29 Burst results for "Christopher Joyce"

Forty Seven Billion Dollars discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

04:04 min | 1 year ago

Forty Seven Billion Dollars discussed on All Things Considered

"Plastic waste litters cities and oceans plastic particles float in the air that's just the stuff people can see largely overlooked is how making plastic affects the environment is NPR's Christopher Joyce reports it's a big contributor to climate change but then so are many of the alternatives the plastic water bottle or grocery bag or tray of cucumbers at the supermarket they're made from oil or natural gas and says Carol muffin it takes a lot of energy to make that happen the real story of plastics impact on the environment begins at the well heads where it comes out of the ground and it never ever stops Moffett runs the center for international environmental law the center has gathered global data on how much climate warming greenhouse gas is produced in making all that plastic from cradle to grave first there are gas leaks at the well heads then there are leaks from the pipelines that take oil and gas to a chemical plant then there's the link the chemical process of turning oil or gas into raw plastic resin plastics is among the most energy intensive materials to produce factories then use more energy to fashion the plastic in the packaging or carport toward textiles trucking around to consumers causes more emissions and once it's used often gets burned to make electricity that's another source of greenhouse gases all told says Moffett emissions from plastics production incineration could account of fifty six giga tons of carbon between now and twenty fifty or about fifty times the annual emissions of all the coal power plants in the US that's a big number because a plastic production is expected to almost quadruple by twenty fifty that's according to the World Economic Forum the American chemistry council says the US industry plans to spend forty seven billion dollars on new capacity over the next decade the key message that people should take away is that the plastics crisis is the climate crisis hiding in plain sight but one thing this analysis does not do is examine the carbon footprint of things that would replace plastic things like paper or canvas or glass several research groups have in plastic repeatedly comes out ahead chemical engineer Beverly sour of E. R. G. an independent research group compared a mix of plastic packaging with a mix of substitutes the impact associated with plastics are generally much lower than the impact for the mix of substitute materials that would replace packaging here Jeez analysis calculate that the quantity of raw materials as well as the electricity fuel water and other materials needed to make paper and plastic packaging plastic uses less and at the end of its life paper in a landfill emits more greenhouse gases one big advantage plastic has is its light the plastic packaging accomplishes its purpose with very little weight of material just for example a paper bag weighs twice with a plastic one does not only do you have to produce you know twice the weight of material you have to transport twice the weight of material you have twice the weight of material to to manage at the end of its useful life and glass bottles way several times more than plastic ones the E. RG analysis was done for the American chemistry council analyses by the British government and other independent researchers have also found that most plastic packaging has a lighter carbon footprint than paper but his plastics effect on climate all that matters Angela houses no she's a surfer and an attorney with the surf rider foundation it's a group started by surfers who keep beaches like this one in southern California clean so they pick up trash and they see that it's abundantly plastic overwhelmingly plastic literal lasts for decades at least it's trash that marine animals eat plastic breaks down into tiny pieces to contaminate rivers and oceans and our own food where

Forty Seven Billion Dollars
The 'Great Dying' Nearly Erased Life On Earth. Scientists See Similarities To Today

Environment: NPR

04:16 min | 1 year ago

The 'Great Dying' Nearly Erased Life On Earth. Scientists See Similarities To Today

"There was a time when life on earth was almost wiped out. The great dying was the biggest extinction ever, it happened two hundred and fifty million years ago and was largely caused by greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. As NPR's Christopher Joyce reports scientists are beginning to see alarming similarities between the great dying and what's happening to our atmosphere. Now you can learn about the great dying at the new deep time exhibit at the Smithsonian's national museum of natural history. I get a back door visit by a giant freight elevator. That's used to haul life size dinosaurs up to the new hall. Workers are assembling dioramas and video monitors. It's a few weeks before opening curator, Scott wing shows me, the exhibits, crown jewel, the museums. First real tyrannosaurus Rex what an enormous head. It's a pretty big body to the Toronto. Sora stands over a prone triceratops. It's jaws clamped on its head. But I guess while the, the truth is, it's really isn't a dinosaur hall. Yes. There are plenty of dinosaurs in it. We like to say come for the dinosaurs. Stay for everything else, the theme is factually, the interconnectedness of life through geologic time exhibits show, for example, how plants at the bottom of the food chain supported everything from insects to twenty ton of Pata services wing likes that he's a botanist. I'm a photo synthesis chauvinist. The whole ecosystem is based on photosynthesis, and because life from toadstools to tyrannosaurs is connected. When something big happens to the earth, the whole fabric can disintegrate and that happened due to global warming. It's explained in the exhibit, great dying section. This is it. This is the big one. The exhibit explains that an enormous volcanic field erupted in what is now Siberia, it spewed carbon dioxide in pollution into the atmosphere possibly for millions of years that warmer to the planet made the oceans, acidic and robbed them of oxygen. There have been other mass extinctions like the one that wiped out the dinosaurs. But this one at the end of the Permian period was about what happens when too much carbon dioxide rises into the atmosphere. Those are lessons that we can learn from studying the past, and they're also those processes that are being observed by scientists today. Earth. Scientists is like Curtis Deutsche of the university of Washington, whose research helped inform, the Smithsonian curator's the very same things that caused the great dying are happening right now in our ocean today as a result of human activities, not to the same degree but in the same direction, so Deutsche thought, why not recreate the hothouse of the great dying in a computer and see how present day life would fare, he could crank up the heat and lower the oxygen and watch as parts of the ocean started to become deadly. The first thing that happens is that you start to see a local loss of species as they begin to move in response to the climate heating up. But some parts of the planet were more forgiving. And we discovered something that was kind of surprising and new, I think, and that is that extinction was very strong everywhere, but it was even stronger near the cold parts of earth in the near the polar oceans. Than it was in the warmer, tropical oceans. It makes sense. He says animals that live near the equator can migrate toward the pulse to find cooler water. But those that are already live in cold oxygen rich waters near the polls have very little room to run. Deutsche says the experiment is a window on the future, even the present marine species are ready migrating, we see responses of marine species to those changes today that look like what we think happened at the end of the Permian, and that says the Smithsonian Scott wing is what visitors should take away from the new exhibit, or so powerful. We are basically a geological for us now, as well as a human force a force that changing the conditions for life on the

Curtis Deutsche Scott Wing National Museum Of Natural Christopher Joyce NPR Dinosaur Hall Toronto Tyrannosaurs Siberia University Of Washington Fifty Million Years Twenty Ton
Christopher Joyce, National Museum Of Natural And NPR discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Christopher Joyce, National Museum Of Natural And NPR discussed on All Things Considered

"There was a time when life on earth was almost wiped out. The great dying was the biggest extinction ever, it happened two hundred and fifty million years ago and was largely caused by greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. As NPR's Christopher Joyce reports scientists are beginning to see alarming similarities between the great dying and what's happening to our atmosphere. Now you can learn about the great dying at the new deep time exhibit at the national museum of natural history. I get a back door of visit by a giant freight elevator. That's used to haul life size dinosaurs up to the new hall.

