18 Burst results for "Christy Lopez"

"christy lopez" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

10:17 min | 3 months ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on Post Reports

"M. p. d. engages in unconstitutional stops searches and seizures as well as whether the department unlawfully execute search warrants on private homes. It will also assess whether l. mp engages in discriminatory conduct on the basis of race or fails to provide public services that comply with the americans with disability act attorney. General merrick garland framed. This as the start of a process to rebuild trust between at marginalized communities and police all of these steps will be taken with one goal in mind to ensure that policing policies and practices are constitutional. Unlawful that is the same goal as that of our investigation in minneapolis and of every pattern or practice investigation that the department undertakes part of what the department of justice is doing now to address that is it has restarted its program for conducting pattern of practice investigations of police departments under the obama administration. This has been a very robust practice. The obama administration about twenty five investigations a police departments and the trump administration brought one. This week we talked to christy lopez. She's a professor at georgetown law. Who used to work for the justice department looking into local police forces accused of violating civil rights. We wanted to know what it looks like to do. This work on the ground and whether she thinks the feds are the solution to the problem of bad policing i think the department of justice now correctly recognizes that in a democracy. It's dangerous and an embarrassment to have a federal government that doesn't step in when local law enforcement is violating the rights of the people. They're supposed to serve so they're doing that in part to send that message that you know this is actually a law. And order means it means policing pursuant to the law and the rules and it's also recognizing that these individual prosecutions of officers for bad acts are never going to be enough. Because those criminal acts don't happen in a vacuum. They are bolstered by cultures. That make that kind of behavior. Acceptable and tolerated for far too long until something happens. So when you say a pattern or practice investigation. What exactly does that mean like. What is the pattern or practice refer to. We are trying to figure out is is really a two things. One is are there violations of peoples federal or constitutional rights happening on a regular basis. Is it the closer to the rule than the exception. So for example when you review the uses of force are you finding that it's not a rare thing to have a use of force that was unreasonable. Or when you're looking at stops how many of those dots occur not to have been supported by reasonable suspicion. Which is the legal standard. And that's the first step is you're looking to see whether they're violations of the constitution. I should note also federal law and that's important in both minneapolis and louisville. The investigation noticed that the department would be looking at violations of the americans with disabilities act. And that's a federal statute that addresses among other things. The rights of individuals who have behavioral health disabilities and. That's a really important segment in policing. It's people who might find him in the health crisis people who are autistic. And that's the first thing that you're doing is you're looking at whether there is a pattern of violating people's rights. You're also looking at the practices that might be facilitating causing those violations. So you're looking at their systems for investigating misconduct. You're looking at their policies related to force at their training regarding their practices at supervision. All those things that might be causing those legal violations to occur so frequently and so in cases where the department of justice does identify issues with the police department or practices or policies that they say are the cause of these bad outcomes. What can they actually do about it. There's two things that the department of justice can do directly through. This had her practice authority. The first is a right up their findings and they release them publicly in a findings report. Those finding reports really lay out for the public. What happened and why. And i find them really important for affirming people in the communities reality their experiences and in having the federal government come in and say yes this happened. We are affirming that we are going to try to fix that. I think there's an intrinsic independent value in having the department of justice released the findings report like that interesting so people don't feel like they're just screaming into the void. Had they been heard in they. It's been affirmed that what happened to them was wrong and needs to be corrected and those findings reports are picked up by agencies all across the country to better understand problems in their own departments and how to fix them and then the next step is if the pattern or practice demonstrated a pattern violations of people's rights. Then you can sue them or you can ask them to negotiate an agreement to correct the problems and that's usually what happens. In the earlier days of this of enforcing the statute a lot of agreements were memoranda of understanding which were basically private agreements had to be enforced to contract law. We learned the for a couple of reasons. It was important to have consent decrees. Consent decrees have ongoing involved in a federal court which provides kind of pressure That you need in game just ask. What is it consent decree like what does that mean. It's called the consent decree because the parties agree to it so the police department and the city that you are investigating that are the defendants in the lawsuit are green. It's not ordered against their will by judge so you spend a long time negotiating the terms of that agreement so that it will be something that they can agree to and then you enter that into court you go into corny actually entered as a court order so now they're under legal obligations to the court to do everything they said in that decree if they don't do it they can be held in contempt and the court generally has ongoing oversight of the consent decree so calls in the parties on a regular basis to find out how it's going will usually have a monitor to be in the department to be reviewing documents to assess how things are going so that it really allows a much closer look at whether the department is doing what it said. It would do so at least in theory. It's not just a situation where the federal government is saying. You did xyz wrong. And you should fix it at some point that it's supposed to be an ongoing action or relationship where the federal government is basically monitoring the situation so that these local police departments do actually improve. Yeah that's exactly right and you know the problems that have developed in. These agencies are long standing in the department and the really tricky bit is that they really stemmed from dynamics not only within the police department but throughout our society in so bad i think is the next terrain for doj is to really figure out how to look more broadly at what's happening outside the police departments in order to fix what is happening within police departments some curious how this involvement by the department of justice might play out in a city like louisville. Where of course brianna taylor died. There have been a lot of tough questions about the police department there. What exactly is the possibility for change their through this federal process. I think that the department of justice is going to look at a lot of the same issues. it has looked at in the past Especially in louisville in minneapolis. Use of force is obviously going to be a big topic. Hopefully use of swat teams will be something. They look at closely in louisville. But one of the things. I'm most excited about i. Think is most encouraging about the investigations and louisville an minneapolis. is that the department of justice is emphasizing that. They're looking at the treatment of people with behavioral health disabilities. And what i see in that is doj recognizing what communities have been saying that. We need a different response to some sort of calls. We need somebody else besides police. Doj has known that for a while. But what's always been challenging about that. Is that the funding for police. Generally comes from the city while the funding for mental health systems generally comes from a county. So when you're doj you're going in and you're investing police department or a city you're not actually investigating the entity with the power to fix the problems directly but what's great about louisville is that it is co extensive with jefferson county So you have that. That mental health care funding stream coinciding with the policing funding stream. Which may really provide an opportunity for doj to come up with some solutions for how you create a better response to calls from people who are in a health crisis that other jurisdictions can use to try to create the similar kinds of models to have a better response in their own communities. That's really interesting. Because i feel like the thing that i've heard from. Police departments. Specific police officers is that look. We don't want to respond to these mental health calls either like we are not prepared oftentimes to do this and we wish that it were somebody else's problem but there's nobody else and there's no funding for that so it is left to us and it shouldn't be surprising that we're not perfect at it. That's exactly right and in my experience has been the same. I have talked with so many police officers. Who absolutely don't wanna be. Don't wanna be the one responding to a mental health call or you know just the call of someone. Hey there's there's someone who's homeless who sleeping on the stoop outside my house. Why is that a please call or you know. There are kids hanging out in the park. why is that a please call. There's so many things that we have normalized as requiring police response and even police you know they. That's what they signed up to do is not what they wanna do. And we don't need someone with a badge in handcuffs and a gun. And so i feel like this is a start by doj to start addressing that and if they can do that then.

christy lopez taylor brianna minneapolis jefferson Doj louisville This week both two things americans with disabilities ac first disability act first step One one goal about twenty five investigatio one department of justice obama
"christy lopez" Discussed on FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

07:37 min | 11 months ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on FRONTLINE: Audiocast | PBS

