a very creative read or kind of broader read in sort of what that set of responses indicated about the tendency of the US government not to think about human consequences more broadly on a whole set of issues and he was new to the Senate on the Senate relations committee and wanting to put forth already what he called a tough smart and humane approach to foreign policy so you become a foreign policy adviser to his during the campaign and you get to know cash son Stein who becomes your husband I do all rolled into one yeah well that one that was a bit of a miracle. That's more serendipity because I with sitting at my desk one day and casts a received a letter excuse me an email from Kazakhstan the gasoline whose books I've read and and the email basically was an email lambasting the state of the campaign or at least one subset of the campaign that worked on Obama's rule of law aw ideas and Santa last email. He didn't mean to blast Senate to one person mistake completely. I am thinking taking did he. Just send to that one person because it was addressed to one person. Am I the only one and then very soon I realized it had gone to the entire. Obama campaigns and that made you decide you wanted to marry. I would just like everyone else. Nobody else is going to marry him. No I thought to myself I've done that and it sucks in my heart. I just went out to cass sunshine and so I wrote him. I said I'm just don't worry about it and next time you're in Boston. Let's get a coffee. I promise you people will forget and next thing. I knew we were married well. He had to walk us through your big mistake. Yeah he which is on book tour you make the mistake of offhandedly using the word monster when you're talking about Hillary Clinton now our and so we have to step down from the campaign for a while in the penalty box the Sin Bin is my Irish relatives called it. Indeed is my first campaign. You know I was so emotionally invested I did not have a kind of distance or the experience of prior campaign so you know what we're probably in retrospect pretty traditional a a maybe not ideal campaign tactics but a bit run of the mill for me. Were just these transgressions these outreach and so basically I went off often was all upset about something that the Clinton campaign was doing and then reporter published it and it included the denigrating integrate comments about Senator Clinton and it was mortifying for the first time really since the community.

Obama Christy Turlington Walter Isaacson Hillary Clinton US Senate Dublin Samantha Power Jim Power America Christie Burns Pulitzer Prize Apar- in Ireland Ireland National Security Council United Nations IVF Kazakhstan
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:07 min | 1 year ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on Amanpour