Christopher Joyce National Museum Of Natural NPR Fifty Million Years
Smithsonian National Museum Of Natural, Christopher Joyce And NPR discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Smithsonian National Museum Of Natural, Christopher Joyce And NPR discussed on All Things Considered

"There was a time when life on earth was almost wiped out. The great dying was the biggest extinction ever happened to hundred and fifty million years ago and was largely caused by greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. As NPR's Christopher Joyce reports scientists are beginning to see alarming similarities between the great dying and what's happening to our atmosphere. Now you can learn about the great dying at the new deep time exhibit at the Smithsonian national museum of natural history. I get a back door visit by a giant freight elevator. That's used to haul life size dinosaurs up to the new

Smithsonian National Museum Of Christopher Joyce NPR Fifty Million Years
China factories releasing thousands of tonnes of illegal CFC gases, study finds

Fresh Air

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

China factories releasing thousands of tonnes of illegal CFC gases, study finds

"An industrial chemical damaging the earth's. Ozone layer has been increasing in the atmosphere in Paris. Christopher Joyce tells us scientists believe it's coming from eastern China. The chemical is a coolant mostly used in refrigeration called CFC eleven. It destroys ozone in the atmosphere, creating ozone holes that let harmful amounts of solar radiation, strike the earth and international treaty required. Nations to phase out. These chemicals by twenty ten yet scientists have detected a spike in CFC's in the atmosphere over the past five years. Researchers working in Asia measured and tracked the CFC's in the atmosphere. They found that up to sixty percent of increase is coming from China, the source appears to be in northeastern provinces, writing in the journal nature of the scientists attribute the rise to new reported use of the

CFC China Christopher Joyce Paris Asia Sixty Percent Five Years
Greenland, Christopher Joyce And National Academy Of Sciences discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Greenland, Christopher Joyce And National Academy Of Sciences discussed on Morning Edition

"Londonderry new research on the massive ice sheet that covers much of Greenland shows eighties melting six times faster than it was forty years ago as NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that's contributing to rising sea levels, billions of tons of ice covered Greenland up until the nineteen seventies. The amount of ice was relatively stable. What melted and flowed into the ocean was offset by new ice formed on land every year? Now, scientists writing in the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences say that balance is off a lot more ice is melting than being newly deposited a study of two hundred sixty glaciers on Greenland shows that. While the rate of melting varies over short. Periods of time over the long term the rate is speeding up. The researchers point out that Greenland melt at ice as raised global sea levels by half an inch since nineteen seventy-two but half of that rise came in just the last

Greenland Christopher Joyce National Academy Of Sciences NPR Forty Years
"christopher joyce" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on KCRW

"For the killing of journalist Lyra Mckee, she was killed while observing Irish nationalist youths clashed with police in Londonderry new research on the massive ice sheet that covers much of Greenland shows it is melting six times faster than it was forty years ago as NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that's contributing to rising sea levels, billions of tons of ice covered Greenland up until the nineteen seventies. The amount of ice was relatively stable. What melted and flowed into the ocean was offset by new ice formed on land every year? Now, scientists writing in the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences say that balance is off a lot more ice is melting than being newly deposited a study of two hundred and sixty glaciers on Greenland shows that. While the rate of melting varies over short. Periods of time over the long term the rate is speeding up. The researchers point out that Greenland's melted ice as raised global sea levels by half an inch since nineteen seventy two but half of that rise came in just the last eight years, Christopher Joyce NPR news six people were killed yesterday. When a small plane crashed after it left west Houston airport in Texas, a family member of one of the people who died says the group was going to survey some property, it's not clear what caused the accident the National Transportation Safety board will investigate I'm korva Coleman. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include zoom zoom offers cloud video conferencing, online meetings and video conference room solution in one platform, featuring digital video and audio with.

Greenland NPR Christopher Joyce NPR Lyra Mckee Christopher Joyce National Academy of sciences Londonderry National Transportation Safety Houston korva Coleman Texas Washington eight years forty years
Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

All Things Considered

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

"Cornish. The Galapagos islands are like a biological arc in the eastern Pacific Ocean. There giant tortoises and swimming iguanas and numerous creatures found nowhere else is one of the world's most protected places. But scientists have discovered that dozens of exotic species have invaded the Galapagos underwater NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on this unexpected finding marine biologists James Carlton remembers when he first got to thinking that the Galapagos islands may not be as pristine as people thought on my first visit to the Galapagos collected some samples from both bottom barnacles sponges and other hitchhikers that was nineteen eighty-seven Carlton didn't know if those creatures he found were native or not so four years ago he and a team of scientists decided to return and take a closer. Look, we didn't know quite what to do. Expect what they did know was that on land. There were lots of invasive species species that are not native to the islands, but in the surrounding ocean. Scientists only knew of five invaders everything else presumably was native when Carlton's team looked underwater. However, they found a hoard of invaders and now we have fifty three which is a rather stunning increase marine biologist. Gregory Ruiz says they found exotic species on pilings docks and mangrove roots. They hung plastic plates underwater in all sorts of alien invertebrates latched onto them at the Smithsonian environmental research center in Maryland, where he works Ruiz shows me, the invasions lab, researchers here track invasive species around the world, this is a organism that we've found in the Galapagos tuna could also known as a sea squirt a tiny tube-like animal. He has more invaders in glass bowls filled with alcohol barnacle. Nls LG, CNN enemies. They're described in the journal aquatic invasions recess rising tourism in the Galapagos means more boats, docks, pilings, transportation and homes. For invasive, these organisms aren't just footnotes in the biology. Text zebra mussels invaded the Great Lakes and caused havoc the tiny parasite called MS X has killed millions of choice tres in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast James Carlton now, professor emeritus at Williams. College says tracking invaders helps authorities stem they're spread he expects other tropical areas or heavily invaded as well. And in a protected place. Let the Galapagos he says their presence means something's been lost. We value a world that we think represents nature before we began altering it before we began removing species, Abby species and changing the abundance of species, even in the Galapagos that were. World is

Galapagos James Carlton Cornish. The Galapagos Gregory Ruiz Pacific Ocean Williams Christopher Joyce Smithsonian Environmental Rese Great Lakes Maryland Chesapeake Bay NPR LG CNN Professor Four Years
Teenage Diver Finds Tons Of Golf Balls Rotting Off California

Marketplace

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Teenage Diver Finds Tons Of Golf Balls Rotting Off California

