21 Burst results for "Christopher Joyce Npr"

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"For the killing of journalist Lyra Mckee, she was killed while observing Irish nationalist youths clashed with police in Londonderry new research on the massive ice sheet that covers much of Greenland shows it is melting six times faster than it was forty years ago as NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that's contributing to rising sea levels, billions of tons of ice covered Greenland up until the nineteen seventies. The amount of ice was relatively stable. What melted and flowed into the ocean was offset by new ice formed on land every year? Now, scientists writing in the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences say that balance is off a lot more ice is melting than being newly deposited a study of two hundred and sixty glaciers on Greenland shows that. While the rate of melting varies over short. Periods of time over the long term the rate is speeding up. The researchers point out that Greenland's melted ice as raised global sea levels by half an inch since nineteen seventy two but half of that rise came in just the last eight years, Christopher Joyce NPR news six people were killed yesterday. When a small plane crashed after it left west Houston airport in Texas, a family member of one of the people who died says the group was going to survey some property, it's not clear what caused the accident the National Transportation Safety board will investigate I'm korva Coleman. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include zoom zoom offers cloud video conferencing, online meetings and video conference room solution in one platform, featuring digital video and audio with.

Greenland NPR Christopher Joyce NPR Lyra Mckee Christopher Joyce National Academy of sciences Londonderry National Transportation Safety Houston korva Coleman Texas Washington eight years forty years
Teenage Diver Finds Tons Of Golf Balls Rotting Off California

Marketplace

02:28 min | 2 years ago

Teenage Diver Finds Tons Of Golf Balls Rotting Off California

"Carmel, California. She and her father were diving in the Pacific just offshore from a golf course. She looks down. And saw something weird. You couldn't see the fan. It was completely white golf balls. You looked down. And you're like, what are you doing here? Thousands of golf balls. It felt like a shot to the heart. She was offended. She decided she'd haul them up she put them in her family's garage. I had all these. My garage and they stunk and I had no idea why. Then she heard about a scientist who studied the plastic waste in the ocean. His name was Matt Sevaka from Stanford University. She emailed him. He came to look at her collection fifty thousand golf balls just sitting in the garage. He said, I should write a paper about this. And I was like man, I'm sixteen years old. I don't know how to read a scientific paper he said he'd help that meant diving with her not easy. The oceans off California, actually, quite cold. And so you suit up in a pretty thick wet suit. It's incredibly physically demanding they took kayaks out to ferry the golf balls back. We'll have the kayak so-so prostate that will end up just having the to- the kayak back, and we'll have to swim to shore while we were out there. We would hear plink plink. And then we look up on the hill. And there would be golf balls flying in off the course right into the ocean. Where we were doing some collections actually whenever we have good conditions were able to pull out between like five hundred. Two five thousand off ball over two years. They found more than fifty thousand golf balls. The source five golf courses. Three were up. The Carmel river, the golf balls just rolled underwater down to the ocean in the journal marine pollution bulletin, the team says chemicals from fifty thousand or so cough balls. We'll probably only have a small effect on the ocean. But they do degrade into micro plastic pieces that marine animals could eat Alex Weber says, if those golf balls floated people would be shocked, if a person could see what we see underwater, it would not be acceptable. Christopher Joyce NPR news, the Brazilian composer and pianist Andre math Mari has always played with the concept of theme and variation. He did a whole album of variations on Beatles tunes. She's a very early age. I was drawn to improvisation even sometimes the classical teachers didn't like it when he got off the

Golf Matt Sevaka California Carmel Alex Weber Carmel River Christopher Joyce Npr Andre Math Mari Scientist Stanford University Sixteen Years Two Years
An Island Crusader Takes On The Big Brands Behind Plastic Waste

NPR's World Story of the Day

06:29 min | 2 years ago

An Island Crusader Takes On The Big Brands Behind Plastic Waste

"A tide of plastic waste is contaminating the oceans. And in a congressional hearing Senator Sheldon Whitehouse named major culprits over fifty percent of the plastic waste in the oceans comes from just five countries, China, Indonesia, the Philippines, Vietnam and Sri Lanka NPR science. Correspondent Christopher Joyce. Went to one of those countries the Philippines to see how bad it is Manila it sprawls along the coast of Manila Bay. Shantytown sit in the shadow of new high rises and mega shopping malls, people here have more money than they used to. So they're buying more stuff from fancy soaps to important coffee in fast food, all which is wrapped in plastic packaging. A lot of that plastic ends up in the bay. There's an island in the bay that's kind of like a doormat for that floating. Plastic. I went to take a look it's not far from shore. We're on a Bunka, which is a Filipino vote. Wouldn't vote about twenty long creepy by. I could see lots of mangrove trees, the islands could be a place for a resort except that what looks like Spanish moss hanging from the branches. Isn't it's plastic bags. On the way out there. You look along the shore at just one all mine, plastic debris. To get a sure we walk on a little catwalk me, Dan Boone held together with plastic tie underneath it. It's. Classic perplex. Hello. The variety of stuff leading around is amazing shoes bottles, syringes, even motorcycle films. It's impossible to tell exactly where all this stuff comes from. The clearly a lot of it comes from the neighborhood surrounding Manila Bay. Some of those neighborhoods trying to stop the flow of plastic into the bay. Visit who long do hot? Good morning told people the local government is now requiring residents to actually pick through their trash and segregate out the plastic. So the community can deal with it. The woman pushes her trash carts who had paid and series of allies and along with her is a monitor from the neighborhood government. My name isse Danya Daleas, Akita speaking through a translator. So the policies that no segregation election so collection is free. But the household need to segregate their race food waste goes in one bag metals paper glass in another in two bags for plastic recyclable and nonrecyclable if residents don't comply with all this. They pay a fine. I offense by bonded vessels. Second offense one thousand and third going to Jane even jail for nuts. Separating plastic from your trash. There are hundreds of official neighborhoods in this huge city who long do hot is one of just sixteen now require residents to segregate plastic from their garbage. Is it enough? I asked the town secretary need to Yano you think it's going to work. I mean, it's. Like a soon. Nami aplastic. Now do not own. Well, sometimes I get mad as a community. We do our part to clean up the waste and educate people about the environment and in the beginning people call rate, but then they go back to their old ways. And it makes me sad. But even when people do do their best where does that plastic go? That's where it gets complicated. Some plastic bottles gets recycled. But then there are the sachets plastic packets that contain a single portion of soap or coffee your shampoo, that's how corporations like Unilever and Nestle market consumer goods in Asia. And most of these Shays cannot be recycled that rankles froylan. Greta he's with an environmental group mother earth foundation, which has sponsored the neighborhood cleanups. The problem is that for most of these companies, they feel they're responsible to their product ends the moment, they sell it. He says there's a reason us. Sachets end up in the ocean, and the Philippines, independent waste workers collect plastic and sell it to recyclers. But if it can't be recycled like, those Shays, it has no value doctoral waste Mercker, can you actually earned from this big collecting it. So they don't collect it groti has spent seventeen years looking for ways to get rid of plastic waste in our realizes that Filipinos can't dig out of this alone. Most packaging comes from just a few big companies. He says it's time they take more responsibility companies dumping all of this new products and packaging that is beyond their capacity to manage you earned from this in and you expect all of us to then magically just solve it for you. You can't just magically get rid of something that is permanent that doesn't degrade. It just keeps piling up. Remember that visited walking toward the beach plastic underfoot? I stopped to look at a huge pile of burlap bags stuffed with plastic waste a team of workers collected that waste one day's work. And yet they barely make dent. It's relentless and it buries itself in the sand and becomes permanent. Kick the stand aside. And there's a plastic tile. There's four or five straws Sanders, a half of a plastic bag and mixed in with coconuts and mangrove seeds. You know, it's just it gives you the feeling that you can't ever catch up. That's why many people throughout southeast Asia are now saying enough cleaning up isn't going to fix this. They want to take the fight to the corporations that create the plastic in the first place. Christopher Joyce NPR news.