"And that's what makes it so urgent and we sat down in New York to talk about her campaign. Every mother counts Christy Turlington Burns. Welcome to of the program. We have just seen a really dramatic piece in my introduction to you of a very intimate scene in which you are in distress in labor. You've just given birth to your child and then it gets very dangerous. Few 'cause you hemorrhage. Remind us of what happened. When you give birth to your daughter grace yes so after very very good pregnancy complications at all lots of birth options a great team taking care of me and a supportive partner. the unexpected unexpected happened. I delivered grace. I didn't know that she was going to be a girl. So the most exciting thing was that I was meeting my daughter for the first time and then after we're having a you know a few minutes really bonding with her. She latched onto breastfeed. Everything was going well as it should be and I was you know sort of euphoric. I can feel the the feeling in the room just changed the nurses and the midwife got a little bit nervous and what I later learned was that after a certain period of time when the Placenta doesn't expel it becomes quite toxic inside the body and so so it needed to be extracted attracted and because I had an unmedicated natural delivery that meant without any pain medication or anything like that what about it talk to your activism because you could have thought well you know it was my bad luck. You know it took a little while to process. I would say the I think in those first few days as I was sharing my story where people would come to visit me or and I would talk about it and I learned that other people had a similar kind of complication or other complications that I was not aware of in my pregnancy but then I don't know year or so later when I was pregnant with my son I was able to travel to El Salvador which is where my mom was born and where I spent some in time in my youth and visiting an NGO and some programs there. That's where I had the Aha moment is about six months pregnant and my mother's country and on we're in very poor communities hours away from the capital city and in one particular site visit where we were visiting a water project a lot of women had come either with small children on their backs or pregnant and that's where I kind of put my feet in their shoes and I thought had I had the delivery with my daughter in this community where women had to walk miles to get to clean water where all of the homes were ten rude where there was no electricity with the roads were paved saved and where you're two hours away from a hospital. I learned that a woman could bleed out with the same complication I had if you don't get to that emergency obstetric care with into two hours maybe sooner and I was stunned to learn. I assume you were that in terms of maternal mortality the US is the only Western country where this is is rising exactly so in two thousand three when I delivered my daughter the global estimate was five hundred and thirty thousand girls and women were estimated to die every year and those numbers hadn't budged conduct decades it was only when I was travelling in El Salvador that I learned where the US was and I was shocked to learn that the US was ranked forty first at that time ah I learned also that really of all the developed countries in the world we are doing the worst we're one of thirteen countries with a rising maternal mortality rate and that was completely clearly shocking and I learned a New York that were also really poorly ranked in fact New York City African American women are twelve times more likely to die than Caucasian women and that's three or four times more than the national average which is shocking. Why is this happening here in the United States. What is it that makes this this this figure keep rising. It's interesting because the US is complex for many reasons it could be fifty countries versus fifty states when I was going through the exploration of figuring out how I would be a good advocate. I went back to school to work in a masters in Public Health at Columbia and then I started a documentary film and that film No woman no cry was really Kinda thesis in a way of my exploring lower the barriers and challenges in a number of countries and the US was part of that exploration process. There are a number of reasons why we're doing so poorly for one we have a lot of chronic health conditions that are on the rise such as diabetes and obesity that impacts the outcomes of pregnancy not only for babies but for mother's there's also racial disparities that are have been a problem for for a very long time but now we're really focusing on what's driving that and what we're learning from talking to women and hearing more stories from women women who experience near-misses which is very very common if women don't die there twenty to thirty others who will suffer lifelong disabilities related to childbirth and pregnancy and we're hearing from women that they're not listened to or their disregarded in hospitals. The stats are a crazy. Some doctors can enter the specialty of maternal fetal medicine even complete training without spending any time in the Labor delivery unit. I mean it's extraordinary. Serena Williams obviously a major star who had her first baby girl a nearly died in that process she also wrote about it and focused on what you're talking about. which was the racial disparity? What can be done about? What does your organization do well. We've been really trying to educate the public about about this as an issue generally at the local level at the national level at the international level but we've also tried to really invest in healthcare providers mid level providers not every pregnancy requires a physician. We partner with a lot of community led organizations. It's very important for women who are most vulnerable to see themselves and the providers that that provide care for them and so it's really important for them to be getting care pre. Nataly as well as throughout their pregnancies and postpartum. We try to educate people about family planning and family spacing which is controversial all but it is the most effective way to keep the mother safe. I'm throughout the rest of it must be gratifying to you to see and I think it's for the first time that all the major Democratic presidential candidates are putting this issue pretty heavily on their agenda. Are You satisfied satisfied with the way the Democratic candidates are pledging to combat this. I an I mean ten years ago. When I started every mother counts there were a few bills that were introduced. I and they just passed at the end of twenty eight ten years and years. I spent an early part of this year actually in May around Mother's Day on the hill talking to members on both sides and a lot of them had the attitude of what we pass these other two things. Why do we need war and if there are Democrats introducing these bills we you don't WanNa be on their side so we can't possibly so that's frustrating the way that it works at the government level you film and You you talked about no woman. No Oh cry and their scenes from other parts of the world where you were investigating this and we're going to play a clip and this one's from Tanzania and it's all about a woman in distress trying to get get to somewhere safe a hospital to have her baby. We're not turtle. Laurent Bio one idea particularly Wendy do neither did I but certain Janet's Labor is not progressing and the threat of death for both baby and mother is palpable with no money to pay for food food or transport the nurses ask us to help. We arranged for a van to take Janet the nearest hospital an hour away did did that shock you that you actually had to intervene. There was nobody else but your team to actually pay for vehicle to take this woman to somewhere safe clinic to have her baby. I mean I think if we hadn't been there. Probably the nurses would have come together and found some way to pull together funds and they do do that from time to time. It's very I mean I'm not a traditional filmmaker and that was my first film but we did break the fourth wall because the last thing that I wanted to do was sit hit by it watched if we could help at that time I really hadn't taken in that even a hospital. That's forty five kilometers.

United States New York Christy Turlington Burns Janet El Salvador diabetes Serena Williams partner. Tanzania Columbia Nataly partner Laurent Bio Wendy two hours twenty eight ten years forty five kilometers
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on Amanpour