"Carmel, California. She and her father were diving in the Pacific just offshore from a golf course. She looks down. And saw something weird. You couldn't see the fan. It was completely white golf balls. You looked down. And you're like, what are you doing here? Thousands of golf balls. It felt like a shot to the heart. She was offended. She decided she'd haul them up she put them in her family's garage. I had all these. My garage and they stunk and I had no idea why. Then she heard about a scientist who studied the plastic waste in the ocean. His name was Matt Sevaka from Stanford University. She emailed him. He came to look at her collection fifty thousand golf balls just sitting in the garage. He said, I should write a paper about this. And I was like man, I'm sixteen years old. I don't know how to read a scientific paper he said he'd help that meant diving with her not easy. The oceans off California, actually, quite cold. And so you suit up in a pretty thick wet suit. It's incredibly physically demanding they took kayaks out to ferry the golf balls back. We'll have the kayak so-so prostate that will end up just having the to- the kayak back, and we'll have to swim to shore while we were out there. We would hear plink plink. And then we look up on the hill. And there would be golf balls flying in off the course right into the ocean. Where we were doing some collections actually whenever we have good conditions were able to pull out between like five hundred. Two five thousand off ball over two years. They found more than fifty thousand golf balls. The source five golf courses. Three were up. The Carmel river, the golf balls just rolled underwater down to the ocean in the journal marine pollution bulletin, the team says chemicals from fifty thousand or so cough balls. We'll probably only have a small effect on the ocean. But they do degrade into micro plastic pieces that marine animals could eat Alex Weber says, if those golf balls floated people would be shocked, if a person could see what we see underwater, it would not be acceptable. Christopher Joyce NPR news, the Brazilian composer and pianist Andre math Mari has always played with the concept of theme and variation. He did a whole album of variations on Beatles tunes. She's a very early age. I was drawn to improvisation even sometimes the classical teachers didn't like it when he got off the

Golf Matt Sevaka California Carmel Alex Weber Carmel River Christopher Joyce Npr Andre Math Mari Scientist Stanford University Sixteen Years Two Years
An Island Crusader Takes On The Big Brands Behind Plastic Waste

NPR's World Story of the Day

06:29 min | 1 year ago

An Island Crusader Takes On The Big Brands Behind Plastic Waste

"A tide of plastic waste is contaminating the oceans. And in a congressional hearing Senator Sheldon Whitehouse named major culprits over fifty percent of the plastic waste in the oceans comes from just five countries, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Sri Lanka NPR science. Correspondent Christopher Joyce. Went to one of those countries the Philippines to see how bad it is Manila it sprawls along the coast of Manila Bay. Shantytown sit in the shadow of new high rises and mega shopping malls, people here have more money than they used to. So they're buying more stuff from fancy soaps to important coffee in fast food, all which is wrapped in plastic packaging. A lot of that plastic ends up in the bay. There's an island in the bay that's kind of like a doormat for that floating. Plastic. I went to take a look it's not far from shore. We're on a Bunka, which is a Filipino vote. Wouldn't vote about twenty long creepy by. I could see lots of mangrove trees, the islands could be a place for a resort except that what looks like Spanish moss hanging from the branches. Isn't it's plastic bags. On the way out there. You look along the shore at just one all mine, plastic debris. To get a sure we walk on a little catwalk me, Dan Boone held together with plastic tie underneath it. It's. Classic perplex. Hello. The variety of stuff leading around is amazing shoes bottles, syringes, even motorcycle films. It's impossible to tell exactly where all this stuff comes from. The clearly a lot of it comes from the neighborhood surrounding Manila Bay. Some of those neighborhoods trying to stop the flow of plastic into the bay. Visit who long do hot? Good morning told people the local government is now requiring residents to actually pick through their trash and segregate out the plastic. So the community can deal with it. The woman pushes her trash carts who had paid and series of allies and along with her is a monitor from the neighborhood government. My name isse Danya Daleas, Akita speaking through a translator. So the policies that no segregation election so collection is free. But the household need to segregate their race food waste goes in one bag metals paper glass in another in two bags for plastic recyclable and nonrecyclable if residents don't comply with all this. They pay a fine. I offense by bonded vessels. Second offense one thousand and third going to Jane even jail for nuts. Separating plastic from your trash. There are hundreds of official neighborhoods in this huge city who long do hot is one of just sixteen now require residents to segregate plastic from their garbage. Is it enough? I asked the town secretary need to Yano you think it's going to work. I mean, it's. Like a soon. Nami aplastic. Now do not own. Well, sometimes I get mad as a community. We do our part to clean up the waste and educate people about the environment and in the beginning people call rate, but then they go back to their old ways. And it makes me sad. But even when people do do their best where does that plastic go? That's where it gets complicated. Some plastic bottles gets recycled. But then there are the sachets plastic packets that contain a single portion of soap or coffee your shampoo, that's how corporations like Unilever and Nestle market consumer goods in Asia. And most of these Shays cannot be recycled that rankles froylan. Greta he's with an environmental group mother earth foundation, which has sponsored the neighborhood cleanups. The problem is that for most of these companies, they feel they're responsible to their product ends the moment, they sell it. He says there's a reason us. Sachets end up in the ocean, and the Philippines, independent waste workers collect plastic and sell it to recyclers. But if it can't be recycled like, those Shays, it has no value doctoral waste Mercker, can you actually earned from this big collecting it. So they don't collect it groti has spent seventeen years looking for ways to get rid of plastic waste in our realizes that Filipinos can't dig out of this alone. Most packaging comes from just a few big companies. He says it's time they take more responsibility companies dumping all of this new products and packaging that is beyond their capacity to manage you earned from this in and you expect all of us to then magically just solve it for you. You can't just magically get rid of something that is permanent that doesn't degrade. It just keeps piling up. Remember that visited walking toward the beach plastic underfoot? I stopped to look at a huge pile of burlap bags stuffed with plastic waste a team of workers collected that waste one day's work. And yet they barely make dent. It's relentless and it buries itself in the sand and becomes permanent. Kick the stand aside. And there's a plastic tile. There's four or five straws Sanders, a half of a plastic bag and mixed in with coconuts and mangrove seeds. You know, it's just it gives you the feeling that you can't ever catch up. That's why many people throughout southeast Asia are now saying enough cleaning up isn't going to fix this. They want to take the fight to the corporations that create the plastic in the first place. Christopher Joyce NPR news.

Manila Bay Philippines Manila Senator Sheldon Whitehouse Christopher Joyce Shays NPR Christopher Joyce Npr Southeast Asia Danya Daleas Dan Boone Vietnam Asia Indonesia Sanders Unilever China Jane
"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Climate experts say global warming is responsible for intensifying some of last year's weather extremes around the world, including drought in the US NPR's. Christopher Joyce reports. Scientists meeting in Washington DC say they've connected. Several extreme weather events to the effects of global warming in two thousand seventeen and drought in the northern plains of the US was made more likely because average temperatures are higher now flooding in China a heat wave in Europe heavy rainfall in Peru, and several other examples of severe weather made the list last year was also one of the worst ever for Atlantic hurricanes. But the analysis of those events wasn't complete in. Time for the report from the American meteorological society, scientists have already linked the severity of hurricane Harvey in Texas to global warming. Christopher Joyce NPR news, snow ice and below freezing temperatures are causing problems again today in North Carolina and Virginia and parts of Georgia. Some school systems are closed for a second consecutive day due to icy roads and sidewalks North Carolina's governor ROY Cooper says the state's highway patrol responded to hundreds of accidents yesterday because of the winter like weather more than twenty inches of snow fell in western North Carolina. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Sierra Nevada brewing company, family owned operated and argued over since nineteen eighty proud supporter of independent thought whether that's online over the air or in a bottle, more at Sierra, Nevada dot com. This is WNYC. Good morning. I'm Sean Carlson with a look at our weather forecast. Sunny today, the high only reaching about forty today with the win though that will feel anywhere between twenty five and thirty five for tonight, partly cloudy, low thirty the wind making it feel between twenty and twenty five degrees. Tomorrow Wednesday sunny today, high near thirty nine wind chills between twenty five and thirty five once again looking at it Thursday, we could see some flurries just a chance of flurries on Thursday. Otherwise, partly sunny with a high near forty..