Manila Bay Philippines Manila Senator Sheldon Whitehouse Christopher Joyce Shays NPR Christopher Joyce Npr Southeast Asia Danya Daleas Dan Boone Vietnam Asia Indonesia Sanders Unilever China Jane
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"That already comply with them say it's not worth them back. Christopher Joyce NPR news. At the end of a dramatic week. Wall Street drifted between minor gains and losses today. The Dow closed down seventy six points, the NASDAQ closed up five points. This is NPR news in Washington. And this is KCRW Leary parole infrastructure. Take us on a Friday, December twenty eight the very good afternoon to you. Here's what's happening at three. Oh, four another caravan a Central American migrants preparing to travel north and this one could be much larger than the last group as KCRW's, Gerald sats. Been reports. These migrants are not making the US border their destination at least not right away without hundreds of migrants. From the last caravan languishing in Tijuana's, they wait out the length the asylum process. The new group is planning a shorter trip. According to the San Diego union Tribune organizers, say the migrants will initially stay in southern Mexico in Chiapas and Oaxaca. They estimate that fifteen thousand migrants from Honduras, El Salvador in Guatemala will join the new caravan the new Mexican president Andres Manuel Lopez Oberdorf has pledged visas and work for Central American migrants. He's planning billions of dollars in public works projects in the southern part of the country that will provide some of those. Those jobs factual several thousand bikers arrived at the US border in November President Trump deployed troops to help prevent them from entering the country. A handful of migrants have tried to cross into the US le- illegally. But most are staying in crowded shelters in two one is the way to make asylum claims the state of California will get a big chunk of a new settlement reached with Wells Fargo. It's all connected to revelations that the Bank opened millions of fake Bank and credit card accounts without customer's knowledge well today said it will pay five hundred seventy five million dollars. CEO? Tim Sloan says the deal shows the Bank is making a serious commitment to make things right. More than a quarter of the payout is coming to the bank's home state of California state. Attorney general heavier Sarah called the banks behavior disgraceful support for NPR comes from American universities kogo school of business committed to business being forced for meaningful change through graduate and undergraduate degrees, mission driven curriculum and a hands on approach. More kogo dot American dot EDU right now, Santa Monica..

US Andres Manuel Lopez Oberdorf Bank Christopher Joyce NPR president NPR California Gerald sats Leary Tim Sloan KCRW Santa Monica Washington San Diego Tijuana Oaxaca kogo school of business Chiapas
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Noel king. And I'm David Greene a plane left the United States on Monday destined for Cambodia on this plane were thirty six Cambodians many who came to the US as refugees, and they were being removed from the US by immigration and customs enforcement ice says thirty four of the people on this plane are criminals, and that the agency's acting lawfully but advocates say these are people who are being sent to a place. They have never known attorney. Melanie, Kim is with the Asian Americans advancing Justice Asian law caucus, she represents Cambodians fighting to stay in the US, including one on this flight. And she spoke with Steve Inskeep. All the folks who are being deported came here as refugees when they were either intense or really young children fleeing to be at Phnom war, and the Canaries genocide, let's remember Cambodia is right next to Vietnam and to say, the least the war in which the United States was involved spilled over into Cambodia. With catastrophic consequences for decades afterward. The US basically carpet bombed Cambodia and Laos during the Vietnam war. It's believed that the bombings to stabilize the country, and they've laying the Canarias to take power and for the Canaries genocide to occur then some people escaped and eventually ended up in the United States. Right. Mostly in the seventies and eighties. They were settled into neighborhoods in the United States poor neighborhoods with no resources, so some committed crimes overtime were convicted of crimes anyway. That's right. There were placed in neighborhoods that were over policed and grub at a time where the United States was passing tough on crime policies. And so these children were interacting with law enforcement being convicted of crimes he's saying really harsh punishments, then shooting their sentences and then being placed in immigration proceedings where they didn't have available to them until they were deported. Meaning that once you finish your prison sentence. You're gone right in the case of a lot of South East Asian folks, Vietnam Cambodia and Laos have been reluctant to accept those for repatriation Cambodian the United States, not have repatriation agreement until two thousand two is the Trump administration doing anything different than previous administrations given that it's been possible. Since two thousand two to send Cambodians back administration has placed a lot of pressure on southeast Asian country. Stories and other countries as well such as Iraq into Malia except more people for deportation and he's populations largely came to this country as refugees. So people have been sent back under George W Bush under Barack Obama. But it's happening more frequently now is that it, right? Administration has placed a lot of pressure on Cambodia through visa sanctions for them to accept more and more people for deportation. So this past April Cambodia accepted about forty three refugees on a flight, and that was thought to be the largest deportation flight of Cambodians in US history. And this week's flight is around forty are all of these people convicted of crimes so far as you know, as far as I know. Yes, their convictions run the gamut of the penal code what they do have in common is that you convictions are really old everyone on that flight has competed their sentences can't the administration say they committed a crime. This is what the law says should be done. I would argue that this country is doing it in a coercive way. They are bullying countries, not just southeast Asian countries. But other countries as well. How many of the forty or your clients we represented six folks who were slated to be deported. Five of them are not on that plane, but one is right ton. We are waiting for a pardon for him. What's his story? So he came to this country as a young person in nineteen ninety eight at the age of twenty one. She was involved in the fact of the vehicle she didn't steal the deal, call himself and after this conviction. He's a changed person. Stayed out of trouble. Does your client have some connection still to Cambodia is he gonna know anybody there? She doesn't she doesn't have family in Cambodia. Like, most of the people who are deported largely considered themselves American. So when they are deported. It's a huge culture shock. You said that your client was seeking a pardon. But does it matter if he gets pardoned after the fact, we're not getting up on folks who have been deport? We're still pushing for them to come home. Melody, Kim tech so much. Thank you. Steve is talking to attorney Melanie Kim. She represents Cambodians facing deportation. Alien invaders have colonized island near Antarctica. They landed there in the nineteen sixties and dug deep into the soil. They've been reproducing. And spreading scientists say they seem to be changing the islands environment and worry, they'll infest Antarctica's mainland. NPR's? Christopher Joyce explains. What's going on? Ecologists doesn't mean Bartlett says the invaders pretty much only island of Signi, it's the largest terrestrial organism on the island large. Well, maybe a third of the size of a lady bug their midges, miniature flies normally they live only on South Georgia island, hundreds of miles away. But researchers in the nineteen sixties moved some plants from South Georgia to see if they could survive on Signi, they didn't but the bugs on the plants managed to hang in there. These are really extreme environment to talking about much to get there. Much ten survived that and this thing is done both in ninety striving doesn't even need mates. It reproduces solo. A sexually doesn't have any predators. It doesn't have any competitive. So it's been able to just set up camp. Staff and spread around the midges like moss, which is good for them. Because it's mostly what grows on the island Bartlett at the university of Birmingham in Great Britain says the midges deacon. Impose organic material in the soil it to be doing the job of an SM in an ecosystem that never seen anything like it. So what's the harm here? Well, their appetite is altering the island. They create huge amounts of nitrogen compounds. It's like dumping fertilizer in the soil, and it could change the mix of plants and other insects there. Peter condie. From the British Antarctic survey says that the midges might reach the Arctic mainland and play havoc with the ecosystem of one of the world's last pristine places, basically the cat's out the bag invading species are affecting everywhere and moral less unintelligent the last continental scale also where this isn't the case convy says scientists are doing their best to keep the midges from migrating off the island. Christopher Joyce NPR news. This is NPR news. Mac Schachter son, Alex died in the parkland, Florida school shooting we look back on their last holidays together. He was a bad food critic because the kid will often a everything monster ball soup. Stake a father on the loss of his son. And how he gave him new purpose? This year this afternoon on all things considered from NPR news. One.