"Politics at the moment but the country has to come to terms with the fundamental choices that are posed posed by the brexit referendum not least to the legitimacy of parliament because obviously Britain is a parliamentary democracy and pitted against that now is the result of a referendum and it taken three years ago and it really worries me that the the idea of a no deal brexit no relations with the European Talk Union at all after October thirty first. Should it be normalized in the process of trying to justify the pursuit of the goals set out three years ago and I and as I also said in the introduction the Prime Minister Boris Johnson went to Europe to the seat of Europe in Brussels first time meeting with the head of the the European Commission and by all intents and purposes afterwards. We were told there were no new British proposals put forth to even contemplate some kind of a new or amended deal so it looks like they hurtling towards a no deal. That's what people are saying. Boris Johnson's compared himself to the hulk and said that he'll get out of this not one way or another and get out of the EU one way or another so the question then is given what parliament has dubbed by majority not saying that we cannot have a no deal brexit. Do you believe that the prime minister might kind of break the law and and having no deal brexit anyway away that's a huge point of discussion and debate here in the UK. I find it very hard to believe that a British Prime Minister would disobey the law and and your viewers around the world I think would find it. Extraordinary that country renowned for its pragmatism for its stability should be taking leave of its senses never mind taking leave of his legal history in the way that you describe the good news is that there are parliamentarians willing to stand up for the rule of law aw and they will take this to the ultimate conclusion which eventually is to threaten their support for the government the government now does not have a majority of the ways tried to purge its enemies within the Conservative Party and the important point is the parliament continues to stand up for the for its rights because when the role of MP's MP's is subjugated than democracy itself is at risk and that's why I think the passions are so high and why the attention to the Supreme Court judgement of the Supreme Court case ace that you mentioned is so important there is a way out of this but it involves all sides acknowledging the in the end the people have to be the arbiters of this and so what a final final deal is done including no deal is put to the British people in a final judgment about how to at least end this stage of the Brexit Songa and very quickly quickly. We've only got about forty five seconds less. You've seen David Cameron's ebook the exits he has said he's very depressed and upset about this result and that he you know he accused Boris. Boris Johnson and Michael Grove Form Leave Minister of being economical with the truth truth twisting he said. Are you glad he's saying that now yes. I think it's important that he speaks out. Many people feel that it was his decision to Lawrence the referendum the goes into this mess in the first blaze and I think it is very important that someone from the Conservative Party's able to speak up in this way especially someone with his experience and background. I'm obviously sorry he's depressed rest. I can commend to him a work and international NGO as a way of at least mitigating the frustration that exploitations feel from the sense of impotence that comes from leaving office but there is a world outside politics. There's a whole nother layer to that last answer David. Thank you so much indeed. Martha Stewart wants to give you three free meals for your own in-home taste test. That's right Martha's meal delivery service. Martha and Marley spoon is giving being away three full size meals to be part of Martha's free. Atom taste test visit. MARLEY SPOON DOT COM slash C. N. forget about awful frozen food and unhealthy healthy fast food. Martha wants you to enjoy three of her best thirty minute meals for free go to Marley spoon dot com slash. CNN that's Marley spoon dot com slash slash. CNN guys are terrible taking care of their health. Whether it's a knee injury bad back or something worse guys usually more comfortable rub some dirt on it than seeing a doctor. I'm guilty of it myself. The same is true for erectile dysfunction study shows seventy percent of guys who experience eighty don't get treated for it thankfully Roman in created an easy way to chat with Dr Online with Roman. You get medical care free D if appropriate from the comfort and privacy of your own home you can handle everything online mine inconvenient discreet manner getting started as simple just go to get. Roman dot com slash Amanpour and complete an online visit. If your doctor decides the treatment treatment would be appropriate that can prescribe genuine medication that can be delivered in discreet packaging right to your door with free two day shipping guys go talk to the doctor erectile dysfunction and can be tough to tackle but it's really important to get checked out with Roman. It's easy to connect with the doctor. Just go to get Roman dot com slash on poor to get a free online. visit is it and free two day shipping. That's get Roman dot. com slash on poor for a free visit to get started. GET ROMAN DOT com slash Amanpour. Finding a new job is a a lot of work. What if you had your own personal recruiter to help you find a better job now. ZIPRECRUITER's technology can do that for you. Just download the ZIPRECRUITER APP. Let know what kind of jobs you're interested in and put your profile in front of employers if an employer likes your profile Ziprecruiter. Let's you know so. If you're interested in the job you can apply listeners should download mode free number one rated ziprecruiter job search app today and let the power of technology work for you. We turn now to someone who's using her life in the spotlight to illuminate a dark issue she is Christy Turlington Burns one of the world's original supermodels. She's walked thousands of runways and appeared on countless magazine covers including most recently British vogue September issue. It's most most important of the year but her focus for nearly a decade has been the issue of maternal mortality and this became personal as she explained in her documentary entry. No woman no cry..