NPR North Carolina Christopher Joyce NPR US Washington Christopher Joyce Sierra Nevada brewing company Sean Carlson Dave Mattingly American meteorological societ ROY Cooper hurricane Harvey Nevada WNYC Texas Europe Peru
Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

NPR's World Story of the Day

02:55 min | 1 year ago

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything in Poland climate negotiators from around the world are meeting to figure out how to keep greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere. The task looks harder than ever as NPR's. Christopher. Joyce reports. New research shows emissions are getting worse for three years. The news about global emissions of the biggest greenhouse gas carbon dioxide was pretty good. They were leveling off. But then they started to rise again in twenty seventeen and they're still going up. Rob Jackson is a climate researcher at Stanford University last year, we thought was a blip or could be a blip. But it isn't this year were up again the second year in a row and emissions arising the slowdown. And then the uptick are largely the result of. What's been happening in China? Their economy has been slowing a bit, which is one reason the mission stalled. But now the government is trying to boost growth than are green lighting, some coal projects that had been on hold. India is also using a lot more coal as the government tries to bring electricity to millions. Who don't have it writing in the journal environmental research letters Jackson notes that Americans are using way less coal now. But like most everyone else in the world, they're using a lot more of another kind of fossil fuel. It's cheap gasoline were buying bigger cars, and we're driving more miles per vehicle. Another hurdle reported in the journal nature this week China is cleaning up its air pollution. That sounds great for pollution, weary Chinese citizens. But some of that air pollution, actually, cools the atmosphere. It blocks out solar radiation, less pollution. Ironically, could mean more warming some climate experts meeting in Poland are eager to point to successes rather than a Lou. Coming carbon apocalypse like Corine mccarey from the university of East Anglia in Great Britain. She says take a look at clean energy growth. Ninety owner and wind power. Yeah. Hasn't been investment by government, and by businesses and wind and solar energy. And these investments have driven down to cost down to where renewable energy can compete with coal for new power plants, but renewable energy is far from replacing fossil fuels and the gauche eaters in Poland. Just got a rude. Reminder of how hard that will be in France a proposed tax on gasoline meant to cut consumption caused widespread rioting the French government quickly put that idea on ice. Christopher Joyce NPR news.

Christopher Joyce Npr Poland Rob Jackson China Comcast University Of East Anglia NPR French Government Stanford University France Environmental Research Researcher
"christopher joyce" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. President Trump says he is looking into canceling all subsidies for General Motors after the automaker decided to lay off more than fourteen thousand American workers. Impairs more license. More President Trump has angry and disappointed about the move by GM. He said Monday, the GM quote, better damn well opened a new plant very soon. Now, he appears to have settled on the oral else the president tweeting that he is now quote looking at cutting all GM subsidies, including for electric cars. It's not clear whether the president will follow through on that threat or whether he could get support from congress to remove the subsidies, President Trump is in a tough spot because he promised workers throughout the midwest that once he was president new manufacturing plants would be opening throughout the rust belt. Mara Liasson, NPR news, the Whitehouse. Scientists say average to slow global warming are falling further behind. And were they need to be to avoid serious damage to the climate NPR's. Christopher Joyce has more on the new study. They come up the emissions gap report. Scientists measure what countries are doing to lower emissions of greenhouse gases, then calculate if those measures will keep the rise in global temperature from overtopping the danger level about three and a half degrees Fahrenheit. Their latest report finds and increasingly large gap between current efforts in what's needed to protect the climate for a while. It looked like emissions were leveling out. But despite growth in renewable energy and less coal used in the US and Europe. Global emissions are rising too fast to avoid dangerous warming. The report was issued by the United Nations. Christopher Joyce NPR news amid a growing belief. They will not be successful in their efforts to get asylum in the US more of the five thousand or so mostly Central American migrants at the US Mexico border are now looking at other options, many were dispirited after failing across the border over the weekend. Some were repelled by US agents firing tear-gas Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina's. He trust the citizen of the border officers who decided to take the action go down there and.

President Trump president NPR Christopher Joyce NPR US Christopher Joyce GM Jack Speer General Motors Senator Lindsey Graham Mara Liasson Washington South Carolina United Nations midwest congress Europe
"christopher joyce" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on KCRW

"Rarely ever produced before Christopher Joyce NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This weekend. Turkey's president said for the first time that he had given audiotapes of the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal kashogi to officials in a number of western countries, including the US kashogi was killed last month. Inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. The Turkish president's comment on Saturday keeps the pressure on the Trump administration to make Saudi Arabia face consequences for Kashoggi's death. NPR's? Jackie Northam has been following the case and joins us now. Hey, Jackie so Turkey's, president rage uptight. Irwin has ended for a while. Now that there was this audio recording of Kashoggi's killing now, he's publicly confirmed. It do you think these audiotapes will impact the global response to what happened to kashogi? Right. You know, this tape is expected to be extremely disturbing with sounds of the final moments of Jamaica show. Jeez. Life. Turkish officials say he was strangled and dismembered by fifteen men hit team from Saudi Arabia. So is probably pretty. Gruesome, the Washington Post has reported CIA director Gina hospital listened to the audio while she was on a trip to Istanbul last month, but the administration hasn't confirmed that in fact, the only country that has confirmed as listen to the audio tapes is Canada. Here's a Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Paris this weekend. Canada's intelligence agencies have been working very closely on this issue with the Turkish intelligence Canada has been fully briefed up on what Turkey had to share. So the audiotape is out there. Yeah. Are there any plans to make the tapes more broadly public? We don't know that. But you know, every week Turkey seems to release more information about this killing so perhaps somehow it could leak out, and certainly a broader access to put more pressure on the Trump administration act to take tougher measures against Saudi Arabia. Okay. So clearly Canada's been talking about these tapes is the Trump administration saying anything new at this point. There was a few things this weekend. The administration has been sending mixed messages about whether senior Saudi officials were involved in this killing and what they will do if it's found out that success. I'm this weekend secretary estate, Mike Pompeo talked with Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, and reiterated that the US will hold those responsible for Kashoggi's killing to account. But there was no mention in the State Department read out of that conversation. Anything about the audiotapes? The administration says it is reviewing whether to sanction some Saudis believed to be involved in the killing and President Trump has said he wants to wait until the Saudi authorities have finished up their investigation. And then he'll decide what to do. And he suggested that might happen as early as this week. So we could hear some time soon. But, you know, also Trump is under a lot of pressure to do something. And there are a growing bipartisan calls in congress to suspend or cancel weapons deals to the kingdom plan or cutback US involvement in the Saudi led war. You know, Yemen. Yeah. And on that the US has decided to stop refueling Saudi aircraft carrying out airstrikes in Yemen. Was that some sort of response ticket? Oh, jeez. Staff possibly the kashogi killing has put the Saudis on the defensive for sure. And the warning has been on the top of the list of what people are objecting to the thing is the Saudis have been doing the majority of the refueling anyway. So this doesn't necessarily mean a lot. But it does come at a time. When the Saudi led coalition is attacking a key port in Yemen. And groups are warning that could cut off food to millions of people in Yemen in the countries are ready on the verge of famine. So there's growing.