Cambodia United States NPR Melanie Kim Steve Inskeep Canaries attorney Laos Noel king South Georgia island Christopher Joyce NPR David Greene Vietnam Iraq Antarctica George W Bush
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Climate experts say global warming is responsible for intensifying some of last year's weather extremes around the world, including drought in the US NPR's. Christopher Joyce reports. Scientists meeting in Washington DC say they've connected. Several extreme weather events to the effects of global warming in two thousand seventeen and drought in the northern plains of the US was made more likely because average temperatures are higher now flooding in China a heat wave in Europe heavy rainfall in Peru, and several other examples of severe weather made the list last year was also one of the worst ever for Atlantic hurricanes. But the analysis of those events wasn't complete in. Time for the report from the American meteorological society, scientists have already linked the severity of hurricane Harvey in Texas to global warming. Christopher Joyce NPR news, snow ice and below freezing temperatures are causing problems again today in North Carolina and Virginia and parts of Georgia. Some school systems are closed for a second consecutive day due to icy roads and sidewalks North Carolina's governor ROY Cooper says the state's highway patrol responded to hundreds of accidents yesterday because of the winter like weather more than twenty inches of snow fell in western North Carolina. I'm Dave Mattingly. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Sierra Nevada brewing company, family owned operated and argued over since nineteen eighty proud supporter of independent thought whether that's online over the air or in a bottle, more at Sierra, Nevada dot com. This is WNYC. Good morning. I'm Sean Carlson with a look at our weather forecast. Sunny today, the high only reaching about forty today with the win though that will feel anywhere between twenty five and thirty five for tonight, partly cloudy, low thirty the wind making it feel between twenty and twenty five degrees. Tomorrow Wednesday sunny today, high near thirty nine wind chills between twenty five and thirty five once again looking at it Thursday, we could see some flurries just a chance of flurries on Thursday. Otherwise, partly sunny with a high near forty..

NPR North Carolina Christopher Joyce NPR US Washington Christopher Joyce Sierra Nevada brewing company Sean Carlson Dave Mattingly American meteorological societ ROY Cooper hurricane Harvey Nevada WNYC Texas Europe Peru
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:13 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There have also been remembrances of President Bush outside the US, of course in China and editor in the state run. People's daily called him, quote, an old friend who helped set the course for ties Bush was stationed in China in the mid nineteen seventies as America's unofficial embassador is was before the US and China had established formal diplomatic relations, and to talk about Bush's time there and the impact he had on U S China relations. We're joined now by journalist and historian Orville. Schell? Welcome good to be with you. So what would George and Barbara Bush had encountered when they took up residence in Beijing in nineteen seventy four well, it was a very different time Kissinger and Nixon had just been there a few years before and we didn't yet have formal diplomatic relations. So they ran the liaison office, which is sort of a holding operation and Beijing in those days, I mean was utterly different than it is now the streets were empty of cars, people were on bicycles, and the idea of a foreigner, particularly one on a bicycle Bush's hit all the time was a kind of a circus act almost so it was a very very early time when China was just beginning to re-engage with the world outside. Now, you have the opportunity to directly meet with Bush in Beijing in nineteen seventy five I understand what was Bush's mission at the time. Well, his mission was to begin to sort of so back together, the US and China. In the absence of diplomatic relations. It was something of an incomplete diplomatic mission. But I think like many people who come into contact with China in for better or worse. They kind of never get over it. They bond with it in some kind of very organic way. And I think that was very true of that year, the Bush spent there would you say though, within the span of just that one year that Bush was successful to some extent. What did he lay the groundwork for? I think he was one of the very first Americans of any stature who actually live there who got to know the Chinese leadership. He loved to play tennis and played often with people from the foreign ministry, and he became the kind of the original old friend of China, and that served him in very good stead as the years went on. I want to fast forward to nineteen eighty nine a year that has been burned into the minds of many people. It's when the Chinese government violently crackdown on the pro-democracy. See movement in Tiananmen Square. Bush is president at this point. And he sends Brent Scowcroft national security adviser to Beijing to meet with shopping China's leader at the time, which was a very controversial move. What did that move say to you about Bush? Well, it wasn't extremely controversial move. And I remember it well because people were still just reeling from this, very savage attack that had taken place right in the center of the center of the center of China and Tiananmen Square and the avenues leading into it. At the moment. I think there were very few people who felt particularly comfortable about it. But in retrospect, I think history shined a little more kindly on it, and I think Bush properly recognized and his original intention. Remember was to do it secretly. But CNN got a hold of the news that Scowcroft was there and revealed it so his intention was to do it secretly. And to recognize that China wasn't gonna go away just because of this tragedy, and that we had to keep a relationship up with them, even as we censured them and indeed sanctioned them. So there have been many occasions Chinese American relations of this this kind when it might seem morally repugnant to engage. But in fact, the reality is the China isn't going away. It's there and it needs to be engaged whatever the state of grace of the relationship is Orville Schell is the director of the center on US China relations at the Asia Society. Thank you. Very much for joining us today. Great pleasure. In Poland climate negotiators from around the world are meeting to figure out how to keep greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere. The task looks harder than ever as NPR's. Christopher. Joyce reports. New research shows emissions are getting worse for three years. The news about global emissions of the biggest greenhouse gas carbon dioxide was pretty good. They were leveling off. But then they started to rise again in two thousand seventeen and they're still going up. Rob Jackson is a climate researcher at Stanford University last year, we thought was a blip or could be a blip. But it isn't this year. We're up again the second year in a row and emissions arising the slowdown. And then the uptick are largely the result of what's been happening in China. Their economy has been slowing a bit, which is one reason the mission stalled, but now the government is trying to boost growth, and they're green lighting some coal projects that had been on hold. India is also using a lot more coal as the government tries to bring electricity to millions. Who don't have it writing in the journal environmental research letters Jackson notes that Americans are using way less coal now. But like most everyone else in the world, they're using a lot more of another kind of fossil fuel. It's cheap gasoline were buying bigger cars, and we're driving more miles per vehicle. Another hurdle reported in the journal nature this week China is cleaning up its air pollution. That sounds great for pollution, weary Chinese citizens. But some of that air pollution, actually, cools the atmosphere. It blocks out solar radiation, less pollution aerobically. Could mean more warming some climate experts meeting in Poland are eager to point to successes rather than a looming carbon apocalypse, like Corey Lee Kerry from the university of East Anglia in Great Britain. She says take a look at clean energy growth owner and wind power has been in Batman. By governments and by businesses and wind and solar energy. And these investments have driven down the cost down to where renewable energy can compete with coal for new power plants, but renewable energy is far from replacing fossil fuels and the ghostwriters in Poland just got a rude. Reminder of how hard that will be in France a proposed tax on gasoline meant to cut consumption caused widespread rioting the French government quickly put that idea on ice. Christopher Joyce NPR news. You're listening to all things considered on WNYC CBS ousted CEO. Les Moonves says following multiple accusations of sexual harassment and assault. Now, it seems moon vests will not receive his big severance package CBS's outside lawyers say that if CBS wants to fire him for 'cause they are certainly able to do so to have more than enough..