"Good good good. I talk to the mayor what I'd been seeing. visit the precepts male MC, people are working. You know we met up one day while he was touring the city's police precincts. We went out with the again to be going around getting guns. In the illegal required you rolling up one fold. How does that happen without being the same slip policing that people have protested about Baraka intelligence? Who is actually somebody? You should probably stop somebody who's just Miss Martha's kid going to the store with his hat to the back. Right? I mean, it's intelligence get you that information not just like random stops. That's not how you police that. Right. There is racism but Riva Black and Brown. COPS. So worse before police force it's not the WHO. Did it that make it raises? To me is the fact that overwhelmingly it happens to us specific group of people is what makes it race become systemic? Most of the problems come from you and like then they believe that. Everybody. Must be a Gangnam going grab you and is wrong is unconstitutional. Not long after spoke, the gang unit was disbanded. and. One of the offices we rode with. Release this fired following multiple complaints against him. At. The same time. The mayor was welcoming the DOJ's help to fit with the stomach problems here. Lack of resources and expertise, and the friction of local politics have long made it difficult for cities like Newark to reform their own police departments. That's why more than twenty five years ago Congress gave the Department of Justice extraordinary powers to police local police departments. happened. In the wake of infamous beating of Rodney King by four, WHITE COPS L A. Guilty of the crime. Officers were acquitted. The city exploded. Congress decided to act. Control Enforcement Act is adopted adding provisions of the Nineteen Ninety Four Crime Bill. The gave the Department of Justice, the power to investigate local police departments and force them to reform. Congress thought it was important for the Justice Department to have a way to really address and engage stomach reform in police departments around the country Vanita Gupta ran the civil rights division of the Justice Department under President Obama. We are here today to announce a landmark agreement between the Justice Department and the city of Albuquerque exhaustive review of the Cleveland Division of police jobs related to policing the city of Malt. Issues its power aggressively. Opening Twenty five new investigations into law enforcement agencies for civil rights violations. All but a few ended up in agreements to, carry out reforms. Many of those court enforced consent decrees, how effective have these decrees been? So. they've been really effective and look, they're not the the net result of our work in police department does not result in perfect police department I? Don't think there is such a thing as a perfect police department but we've seen in police departments over and over again small and big that even where there's deeply entrenched discriminatory policing or a problems with use of force. Or lack of accountability that those are changeable over time. The daily spoke in two thousand Sixteen Gupta was Newark to sign the consent decree. and. The Justice Department I now stand before you to announce this agreement that holds the potential to make. National Model for the agreement with force the city to spend millions of dollars to write new policies, trade officers and overhaul but departments displinary system, and I know that together we're going to be able to write a new chapter for the police officers of Newark and the communities that they serve. Thank you. The city of Newark New Jersey agreed today to reform the way. It's police treat minorities from now on officers actions their use of force and investigations will be closely watched lies at search and seizure policy in car and body worn camera data on all uses of. Trade civilian oversight at as reforms got underway in Newark and the Obama administration continued pushing through an unprecedented number of consent decrees. An entirely different view of race and policing was about to take hold in Washington the war our police must end an must end now. Donald Trump was on his way to victory. And from the very beginning of his presidency. Solidly Investigating Police Departments. Civil rights violations was no longer a priority. Jeff sessions, the new attorney general spelled it out. I, made it clear that this department of Justice will not sign consent craze that will cost lives by handcuffing the police rather than handcuffing the criminals. Fine. How're you doing? Good. Taking the time to talk I recently spoke remotely Christy Lopez who oversaw the deal Jay's police investigations during the Obama. Administration. Many were trying to paint but these consent decrees with radical thing that were happening. And they were not. They really were meant to keep police departments from systematically violating people's Rights Lopez left the department right before jeff sessions took over two thousand eighteen jeff sessions said. At the end of the previous administration came to believe that some of the political leadership of this country had abandoned you speaking to a police officer group. Of. Radicals and. Politicians. Maligned blame police as a whole for the. Of An unacceptable deeds few. Then, goes on to say, let me say this loud and clear as long as I'm attorney general of the United States, the Department of Justice will have the back about honest and honorable law enforcement. As this was happening, all this unfolded I was thinking this man is living in the last century if not two centuries back and this man knows nothing about sleazy. Because I think he cares about police but I don't think he realized how what he was advocating floor actually hurts police along with black. People. How does this hurt black people not next people If you if you tell police at the previous administration was abandoning you because they were insisting that you comport yourself consistently with the constitution. Then, you are telling police that. They have a right to police without comporting themselves to the constitution. Please don't be too nice. Like when you guys put somebody in the car and you're protecting their head the way you put their hand of. Like, don't hit their head and they've just killed somebody..

Justice Department department of Justice Cleveland Division of police Newark Congress President Obama Christy Lopez attorney Miss Martha Baraka Rodney King Riva Black Donald Trump Vanita Gupta Obama administration Washington Albuquerque
"christy lopez" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:11 min | 11 months ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on WTOP

"York will now let them in without quarantining. One of those states is Maryland. It'll be joined by California, Hawaii, Minnesota, Nevada, Nevada and Ohio. New York is lightening up on these states because they're rolling. Seven day average is less than 10 infections per 100,000. By the way. Virginia, Delaware and West Virginia are still on New York's quarantine list, knew this evening to park police officers say they gave chance after chance to a northern Virginia man in a stop and go police chase before firing 10 shots that killed him in 2017. Documents made public just tonight in a civil suit filed by the parents of 25 Year Old John Gays are of McLean provide the first real insight into the thought process of the two officers who shot and killed gays are after a chase on the George Washington Parkway Dash cam Video of the Chase and shooting prompted outrage. Geysers family and several lawmakers believe the officers acted with excessive force, but the officers say they reasonably feared for their lives after Gesar drove toward them. Here's the latest in the shooting death of 18 year old Dion K by D. C. Police. Earlier this month. Body camera video shows Kay had a gun in his hand before he was shot. The shooting is the focus of the city's new Police Reform Commission and the DC auditor's office is working on a two will be meeting with the auditor to make sure that the other has all of our questions. Christy Lopez, co chair of the Police Reform Commission, says the auditor's office has power that the commission lacks including the authority to obtain witness testimony and video. Yo and audio recordings of the shooting. Dion Kaye was shot and killed in southeast during the police chase after officers saw a gun in his hand. What we're going to do is have everybody on the commission all of our requests them all in one place and then give those directly to BBC out of term. The commission was created through police reform legislation that was passed by the D. C council in June. Nick in L A w T o P NEWS Coming up on w t o p an update on the purple line 11 07. It's a great date Exterior medics Are you guys open Because it's pouring inside my living room. Absolutely. And we are for 24.

Police Reform Commission D. C. Police auditor New York Virginia John Gays York Dion Kaye Maryland Nevada Dion K Kay George Washington Parkway West Virginia Christy Lopez Nick Ohio Gesar California Hawaii
"christy lopez" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on WTOP

"Here's the latest in the shooting death of 18 year old Dion K by DC police earlier this month Body camera video shows Kay had a gun in his hand before he was shot. The shooting is the focus of the city's new Police Reform Commission and the DC auditor's office is working on it, too, will be meeting with the auditor to make sure that the other has all of our questions. Christy Lopez, co chair of the Police Reform Commission, says the auditor's office has power that the commission lacks including the authority to obtain witness testimony and video and audio recordings. The shooting. Dion Kaye was shot and killed in southeast during the police chase after officers saw a gun in his hand. What we're going to do is have everybody on the commission all of our requests with them all in one place and then give those directly to BBC upturned. The commission was created through police reform legislation that was passed by the D. C council in June. Nick in Delhi, W. T. O P News 25 year old man who admits to killing a transgender woman he'd known for years has learned he'll spend the next 35 years behind bars. Montgomery County Judge Debra Dwyer called Rico love blonds actions in the 2015 killing, premeditated and entirely unnecessary. LeBron's first trial in 2017 resulted in a hung jury. His second trial ended with a conviction, which was that overturned, the blonde took a plea deal admitting he shot 21 year old zealous Fiona in a Gaithersburg alley after she slighted him and his friends before he was sentenced to the maximum time. Under his plea deal, Leblon turned toward the gallery where Jonas family was sitting in Apologize, saying I hope that in time you're able to cope with this tragic situation..

Police Reform Commission auditor Dion Kaye Dion K Kay Christy Lopez DC Fiona LeBron Montgomery County Judge Debra Dwyer BBC Jonas family Leblon Gaithersburg Nick Delhi D. C council W. T. O Rico
"christy lopez" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:12 min | 11 months ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on WTOP

"73 65 Listen on air on Alexa and on the w T o p AP Good afternoon. Edie's 11 03 on this very foolish Tuesday, September, the 15th were only at 61 degrees. Lo I'm Hillary Howard. Our top local stories. The ransomware attack on Fairfax County Public schools. It's a dilemma. Hackers are demanding money for personal information they say they've stolen from the district's computer network. So what Khun School leaders do? One expert tells w t o p They don't have a lot of options. Callow threat analyst for the cyber security company EMC Soft believes Fairfax has just two choices since its potential data breach they can refuse to pay in which case they stolen days will be published online. Callow says. The other option is Fairfax can pay the demand, which buys a promise from the criminals that the data will be deleted. School system says an investigation involving the FBI is continuing. While Fairfax announced the hack on Friday, the Fairfax County Federation of Teachers says some teachers were getting ransomware messages days earlier. Callow says hackers typically access networks about 56 days before an organization realizes that has a problem. Dick Uliano w T o p News. Meantime, another local school is trading. It's old name for a new one. The Fairfax City School board decided to jettison the name of Lanier Middle School, and that's because it honor Cindy, a. Sidney Lanier Ah Confederate Army soldier known as the poet of the Confederacy. The school board hasn't come up with a replacement. But it's taking suggestions through Friday at city of Fairfax schools dot or GE, As you know, most kids in the region are learning online, and that's leading to problems in Charles County, where students are apparently sending some inappropriate posts during virtual class. In the letter sent to parents yesterday, Charles County Superintendent Kimberly Hill says they're looking into inappropriate posts on zoom created by students and sent his chats to some of their classmates and teachers. County Sheriff's Office has joined the investigation. They've since double down on security and are working with zoom to turn off features that allowed chats to be sent from outside virtual classrooms. Students involved could face suspension, He'll stress the same technology rules inside the classroom also applied to virtual learning. Melissa. How w. T O Penis. Virtual Learning is complicated if kids don't have good Internet access, so Montgomery County Public schools plan to help with 34 million bucks from the federal cares Act. School leaders say more than half that money will directly fund technology related learning, and that includes making sure students have computers and good Internet access. Another 13 million will pay for tutoring to help some kids acclamation to distance learning. In other news today, D C is newly created. Police Reform Commission is investigating after an officer shot and killed Dion K, an 18 year old man. It happened earlier this month. And we're learning. The commission is now working on the case with DCs auditor's office. We will be meeting with the auditor to make sure that the other has all of our questions. Christy Lopez, co chair of the Police Reform Commission, says the His office has power that the commission lacks, including the authority to obtain witness testimony and video and audio recordings of the shooting. Dion Kaye was shot and killed in southeast during the police chase after officers saw a gun in his hand. What we're going to do is have everybody on the commission all of our requests with them all in one place and then give those directly to BBC out of term. The commission was created through police reform legislation that was passed by the D. C council in June. Nick in Delhi. W T o P News Keep it here on w t o P. We have a look at your very autumnal forecast coming up. It's 11 07. It's a great date. Exterior medics. I are you guys open because it's pouring inside my living room. Absolutely. And we are for 24 Hour. Emergency services weaken center.