Saudi Arabia Kashoggi Saudi consulate Yemen US Turkey Trump president Canada Saudi Crown Istanbul Christopher Joyce NPR NPR Jackie Northam Jamal kashogi Jamaica Justin Trudeau Washington Post Irwin
"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rarely ever produced before Christopher Joyce NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This weekend. Turkey's president said for the first time that he had given audiotapes of the killing of Saudi journalists Jamal kashogi to officials in a number of western countries, including the US kashogi was killed last month inside the Saudi consulate in eastern bowl. The Turkish president's comment on Saturday keeps the pressure on the Trump administration to make Saudi Arabia face consequences for Kashoggi's death. NPR's? Jackie Northam has been following the case and joins us now. Hey, Jackie so Turkey's, president rage uptight. Irwin has ended for a while. Now that there was this audio recording Kashoggi's killing now, he's publicly confirmed. It do you think these audiotapes will impact the global response to what happened to this tape is expected to be extremely disturbing with sounds of the final moments of Jamaica show. Jeez. Life. Turkish officials say he was strangled. And then dismembered by fifteen men hit team from Saudi Arabia's who's probably pretty. Gruesome, the Washington Post has reported CIA director Gina hospital listened to the audio while she was on a trip to Istanbul last month, but the administration hasn't confirmed that in fact, the only country that has confirmed its listen to the audiotapes is Canada. Here's a Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Paris this weekend. Canada's intelligence agencies have been working very closely on this issue with the Turkish intelligence that Canada has been fully briefed up on what Turkey had to share. So the audiotape is out there. Yeah. Are there any plans to make the tapes more broadly public? We don't know that. But you know, every week Turkey seems to release more information about this killing so perhaps somehow it could leak out, and certainly a broader access to or put more pressure on the Trump administration actor take tougher measures against Saudi Arabia. Okay. So clearly Canada's been talking about these tapes is the Trump administration saying anything new at this point. A few things this weekend. The administration has been sending mixed messages about whether senior Saudi officials were involved in this killing and what they will do if it's found out that success. I'm this weekend secretary estate Mike Pompeo talked with Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, reiterated that the US will hold those responsible for Kashoggi's killing to account. But there was no mention in the State Department read out of that conversation. Anything about the audiotapes? The administration says it is reviewing whether to sanction some Saudis believed to be involved in killing President Trump has said he wants to wait until the Saudi authorities have finished up their investigation. And then he'll decide what to do. And he suggested that might happen as early as this week. So we could hear some time soon. But you don't also Trump is under a lot of pressure to do something. And there are growing bipartisan calls in congress to suspend or cancel weapons deals to the kingdom way or cutback US involvement and in the Saudi led war in Yemen. Yeah. On that the US has decided to stop refusing Saudi aircraft carrying out airstrikes in Yemen. Was that some sort of response ticket show? Jeez. Death possibly the kashogi killing has put the Saudis on the defensive for sure. And the war in Yemen has been on the top of the list of what people are objecting to the thing is the Saudis have been doing the majority of the refueling anyway. So this doesn't necessarily mean a lot. But it does come at a time. When the Saudi led coalition is attacking key port in Yemen. And groups are warning that could cut off food to millions of people in Yemen in the countries are ready on the verge of a famine. So there's growing urgency to stop the war. That's NPR's. Jackie northbound. Thanks very much. Jackie. Thank you..

Saudi Arabia Yemen Trump Turkey Jackie Northam Saudi consulate US president Canada NPR Kashoggi Christopher Joyce NPR Irwin Jamal kashogi Jamaica Justin Trudeau Washington Post Gina hospital State Department
"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Weapons? Kiva gave up. What does that mean? Giving up already all the nuclear weapons already made individual okay now impossible. That was part of the statement. They signed him Singapore, though. Oh, yeah. Via are not reproducing nuclear warfare and nuclear weapons anymore. Vessel for mate. This is our you think the ones you has is our strength because DPRK already developed into nuclear power. This is what they will knows already made all the way it will not give up impulsively. Jay, our guide on a tour of juche tower this month, she is one North Korean one voice and not an official one, but a window into how one North Korean sees her country's nuclear weapons status, and it's changing relations with the US and the world more stories from my reporting trip to Pyongyang in the days ahead. Smugglers are selling tens of thousands of tons of ivory every year that illegal trade threatens the existence of elephants conservationists have developed high-tech strategies to track the source of the ivory NPR's. Christopher Joyce reports on a new effort to trace the smugglers as well. Biologists. Samuel Wasser follows the ivory trade closely. He says too many elephants are dying right now. We're after meeting that they're about forty thousand elephants being killed a year, and there's only four hundred thousand left in Africa. So that's a tenth of the population. A year the cartels that run the ivory trade try to cover their tracks. They falsify shipping documents. For example. They hide ivory in shipping. Containers, they send the average multiple ports before its final destination at the university of Washington. Wasser developed a way to use DNA in tusks to tell what part of Africa the elephants lived in. Now, he's using the technique to home in on the cartels Wasser, analyzed d. Anna from tusks that were seized by customs officials. He noticed that smugglers often separate the two tusks that come from a single elephant and ship them. Separately, presumably to make it harder to track with a came from. But Wasser found a pattern with matching tusks through common port. They were shipped close together in time, and they showed high overlap and the genetically determined origins of the topics. So these three characteristics suggest that the same major trafficking cartel was actually responsible for shipping. Both of the shootings worser says wildlife authorities rarely get enough evidence to identify the big players often. It's they're smaller suppliers who get caught with only as much as they can carry those convictions are well down the smuggling pyramid and don't do much to stem the trade his technique aims higher. When you get a strong connection in the DNA, all of a sudden weak evidence becomes much more confirming Wasser says linking different shipments to a small number of. Sports made about the same time with ivory from elephants in just a few locations in Africa reveals which are the likely cartels doing the smuggling writing in the journal science advances washers team identifies three cartels associated with much the trade. They operate out of Mombasa in Kenya. Entebbe in Uganda and low may in Togo, Christopher Joyce NPR news. You're.