China Barbara Bush Beijing US Orville Schell Christopher Joyce NPR U S China Brent Scowcroft president Poland Rob Jackson Tiananmen Square Chinese government WNYC CBS Les Moonves
Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

NPR's World Story of the Day

02:55 min | 2 years ago

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything in Poland climate negotiators from around the world are meeting to figure out how to keep greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere. The task looks harder than ever as NPR's. Christopher. Joyce reports. New research shows emissions are getting worse for three years. The news about global emissions of the biggest greenhouse gas carbon dioxide was pretty good. They were leveling off. But then they started to rise again in twenty seventeen and they're still going up. Rob Jackson is a climate researcher at Stanford University last year, we thought was a blip or could be a blip. But it isn't this year were up again the second year in a row and emissions arising the slowdown. And then the uptick are largely the result of. What's been happening in China? Their economy has been slowing a bit, which is one reason the mission stalled. But now the government is trying to boost growth than are green lighting, some coal projects that had been on hold. India is also using a lot more coal as the government tries to bring electricity to millions. Who don't have it writing in the journal environmental research letters Jackson notes that Americans are using way less coal now. But like most everyone else in the world, they're using a lot more of another kind of fossil fuel. It's cheap gasoline were buying bigger cars, and we're driving more miles per vehicle. Another hurdle reported in the journal nature this week China is cleaning up its air pollution. That sounds great for pollution, weary Chinese citizens. But some of that air pollution, actually, cools the atmosphere. It blocks out solar radiation, less pollution. Ironically, could mean more warming some climate experts meeting in Poland are eager to point to successes rather than a Lou. Coming carbon apocalypse like Corine mccarey from the university of East Anglia in Great Britain. She says take a look at clean energy growth. Ninety owner and wind power. Yeah. Hasn't been investment by government, and by businesses and wind and solar energy. And these investments have driven down to cost down to where renewable energy can compete with coal for new power plants, but renewable energy is far from replacing fossil fuels and the gauche eaters in Poland. Just got a rude. Reminder of how hard that will be in France a proposed tax on gasoline meant to cut consumption caused widespread rioting the French government quickly put that idea on ice. Christopher Joyce NPR news.

Christopher Joyce Npr Poland Rob Jackson China Comcast University Of East Anglia NPR French Government Stanford University France Environmental Research Researcher
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Hurricane. Michael's quick. And powerful strike came in with the war. The most powerful storm to hit you that it's dates in fifty years that was Florida. There was fire to in places like Australia. The fire writing danger for parts of central Queensland has now been rise to the highest level in the state's history gig hurricanes and fires aren't new what is new is there rising intensity or frequency caused by a warming planet? The last two hurricane seasons in the Atlantic. Ocean have been more intense than average for example, fires in California have set new records. Scientists say expect more of that they delivered a new report to the UN back in October. And the findings were quite stark Brenda Equatorial is a climate scientist at the union of concerned scientists she says the report gives governments very little time to live up to their promises. To reduce emissions dozen years that will be make or break whether we can achieve the goals of the Paris climate agreement. I don't think people really realized how close and how narrow that window is two more pessimistic. Studies followed from the United Nations and the US government. They confirmed that current efforts to cut greenhouse gas. Emissions are falling far short. I asked Ecuador. So what is needed to create the political will to act more science or monster storms like hurricane Harvey or the deadly campfire in California. I think its Harvey. I think it's the campfire. I think people who are in these extreme events are saying this is like nothing that I've ever experienced in my life. I never heard my grandparents talk about events like this. But the hurdle is high in Poland governments fear the political cost of damaging their economies by eliminating fossil fuels as fast as the scientists say they should David Victor is a political scientist at the university of California, San Diego. These two ships are sailing opposite Iraq. Actions in one direction. The science is showing that the problem is more even more severe than we originally thought. And the other direction we're learning that the political challenges and making big reductions are more challenging than people at imagined Victor notes that emissions have dipped in some places the US and Europe, for example. But worldwide there on the upswing, there's been a lot of progress kind of in bits and pieces here and there, but it's not progress that adds up to the fifty sixty eighty percent reduction in global emissions that you need to stop global warming. The Paris agreement was progress but back then the US was pushing governments to commit to a solution. This time around says, Victor, no one seems to be willing to take charge all these different countries. Trying to figure out what to do about the problem. And there aren't any really very clear leaders. Instead, President Trump says the US should withdraw from the agreement. Christopher Joyce NPR news..

US David Victor California scientist Paris hurricane Harvey Australia UN Brenda Equatorial Hurricane. Michael Christopher Joyce NPR Atlantic Florida Ecuador United Nations President Trump Queensland university of California
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And powerful strike came in with the war. The most powerful storm to hit you that estates in fifty years. That was Florida. There was fire to in places like Australia. The fire writing danger for parts of central Queensland has now been rise to the highest level in the state's history gig hurricanes and fires are new what is new is there rising intensity or frequency caused by a warming planet? The last two hurricane seasons in the Atlantic. Ocean have been more intense than average for example, fires in California have set new records. Scientists say expect more of that they delivered a new report to the UN back in October. And the findings were quite stark Brenda equitable is a climate scientist at the union of concerned scientists she says the report gives governments very little time to live up to their promises. To reduce emissions dozen years that will be make or break whether we can achieve the goals of the Paris climate agreement. I don't think people really realized how close and how narrow that window is two more pessimistic. Studies followed from the United Nations and the US government. They confirmed that current efforts to cut greenhouse gas. Emissions are falling far short. I asked Ecuador what is needed to create the political will to act or science or monster storms like hurricane Harvey or the deadly campfire in California. I think its Harvey. I think it's the campfire. I think people who are in these extreme events are saying this is like nothing that I've ever experienced in my life. I never heard my grandparents talk about events like this. But the hurdle is high in Poland governments fear the political cost of damaging their economies by eliminating fossil fuels as fast as the scientists say they should David Victor is a political scientist at the university of California, San Diego. These two ships are sailing opposite. Directions in one direction. The science is showing that the problem is more even more severe than we originally thought. And the other direction we're learning that the political challenges in making big reductions are more challenging than people at imagined Victor notes that emissions have dipped in some places the US and Europe, for example. But worldwide there on the upswing, there's been a lot of progress kind of in bits and pieces here and there, but it's not progress that adds up to the fifty sixty eighty percent reduction in global emissions that you need to stop global warming. The Paris agreement was progress but back then the US was pushing governments to commit to a solution. This time around says, Victor, no one seems to be willing to take charge all these different countries. Trying to figure out what to do about the problem. And there aren't any really very clear leaders. Instead, President Trump says the US should withdraw from the agreement. Christopher Joyce NPR news..