Police Reform Commission Fairfax Fairfax County Fairfax County Federation of T Fairfax City School Callow Charles County Khun School Hillary Howard Alexa Kimberly Hill County Sheriff's Office Edie Lanier Middle School Lanier Ah Confederate Army Montgomery County FBI auditor
"christy lopez" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

05:42 min | 11 months ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Was just as likely if not more than it was fear of police misconduct that was prompting the move rather than guilt on the part of the the mover which I thought was an historic decision but unfortunately, it's not gotten. Much play, Jilani? COBB can we fast forward to your your current documentary torch Christy Lopez oversaw the Department of Justice is police investigations under President Obama and here she is explaining why it's particularly dangerous. The trump administration is throwing out this oversight playbook and most cases. If you tell police at the previous administration was abandoning you because they were insisting that you comport yourself consistently with the constitution. then. You are telling police that. They have a right to police without comporting themselves to.

President Obama Jilani Christy Lopez COBB Department of Justice
"christy lopez" Discussed on The Daily Beans

The Daily Beans

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on The Daily Beans

"Nineteen year veteran in the force. He had his initial hearing. at the fortified Hannigan county courthouse on a video feed so. That is now what his bail said ads and that's incredibly yeah, I mean I don't really have a reference for that sort of thing I. Guess, but that's a lot of money that he don't anticipate. He's going to post. I would have remanded without bail. He can probably raise that money because he's a cop. Yeah, but or a former cop I should say. But It is what it is, you know. Yeah. I mean I hope to God that that doesn't happen, but that's what it said now. and then finally this is a Oh and he's facing up to forty years in prison is doing the sentencing guidelines? As are the other three for this 'cause. They face the same son so yeah. Final Final Story. This is A. So defend. The police is a phrase that has made. People, you know. That are maybe not as educated on the roots of the phrase in the movement, quite uncomfortable and an author named Christy Lopez, wrote this piece in Washington. Post called de-fund police. Here's what that really means, and it's an amazing amazing article so I'm not going to try to re hash her words in mind. Instead I'm just GonNa take this opportunity to read a couple paragraphs from that and encourage you to read it yourselves. To give that some airtime so here we go. To fix policing. We must first recognize how much we have come to over. Rely on law enforcement, we turn to the police in situations where years of experience and common sense tell us that their involvement is unnecessary can make things worse. We asked police to take accident. Reports respond to people who have overdosed arrest rather than site people who might have intentionally or not pass a counterfeit twenty dollar bill. We call police two rows, homeless people from all corners endorse steps resolve verbal squabbles between family members and strangers alike and arrest children for behavior that once would have been handled as school disciplinary issue. Police themselves often complain about having to do too much. Including handling social problems, for which they are ill-equipped, some have been vocal about the need to decriminalize social problems and take police out of the equation. It is clear that we must reimagined the role. They play in public safety. Re, imagine the role I. think that is one of the most important sentences in this reimagined the role they play in public safety, defunding and abolition probably means something different from what you are thinking for most proponents defunding the police does not mean zeroing out budgets for public safety and police abolition does not mean that police will disappear overnight, or perhaps ever defending the police means shrinking the scope of police responsibilities and shifting most of what government does to keep.

Hannigan county courthouse overdosed Christy Lopez Washington
"christy lopez" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The national conversation that we're having in this country right now about systemic economic racism turns today on three words D. fund the police in Minneapolis where George Floyd was killed by police is super majority of the city council there says it wants to dismantle its police force and in part because that define the police has become kind of a catch phrase for a really complicated problem so marketplace's Kimberly Adams spent her day today talking to people about what it might mean concepts like defunding or dismantling or even abolishing the police are a bit more nuance to then may come across in a protest chant Christy Lopez is co director of the innovative policing program at Georgetown law and used to work at the department of justice investigating police departments she says when people talk about defunding police it doesn't mean that you zero out budgets for public safety it may mean that you decrease and get rid of the please part per se but you might still have something like an office of public safety so what would it do Ron surpassed spent thirty years in law enforcement police chief in New Orleans and Nashville chief of the Washington state patrol and in all that time about ninety percent of all the police department calls that I've looked at in my life have nothing to do with a major uniform crime has nothing to do with rape murder robbery burglary assault nothing surpassed now teaches at Loyola University in New Orleans he says cops spend most of their time responding to auto accidents noise complaints lots of calls about people dealing with substance abuse and when someone is having a mental health crisis we often are sending out the police to abjure Holden runs the Minnesota branch of the National Alliance on mental illness she says the state has mobile mental health crisis teams that can respond unfortunately they're not fully funded so that they can respond twenty four seven to every call that comes in which means the police legally have to says Jim Burch president of the national police foundation the bottom line is who else would you call on a Saturday afternoon or in the middle of the night on a Friday night to come and respond to help address the dispute or disagreement there literally is no one else to call part of the work ahead for Minneapolis is figuring out whose job it should be to take those calls in Washington I'm Kimberly Adams for market place we spent quite a bit of time on the program on Friday talking about the may unemployment reported how surprising it was in a way better than expected way but it turns out if it wasn't something called a mis classification error the bureau of labor statistics says made the actual unemployment rate might have been three percentage points higher than reported for may and five percentage points higher for April that is not suffice it to say how things usually go so we have got Eric groschen on the phone she was the commissioner of the bureau of labor statistics from two thousand thirteen to two thousand seventeen welcome program it's a pleasure to be here first of all let me get your gut reaction from Friday morning eight thirty east coast time you see that jobs report and what do you think I was surprised I like many other people expected to see further deterioration and instead saw a partial rebound yeah and I'm sure you will like it a lot of people scroll down and read through that whole thing and found this note about miss classification could you as simply an N. as lazy person friendly paragraph or two as you could explain what this miss classification error is and what's sure so this is the result of the normal interviewers asking the normal questions that they always ask and BLS was trying asks a series of questions about people's activities that allows BLS to them put to put them into these conceptual buckets are you employed are you not employed if you're not employed are you unemployed or are you out of the labor force that's that's how we get the unemployment rate and and this is better than asking people for their opinion about whether they're employed or unemployed right now which which I get right but now we have people not answering I suppose in a way that the surveyors would've expected and we have three percent errors for may and five percent errors for April numbers would have been much higher which as I'm sure you appreciate is a very big deal why is this so hard right now my guess is I'm put I visualize is that you have a lot of people who one day discovered they were staying home rather than going to work and they had some kind of conversation with their bosses but maybe even you know most of them never received any kind of piece of paper saying you are on temporary layoff until I can recall you and so people don't think of themselves as having a job but not at work yeah last thing the let you go at as you well know because you were in office at the time Donald Trump when he was a candidate accused the bureau of labor statistics of innocence cooking the books to benefit the democratic candidate and president Obama as I'm sure you're also where the pregnant Nobel Prize winning economist on Friday said well I hope the trump administration didn't get to these numbers implying in essence the same thing that then candidate trump had done is it possible to politically manipulate these numbers now this is a much more like a factory process than most people realize it's highly automated a plus that would be really hard and then subverting the really strong internal culture to achieve that it it's impossible nevertheless I do think that it is reasonable all at all times to seek verification of that and certainly I always have my eyes open for red flags and I saw no red flags this time Erica Grossman is a former commissioner of the bureau of labor statistics during the Obama administration now at Cornell regression thank your time I appreciate a man you're very welcome Wall Street day the day we officially learned we are in a recession Wall Street said that again yeah no it's all good we'll have the details when we do the numbers a lot of big brands and companies have been doing the expected the past week or ten days taking a stand against.