Boris Johnson Martha Stewart parliament Prime Minister Conservative Party Amanpour prime minister CNN Europe Brussels Christy Turlington EU European Talk Union David Cameron Marley spoon Brexit Songa David Britain Supreme Court
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:53 min | 1 year ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on Amanpour

"Welcome to the program everyone. I'm Christiane Amanpour in London where the Supreme Court is hearing arguments in what will surely be one of its most momentous decisions for these times and whether Boris Johnson broke the law by asking the Queen to suspend parliament ahead of the Brexit deadline next month the British prime minister met with e you leaders on Monday Monday who is still waiting a detailed proposal for a deal from Johnson. The Luxembourg prime minister pulled off a bit of political theater holding a press conference next thanks to an empty podium because Johnson didn't want to speak outside near noisy protesters. My guest tonight is David Miliband who served as both British Foreign Secretary and a leading member of the Labour Party. He's now president of the International Rescue Committee and so he's well placed to discuss the other global crisis the fallout from the attack on on Saudi oil installations tear on has denied is responsible and President Hassan. Rohani says that the attacks whoever is responsible are all about the devastating dating proxy war in Yemen a civil visual you now to look at it more as a question of security and stability ability rather than oil but the root cause of goes back to the Yemen problem those that attacked Yemen and in conduct daily bombardments and have leveled great parts of the country and taken hundreds hundreds of thousands of Yemeni lives and supported by waves of American and European armaments. They must be helped l. to answer. David Miller Band is joining me from New York now. Welcome to the program buying Cristiani goes to be with you so let's just take the president of Iran left off talking about the bombings and obviously he was referring to Saudi Arabia and the coalition with the United States and others in Yemen from your perspective Tiv- as President of the IRC and with such an obvious interest in what happens to the people there the refugees just give us a you know a layout of what's happening on the ground what this war is doing to the people that it's not a rescue committee has about six hundred stoff off in Yemen in the northern part which is controlled by the WHO `they rebel alliance and in the South where there are remnants of the Hadid government and a range of other forces else's who are in control. I was in Yemen Myself at this time last year and essentially what's happening. Is that the war strategy that's been prosecuted by by the Saudi led coalition over the last five years four to five years has comprehensively failed in its principal war which was dislodged lodged from sun which used to be the capital of Yemen. It's also failed in its secondary age which was to push back the Iranians. The Iranians are stronger today a than they were four or five years ago and then there's a third element is in the south of the country. The Saudi led coalition is breaking up the United Arab Arab Emirates have essentially backed some secessionist forces and so you're seeing fragmentation in the country and radicalization alongside desperate Humanitarian Aryan crisis twenty four million people are in desperate need of humanitarian aid to survive levels of malnutrition are unprecedented cholera had the largest outbreak last year and so we're that international rescue committee on humanitarian grounds but frankly the country is imprisoned by this political military stalemate stalemate so I mean really extraordinary to hear you even say for nearly five years that this has been going on the tens of millions of people at risk and those who've died and caller all the rest of it. Why do you think and what is your view as to. Who might have been responsible? Why do you think the WHO tease claimed responsibility for the attack on the Saudi installations given what might be the repercussions might hurt them or I think I think that the argument about the relationship between the Hutus and the Iranians is obviously the center of the geopolitics of this dispute a my own view is the WHO have longstanding roots in Yemeni society there a branch of Shia the so-called Zaidi branch of Shia. They don't have historic links things with the Iranians but over the last ten years or so five to ten years those links have strengthened and in the last forty five years the Iranians have seen a cheap way to tweak tweak the tale of Saudi Arabia and its Western allies by supporting the WHO thieves in this civil war of the claim of responsibility is obviously being looked at in a rather sceptical way because the drones that seem to have been used go way beyond anything that the youth of ever shown before for and there are some significant claims of from the US amongst others that the Iranians would behind it but his the terrible truth as a crisis of diplomacy not just in Yemen the Chrysler diplomacy applies across the Middle East and significantly revolves around the role of Iran in the region the US tore up the nuclear agreement agreement which tried to take the table the ultimate weapon that the Iranians were feared to be chasing and of course by backing the Iranians is into a corner by allowing the hardliners in Tehran to say that the reformers were wrong to believe that they could have come to a deal with the West. You've got a situation relation where Iran feels. It's got nothing to lose and so I don't