US David Victor scientist California Paris hurricane Harvey UN Atlantic Christopher Joyce NPR Florida Australia United Nations President Trump Ecuador Queensland university of California Europe San Diego
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And powerful strike came in with the war. The most powerful storm to hit United States in fifty years. That was Florida. There was fire to in places like Australia. The fire writing danger for parts of central Queensland has now been rise to the highest level in the state's history. Gig hurricanes and fires aren't new. What is new is there rising intensity or frequency caused by a warming planet? The last two hurricane seasons in the Atlantic. Ocean have been more intense than average for example, fires in California have set new records. Scientists say expect more of that they delivered a new report to the UN back in October. And the findings were quite stark Brenda equal is a climate scientist at the union of concerned, scientists she says the report gives governments very little time to live up to their promises to reduce emissions dozen years that will be make or break we can achieve the goals of the Paris climate agreement. I don't think people really realized how close and how narrow that window is two more pessimistic. Studies followed from the United Nations and the US government. They confirmed that current efforts to cut greenhouse gas. Emissions are falling far short. I asked what is needed to create the political will to act more science or monster storms like hurricane Harvey or the deadly camp. Fire in California. I think its Harvey. I think it's the campfire. I think people who are in these extreme events are saying this is like nothing that I've ever experienced in my life. I never heard my grandparents talk about events like this. But the hurdle is high in Poland governments fear the political cost of damaging their economies by eliminating fossil fuels as fast as the scientists say they should David Victor is a political scientist at the university of California, San Diego. These two ships are sailing opposite directions in one direction. The science is showing that the problem is more even more severe than we originally thought and the other direction where the political challenges in making big reductions are more challenging than people imagined Victor notes that emissions have dipped in some places the US and Europe, for example. But worldwide there on the upswing, there's been a lot of progress kind of in bits and pieces here and there, but it's not progress that adds up to the fifty sixty eighty percent reduction in. Global emissions that you need to stop global warming. The Paris agreement was progress but back then the US was pushing governments to commit to a solution. This time around says, Victor, no one seems to be willing to take charge all these different countries. Trying to figure out what to do about the problem. And there aren't any really very clear leaders. Instead, President Trump says the US should withdraw from the agreement. Christopher Joyce NPR news. You're listening. You're listening to all things considered on WNYC US military. Investigators have concluded that there has been a genocide in Myanmar. The level of depravity was so shocking to all of us. We heard different stories from different people all these horrific events. Meanwhile, the US State Department is not calling it a genocide. We'll have that story coming up next..

United States David Victor US State Department California scientist Paris hurricane Harvey Australia Atlantic UN Myanmar United Nations Florida Brenda Queensland Christopher Joyce NPR Europe university of California
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. President Trump says he is looking into canceling all subsidies for General Motors after the automaker decided to lay off more than fourteen thousand American workers. Impairs more license. More President Trump has angry and disappointed about the move by GM. He said Monday, the GM quote, better damn well opened a new plant very soon. Now, he appears to have settled on the oral else the president tweeting that he is now quote looking at cutting all GM subsidies, including for electric cars. It's not clear whether the president will follow through on that threat or whether he could get support from congress to remove the subsidies, President Trump is in a tough spot because he promised workers throughout the midwest that once he was president new manufacturing plants would be opening throughout the rust belt. Mara Liasson, NPR news, the Whitehouse. Scientists say average to slow global warming are falling further behind. And were they need to be to avoid serious damage to the climate NPR's. Christopher Joyce has more on the new study. They come up the emissions gap report. Scientists measure what countries are doing to lower emissions of greenhouse gases, then calculate if those measures will keep the rise in global temperature from overtopping the danger level about three and a half degrees Fahrenheit. Their latest report finds and increasingly large gap between current efforts in what's needed to protect the climate for a while. It looked like emissions were leveling out. But despite growth in renewable energy and less coal used in the US and Europe. Global emissions are rising too fast to avoid dangerous warming. The report was issued by the United Nations. Christopher Joyce NPR news amid a growing belief. They will not be successful in their efforts to get asylum in the US more of the five thousand or so mostly Central American migrants at the US Mexico border are now looking at other options, many were dispirited after failing across the border over the weekend. Some were repelled by US agents firing tear-gas Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina's. He trust the citizen of the border officers who decided to take the action go down there and.

President Trump president NPR Christopher Joyce NPR US Christopher Joyce GM Jack Speer General Motors Senator Lindsey Graham Mara Liasson Washington South Carolina United Nations midwest congress Europe
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Rarely ever produced before Christopher Joyce NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This weekend. Turkey's president said for the first time that he had given audiotapes of the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal kashogi to officials in a number of western countries, including the US kashogi was killed last month. Inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. The Turkish president's comment on Saturday keeps the pressure on the Trump administration to make Saudi Arabia face consequences for Kashoggi's death. NPR's? Jackie Northam has been following the case and joins us now. Hey, Jackie so Turkey's, president rage uptight. Irwin has ended for a while. Now that there was this audio recording of Kashoggi's killing now, he's publicly confirmed. It do you think these audiotapes will impact the global response to what happened to kashogi? Right. You know, this tape is expected to be extremely disturbing with sounds of the final moments of Jamaica show. Jeez. Life. Turkish officials say he was strangled and dismembered by fifteen men hit team from Saudi Arabia. So is probably pretty. Gruesome, the Washington Post has reported CIA director Gina hospital listened to the audio while she was on a trip to Istanbul last month, but the administration hasn't confirmed that in fact, the only country that has confirmed as listen to the audio tapes is Canada. Here's a Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Paris this weekend. Canada's intelligence agencies have been working very closely on this issue with the Turkish intelligence Canada has been fully briefed up on what Turkey had to share. So the audiotape is out there. Yeah. Are there any plans to make the tapes more broadly public? We don't know that. But you know, every week Turkey seems to release more information about this killing so perhaps somehow it could leak out, and certainly a broader access to put more pressure on the Trump administration act to take tougher measures against Saudi Arabia. Okay. So clearly Canada's been talking about these tapes is the Trump administration saying anything new at this point. There was a few things this weekend. The administration has been sending mixed messages about whether senior Saudi officials were involved in this killing and what they will do if it's found out that success. I'm this weekend secretary estate, Mike Pompeo talked with Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, and reiterated that the US will hold those responsible for Kashoggi's killing to account. But there was no mention in the State Department read out of that conversation. Anything about the audiotapes? The administration says it is reviewing whether to sanction some Saudis believed to be involved in the killing and President Trump has said he wants to wait until the Saudi authorities have finished up their investigation. And then he'll decide what to do. And he suggested that might happen as early as this week. So we could hear some time soon. But, you know, also Trump is under a lot of pressure to do something. And there are a growing bipartisan calls in congress to suspend or cancel weapons deals to the kingdom plan or cutback US involvement in the Saudi led war. You know, Yemen. Yeah. And on that the US has decided to stop refueling Saudi aircraft carrying out airstrikes in Yemen. Was that some sort of response ticket? Oh, jeez. Staff possibly the kashogi killing has put the Saudis on the defensive for sure. And the warning has been on the top of the list of what people are objecting to the thing is the Saudis have been doing the majority of the refueling anyway. So this doesn't necessarily mean a lot. But it does come at a time. When the Saudi led coalition is attacking a key port in Yemen. And groups are warning that could cut off food to millions of people in Yemen in the countries are ready on the verge of famine. So there's growing.