Minneapolis
What it means to defund police

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:20 min | 1 year ago

What it means to defund police

"Conversation that we're having in this country right now about systemic economic racism. Turns today on three words, De Fund, the police. In Minneapolis where George Floyd was killed by police. A Super Majority of the city council there says it wants to dismantle its police force, and in part because that defined the police has become kind of a catch phrase for a really complicated problem, so marketplace's Kimberly. Adams spent her day today, talking to people about what it might mean, concepts like defunding or dismantling or even abolishing the police are a bit more nuance to then may come across a protest. Chant Christy Lopez is co director of the innovative policing program at Georgetown Law and used to work at the Department of Justice Investigating police departments. She says when people talk about defunding police. It doesn't mean that you route budgets for public safety. It may mean that you decrease. Get rid of the police department per se, but you might still have something like an office of public safety. So, what would it do? Ron Surpass spent thirty years in law. Enforcement Police chief in New Orleans in Nashville, chief of the Washington State Patrol, and in all that time about ninety percent of all the police department calls that I've looked at in my life. have nothing to do with a major uniform crime. Crime has nothing to do right murder robbery burglary assault theft auto, nothing surpass now teaches at Loyola University in New Orleans. He says cop spend most of their time. Responding to auto accidents, noise complaints, lots of calls about people dealing with substance abuse. And when someone is having a mental health crisis, we often are sending out the police. Sue Abdur Holden runs the Minnesota branch of the National Alliance on mental illness she. She says the state has mobile mental health crisis teams that can respond. Unfortunately, they're not fully funded so that they can respond twenty four seven to every call that comes in which means the police legally have to says Jim Birch President of the National Police Foundation. The bottom line is who else would you call on a Saturday afternoon or in the middle of the night on a Friday night to come and respond. Respond to help address a dispute or disagreement. There literally is no one else to

National Police Foundation Enforcement Police Sue Abdur Holden Christy Lopez Georgetown Law Ron Surpass New Orleans De Fund George Floyd Minneapolis Jim Birch Washington State Patrol Department Of Justice Adams Loyola University President Trump Director National Alliance Nashville Murder
"christy lopez" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:58 min | 2 years ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on KCRW

"And individuals, choose T Rowe price T. Rowe price. Invest with confidence. He'd say twenty two. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm David Greene in Ukraine. Lawmakers have voted to impose martial law in the country for the next month. This comes after a naval clash with Russia off the coast of Crimea on Sunday. The seizure of three Ukrainian boats is a serious escalation in the conflict that has been simmering since Russia forcibly annexed Crimea more than four years ago. Let's turn to NPR's correspondent in Moscow. Lucian Kim Lucienne good morning, David. So catch us up briefly if you can about what happened Sunday, and what brought us to this moment. Well, amazingly there is actually general agreement on what happened three Ukrainian naval vessels were trying to pass through a narrow bottleneck between the Crimean peninsula and the Russian mainland the Russian coast guard didn't want that to happen and stop them with force. And now two dozen Ukrainian semen that are detained as well. As a boats and Ukraine says six of those seamen are injured the bone of. Of contention here is that narrow bottleneck it's called the Kerch strait and before the annexation of Crimea ships from both countries could pass through it freely. But since the annexation Russia now controls both sides of it. They've opened a bridge over the Kurt straight sort of symbolically submitting Crimea to Russia, and of course, Ukraine cannot accept any of that. And so now, of course, the big question is will this widen into a larger conflict, which could be really significant you have Ukraine now imposing martial law in ten of its provinces which sounds like I mean, they're preparing for some sort of conflict. But what does it actually mean for life in Ukraine? Well, it's unclear exactly what the government is going to do. Now. There will be some kind of partial military mobilization some strengthening of air defense. The government says they aren't planning to curb civil liberties, but they could still do that. The government did make some concessions to the opposition. They shortened that martial law to one month and also fixed the date for the presidential election to March thirty first next year is really hard to get around the political context. President petro partial of Ukraine who proposed martial law is very unpopular. And of course, by imposing martial law. That's a very good way of sort of focusing people's minds and also mobilizing the population against an outside threat. Oh, interesting says, so there's some speculation. This could be there's some politics behind what the president's doing. There's a lot of speculation about that. What about Russia Lucian? I mean, the Russian foreign ministry is is now warning Kiev and its allies about real consequences. If there is a conflict that does that tell us something about Russia's plans at all. Well, it's always hard to second guess of let your Putin. The Kremlin has already reacted to the imposition of martial law that could it could lead to higher tensions in those border regions and rather ominously. The Kremlin spokesman said today that President Putin will express his viewpoint on the issue in the coming days. But what's clear is that a flare up in this conflict? Also doesn't necessarily hurt. Putin domestically since his reelection in March. He's faced a lot of disillusionment the population over his domestic policies and his approval rating has actually dropped twenty percentage points over the last year. Of course, it was at an all time high right after he annex Crimea back in two thousand fourteen. All right, speaking, NPR's Lucian Kim in Moscow. Listen, thanks. Thank you three. Current and former Chicago police officers are set to go on trial today. They're charged with lying about what really happened the night. Police killed seventeen year old Liqun McDonald officer Jason Van Dyke. Was convicted last month of second degree murder for that shooting. But police reform advocates like, Christy. Lopez say this trial of the officers who allegedly covered for Van Dyke. This trial may get deeper issues in some respects, I think this is more important because if we didn't have people willing to cover up for bad officers, we wouldn't have that officers. Patrick Smith of our member station. WBZ has more officers Jason Van Dyke shot. Mcdonald's sixteen times in October of two thousand fourteen he claimed the McDonald attacked him with a knife. And then even after he shot him to the ground. He kept trying to get up and attack him. Again. The shooting was captured by police dash camera. The video showed McDonald walking away from police showed him fall almost immediately after Van Dyke opened fire and showed the teenager crumpled on the pavement as he took shot after shot, but the three police officers on trial backed up van dykes version of what happened not a single police officer on the scene who wrote up a summary. What they saw. Said anything that can be reconciled with the video Michael Robbins is one of the attorneys for McDonald's family, you had this complete array of of dishonest accounts. And there's this instinctual immediate move to cover up in to close ranks now Chicago police officer Thomas Gaffney, former officer Joseph Walsh and former detective David March or set to go on trial because prosecutors argue they got together to cook up a story to justify Van Dyke killing McDonald, here's special prosecutor, Patricia Brown homes. These defendants lied about what occurred during a police involved shooting. The indictment makes clear that it is unacceptable to obey an official code of silence. Defense attorneys. Insist there's no conspiracy more any crime at all they argue that prosecutors pounced on a few routine errors in police reports. Exaggerating them to satisfy an outraged public one attorney for the officers described the basis for the prosecution's case. As a few pieces of bad paper. Here's defense attorney James McKay at a pretrial hearing..

Ukraine Liqun McDonald Van Dyke Crimea Russia NPR Jason Van Dyke officer President Putin president Moscow David Greene Chicago Rachel Martin T Rowe Kerch strait Lucian Kim Lucienne
"christy lopez" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm David Greene in Ukraine. Lawmakers have voted to impose martial law in the country for the next month. This comes after a naval clash with Russia off the coast of Crimea on Sunday, the seizure of three Ukrainian. In boats is a serious escalation in the conflict that has been simmering since Russia forcibly annexed Crimea more than four years ago. Let's turn to NPR's correspondent in Moscow. Lucian Kim Lucienne good morning, David. So catches up briefly if you can about what happened Sunday, what brought us to this moment. Well, amazingly there is actually general agreement on what happened three Ukrainian naval vessels were trying to pass through a narrow bottleneck between the Crimean peninsula and the Russian mainland the Russian coast guard didn't want that to happen and stop them with force. And now two dozen Ukrainian semen that are detained as well. As the boats and Ukraine's has six of those seamen are injured the bone of contention here is that narrow bottleneck it's called the Kerch strait and before the annexation of Crimea ships from both countries could pass through it freely. But since the annexation Russia now controls both sides of it. They've opened a bridge over the Kurt straight sort of symbolically submitting Crimea to Russia, and of course, Ukraine cannot accept any of. That. And so now, of course, the big question is will this widen into a larger conflict, which could be really significant you have Ukraine now imposing martial law in ten of its provinces which sounds like I mean, they're preparing for some sort of conflict. What does it actually mean for life in Ukraine? Well, it's unclear exactly what the government is going to do. Now. There will be some kind of partial military mobilization some strengthening of air defense. The government says they aren't planning to curb civil liberties, but they could still do that. The government did make some concessions to the opposition. They shortened that martial law to one month and also fixed the date for the presidential election tomorrow thirty-first next year, it's really hard to get around the political context. President a petrol partial of Ukraine who proposed martial law is very unpopular. And of course, by imposing martial law. That's a very good way of sort of focusing people's minds and also mobilizing the population against an outside threat. Oh, interesting says, so there's some speculation. This could be there's some politics behind what the president's doing. There's a lot of speculation about that. What about Russia Lucian? I mean, the Russian foreign ministry is is now warning Kiev and its allies about real consequences. If there is a conflict that does that tell us something about Russia's plans at all. Well, it's always hard to second guess of leading your Putin. The Kremlin has already reacted to the imposition of martial law said could it could lead to higher tensions in those border regions and rather ominously? The Kremlin spokesman said today that President Putin will express his viewpoint on the issue in the coming days. But what's clear is that a flare up in this conflict? Also doesn't necessarily hurt. Putin domestically since his reelection in March. He's faced a lot of disillusionment in the population over his domestic policies and his approval rating has actually dropped twenty percentage points over the last year. Of course, it was at an all time high right after he annex Crimea back in twenty fourteen. All right, speaking to NPR's Lucian Kim in Moscow listening. Thanks. Thank you three. Current and former Chicago police officers are set to go on trial today. They're charged with lying about what really happened the night. Police killed seventeen year old Liqun McDonald officer Jason Van Dyke. Was convicted last month of second degree murder for that shooting. But police reform advocates like, Christy. Lopez say this trial of the officers who allegedly covered for Van Dyke. This trial may get deeper issues in some respects, I think this is more important because if we didn't have people willing to cover up for bad officers, we wouldn't have that officers. Patrick Smith of our member station WBZ has more officer Jason Van Dyke shot. Mcdonald's sixteen times in October of two thousand fourteen he claimed that MacDonald attacked him with a knife. And that even after he shot him to the ground. He kept trying to get up and attack him. Again. The shooting was captured by police dash camera. The video showed McDonald walking away from police showed him fall almost immediately after Van Dyke opened fire and showed the teenager crumpled on the pavement as he took shot after shot, but the three police officers on trial backed up Ben dykes version of what happened not a single police officer on the scene who wrote up a summary of what they saw. Said anything that can be reconciled with the video Michael Robbins is one of the attorneys for McDonald's family, you had this complete array of of dishonest accounts. And there's this instinctual immediate move to cover up and to close ranks now Chicago police officer Thomas Gaffney, former officer Joseph Walsh and former detective David March or set to go on trial because prosecutors argue they got together to cook up a story to justify Van Dyke killing McDonald, here's special prosecutor, Patricia Brown homes. These defendants lied about what occurred during a police involved shooting. The indictment makes clear that it is unacceptable to obey an unofficial code of silence. Defense attorneys insist there's no conspiracy more any crime at all they argue that prosecutors pounced on a few routine errors in police reports. Exaggerating them to satisfy an outrage public one attorney for the officers described the basis for the prosecution's case. As a few pieces of bad paper. Here's defense attorney James McKay at a pretrial hearing..