Samuel Wasser Africa Kiva Christopher Joyce DPRK NPR Christopher Joyce NPR juche tower Mombasa university of Washington Entebbe Pyongyang Singapore Kenya Togo Uganda
US, NPR and China discussed on Q

Q

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

US, NPR and China discussed on Q

"Hurricane Florence is. Now a category. Four storm and is expected to bring heavy surf and high water levels by Wednesday along the southeast coast, embarrass Christopher Joyce reports on the storm's progress meteorologists say Florence continues to strengthen as it moves toward North Carolina and Virginia while it may moderate once it hits the coast, high winds pose a serious threat to life and property. In addition, the National Hurricane Center warns of storm surge that could be several feet high even more worrisome experts say is the potential for the storm to stall once it works its way over land that could drop more than two feet of rain in some places and caused flash flooding hurricane this strong. So far north is rare climate scientists say Florence potential to cause flooding is due in part to a warmer Atlantic Ocean and atmosphere caused by global

United States NPR China Hurricane Florence Christopher Joyce Npr National Hurricane Center Hurricane Gotham Senator Jeanne Shaheen Christopher Joyce Cuba Exxon Mobil Senator Jeff Klein Russia Florence Chris Christie NBC North Carolina State Department
"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Climate scientists are struggling to figure out how a. Warming planet will affect different ecosystems like forests swamps grasslands so researchers looked back at the end of the last ice age to see, what might, be in store for us as NPR's Christopher Joyce reports. They suspect some ecosystems could change completely in a century, much of the northern. Hemisphere was covered by ice sheets twenty thousand years ago then. The earth started warming up by ten thousand years ago. It was warmer by about seven to. Twelve. Degrees Fahrenheit Ecologists. Stephen Jackson, says that makes that period of history much like what greenhouse gases are doing to the earth now the change, over, the next, one hundred hundred fifty years is of similar magnitude. Globally to what we, saw during the last ice retreat Jackson worked for the US Geological Survey he and a team of more than forty. Scientists examined the fossil pollen. And vegetation to figure out how that ancient warming affected various ecosystems the researchers found huge changes after the. Ice age in Jackson's neighborhood in Arizona for example it's now desert cactus and Trump's mostly fifteen thousand years ago though what we'd see, there instead, is juniper Pinon woodland and evergreen woodland utterly different from. The vegetation we'd find here so as climate changes some forests may give way. To Woody shrubs or grassland or grassland could convert to desert. Writing in the journal science the researchers say they can't Predict exactly where and how fast these changes will happen for one. Thing the. Warming now is a lot faster than it was, at the end of the ice age instead of that. Happening, over several thousand years we're cramming all of that climatic change in two century century and a half and their historical record shows a. Climate going from frigid too warm now. It's moving from warm to warmer that may be different but Jackson says one thing is likely more unpredictability maybe even ecosystems that are totally. New and that poses challenges for forests wildlands and even fisheries and for people. Who depend, on them that's gonna create a great deal of chaos ecological chaos out there as they try to adapt and, respond, to those, changes these changes are happening now some forests in. The southwest are dying, and being replaced by smaller plants and shrubs ecologist David Beshir's at the university of Arizona says it's similar to what. Happened in the, past each Changes is very temperature sensitive and I think that's the most important takeaway message because that's what we're dealing with right now I. Think in contemporary times in the journal scientific reports Beshir's and scientists in Australia showed how quickly big changes can happen a. Heatwave in Western Australia. In, twenty eleven caused coral bleaching in the ocean as well as tree deaths damaging insect outbreaks and die-offs of birds all very different ecosystems responding to a warmer environment Christopher Joyce NPR. News You're listening to all, things considered from NPR news is a look at.

Stephen Jackson NPR Christopher Joyce NPR Christopher Joyce juniper Pinon woodland David Beshir Western Australia Arizona Australia university of Arizona US Trump one hundred hundred fifty year fifteen thousand years twenty thousand years ten thousand years thousand years two century
"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He served as british ambassador to iran from two thousand nine twenty eleven thank you for speaking with all things considered thank you so much for the first time scientists have filmed sharks traveling a five hundred mile long shark highway it's in the eastern pacific ocean and is npr's christopher joyce reports biologists hope to turn the highway into a protected wildlife corridor biologists have been attaching electric tags two sharks near costa rica for years the new the shark sometimes travelled south to the galapagos islands but they've never actually witnessed it to do that they took some go style cameras and attached them to metal frames along with some bloody fish bait and dragged them behind a research vessel for almost two weeks and they waited and waited until says biologist mario espinosa dozens of sharks swam out of the gloom and interview we actually document over sixteen species of sharks and fish house so she totals and dolphins is really surprising to see that many amazing sharks tom most of the hammer heads but also thresher sharks and silky sharks sometimes a single video frame captured dozens of them what they were witnessing is what appears to be a continuous swim way of large marine animals it starts in cocos island in costa rica and extends to the galapagos the route follows a range of underwater mountains some of the tops of these seamounts extend fairly close to the surface so this was like the first time we actually documented animals use in these seamounts we don't know exactly whether they're feeding or they're like stopping by or using this amounts of navigation routes underwater peaks as road signs maybe or drive through restaurants espinosa is at.

npr costa rica galapagos iran christopher joyce mario espinosa two weeks
"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He served as british ambassador to iran from two thousand nine to twenty eleven thank you for speaking with all things considered thank you very much for the first time scientists have filmed sharks traveling a five hundred mile long shark highway it's in the eastern pacific ocean and is npr's christopher joyce reports biologists hope to turn the highway into a protected wildlife corridor biologists have been attaching electric tags two sharks near costa rica for years the new the shark sometimes travelled south to the galapagos islands but they'd never actually witnessed it to do that they took some go pro style cameras and attach them to metal frames along with some bloody fish bait and dragged them behind the research vessel for almost two weeks and they waited and waited until says biologists mario espinosa dozens of sharks swam out of the gloom and interview we actually duckman over sixteen species of sharks and fish out so she totals and dolphins is really surprising to see that many animals amazing sharks domino needed most the hammer heads but also thresher sharks and silky sharks sometimes a single video frame captured dozens of them what they were witnessing is what appears to be a continuous swim way of large marine animals it starts in cocos island in costa rica and extends to the galapagos the route follows a range of underwater mountains some of the tops of these seamounts extend fairly close to the surface so this was the first time we actually documented animals using these seamounts we don't know exactly whether they're feeding or they're like stopping by or using these seamounts navigation routes underwater peaks as road signs may be or drive through restaurants espinosa.