Saudi Arabia Kashoggi Saudi consulate Yemen US Turkey Trump president Canada Saudi Crown Istanbul Christopher Joyce NPR NPR Jackie Northam Jamal kashogi Jamaica Justin Trudeau Washington Post Irwin
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rarely ever produced before Christopher Joyce NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This weekend. Turkey's president said for the first time that he had given audiotapes of the killing of Saudi journalists Jamal kashogi to officials in a number of western countries, including the US kashogi was killed last month inside the Saudi consulate in eastern bowl. The Turkish president's comment on Saturday keeps the pressure on the Trump administration to make Saudi Arabia face consequences for Kashoggi's death. NPR's? Jackie Northam has been following the case and joins us now. Hey, Jackie so Turkey's, president rage uptight. Irwin has ended for a while. Now that there was this audio recording Kashoggi's killing now, he's publicly confirmed. It do you think these audiotapes will impact the global response to what happened to this tape is expected to be extremely disturbing with sounds of the final moments of Jamaica show. Jeez. Life. Turkish officials say he was strangled. And then dismembered by fifteen men hit team from Saudi Arabia's who's probably pretty. Gruesome, the Washington Post has reported CIA director Gina hospital listened to the audio while she was on a trip to Istanbul last month, but the administration hasn't confirmed that in fact, the only country that has confirmed its listen to the audiotapes is Canada. Here's a Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Paris this weekend. Canada's intelligence agencies have been working very closely on this issue with the Turkish intelligence that Canada has been fully briefed up on what Turkey had to share. So the audiotape is out there. Yeah. Are there any plans to make the tapes more broadly public? We don't know that. But you know, every week Turkey seems to release more information about this killing so perhaps somehow it could leak out, and certainly a broader access to or put more pressure on the Trump administration actor take tougher measures against Saudi Arabia. Okay. So clearly Canada's been talking about these tapes is the Trump administration saying anything new at this point. A few things this weekend. The administration has been sending mixed messages about whether senior Saudi officials were involved in this killing and what they will do if it's found out that success. I'm this weekend secretary estate Mike Pompeo talked with Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, reiterated that the US will hold those responsible for Kashoggi's killing to account. But there was no mention in the State Department read out of that conversation. Anything about the audiotapes? The administration says it is reviewing whether to sanction some Saudis believed to be involved in killing President Trump has said he wants to wait until the Saudi authorities have finished up their investigation. And then he'll decide what to do. And he suggested that might happen as early as this week. So we could hear some time soon. But you don't also Trump is under a lot of pressure to do something. And there are growing bipartisan calls in congress to suspend or cancel weapons deals to the kingdom way or cutback US involvement and in the Saudi led war in Yemen. Yeah. On that the US has decided to stop refusing Saudi aircraft carrying out airstrikes in Yemen. Was that some sort of response ticket show? Jeez. Death possibly the kashogi killing has put the Saudis on the defensive for sure. And the war in Yemen has been on the top of the list of what people are objecting to the thing is the Saudis have been doing the majority of the refueling anyway. So this doesn't necessarily mean a lot. But it does come at a time. When the Saudi led coalition is attacking key port in Yemen. And groups are warning that could cut off food to millions of people in Yemen in the countries are ready on the verge of a famine. So there's growing urgency to stop the war. That's NPR's. Jackie northbound. Thanks very much. Jackie. Thank you..

Saudi Arabia Yemen Trump Turkey Jackie Northam Saudi consulate US president Canada NPR Kashoggi Christopher Joyce NPR Irwin Jamal kashogi Jamaica Justin Trudeau Washington Post Gina hospital State Department
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Will there be recounts? Find out on all things considered from NPR and KCRW. It's five oh one live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. A new report from Washington think tank says North Korea continues to operate more than a dozen missile basis, even as President Trump boasts of ending pain Young's nuclear threat, NPR's Scott, Horsely reports the basis are widely. Scattered throughout North Korea in an effort to avoid easy destruction. Researchers identified the missile bases through a combination of satellite, imagery, and interviews with intelligence experts and North Korean defectors. North Korea has not publicly acknowledged any of the bases. Lisa Collins of the center for strategic and international. Studies says that would be a first step towards actually dismantling the regime's nuclear and ballistic weapons program where you're just putting a spotlight on those different bases and showing the world that there's more to the North Korean missile program than maybe publicly known President Trump has promised to hold a second meeting soon with North Korean leader Kim Jong own but last week the North Koreans cancelled a preparatory meeting with the secretary of state, Scott Horsely NPR news Washington after a vote count that dragged on for nearly a week. The democrat is the projected winner in the Zona Senate race to fill the seat vacated by Jeff flake, forty two year old karston cinema beating out fifty two year old Republican Martha mcsally cinema, a three term congress. This will in faced a stiff challenge from accelerator. Former air force pilot or brace President Trump after opposing him during the two thousand sixteen election mic Sally had labelled anymore. Protests by cinema fifteen years ago, treason. The contest drew more than ninety million in spending much by outside groups as California suffers through a catastrophic series of wildfire. Scientists say both climate change and forest management are partly to blame. Here's NPR's. Christopher Joyce climate change has driven up temperatures around the planet in California that's contributed to record droughts. Hot dry air sucks moisture out of vegetation and leads to more fire fire. Scientists Jennifer bolts at the university of Colorado says it's getting worse in the American west. But the trend has been is that we've seen the number of large. Fires increase fivefold since the nineteen seventies forest managers have made matters worse by suppressing even small fires over the past century. That's led to overgrown forests that are full of ready to burn trees. Experts say thinning out those fire prone forest spy, cutting or burning some trees is difficult and expensive Christopher Joyce NPR. News highlights discount carrier frontier could be close to reaching a new contract. After two years of discussions union, representing pilots for the Denver based airline announcing today, the two sides of reaching agreement in principle on a deal that would include improvements to pay work rules and benefits. The airline Pilots Association says terms to must be reviewed by frontiers. Union executive council abroad selloff in the tech sector sent large swaths of the financial markets lower than that affected. Stocks broadly. The Dow was down six hundred and two points today. You're listening to NPR then this is KCRW. I'm Larry parole infra Steve take us on Monday, November twelfth good evening to you. Here's what's happening at five. Oh, four a utility is facing increasing criticism after a wildfire ignited in northern California. The campfire surrounding the town of paradise has killed at least twenty nine people Pacific Gas and electric told regulators last week it detected a problem on. Electrical transmission line near the town of paradise just before the fire broke out Thursday. Estimates are the fire started two minutes after the reported outage. Paradise. Resident Jim Flint says he was kicked out of a community meeting last night after asking a PG any exact if the company was responsible for the fire fire now twenty five percent contained burn more than one hundred thirteen thousand acres after thirty years in the house of representatives, Orange County Republican Dana Rohrabacher is out several media outlets have called the race for democrat Harley Rueda even though Rohrabacher hasn't conceded yet. Here's KCRW Daryl salesman Rueda is up by more than eighty five hundred votes over Robert Bacher in the latest election update. There are still male and provisional ballots left account. But apparently not enough for Rohrabacher to close the gap. Rueda? A Newport Beach businessman has declared victory in the coastal district. Rohrabacher's campaign says it will have no comment until all the votes are counted which could take a couple of more weeks. Meanwhile, two other Republicans in undecided Orange County races saw their lead. Shrink in the latest vote. Count Representative Mimi Walters is a head of democrat. Katie porter by two thousand votes and young Kim is ahead of democrat Gil Cisneros by six hundred votes. Both contests are still too close to call KCRW's, Gerald sats been family and fans alike. Remembering STAN Lee today, the longtime editorial titan of marvel comics and creator of its most iconic characters has died. He was ninety five lease characters such as spider, man, wolverine and iron, man or credited with strengthening the movie industry at a time. When box offices were slumping around the world that delanie is the editorial director at the Hollywood reporter because they are enduring stories that appeal globally everybody can relate to Peter Parker. And you know, the powers that he has to embrace with responsibility. Everybody loves a superhero stories, I don't think these are going away at all these characters have been the driving force behind the top grossing movies of all time and the.