Ukraine Liqun McDonald Crimea Russia officer NPR President Putin Van Dyke Jason Van Dyke Moscow President David Greene Chicago Rachel Martin Lucian Kim Lucienne Kerch strait Michael Robbins
"christy lopez" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:45 min | 2 years ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm David Greene in Ukraine. Lawmakers have voted to impose martial law in the country for the next month. This comes after a naval clash with Russia off the coast of Crimea on Sunday. The seizure of three Ukrainian boats is a serious escalation of conflict that has been simmering since Russia forcibly annexed Crimea more than four years ago. Let's turn to NPR's correspondent in Moscow. Lucian Kim Lucienne good morning, David. So catches up briefly if you can about what happened Sunday, and what brought us to this moment. Well, amazingly there is actually general agreement on what happened three Ukrainian naval vessels were trying to pass through a narrow bottleneck between the Crimean peninsula and the Russian mainland the Russian coast guard didn't want that to happen and stop them with force. And now two dozen Ukrainian semen that are detained as well. As the boats and Ukraine's has six of those seamen are injured the bone of contention here is that narrow bottleneck. It's called the Kurds. Great and before the annexation of Crimea ships from both countries could pass through freely, but since the annexation Russia now controls both sides of it. They've opened a bridge over the Kurt straight sort of symbolically cemented Crimea to Russia, and of course, Ukraine cannot accept any of that. And so now, of course, the big question is will this widen into a larger conflict, which could be really significant you have Ukraine now imposing martial law in ten of its provinces, which sounds like I mean, they're preparing for some sort of conflict of what does it actually mean for life in Ukraine? Well, it's unclear exactly what the government is going to do. Now. There will be some kind of partial military mobilization some strengthening of air defense. The government says they aren't planning to curb civil liberties, but they could still do that. The government did make some concessions to the opposition. They shortened that martial law to one month and also fixed the date for the presidential election tomorrow thirty-first next year, it's really hard to get around the political context. President petro partial of Ukraine who proposed martial law is very unpopular. And of course, by imposing martial law. That's a very good way of sort of focusing people's minds and also mobilizing the population against an outside threat. Oh, interesting says, so there's some speculation. This could be there's some politics behind what the president's doing. There's a lot of speculation about that. What about Russia? Lucian the Russian foreign ministry is is now warning Kiev and its allies about real consequences. If there is a conflict that does that tell us something about Russia's plans at all. Well, it's always hard to second guess of letting your Putin. The Kremlin has already reacted to the imposition of martial law. It's could it could lead to higher tensions in those border regions and rather ominously. The Kremlin spokesman said today that President Putin will express his viewpoint on the issue in the coming days. But what's clear is that a flare up in this conflict? Also doesn't necessarily hurt. Putin domestically since his reelection in March. He's faced a lot of disillusionment in the population over his domestic policies and his approval rating has actually dropped twenty percentage points over the last year. Of course, it was at an all time high right after he annexed Crimea back in twenty fourteen. All right. Speaking to NPR's Lucian Kim in Moscow. Listen, thanks. Thank you three. Current and former Chicago police officers are set to go on trial today. They're charged with lying about what really happened the night. Police killed seventeen year old Liqun McDonald officer Jason Van Dyke. Was convicted last month of second degree murder for that shooting. But police reform advocates like, Christy. Lopez say this trial of the officers who allegedly covered for Van Dyke. This trial may get deeper issues in some respects, I think this is more important because if we didn't have people willing to cover up for bad officers, we wouldn't have that officers. Patrick Smith of member station WBZ has more officers Jason Van Dyke shot McDonald sixteen times in October of two thousand fourteen he claimed that MacDonald attacked him with a knife. And that even after he shot him to the ground. He kept trying to get up and attack him. Again. The shooting was captured by police dash camera. The video showed McDonald walking away from police showed him fall almost immediately after Van Dyke opened fire and showed the teenager crumpled on the pavement as he took shot after shot, but the three police officers on trial backed up Ben dykes version of what happened not a single police officer on the scene who wrote up a summary. What they saw. Said anything that can be reconciled with the video Michael Robbins is one of the attorneys for McDonald's family, you had this complete array of of dishonest accounts. And there's this instinctual immediate move to cover up in to close ranks now Chicago police officer Thomas Gaffney, former officer Joseph Walsh and former detective David March or set to go on trial because prosecutors argue they got together to cook up a story to justify Van Dyke killing McDonald, here's special prosecutor, Patricia Brown homes. These defendants lied about what occurred during a police involved shooting. The indictment makes clear that it is unacceptable to obey an unofficial code of silence. Defense attorneys insist there's no conspiracy more any crime at all they argue that prosecutors pounced on a few routine errors in police reports. Exaggerating them to satisfy an outraged public one attorney for the officers described the basis for the prosecution's case. As a few pieces of bad paper. Here's defense attorney James McKay at a pretrial hearing..

Ukraine Crimea Liqun McDonald Russia NPR President Putin Van Dyke Jason Van Dyke officer Moscow president David Greene Chicago Rachel Martin Lucian Kim Lucienne Lucian Michael Robbins
"christy lopez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:04 min | 2 years ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm David Greene in Ukraine. Lawmakers have voted to impose martial law in the country for the next month. This comes after a naval clash with Russia off the coast of Crimea on Sunday. The seizure of three Ukrainian boats is a serious escalation in the conflict that has been simmering since Russia forcibly annexed Crimea more than four years ago. Let's turn to NPR's correspondent in Moscow. Lucian Kim, I Lucienne good morning, David. So catch us up briefly if you can about what happened Sunday, and what brought us to this moment. Amazingly. There is actually general agreement on what happened three Ukrainian naval vessels were trying to pass through a narrow bottleneck between the Crimean peninsula and the Russian mainland the Russian coast guard didn't want that to happen and stop them with force. And now two dozen Ukrainian semen that are detained as well. As the boats and Ukraine's has six of those seamen are injured the bone of contention here is that narrow bottleneck it's called the Kerch strait. And before the annexation of Crimea ships from both countries could pass through it freely. But since the annexation Russia now controls both sides of it. They've opened a bridge over the Kurt straight sort of symbolically submitting Crimea to Russia, and of course, Ukraine cannot accept any of that. And so now, of course, the big question is will widen into a larger conflict, which could be really significant you have Ukraine now imposing martial law in ten of its provinces, which sounds like I mean, they're preparing for some sort of conflict of what does it actually mean for life in Ukraine? Well, it's unclear exactly what the government is going to do. Now. There will be some kind of partial military mobilization some strengthening of air defense. The government says they aren't planning to curb civil liberties, but they could still do that. The government did make some concessions to the opposition. They shortened that martial law to one month and also fixed the date for the presidential election tomorrow thirty-first next year, it's really hard to get around the political context. President a petrol partial of Ukraine who proposed martial law is very unpopular. And of course, by imposing martial law. That's a very good way of sort of focusing people's minds and also mobilizing the population against an outside threat. Oh, interesting. So so there's some speculation. This could be there's some politics behind what the president's doing. There's a lot of speculation about that. What about Russia Lucienne? I mean, the Russian foreign ministry is is now warning Kiev and its allies about real consequences. If there is a conflict that does that tell us something about Russia's plans at all. Well, it's always hard to second guess of leading your Putin. The Kremlin has already reacted to the imposition of martial law. It's that could it could lead to higher tensions in those border regions and rather ominously. The Kremlin spokesman said today that President Putin will express his viewpoint on the issue in the coming days. But what's clear is that a flare up in this conflict? Also doesn't necessarily hurt. Putin domestically since his reelection in March. He's faced a lot of disillusionment in the population over his domestic policies and his approval rating has actually dropped twenty percentage points over the last year. Of course, it was at an all time high right after annex Crimea back in twenty fourteen. All right. Speaking to NPR's Lucian Kim in Moscow. Listen, thanks. Thank you three. Current and former Chicago police officers are set to go on trial today. They're charged with lying about what really happened the night. Police killed seventeen year old Liqun McDonald officer Jason Van Dyke. Was convicted last month of second degree murder for that shooting. But police reform advocates like, Christy. Lopez say this trial of the officers who allegedly covered for Van Dyke. This trial may get deeper issues in some respects, I think this is more important because if we didn't have people willing to cover up for bad officers, we wouldn't have that officers. Patrick Smith of our member station. WBZ has more officers Jason Van Dyke shot. Mcdonald's sixteen times in October of two thousand fourteen he claimed at McDonald's attacked him with a knife. And that even after he shot him to the ground. He kept trying to get up and attack him. Again. The shooting was captured by police dash camera. The video showed McDonald walking away from police showed him fall almost immediately after Van Dyke opened fire and showed the teenager crumpled on the pavement as he took shot after shot, but the three police officers on trial backed up Ben dykes version of what happened not a single police officer on the scene who wrote up a summary of what they saw. Said anything that can be reconciled with the video Michael Robbins is one of the attorneys for McDonald's family, you had this complete array of dishonest accounts. And there's this instinctual immediate moved to cover up and to close ranks now Chicago police officer Thomas Gaffney, former officer Joseph Walsh and former detective David March or set to go on trial because prosecutors argue they got together to cook up a story to justify Van Dyke killing McDonald, here's special prosecutor, Patricia Brown homes. These defendants lied about what occurred during a police involved shooting. The indictment makes clear that it is unacceptable to obey an unofficial code of silence. Defense attorneys insist there's no conspiracy more any crime at all they argue that prosecutors pounced on a few routine errors in police reports. Exaggerating them to satisfy an outraged public one attorney for the officers described the basis for the prosecution's case. As a few pieces of bad paper. Here's defense attorney James McKay at a pretrial hearing. Sham. Politics. Mccain is co counsels say prosecutors are basing their case on a meeting between the officers hours after the shooting, but they argue those sorts of meetings are common after police shootings, and there's no conspiracy here. This is a bench trial, meaning judge not a jury will decide the case and police reform advocates say the outcome is vitally important to rooting out the so-called code of silence. Among officers, Christy. Lopez worked in the civil rights division at the US department of Justice until last year and help lead investigations into police departments across the country, including in Chicago and Ferguson. She says it's rare that officers face any discipline at all for cover-ups. Let alone go on trial. I hope it sends a message to offer everywhere that it's not worth their careers. And it's not what their integrity to cover up for someone who's violated someone else's right now, it will be up to the judge to decide whether these three officers are guilty of obstruction of Justice official misconduct and conspiracy. Or if all they did was make mistakes in their paper. Work for NPR news. I'm Patrick Smith in Chicago. You're.