npr costa rica galapagos iran christopher joyce mario espinosa two weeks
"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And company international consultants the oceans are getting warmer and fish are noticing many that live along us coastlines are moving to cooler water as a result as npr's christopher joyce reports a new study finds that trend is likely to continue in there could be potentially serious consequences for the fishing industry fish are as picky about their water temperature is goldilocks was about her porridge and ecologist malin pinski rutgers university says a warming climate is heating up there coastal habitats here in north american waters that means fish and other marine animals their habitat is shifting further north quite rapidly pinski studied six hundred and eighty six marine species ranging from bass and flounder to crab and lobster he projected how much warmer oceans would get and how fish species would probably react to that and about four hundred fifty of those who have high certainty in terms of how far they're going to shift in the future some just a few miles others like the alaskan snow crab that gained fame on the television show deadliest catch a lot more they're projected to move up to nine hundred miles further north really dramatic changes for species that's very important pinski points out in a research paper in the journal plus one that there's a lot of uncertainty in how fast this will happen if the climate doesn't warm up too much fish may take their time and not move too far if it warms lot the fish will move farther and probably faster even a shift of a couple of hundred miles can put fish or lobster out of range for small boats and is a serious problem for organizations that manage fish stocks richard seagraves is a scientist formerly with the mid atlantic fishery management council he notes that for fish like southern flounder each state gets a quota a catch limit based on where fish used to be decades ago having trouble catching the quota and the north have more ability fish seagraves says natural variation in coastal ocean temperatures already gives fisheries managers headaches he says climate change will make it a lot harder christopher joyce npr news this is npr news wnyc supporters include hospital for special surgery now offering after school hours at their westchester and connecticut locations more info at hss dot edu bleaker street presenting on chessel beach sears sharon stars in.

npr christopher joyce scientist connecticut malin pinski rutgers university richard seagraves
"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And fish are noticing many that live along us coastlines are moving to cooler water as a result as npr's christopher joyce reports a new study finds that trend is likely to continue in there could be potentially serious consequences for the fishing industry fish are as picky about their water temperature is goldilocks was about her porridge and ecologist mayland pinski rutgers university says a warming climate is heating up there coastal habitats here in north american waters that means fish and other marine animals their habitat is shifting further north quite rapidly pinski studied six hundred eighty six marine species ranging from bass and flounder to crab and lobster he projected how much warmer oceans would get and how fish species would probably react to that and about four hundred fifty of those who have high certainty in terms of how far the shift in the future some just a few miles others like the alaskan snow crab that gained fame on the television show deadliest catch a lot more they're projected to move up to nine hundred miles further north really dramatic changes for species that's very important pinski points out in a research paper in the journal plus one that there's a lot of uncertainty in how fast this will happen if the climate doesn't warm up too much fish may take their time and not move too far if it warms lot the fish will move farther and probably faster even shift of a couple of hundred miles can put fish or lobster out of range for small boats and it's a serious problem for organizations that manage fish stocks richard seagraves is a scientist formerly with the mid atlantic fishery management council he notes that for fish like southern flounder each state gets a quota a catch limit based on where fish used to be decades ago southern states having trouble catching florida north have more availability fish they're moving seagraves says natural variation in coastal ocean temperatures already gives fisheries managers headaches he says climate change will make it a lot harder christopher joyce npr news.

npr christopher joyce scientist florida rutgers university richard seagraves
Bombing at mosque in Afghanistan kills at least 14

All News, Traffic and Weather

02:38 min | 2 years ago

Bombing at mosque in Afghanistan kills at least 14

"Of the year have shaken a jamaica playing community the shootings on friday night kill two men one of the victims christopher joyce who was just twenty three was set to walk in salem states graduation in twelve days vladimir putin has officially taking the oath of office for his fourth term as russian president and president trump's nominee to be director of the cia gina hospital faces confirmation hearings this week before the senate intelligence committee in other news a bomb blast over the weekend at a mosque in eastern afghanistan kills at least fourteen people we have more from abc's tom rivers the injured removed to a nearby hospital in cost the powerful blast happened while worshippers were busy with prayers and in other parts of the moss people had gathered to get their voter registration cards for the upcoming election afghanistan plans to hold elections in october the first since two thousand fourteen the taliban denied involvement in the blasts and so far no group has claimed responsibility main sheriff's deputy eugene cole is honored at a memorial service today cole was the first main law enforcement officer killed in the line of duty in nearly three decades the suspect john williams was caught after a four day manhunt thousands from across the country are expected at the funeral today an m y pd motorcycle unit will lead the procession from the funeral home scou higgin beginning at nine thirty this morning tucson's of dorchester are remembered with a memorial at pope john paul park near the deposit river wbz's karyn regal with that state trooper macho man was shot and killed along route three in kingston as you approach to stop van in nineteen ninetyfour he was thirty one suffolk county sheriff ricky denver was down in two thousand five hundred thirty five now they are remembered together sergeant deborah mother kathleen rickie saves a lot when they put a stop to these career criminals how many more have ultimate sacrifice needs to be in state the death penalty now endorsed chester karyn regal wbz newsradio ten thirty wbz news time now eight fifty one pilots and staff at air france continue a two week long strike today that strike prompted the cancellation of about fifteen percent of air france flights worldwide shares plunged this morning after the company ceo announced his resignation friday after workers rejected the company's latest wage proposal the.

Suffolk County France Chester Karyn Regal Kathleen Rickie Afghanistan Senate Vladimir Putin Salem Christopher Joyce CEO Air France Ricky Denver President Trump Kingston Karyn Regal Pope John Paul Park Dorchester Tucson
"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In many parts of the country you might know that first hand this of course is even though other parts of the world are warmer than usual now scientists say this is normal they're always natural ups and downs even though the planet overall is warming but new research suggests the temperature swings in coming decades could get more extreme here's npr's christopher joyce climate scientists say the warmer the earth gets the more extreme the weather can get bigger hurricanes heavier rainfall and apparently it also means temperature may vary more than it used to sebastian buff yanni advantage von university in the netherlands says it has to do with moisture in the soil soil moisture has a kind of goldilocks effect on local temperature keeping it not too hot and too cold and when you have drier conditions than the temperature fluctuations are not am buffet as much anymore so you can have larger temperature but the only says if the planet continues to warm temperature variability we'll be especially pronounced in the tropics wet places where are warming climate is drying things out the research appears in the journal science advances but the only says that this temperature roller coaster will have its biggest effect in some of the world's most vulnerable countries not only to deal with the impact but in this case also the impacts really verse worse because temperature variation in places like europe and the us is not dependent so much on soil moisture in fact variability may actually go down in these regions but with one notable exception summertime in the us could see more temperature extremes extremes in fact seem to be part of what a warmer world will bring another recent study found that california will see more extreme wet and dry periods this century they're calling that the whiplash effect of global warming christopher joyce npr news.

npr us california christopher joyce sebastian europe
"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sharing your take on the top ten quotes have 2017 with us thank you boom you're listening to all things considered from npr news the arctic is a huge icy cap on the planet and it acts like a global air conditioner but the air conditioner is breaking down today scientists issued a grim report card on the arctic they say the poll continues to warm at an alarming pace and is and pierce christopher joyce reports that will change our weather the arctic is a vast circle frozen loomed with the arctic sea like a giant ici palm than the middle but not as icy as it used to be this was the second warmest year the her in at least fifteen 100 years the warmest ever last year this year also saw the least amount of winter ice in the arctic ocean ever observed and ocean water was several degrees warmer than just a few decades ago it's a trend that some are calling the new normal arctic scientists to jeremy mathis says there's nothing normal about it there is no normal that's what so strange about what's happening in the arctic is it the environment is changing so quickly in such a short amount of time that we we can't quite get a handle on what this new state is going to look like mathis runs the arctic research program at the national oceanic and atmospheric administration he says changes in the arctic are going to affect everybody in the northern hemisphere here's why masses of air an ocean current circulate between the cold arctic in the warmer parts of the hemisphere sort of like a conveyor belt it's driven largely by the temperature different or gradient between the two regions but with less snow and ice to reflect the sun's rays the arctic isn't so cool anymore the heat is not being reflected back into space the.