NPR President Trump North Korea Dana Rohrabacher paradise Scott Horsely KCRW Kim Jong Christopher Joyce NPR California Orange County Jack Speer Washington airline Pilots Association Daryl salesman Rueda STAN Lee
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I'm Ari Shapiro. This hour as wildfires. Burn in California. We'll hear from a business owner in evacuation zone by lookout mountain. I mean, it's completely three hundred sixty degrees charge nothing. Also, former first lady Michelle Obama reflects on her life in place in American history. I am making my Mark in hopes that my grandchildren will experience something better than I did a documentary about the thousands of people helping companies like Google and Facebook, remove toxic content from their sites so stories after these news headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer. A new report from a Washington think tank says North Korea continues to operate more than a dozen missile basis, even as President Trump of ending pain Yong's nuclear threat, NPR's Scott Horsely reports the basis are widely scattered throughout North Korea and effort to avoid easy destruction. Researchers identified the missile basis for a combination of satellite, imagery, and interviews with intelligence experts in North Korean defectors North Korea has not publicly acknowledged any of the basis. Lisa collins. So the center for strategic and international. Studies says that would be a first step towards actually dismantling the regime's nuclear and ballistic weapons program way, just putting a spotlight on those different bases and showing the world that there's more to the North Korean missile program. Then maybe publicly known President Trump has promised to hold a second meeting soon with North Korean leader Kim Jong own the last week the north. Koreans cancelled a preparatory meeting with the secretary of state, Scott Horsely NPR news Washington after a vote count that dragged on for nearly a week. The democrat is the projected winner in the Senate race to fill the seat vacated by Jeff flake, forty two year old cinema beating out fifty two year old Republican Martha mcsally cinema. A three term congresswoman faced a stiff challenge from accelerator. Former air force pilot embraced President Trump after opposing him during the two thousand sixteen election mic Sally, had labelled anywhere protests by cinema fifteen years ago, treason contest, drew more than ninety million in spending much with by outside groups as California's suffers through a catastrophic series of wildfire. Scientists say both climate change and force management are partly to blame. Here's NPR's. Christopher Joyce climate change has driven up temperatures around the planet in California that's contributed to record droughts. Hot dry air sucks moisture out of vegetation and leads to more fire fire. Scientists Jennifer ball. At the university of Colorado says it's getting worse in the American west. But the trend has been is that we've seen the number of large fires increased fivefold since the nineteen seventies forest managers have made matters worse by suppressing even small fires over the past century. That's led to overgrown forests that are full of ready to burn trees experts say thinning out those fire prone. Forests by cutting or burning some trees is difficult and expensive Christopher Joyce NPR. News highlights with discount carrier frontier. Could be close to reaching a new contract. After two years of discussions union, representing pilots for the Denver based airline announcing today, the two sides of reaching agreement in principle on a deal that would include improvements to pay work roles and benefits the airline Pilots Association says terms to must be reviewed by frontiers. Union executive council abroad selloff in the tech sector sent large swaths of the financial markets lower than that affected. Stocks broadly. The Dow was down six hundred and two points today. You're listening to. NPR from news. I'm Tiffany Cam. High the Republican member of congress who represents the area burned by the campfire does not think President Trump's comments blaming California for its large wildfires will mean he withholds funding for the disaster cake lily Demolli reports from Chico President Trump tweeted incorrectly that the wildfires in California were caused by what he calls the gross mismanagement of the forest and he threatened to withhold federal funding. The president has also lashed out against California's democratic leaders GOP. Congressman Douglas alpha says despite the rocky relationship he has no doubt the region will get the federal funding it needs to rebuild for this disaster. He's actually reproved every order every request that California's made for disaster relief at each stage. The federal government owns and manages close to sixty percent of California's forests the state owns three percent. I'm lily dramatic, KiKi weedy news more than. Seventy eight hundred firefighters are deployed at three major wildfires in California state fire and rescue chief with the governor's office of emergency services. Kim Zegarra says resources are stretched thin that's in part because some federal agencies that you seasonal firefighters have laid them off already since the normal fire season would be over by now. So why we do have federal assets were very gracious reform. We have a lot more. A state and local resources that are currently on the line..

President Trump California NPR Washington North Korea Christopher Joyce NPR Ari Shapiro Scott Horsely Michelle Obama Jack Speer lookout mountain business owner president federal government Kim Jong
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KCRW

"Bigger sharks. And ultimately giant reptiles geology controls destiny in the sense that biology has to adapt to the stage that it's put on it was a drama that might have continued if an asteroid hadn't hit the earth in wiped out the giant reptiles and their dinosaur. Cousins opening a door to us the furry little mammals, Christopher Joyce NPR news scores of children who were kidnapped from a boarding school in Cameroon earlier this week have been reunited with their families. The authorities say the kids were released by an unidentified gunmen. This is all happening amid mounting tension between Cameroon's minority English-speaking regions and the. Majority. French-speaking government NPR's ofeibea Quist arcton says two staff members from the school are reportedly still being held. Initial cries of anguish gave way to relief after two days of heartache when some of the nearly eighty missing school children met up with their parents in Bamenda Cameroon's northwest commercial hub, this fifteen year old girl whose family preferred anonymity says the worst part of their captivity was walking barefoot in the Bush. The Dow was it striking very very long distances. Well, we started a journey at night under let us read with Aaron judge the students were kidnapped before dawn on Monday in Cameroon's, restive English speaking region, which has been plagued for the past two years, by instability and increasing violence between the security forces and armed separatists, the rebels accused Maroons dominant French-Speaking government of discrimination against their to anglophone regions and they're vowing to establish a breakaway Republic both sides blame each other. For the mass kidnapping Cameroon's eighty-five year old president Paul Biya made no concessions to the secretaries telling them to lay down their arms..