Ukraine Liqun McDonald Russia NPR Chicago Jason Van Dyke Crimea Van Dyke President Putin officer Lucian Kim Moscow Patrick Smith President Christy David Greene Lopez
"christy lopez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:42 min | 2 years ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm David Greene in Ukraine. Lawmakers have voted to impose martial law in the country for the next month. This comes after a naval clash with Russia off the coast of Crimea on Sunday. The seizure of three Ukrainian boats is a serious escalation in a conflict that has been simmering since Russia forcibly annexed Crimea more than four years ago. Let's turn to NPR's correspondent in Moscow. Lucian Kim, I Lucienne good morning, David. So catch us up briefly if you can about what happened Sunday, and what brought us to this moment. Well, amazingly there is actually general agreement on what happened three Ukrainian naval vessels were trying to pass through a narrow bottleneck between the Crimean peninsula and the Russian mainland the Russian coast guard didn't want that to happen and stop them with force. And now two dozen Ukrainian semen are detained as well. As the boats and Ukraine says six of those seamen are injured the bone of contention here is that narrow bottleneck it's called the curbs. Great and before the annexation of Crimea ships from both countries could pass through it freely. But since the annexation Russia now controls both sides of it. They've opened a bridge over the Kurt straight sort of symbolically submitting Crimea to Russia, and of course, Ukraine cannot accept any of that. And so now, of course, the big question is will this widened into a larger conflict, which could be really significant you have Ukraine now imposing martial law in ten of its provinces, which sounds like I mean, they're preparing for some sort of conflict of what does it actually mean for life in Ukraine? It's unclear exactly what the government is going to do. Now. There will be some kind of partial military mobilization some strengthening of air defense. The government says they aren't planning to curb civil liberties, but they could still do that. The government did make some concessions to the opposition. They shortened that martial law to one month and also fixed the date for the presidential election to March thirty first next year. It's really hard to get around the political context. President a petrol partial of Ukraine who propose martial law is very unpopular. And of course, by imposing martial law. That's a very good way of sort of focusing people's minds and also mobilizing the population against an outside threat. Oh, interesting. So so there's some speculation. This could be there's some politics behind what the president's doing. There's a lot of speculation about that. What about Russia Lucian? I mean, the Russian foreign ministry is is now warning Kievan its allies about real consequences. If there is a conflict does that tell us something about Russia's? Plans at all. Well, it's always hard to second guess of leading Putin. The Kremlin has already reacted to the imposition of martial law that could it could lead to higher tensions in those border regions and rather ominously. The Kremlin spokesman said today that President Putin will express his viewpoint on the issue in the coming days. But what's clear is that a flare up in this conflict? Also doesn't necessarily hurt. Putin domestically since his reelection in March. He's faced a lot of disillusionment in the population over his domestic policies and his approval rating is actually dropped twenty percentage points over the last year. Of course, it was at an all time high right after annex Crimea back in two thousand fourteen. All right. Speaking to NPR's Lucian Kim in Moscow listening. Thanks. Thank you three. Current and former Chicago police officers are set to go on trial today. They're charged with lying about what really happened the night. Police killed seventeen year old Lequan McDonald officer Jason Van Dyke was convicted. Last month of second degree murder for that shooting. But police reform advocates like, Christy. Lopez say this trial of the officers who allegedly covered for Van Dyke. This trial may get deeper issues in some respects, I think this is more important because if we didn't have people willing to cover up for bad officers, we wouldn't have that officers. Patrick Smith of our member station. WBZ has more officers Jason Van Dyke shot. Mcdonald's sixteen times in October of two thousand fourteen he claimed that MacDonald attacked him with a knife. And then even after he shot him to the ground. He kept trying to get up and attack him. Again. The shooting was captured by police dash camera. The video showed McDonald walking away from police showed him fall almost immediately after Van Dyke opened fire and showed the teenager crumpled on the pavement as he took shot after shot, but the three police officers on trial backed up Ben dykes version of what happened not a single police officer on the scene who wrote up a summary of what they saw said any. Anything that can be reconciled with the video Michael Robbins is one of the attorneys for McDonald's family, you had this complete array of dishonest accounts. And there's this instinctual immediate move to cover up in to close ranks now Chicago police officer Thomas Gaffney, former officer Joseph Walsh and former detective David March or set to go on trial because prosecutors argue they got together to cook up a story to justify Van Dyke killing McDonald, here's special prosecutor, Patricia Brown homes. These defendants lied about what occurred during a police involved shooting. The indictment makes clear that it is unacceptable to obey an unofficial code of silence. Defense attorneys insists there's no conspiracy more any crime at all they argue that prosecutors pounced on a few routine errors in police reports. Exaggerating them to satisfy outraged public one attorney for the officers described the basis for the prosecution's case as a few. Pieces of bad paper. Here's defense attorney James McKay at a pretrial hearing sham. That announce. Mccain is co counsel say prosecutors are basing their case on a meeting between the officers hours after the shooting, but they argue those sorts of meetings are common after police shootings, and there's no conspiracy here. This is a bench trial, meaning judge not a jury will decide the case and police reform advocates say the outcome is vitally important to rooting out the so-called code of silence. Among officers, Christy. Lopez worked in the civil rights division at the US department of Justice until last year and help lead investigations into police departments across the country, including in Chicago and Ferguson. She says it's rare that officers face any discipline at all for cover-ups. Let alone go on trial. I hope it sends a message to often it everywhere that it's not worth their careers. And it's not what their integrity to cover up for someone who's violated someone else's right now, it will be up to the judge to decide whether these three officers are guilty of obstruction of Justice official misconduct and conspiracy. Or if all they did was make mistakes in their paperwork for NPR news. I'm pat. Patrick Smith in Chicago. You're listening to NPR news. Cherise Hickson welcomed her doctors offer of a new drug to fighting what she was not prepared for was the price. Her copay was worth three thousand dollars is very unfair. You're sick. And you have to now deal with another headache on top of being. I'm Mary Louise Kelley our latest look into your medical bills this afternoon on all things considered from NPR news. Catch.