air conditioner jeremy mathis arctic npr christopher joyce fifteen 100 years
"christopher joyce" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

NPR's World Story of the Day

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

"The arctic is a huge icy cap on the planet and it acts like a global air conditioner but the air conditioner is breaking down today scientists issued a grim report card on the arctic they say the poll continues to warm at an alarming pace and is and pierce christopher joyce reports that will change our weather the arctic is a vast circle frozen loomed with the arctic sea like a giant ici poem than the middle but not as icy as it used to be this was the second warmest year the her in at least fifteen 100 years the warmest ever last year this year also saw the least amount of winter ice in the arctic ocean ever observed and ocean water was several degrees warmer than just a few decades ago it's a trend that some are calling the new normal arctic scientists to jeremy mathis says there's nothing normal about it there is no normal that's what so strange about what's happening in the arctic is it the environment is changing so quickly in such a short amount of time prime that we we can't quite get a handle on what this new state is going to look like mathis runs the arctic research program at the national oceanic and atmospheric administration he says changes in the arctic are going to affect everybody in the northern hemisphere here's why masses of air and ocean currents circulate between the cold arctic in the warmer parts of the hemisphere sort of like a conveyor belt it's driven largely by the temperature different or gradient between the two regions but with less snow and ice to reflect the sun's rays the arctic isn't so cool anymore the heat is not being reflected back into space the heat is now being absorbed into the landed into the ocean and that's going to alter things like the jet stream or rainstorms whether they be wildfires out in california or hurricane sat down in the golf we have to think about the impact that the changes in the arctic are having on those disruptive climate events scientists say they can't attach.

arctic air conditioner jeremy mathis california golf christopher joyce hurricane fifteen 100 years
"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"View of ethics in order to support a candidate that's the definition of selling out and selling your soul and i i i think i understand people who voted one way or the other but i think you do so with a consistent ethic because that's what christianity is it's not a political win i am it's swelled we believe it's the good news that jesus died on the cross for assent in in our place and in this new life were supposed to have consistency and i think that's why a lot of people are questioning of angelakas right now and i think a lot of andjelko for questioning what do we need to do differently to have a consistency of dust bowl ethic and gospel truth why would so many evangelical changed their views for a parent partisan political game where i think it's the question i'd like to ask him and that the pull your recordings a p r r i poll that really was quite stunning between the two and would like it it's actually a year old and when it first came out but i think ultimately the intervening variable between there was president trump and when eighty one percent of white events elakel supported president trump i think they need to recalibrate their ethical stands to do so i think that was an unhelpful even sinful recalibration and not saying that every person voted for president trump is sinful irs made the decision but i am saying that to change your view use on morality in order to support a candidate is deeply troubling and as of angelakas we used insider language meet the disciple people better so that they actually think biblically not politically about every issue mr set your thanks very much pleasure talking with you thank you add stelzer holds the billy graham distinguish chair at we can college world leaders have been meeting in bonn germany over the past several days trying to work out next steps in the paris climate agreement president donald trump says the us will withdraw from that deal though that can happen till 2020 and pierce christopher joyce reports on what.

irs bonn donald trump president billy graham germany paris christopher joyce eighty one percent
"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To they want local communities to understand what they're risky is there finally in a point where the science is telling them we are granular enough to say this is what's going to happen in boca raton this is what's going to happen in norfolk this is what's going to happen in corpus christi or whatever and people need to know that you know emergency planners need to know this people who were building seawalls need to know what sealevel rise is gonna be and so a the authors of this report tell me that we would be a great pity if if this information didn't go out to the people who really could use it and cares christopher joyce thanks a lot glad to be here hundreds of criminal cases in baltimore are in jeopardy after two incidents picked up by police body cameras show officers allegedly planting drug evidence so far more than forty criminal cases have been dropped because of the videos the cases mostly involved in drug and weapons related felonies public defender say hundreds more could end up being dismissed police and the state attorney's office in baltimore are investigating the case is also bring up larger questions about the use of police body can video and gary eric westerveld has i report when a baltimore police officer hits record on his body camera the device saves the preceding thirty seconds but without audio so it's possible the officer in the first video didn't realize he was being recorded when he appears to place a small baggy filled with white capsules in a trash strewn locked between lien homes he then turns the already recording device on and returns to get the drugs allegedly linked to a suspect already in custody the audio kicks in as his to police colleagues appear to laugh and the second video from a traffic stop appears to show baltimore officers searching a car a second time and finding baggies of drugs that didn't seem to be there during the first search.

boca raton norfolk sealevel rise christopher joyce baltimore attorney officer gary eric westerveld thirty seconds
"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"christopher joyce" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Put your from a shelter for people to they want local communities to understand what they're risk is there finally in a point where the science is telling them we are granular enough to say this is what's going to happen in in boca raton this is what's going to happen in norfolk this is what's going to happen in corpus christi or whatever and people need to know that you know emergency planners you need to know this people who were building see walls need to know what sealevel rise is gonna be and so of the authors of this report tell me that we would be a great pity if if this information didn't go out to the people who really could use it enters christopher joyce thanks a lot glad to be your hundreds of criminal cases in baltimore are in jeopardy after two incidents picked up by police body cameras show officers allegedly planting drug evidence so far more than forty criminal cases have been dropped because of the videos the cases mostly involved a drug and weapons related felonies public defender say hundreds more could end up being dismissed police and the state's attorneys office in baltimore are investigating the case is also bring up larger questions about the use of police bodycam video and bears eric westerveld has i report when a baltimore police officer hits record on his body camera the device saves the preceding thirty seconds but without audio so it's possible the officer in the first video didn't really lies he was being recorded when he appears to place so small baggy filled with white capsules in a trash strewn lock between homes he then turns the already recording device on and returns to get the drugs allegedly linked to a suspect already in custody the audio kicks in as his to police colleagues appear to laugh click here and the second video from a traffic stop appears to show baltimore officer searching a car a second time and finding baggies of drugs that didn't seem to be there during the first search no but hud with defenders discovered the videos not lawyers in the state's attorney's unit devoted solely to reviewing and disseminating body camera footage they apparently missed the videos as did the police unit charged with reviewing hours and hours of bodycam footage who queen i think the police and a howard these incident getting past the review unit there's no excuse for it that's debbie cats levy.

boca raton norfolk sealevel rise christopher joyce baltimore eric westerveld officer attorney howard thirty seconds