Cameroon Bamenda Cameroon Christopher Joyce NPR ofeibea Quist arcton Maroons kidnapping Paul Biya Aaron president eighty-five year fifteen year two years two days
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Weapons? Kiva gave up. What does that mean? Giving up already all the nuclear weapons already made individual okay now impossible. That was part of the statement. They signed him Singapore, though. Oh, yeah. Via are not reproducing nuclear warfare and nuclear weapons anymore. Vessel for mate. This is our you think the ones you has is our strength because DPRK already developed into nuclear power. This is what they will knows already made all the way it will not give up impulsively. Jay, our guide on a tour of juche tower this month, she is one North Korean one voice and not an official one, but a window into how one North Korean sees her country's nuclear weapons status, and it's changing relations with the US and the world more stories from my reporting trip to Pyongyang in the days ahead. Smugglers are selling tens of thousands of tons of ivory every year that illegal trade threatens the existence of elephants conservationists have developed high-tech strategies to track the source of the ivory NPR's. Christopher Joyce reports on a new effort to trace the smugglers as well. Biologists. Samuel Wasser follows the ivory trade closely. He says too many elephants are dying right now. We're after meeting that they're about forty thousand elephants being killed a year, and there's only four hundred thousand left in Africa. So that's a tenth of the population. A year the cartels that run the ivory trade try to cover their tracks. They falsify shipping documents. For example. They hide ivory in shipping. Containers, they send the average multiple ports before its final destination at the university of Washington. Wasser developed a way to use DNA in tusks to tell what part of Africa the elephants lived in. Now, he's using the technique to home in on the cartels Wasser, analyzed d. Anna from tusks that were seized by customs officials. He noticed that smugglers often separate the two tusks that come from a single elephant and ship them. Separately, presumably to make it harder to track with a came from. But Wasser found a pattern with matching tusks through common port. They were shipped close together in time, and they showed high overlap and the genetically determined origins of the topics. So these three characteristics suggest that the same major trafficking cartel was actually responsible for shipping. Both of the shootings worser says wildlife authorities rarely get enough evidence to identify the big players often. It's they're smaller suppliers who get caught with only as much as they can carry those convictions are well down the smuggling pyramid and don't do much to stem the trade his technique aims higher. When you get a strong connection in the DNA, all of a sudden weak evidence becomes much more confirming Wasser says linking different shipments to a small number of. Sports made about the same time with ivory from elephants in just a few locations in Africa reveals which are the likely cartels doing the smuggling writing in the journal science advances washers team identifies three cartels associated with much the trade. They operate out of Mombasa in Kenya. Entebbe in Uganda and low may in Togo, Christopher Joyce NPR news. You're.

Samuel Wasser Africa Kiva Christopher Joyce DPRK NPR Christopher Joyce NPR juche tower Mombasa university of Washington Entebbe Pyongyang Singapore Kenya Togo Uganda
US, NPR and China discussed on Q

Q

00:51 sec | 3 years ago

US, NPR and China discussed on Q

"Hurricane Florence is. Now a category. Four storm and is expected to bring heavy surf and high water levels by Wednesday along the southeast coast, embarrass Christopher Joyce reports on the storm's progress meteorologists say Florence continues to strengthen as it moves toward North Carolina and Virginia while it may moderate once it hits the coast, high winds pose a serious threat to life and property. In addition, the National Hurricane Center warns of storm surge that could be several feet high even more worrisome experts say is the potential for the storm to stall once it works its way over land that could drop more than two feet of rain in some places and caused flash flooding hurricane this strong. So far north is rare climate scientists say Florence potential to cause flooding is due in part to a warmer Atlantic Ocean and atmosphere caused by global

United States NPR China Hurricane Florence Christopher Joyce Npr National Hurricane Center Hurricane Gotham Senator Jeanne Shaheen Christopher Joyce Cuba Exxon Mobil Senator Jeff Klein Russia Florence Chris Christie NBC North Carolina State Department
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Climate scientists are struggling to figure out how a. Warming planet will affect different ecosystems like forests swamps grasslands so researchers looked back at the end of the last ice age to see, what might, be in store for us as NPR's Christopher Joyce reports. They suspect some ecosystems could change completely in a century, much of the northern. Hemisphere was covered by ice sheets twenty thousand years ago then. The earth started warming up by ten thousand years ago. It was warmer by about seven to. Twelve. Degrees Fahrenheit Ecologists. Stephen Jackson, says that makes that period of history much like what greenhouse gases are doing to the earth now the change, over, the next, one hundred hundred fifty years is of similar magnitude. Globally to what we, saw during the last ice retreat Jackson worked for the US Geological Survey he and a team of more than forty. Scientists examined the fossil pollen. And vegetation to figure out how that ancient warming affected various ecosystems the researchers found huge changes after the. Ice age in Jackson's neighborhood in Arizona for example it's now desert cactus and Trump's mostly fifteen thousand years ago though what we'd see, there instead, is juniper Pinon woodland and evergreen woodland utterly different from. The vegetation we'd find here so as climate changes some forests may give way. To Woody shrubs or grassland or grassland could convert to desert. Writing in the journal science the researchers say they can't Predict exactly where and how fast these changes will happen for one. Thing the. Warming now is a lot faster than it was, at the end of the ice age instead of that. Happening, over several thousand years we're cramming all of that climatic change in two century century and a half and their historical record shows a. Climate going from frigid too warm now. It's moving from warm to warmer that may be different but Jackson says one thing is likely more unpredictability maybe even ecosystems that are totally. New and that poses challenges for forests wildlands and even fisheries and for people. Who depend, on them that's gonna create a great deal of chaos ecological chaos out there as they try to adapt and, respond, to those, changes these changes are happening now some forests in. The southwest are dying, and being replaced by smaller plants and shrubs ecologist David Beshir's at the university of Arizona says it's similar to what. Happened in the, past each Changes is very temperature sensitive and I think that's the most important takeaway message because that's what we're dealing with right now I. Think in contemporary times in the journal scientific reports Beshir's and scientists in Australia showed how quickly big changes can happen a. Heatwave in Western Australia. In, twenty eleven caused coral bleaching in the ocean as well as tree deaths damaging insect outbreaks and die-offs of birds all very different ecosystems responding to a warmer environment Christopher Joyce NPR. News You're listening to all, things considered from NPR news is a look at.

Stephen Jackson NPR Christopher Joyce NPR Christopher Joyce juniper Pinon woodland David Beshir Western Australia Arizona Australia university of Arizona US Trump one hundred hundred fifty year fifteen thousand years twenty thousand years ten thousand years thousand years two century
"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"christopher joyce npr" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Are going to give anyone a at we're going to hold corporations accountable the interior department completed an environmental impact study on seismic survey in 2014 it says the effects on marine life will be moderate at worst they pointed out that surveyors will stop their work if they see or hear wales within five hundred yards and will keep away from places there are known to frequent but more than seventy scientists have written to president trump asking him to cancel the surveys anyway they note that the blasting covers regions populated by several kinds of whales that are in danger of extinction the ignoble checked is one of those scientists there are numerous beef off the atlantic coast that have never been we don't have any data what whoever about their response by the interior department is expected to rule on the surveying permits in the next few weeks environmental and other interest groups are preparing to legally challenge any permit to allow seismic testing christopher joyce npr news and you're listening to all things considered from npr news the are called ice meister's the people in charge of creating perfect ice at olympic olympic rings and arenas and each sport from curling to speed skating to figure skating requires a different type density in temperature of ice the art of freezing water coming up in the next segment of all things considered right now though julius back with traffic and big delays trying to get to the middle grade there's a crash southbound six ad after injury a.

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