Ukraine NPR Russia Lequan McDonald Chicago Van Dyke Crimea Lucian Kim President Putin officer Jason Van Dyke Patrick Smith Moscow President Christy David Greene
"christy lopez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm David Greene in Ukraine. Lawmakers have voted to impose martial law in the country for the next month. This comes after a naval clash with Russia off the coast of Crimea on Sunday. The seizure of three Ukrainian boats is a serious escalation in the conflict that has been simmering since Russia forcibly annexed Crimea more than four years ago. Let's turn to NPR's correspondent in Moscow. Lucian Kim Lucienne good morning, David. So catch us up briefly. If you can't about what happened Sunday, and what brought us to this moment. Well, amazingly there is actually general agreement on what happened three Ukrainian naval vessels were trying to pass through a narrow bottleneck between the Crimean peninsula and the Russian mainland the Russian coast guard didn't want that to happen and stop them with force. And now to dozen Ukrainian semen that are detained wells boats and Ukraine says six of those seamen are injured the bone of contention here is that narrow bottleneck it's called the Kerch strait and before. For the annexation of Crimea ships from both countries could pass through it freely. But since the annexation Russian now controls both sides of it. They've opened a bridge over the Kurt straight sort of symbolically submitting Crimea to Russia, and of course, Ukraine cannot accept any of that. And so now, of course, the big question is will this widen into a larger conflict, which could be really significant, and you have Ukraine now imposing martial law in ten of its provinces which sounds like I mean, they're preparing for some sort of conflict. What does it actually mean for life in Ukraine? It's unclear exactly what the government is going to do. Now. There will be some kind of partial military mobilization some strengthening of air defense. The government says they aren't planning to curb civil liberties, but they could still do that. The government did make some concessions to the opposition. They shorten that. Martial law to one month and also fixed the date for the presidential election. Tomorrow thirty first next year, it's really hard to get around the political context. President petro parsh- ankle of Ukraine who proposed martial law is very unpopular. And of course, by imposing martial law. That's a very good way of sort of focusing people's minds and also mobilizing the population against an outside threat. Oh, interesting says, so there's some speculation. This could be there's some politics behind what the president's doing. There's a lot of speculation about that. What about Russia Lucian? I mean, the Russian foreign ministry is is now warning Kiev and its allies about real consequences. If there is a conflict does that tell us something about Russia's plans at all? Well, it's always hard to second guess of letting your Putin. The Kremlin has already reacted to the imposition of martial law. It's that could it could lead to higher tensions in those border regions and rather ominously. The Kremlin spokesman said today that President Putin will express his viewpoint on the issue in the coming days. But what's clear is that a flare up in this conflict? Also doesn't necessarily hurt. Putin domestically since his reelection in March. He's faced a lot of disillusionment in the population over his domestic policies and his approval rating has actually dropped twenty percentage points over the last year. Of course, it was at an all time high right after annex Crimea back in twenty fourteen. All right, speaking to NPR's Lucian Kim in Moscow listening. Thanks. Thank you three. Current and former Chicago police officers are set to go on trial today. They're charged with lying about what really happened the night. Police killed seventeen year old Lequan McDonald officer Jason Van Dyke. Was convicted last month of second degree murder for that shooting. But police reform advocates like, Christy. Lopez say this trial of the officers who allegedly covered for Van Dyke. This trial may get deeper issues in some respects, I think this is more important because if we didn't have people willing to cover up for bad officers, we wouldn't have that officers. Patrick Smith of our member station. WBZ has more officers Jason Van Dyke shot. Mcdonald's sixteen times in October of two thousand fourteen he claimed McDonald attacked him with a knife. And then even after he shot him to the ground. He kept trying to get up and attack him. Again. The shooting was captured by police dash camera. The video showed McDonald walking away from police showed him fall almost immediately after Van Dyke opened fire and showed the teenager crumpled on the pavement as he took shot after shot, but the three police officers on trial backed up Van Dyke version of what happened not a single police officer on the scene who wrote up a summary. What they saw. Said anything that can be reconciled with the video Michael Robbins is one of the attorneys for McDonald's family, you had this complete array of dishonest accounts. And there's this instinctual immediate move to cover up and to close ranks now Chicago police officer Thomas Gaffney, former officer Joseph Walsh and former detective David March are set to go on trial because prosecutors argue they got together to cook up a story to justify Van Dyke killing McDonald, here's special prosecutor, Patricia Brown homes. These defendants lied about what occurred during a police involved shooting. The indictment makes clear that it is unacceptable to obey an unofficial code of silence. Defense attorneys insists there's no conspiracy more any crime at all they argue that prosecutors pounced on a few routine errors in police reports. Exaggerating them to satisfy an outraged public one attorney for the officers described the basis for the prosecution's case. As a few pieces of bad paper. Here's defense attorney James McKay at a pretrial hearing. Sham. It's not an evidence politics. Mccain is co counsels say prosecutors are basing their case on a meeting between the officers hours after the shooting, but they argue those sorts of meetings are common after police shootings, and there's no conspiracy here. This is a bench trial. Meaning a judge not a jury will decide the case and police reform advocates say the outcome is vitally important to rooting out the so-called code of silence. Among officers, Christy. Lopez worked in the civil rights division at the US department of Justice until last year and help lead investigations into police departments across the country, including in Chicago in Ferguson. She says it's rare that officers face any discipline at all for cover-ups. Let alone go on trial. I hope it sends a message to offices everywhere that it's not worth their careers. And it's not what their integrity to cover up for someone who's violated someone else's right now, it will be up to the judge to decide whether these three officers are guilty of obstruction of Justice official misconduct and conspiracy. Or if all they did was make mistakes in.

Ukraine Lequan McDonald Van Dyke Jason Van Dyke Russia Crimea Chicago President Putin officer NPR Moscow Christy Lucian Kim Lucienne David Greene Lopez Rachel Martin
"christy lopez" Discussed on 16 Shots

16 Shots

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on 16 Shots

"Present on on seated last week the defendants had their final hearing before the trial starts, right? All the time then for Mr. Marci filed a defendant demanded trial. Right. So are you continuing demand? Bencher jury indicated will Calloway was in the courtroom watching you've heard for him throughout this podcast. He helped lead efforts to get the video of the shooting of Liqun McDonald released after the hearing our reporter Patrick Smith talked to him in the courthouse lobby. So this is the final status hearing before the conspiracy trial starts wise, this trial important, you a couple of things I think accosts thorough Justice for the quantum McDonald? Because if you would have offices would have stood up and said exactly what happened. We wouldn't even have probably have to get to this point. I think that this asked to deal with the blue code of silence on man for years we've seen Chicago police department in a community. We've been saying that they've been covering up in is this this time, we finally are able to whole officers accountable Calloway was one of the few spectators in the courtroom that day when the trial actually starts. We aren't expecting the same size of crowns that were at the murder trial. And they're likely won't be as big of a media frenzy as there was for Van Dyke, but Christy Lopez says this trial could be key to how the country thinks and talks about policing going forward. Lopez worked in the civil. Rights division at the US department of Justice until last year. I don't want to discount the importance of advantage trial. Verdict. I think it was incredibly important, but in some respects, I think this state is more important because if we didn't have people willing to cover up for bad officers, we wouldn't have that officers, and when you talk to people and communities there are bad for two more betrayed in. It does more to undermine the legitimacy of police when they're audited on the scene who don't don't tell what happened mopeds worked on the team that investigated, the Ferguson, Missouri police department and she's worked on investigations into other law enforcement agencies, including Chicago's police department. She says the code of silence was an issue in most if not all the places she's investigated, and when you talk to people and communities their bathroom two more betrayed into in. It does more to undermine the legitimacy of police when they're offered on the scene who don't don't tell what happened and Lopez hopes police office. Will be watching this trial, not just in Chicago. But across the country. I hope it sends a message to often it everywhere that it's not worth their careers. And it's not what their integrity to cover up for someone who's violated someone else's right? Opening statements are scheduled for Monday. And we'll be there, and we'll be reporting. There are major developments. Estimates are the trial will only last a few days. So check back soon. Sixteen shots is production of WBZ Chicago. And the Chicago Tribune you can find out more about the case at WBZ dot org slash sixteen shots. Let's be honest. There's too much news to catch up on especially after a long day at work. But WBZ Chicago has your back our new daily newsletter the rundown. We'll keep you informed with the five. Biggest local national and international stories delivered right to your inbox. Subscribe for free by texting rundown. Two three zero six four four.

WBZ Chicago Christy Lopez Calloway US department of Justice Chicago Chicago Tribune Mr. Marci McDonald Van Dyke Liqun McDonald murder Patrick Smith reporter Missouri Ferguson
"christy lopez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Need to change a corrupt coach. Get cold. There's been plenty of political fallout mirror. Manuel's announcement that he's not running again, a police superintendent ousted a county prosecutor lost her reelection bid. There. Also have been sweeping police reforms that include de escalation training for cops. Some of the changes occurred as the US Justice department issued a scathing report, they found the Chicago police often used unnecessary deadly force, especially against minorities. The report prompted calls for federal oversight of the department and was formerly called a consent decree. That's something the police union adamantly opposes, Christy. Lopez is a former Justice department attorney who helped lead the investigation. She says the recommendations in a draft consent decree that what mandate reforms are a milestone, what this consent decree does is it attempts to address each of those components that allowed the look Donald and so many other problematic incidents to occur components like training, disciplined recruitment and. Accountability. All things she says that must be addressed in order to change the culture of a police department. Activists gathered recently at Chicago city hall, Maria Hernandez, an organizer with black lives matter said the draft consent decree for Chicago police simply doesn't go far enough. She's also urging people to show up at Chicago's criminal courts building today saying it's time for the city to make history we need to convict Van Dyke we need consent decree to reflect the demands of the people most impacted and we need everyone in the streets at twenty six in California on September fifth when this trial happens a trial that could have long term implications for the city, the Chicago police department and the trust between police and neighborhoods. Cheryl, corley NPR news, Chicago. This is NPR news. And this is WNYC in New York at seven nineteen seventy eight degrees and sunny in New York City coming up on morning edition, Senate Democrats are trying to derail Brett Cavanaugh supreme court confirmation process. This is the most incomplete most partisan these transparent, very for any supreme court nominee I've ever seen. So far, though these attempts haven't garnered all that much support. We'll have that story in about fifteen minutes and a reminder that you can hear.