have any background intelligence on the precise location of the the origin of this very devastating strike on the Saudi oilfield. What I do know is that there are more options for the Iranians than there are for the Americans or the Saudis as at the moment that's the case for two reasons. The Iranians are prepared to escalate because they're already being economically strangled and secondly they've shown or it's been shown own over the last seventy two hours that the Saudi defenses of their all important oil installations are very weak indeed and that leaves the American Administration in a real fix because they can talk about being locked and loaded as the president said in his rather unfortunate phrase the day before yesterday but but it's clear that they lack allies strategy for dealing with some pretty incompatible questions in the Persian Gulf so that's really interesting that analysis and and just to be clear after the locked and loaded statement the vice president's chief of staff denied that it necessarily meant a a military intervention but be that as it may and as you say the Administration seems to have a few allies and beef you options in dealing with the rahm nonetheless it's possible that Yemen and it's people could be dragged further into this morass. Here is what the U N Special Envoy for Yemen said about out this outta minimum. This kind of action carries the risk dragging. Yemen into a regional conflagration gratien because if one thing we can be certain and that is this extremely serious incident makes the trenches of a regional conflict that much higher and other personal that much lower and with Yemen in some way or other linked none of that none of that is good you so there is delineating. What's not good for Yemen. We know that Syria is still in the midst of a war Assad what is still trying to neutralize annihilate the remnants of the opposition and there is the potential conflicts and more war in the region you as IRC have put out a rather calamitous or envisioning the catastrophe. That's unfolding in some of the refugee camps inside Syria. We had a report from the ground from there just last week particularly with seventy thousand people many women and children at the alcohol can what as your report saying about that. Matsen griffiths just to finish on that point the U. N. special envoy for Yemen is outstanding a diplomat the only difference I would have with him is he says that Yemen is threatened by being engulfed with glue with regional conflagration. I would say it already is engulfed. That's what twenty four million people in the military need means and the pursuit of the war strategy by the Saudi led coalition is being justified on the grounds that they can't afford to uncompromised with iranian-backed side so Yemen is already the crucible for this The report that we've put out on alcohol is really devastating in reading it shows that over three hundred children have died in the alcohol camp. This is a place you'll right to say. Seventy thousand people that seven seven thousand of them are suspected Isis foreign fighters and they are in a secluded part of the camp where it's very difficult to get in to deliver humanitarian eight. We are there but we're literally seeing children. Under the age of five babies dying in the tents of malnutrition related diseases before they even even get to the health centers that exist in the camp so there is a real tragedy of enormous proportions because these are the innocent victims the wall he's all children under the age of five who are literally a off the end of the lives on the edge of death and our report ought shows that the rate of death has more than doubled since March this year around one hundred and fifty deaths in the run-up to Mars the rate of death has more than doubled and that speaks to the desperate conditions existed but it also speaks to this diplomatic stasis about what happens to the will. Some some countries have volunteered to take them back to face justice. That's the right thing but too. Many are refusing to do so and that leaves the innocent victims as well as the potentially guilty one's stuck so not not to put too fine a point on it but to pivot to to something that's happening right here. In Great Britain which is in the middle of the Brexit mess your former foreign minister foreign secretary on Britain used to actually take very interventionist actions in diplomacy and humanitarian care and trying to solve some of these great global problems and yet brexit seems to be taking all the oxygen out of all of those efforts having said that I just WanNa get your take on and what I said which was the Supreme Court here is about to rule this week on whether the prime minister broke the law in suspending parliament and getting the Queen to agree to that. What is your view on that. What are your right to say that Brexit has sucked the life out of British foreign policy. Let's see over the last three years and threatens to do so for many years to come my view is that Boris Johnson. The prime minister is on the run from parliament. He's on run because he knows he doesn't have a majority for the policy that he's pursuing the policy is that Britain will leave the European Union on the thirty first among Tober whether whether or not there's a deal he's ready to pull us out without a deal and not a single expert will tell you that there's time between the European Council on the seventeenth eighteenth and the the end of October to get through the necessary legislation and so that's why he's on the run and that's why he is flouting constitutional and political norms in such a cavalier way to see the state of British.

Yemen president Saudi Arabia prime minister Boris Johnson International Rescue Committee Iran David Miliband Supreme Court Christiane Amanpour United States President Hassan South Labour Party London Secretary Zaidi United Arab Arab Emirates New York
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We'd need folks to mobilize. If people do not mobilize. We're at a disadvantage in terms of changing power. We're not gonna wait for CEO's to figure out that structural will deteriorate the livelihood of most Americans. We need to force them to see. And so I'm all for mobilization in these ways. And you think this is something that you're gonna we're going to see more of in the future. Do you think there's labor movement, particularly people of color is viable, absolutely. You saw with the teachers and let me in red states and right to work states where where you can essentially fire folks without recourse, you see white teachers now they say if when white people catch a cold black folks catch pneumonia, that's sort of the axiom there. And so if they're if white folk are stepping out and saying, hey, I'm not earning wages, guess what? There's a whole lot of folks will be willing to step. Out in demand, their proper, and we'll have to leave it there. Andrea periods of Brookings Institution fellow and author of the forthcoming book. No, your price valuing black lives and property in American cities. Thank you Andre. You're welcome. On the next all of Christy Turlington burns joining after experiencing post pregnancy complications, he co founded every mother counts, a nonprofit focus.

Christy Turlington Brookings Institution CEO pneumonia Andrea
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Hi i'm i'm the founder and ceo of split recently acquired by robert bosch split as an enterprise transportation management platform that is changing the way people meet and move worldwide freeing up hours and cars from our daily commute with we partner with organizations such as corporations universities and municipalities to develop customize carpal programs in a very closed network helping to promote green initiatives attraction and retention of employees and interpret networking the platform nabil's users to see their matches prior to accepting the riots and communicate fire the smartphone app we're leveraging the phone screen shared economy and split connects people who are interested in saving money and time reducing their carbon footprint and we're meeting someone new so it's the perfect intersection of economy utility and sociability splits close network platform integrates with multimodal transport including carsharing fussing and fleet optimization in partnership with lift split also provide it's hostels and other healthcare providers with on demand non emergency medical transportation we are active in the us europe and mexico congratulations on your babbitt wishing you and split continued success and by the way listeners you can head over to my instagram at rebecca jarvis to see more of anya story remember if there's someone you wanna nominate for no limits on for noor of the week or if you have career questions shoot me an email at no limits with rj podcast at g mail dot com and to those of you who have been leaving reviews thank you like boppers you go by bopper.

founder and ceo partner nabil us babbitt rebecca jarvis robert bosch europe mexico anya
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Every mile every mother and that's my mantra when i run and it's it's truly what connects us to that and i think it's what's brought so many people in i mean we've had thousands of runners now running with team emc to raise awareness but also to raise funds to invest in the programs that that we fund around the world and so many people have either a personal story or they are in the healthcare field or they have a spouse that has gone through some kind of complication or are they simply like wanted to join a team and then they learn about us and the issue through that experience a mini become supporters it's been such an incredible like community building activity and we've traveled all over the world i've run in tanzania i run in haiti i've running guatemala all countries where we work and now i'm like i've done eight marathons like i'd never and i can't wait to do my next you know where your next marathon will be i'm thinking that it will be i wanted to new york again but i also would like to do big sur which is a really famous smaller race and i would like to do possibly paris i don't know there's a lot there's racism every it's a great way to see the world's even places that you're familiar i ran tokyo in february and just to run in a city that i've visited many times but to see every neighborhood in that way i mean even new york city i mean you really get to see so much of this great city for this mother's day tell me about what you have coming up say mother's day's obviously a big campaign season for for every mother counts and this year we actually are giving people an opportunity to dedicate or to donate an honor of a mom we have a great like mother's day card where people can reach out to not.

tanzania haiti guatemala new york tokyo
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Then seeing how it feels and seeing what opens up what door and then seeing i mean i i have wanted to have some meaningful purposeful life since early days in my life before my first career and i think it's just it it just took like okay i know that but at a certain point one can i stop talking about it and wendy i put when do i put action into the equation when i realize like nothing's was gonna come and knock on my door i have to kind of open some doors and see what's out there what was the point for you where was this switch flipped i think i think for me having personal experience has been really important you know the i i used to support a lot of other people's initials before i figured out and that's great it's great to support your friends who are passionate about their thing and if they've found it like that's a great way to sort of explore and see what it's like but for me as a model doing that i felt like okay that just means superficially that means that i show but an event that means which is meaningful sometimes but not always the most satisfying of not for the introvert in me but eventually i was asked to do things that had a connection rate the more people knew about my life or my story i would get invitations to participate in something that was more connected to that and so my mother's from central america from el salvador one of the first things that i started you in a more active way was to support postwar el salvador and that felt great because he was a connection to my mom it was part of my heritage there was a lot of need as a place that really wasn't on the map or had a very negative association in news and then later was my dad's death so for me it was very it was very personal things that i think resonated with me and gave me more i felt like i had more i could say more perspective but i tell people there's also you don't have to wait almost died in childbirth to go out there and and use your voice so i don't know i think it's timing is also.

america el salvador
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Gosh i would say systems you know what we really need our systems at work and i was having a conversation earlier today anything like we could really we could there's a lot we can do in terms of advocating at the state level or at the national level for legislation that looks more closely at maternal mortality and how do we define it and how do we like can we standardize the way that we do that across the country and there's a lot we can do around identifying you know where certain kinds of healthcare providers are where their gaps and where people just don't have access at all i think the things that get much more complex our system our insurance system the hospital system medicaid bureaucracy registering offer see it's everywhere it's really so complex and even if you have means in resources and have a a a good relationship with your care provider there's still a lot of hoops way too many hopes and so when you take away the haves from those who do not have just insurmountable challenges and then if you have children already small children already or you're a single parent which so many of our moms in this country are it's just not feasible to jump through those hoops and to make it work so that's i feel like if we could like i i am sure i'm not alone certain efforts have been made and it's just complex i was actually at columbia studying public health win aca was first being sort of reexamined and broken down and i was so grateful at the time because it was so complicated and yet i still came through it and i'm still confused because it it's it's we've created a real mess for ourselves so when i look at other countries that have lower rates of maternal and infant deaths when i look at other systems that just have general you know sweden being like england like these are these are countries that have universal health care these are these are countries where midwives and doctors and nurses role integrated into a healthcare system so that in that that time of a one's life that you know it's just it's there there are choices and everybody's working together that you just tell it's the there's not this i'm sure there's some bureaucracies in every system but ours just seem as.