Chicago US Justice department Chicago city hall Lopez NPR New York City Manuel Christy Maria Hernandez Brett Cavanaugh superintendent Van Dyke Donald Cheryl New York attorney prosecutor California
"christy lopez" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:24 min | 3 years ago

"christy lopez" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Public protests in the hearing gallery. As well. One by one each democrat on the Senate Judiciary committee interrupted the proceedings to argue that they have been denied crucial documents about Cavanaugh. And as a result. The hearing should be delayed democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut made one of the motions to delay. And he joins us now. Thanks so much for being with us. Senator. Thank you, Rachel you said yesterday, the process would be in your words tainted and stained forever because you haven't been given all the relevant documents Republican Senator Chuck Grassley, the chair says you already have half a million pages. So what are you? What do you not have that you need? What we lack is the key documents relating to a period of this nominees professional career in the Bush White House that he says is the most formative in fact, it may well be the most important, and we have a lot of documents. But they're only a fraction less than ten percent of all the relevant documents that we need to really advise and consent, and this concealing and hiding documents raise the question. What are they afraid of showing the American people we don't know within those documents that have been concealed? But as a prosecutor, I can tell you I want to know what someone is concealing in order may contract. Although Republicans as you know, say that that would be untenable that Cavanaugh. The documents are talking about are from when Cavanaugh served as a staff secretary to President George W Bush where he was in charge of making sure that all the paperwork that came to the president was vetted properly, and that that would just be. Simply impossible to release all that information. And that it wouldn't be germane anyway because this is separate from his time in the office of legal counsel. It wouldn't give any bearing to his judicial history. The Republicans have this bogus notion that the staff secretary the president is just a traffic cop, which everybody knows is totally untrue. The fact is that these documents will reflect on the key issues that matter so much there's so much at stake. Here what this nominee thinks about whether women should be able to continue to decide when they have children whether people should continue to be able to marry the person they love whether we will be protected from an imperial presidency. Whether people will be protected from abuses in the healthcare system, like pre existing conditions, all of those views may well, be reflected in these documents. And remember, Rachel all these documents will in fact, come out at some point in the. The next few years by law the presidential records act. They have to be released we should have them now. And my colleagues who are concealing them will be judged harshly. If we find some of the bombshells, we think maybe lurking in them how much difference because they could they make I wanna play a clip for you from Senator Ted Cruz Republican of Texas yesterday. There's an old saying for trial lawyers. If you have the facts pound the facts, if you have the law pound the law if you have neither pound the table. We're seeing a lot of table pounding this morning. Several of your colleagues have indicated that they're already they've already decided they're gonna vote no-one cavenaugh. You have said so explicitly is there really anything in these missing documents that would change your mind on him, the American people need to know, what this nominees views are. That's why we're going to be asking tough challenging questions today about whether this nominees writings and opinions and nothing in the. Those documents that would change your mind. Is there a possibility you could vote? Yes. I'm on this nominee. But the important opinions here are of the American people. They're the ones who are going to sway the few key votes in the United States Senate that will make a difference. Ultimately, the court is in fact, the court of public opinion there the jury, and that's why these documents should be available to them. So they can see them. You're a democrat in a highly partisan political moment where clearly the legacy of Merrick garland, looms large Obama's nominee to the court who has never given hearing you are likely I think it's fair to say to take issue with any nominee topped by a Republican president right now, what evidence do you have to suggest that Brett Cavanaugh is outside the judicial mainstream that he is somehow an exceptional Republican nominee. He's taken extreme positions on possibly overturning Roe v. Wade that's the reason that he passed the Trump litmus test, which was a Justice who will automatically his word overturn Roe v. Wade. He. He has taken positions on striking down gun violence protection laws if they in effect didn't exist at the time the constitution was written. And he's taken a view on the presidency. That would give the chief executive the power to refuse to enforce any law. He deemed unconstitutional refused to comply with a subpoena before the grand jury and possibly in effect overturn laws that are duly passed by the congress Senator Richard Blumenthal, democrat member of the Senate Judiciary committee. Thanks for your time, sir. Thank you NPR's. Scott detro- has been covering the cavenaugh hearing San was listening into that conversation. I mean, we heard Senator Blumenthal their list off the several issues. He's going to be looking out for today questions he wants answered including Kavanagh's views on executive power. This is something. That's definitely gonna come up today. Definitely. He's he's written in the past that he skeptical of the idea that that a sitting president should have to answer the litigation should have to answer to subpoenas. Obviously a key issue. Right now, Democrats are going to focus on that ask a lot about abortion rights about the legality of ObamaCare as he sees it. But Democrats are gonna be frustrated by two things. First of all the fact that Kavanagh's likely not going to go into great detail on his personal opinions on any of those issues. No matter how many times they ask because they never do. They never do this pretty standard at this point. Secondly, the votes yesterday. Arizona's governor appointed John Kyle to replace John McCain in the Senate, that's another sure vote for for Cavanaugh. Kyle was the one shepherding him around office buildings. It's just hard to see how this vote fails at this point. NPR's Scott detro- force this morning. He'll be covering the Cavanaugh hearing stay to today. Thanks so much. Thank you. Jury selection is beginning today in Chicago in the trial for a white police officer accused of killing the Quan McDonald, a black seventeen year old this trial is getting underway. Just a week. After a case in Texas, where the jury took the rare step of convicting a police officer of murder and sentencing him to prison for fatally shooting at teenager as NPR's shero corley reports the case in Chicago has prompted protests demanding Justice and police reforms there's one protest chant that's become a mantra and the Chicago case. Sixteen shots in a cover up. It's a reference to the shooting of lukewarm McDonald by officer Jason Van Dyke and a graphic silent. Police dash Cam video released a year after the shooting officer Van Dyke opens fire a few seconds after he exits his police car. He shoots McDonald's sixteen times. I never would have done this. If I didn't think my life or somebody else's life was in danger in an interview last week on a local Fox TV affiliate Van Dyke. Sandy was following the training he received from the Chicago police department and acted in self defense. Police contend McDonnell lunged at officers with a knife. The video tells a different story it shows McDonnell knife in hand walking away Van Dyke is charged with murder and aggravated battery. He's pleaded not guilty critics charge. The mayor Rahm Emanuel tried to keep the video under wraps during a tough reelection campaign. The mayor who announced yesterday that he won't seek a third term always denied that. Charge and three years ago during a city council meeting. He apologized for McDonald's death what happened on October twentieth. Two thousand fourteen should never have happened supervision and leadership in the police department and the oversight agencies that were in place failed and that has to change. There are about a thousand police shootings every year says bowling green state university criminologists, Phil Stinson. Most are deemed justifiable since two thousand and five only ninety three officers across the country has been charged in one of those cases out of those ninety three about a third have been convicted. It was just a week ago in Texas that a jury took the rare step convicting a police officer of murder sentencing him to prison for fatally shooting at teenager. It's been decades in Chicago since a police officer faced a murder charge for an on duty fatality. Then dykes attorney has long argued that his client can't get a fair trial because of all the publicity. He calls the case a tragedy. Not. Cause for murder charge. After an earlier court hearing Marvin hunter lukewarm McDonald's. Great uncle said, his nephew's death was indeed a tragedy and an all too familiar one for African Americans during encounters with police, we need to change a corrupt culture. There's been plenty of political fallout. Mayor emanuel's announcement that he's not running again, a police superintendent ousted a county prosecutor lost her re election bid. There also have been sweeping police reforms that include deescalation training cops some of the changes occurred as the US Justice department issued a scathing report that found the Chicago police often used unnecessary deadly force, especially against minorities. The report prompted calls for federal oversight of the department and was formerly called a consent decree. That's something the police union adamantly opposes, Christy. Lopez is a former Justice department attorney who helped lead the investigation. She says the recommendations in a draft consent decree that mandate reforms are a milestone, what this consent decree does is it attempts to address each of those components that allowed them the clinic. Donald and so many other problematic incidents to occur components like training, disciplined, recruitment and. Ability all things, she says that must be addressed in order to change the culture of a police department. Activists.

Brett Cavanaugh murder officer Chicago Senator Richard Blumenthal Quan McDonald president Texas Senate Judiciary committee Mayor emanuel United States Senate Senator Chuck Grassley Rachel NPR Chicago police department Senator Senator Ted Cruz Scott detro US Justice department prosecutor