sweden
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Of taking care of women that they are thinking about that but that's not always clear and we're not always listening to women so this is one of those things seem to if women could could could be heard could be respected could know their bodies and feel confident their bodies and advocate i mean i think that's as a patient in the medical system it's one of the one of the weirdest things you sort of have to learn is to advocate for yourself and when you feel something is off to really be clear about that being off because you know the medicine is something that i i don't know the first thing about medicine but i do know my own body it's true and i think we could all like do better right i mean listening to our bodies taking that responsibility over our health there are some things that are out of our control but there's a lot that is in our control with regard to our health but you're right it it takes training it takes practice to be able to speak up for yourself in any instance but i feel like healthcare and hospital are definitely a place where i think may even seeing my father go through it you just everything falls away all of your cup and you do you turn into a patient who is doesn't have all the answers and doesn't have and has to rely on somebody else and i think that needs to have more balance for for us to make some progress here what's the biggest challenge.

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"My kids when they see a person with a cigarette like what is that i know now it's the worst thing in the world to smoke a cigarette yeah and our parents would tell us that although my dad was a smoker but they will say that but you didn't see that in the culture like you still saw cigarettes everywhere and i think it helps to not have it everywhere but yeah it just shows me like when when we think about issues how long it can take sometimes to really make a change yes i think i look at that and i've lived through it and i participated it and i've seen how how things can change so that's what the hope is with maternal health if there was one thing with maternal health that you could snap your fingers and would change around the world right now is there something that would really move the needle for women around the world i mean to ensure that every woman has a person with skills at their side like the appropriate skills appropriate level of skills for what is needed in the moment that would be it and that look differently in different places in different instances but you know i'm a big believer in advocate for midwifery care or the midwifery model of care even if doctors providing and what that means is it's built in respect it's built in time that looks at a whole person and it looks at their lifestyle but not in a way of you know bad mom or you know you're at fault for the situation that you're in really like how can we support you how can we give you the support and confidence you need to be your healthiest most confidence going into this very long a role in your life and so that's something that i think is really important but i also think that there are a lot of people that work in the field that you know it doesn't have to be a midwife or it doesn't have to be that there's this sort of united fronts right that everybody's working together and that everybody has interest of the mom and her health you know at the forefront rate that you would think that people that go into business.

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"I need to do this with my life i think i'm trying to think i i did a little bit of work all a lot of work actually before this period of time when i was at school around tobacco i had been a smoker in my team in years and into my early twenties and then my father was diagnosed with lung cancer when i was at nyu and in my like around twenty six or twenty seven and i quit and i was confident as a nonsmoker at that point and i was doing a little bit of like public health advocacy around that issue but when i lost my dad i went deep into that work and it was a great time because it was sort of the beginning of really changing behavior that was very accepted behavior up until then in the late nineties was the very first surgeon general's report on women and tobacco we knew a lot about men and tobacco we didn't know anything about women and tobacco and i think that's it really opened up my mind to women's health and the fact that i reproductive systems make us more susceptible to a lot of different things heart disease like there's a lot of things that because we can carry another live set us up for potential health risks that's a really interesting point yeah so when i i'd already kind of gone down a path of you know i'm interested in women's health interested in my experience activism advocacy and public health amine behavior changes such an important thing and i went to school later to work on a master's in public health but when i think about even maternal health mature mortality when you look at smoking tobacco and you see how much change so quickly i mean not quick enough or some sure but in think about the fact that there used to be smoking in restaurants and bars not that long ago and then all of a sudden overnight every single restaurant and bar is don't think about the tax on cigarettes or the warnings on cigarettes i mean.

nyu
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Continents you know there's some serious serious challenges that women go through and and that make motherhood very very difficult i it's almost impossible to even fathom because you think about the fact that you know women have been getting pregnant since the beginning of time this is not a disease it's not a new disease right we could have been studying this from day one so what's going on here what's the problem more no limits after this quick word from our sponsor brought to you by indeed used by over three million businesses for hiring where business owners and hr professionals can post job openings with screener questions than sort review and communicate with candidates from an online dashboard learn more at indeed dot com slash higher there's a lot coming at you right now turmoil tweets an insane amount of chatter i'm brad milkey with abc news and i am here to throw you a lifeline it's a new podcast called start here where are experts give you on the ground access to the biggest stories of the day we're going to give you some context some clarity among the chaos twenty minutes every weekday subscribe now on apple podcast over ever you get your podcast and start here so what's going on here what's the problem i think i think because it's been going on since the beginning of time and because most births to go perfectly well i mean it's actually surprising in some parts of the world where i've traveled where there is absolutely nothing and that there could be a fairly straightforward delivery and outcome it's actually shocking but when you see women in places where that isn't the case where there are other kind of chronic health conditions at play where there are other kind of social determinants of health that are impacting not only her health and pregnancy but her health just generally those those kinds of things are maybe maybe they're they're more difficult in urban settings or more advanced societies maybe those kinds of outside pressures actually.

brad milkey abc apple twenty minutes
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"I think it was a little early to be really thinking seriously about a career i didn't even thought about college at that point like i really didn't think like where would i want to go to school at what i want to study but my dad was a pilot so i had one of my ambitions at the time as i i want to be a pilot one day but my my sister that didn't model she got her pilot's license she didn't fly professionally but she so she followed that for a little while i also really liked i liked the idea of being a writer i like the idea more than the the whether i had talent or not that i i i was always a big reader and i especially when i traveled a lot earlier in my career i would read about the places or go to places that i'd read about or i would bring books that were based in the part of the world where i was so i just had i just love that sort of transportation that literature can do so i had a dream of like maybe being a writer one day or thinking about like i love to travel what i could do potentially that would allow me to travel and right and you know it a different time you know journalism in that way like living you know working in a bureau in sub saharan africa that kind of thing was like wouldn't that be amazing like real adventure in real i don't know i like the excitement of being off the beaten path but again i just really didn't have the time and then i was so busy for such a long time that it took me a while to say like well what do i really wanna do like i didn't have any plan to work as a model for a very long i that's the one thing i was pretty clear when i started was that it wasn't a very long term profession so i.

writer one day
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"These here's our conversation christy turlington burns welcome to no limits sink you it's great to be here it's great to see you happy early mother's day thank you happy mother's day to all the moms who are listening right now including mine happy mother's day mom you're the founder and ceo of every mother counts and i'm so glad we're having this conversation now given the work that you've been doing now lot i mean this is now almost a decade since the film that's right and the entire idea behind every mother counts that's right we launched a around a documentary film that i made back in two thousand and ten and the organization every mother counts kind of was birthed from that film and i had no idea that we would end up doing what we're doing which is we are a grant making foundation and we are doing lots of storytelling and filmmaking and campaigning to make sure that women are safe through pregnancy and birth but at the time it was just i was trying to raise awareness i had had a personal experience sort of opened up my eyes to challenges that many many millions of women face every day with regard to accessing quality and respectful maternity care in a timely fashion and that film just really kind of opened many doors to do work that i think is so important not only internationally where we have grantee partners bit here at home in the us where we are doing very poorly when you had your scare what happened so i had a great pregnancy i was so ready to become a mom i felt like i had so many options i had a supportive partner i i really wanted an unmedicated birth and natural delivery so i i found a great midwife who was affiliated with a hospital here in the city that had a birthing center which is very rare rarer and rarer thing.

founder and ceo us partner christy turlington
"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"christy turlington burns" Discussed on No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

"Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on qualified candidates in an online dashboard get started at indeed dot com slash higher do you feel like you've been underestimated along the way as i've gotten older i care less about that i guess early on you know it's it is hard when you're known as as doing something to make a change yeah but every time that i ventured outside of what that is and the fact that it was a goal of mine to not be put into any kind of corner box and then to realize like no it was more matter like how i felt about him what was my own perception or you know once i convinced myself but now i can i can try this and i can try that and i i don't need to be stuck i don't need to let anybody else i don't need to do that for my to myself i think that was really helpful from abc it's no limits i'm rebecca jarvis in each week we're talking to the most bold and influential women laying at the top of their game trying to demystify success and what it really takes to get there and all the tradeoffs whether you're looking for answers or you just want to hear a good story you're in the right place on today's episode she's been recognized as one of times one hundred most influential people christy turlington burns became one of the most famous models in the world she started her career as a young teenager she's received international acclaim but today she's the ceo and founder of the maternal health organisation every mother counts where she's made it her mission to make pregnancy and childbirth safe for women everywhere around the world at the reason i wanted to have her with us today is to talk about taking that passion something that is deeply apart of your personal mission statement and making something of it starting a movement around it also how do you keep from getting stuck in a box of expectations she clearly has reinvented herself or at least found ways to break out of what people might have expected of her as a model and finally an honor of mother's day how can you help mothers around the world have healthy pregnancy.

rebecca jarvis ceo founder christy turlington