25 Burst results for "Christopher Hitchens"

'Why So Many Christians Have Left the Faith' With Michael Brown

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:59 min | 2 weeks ago

'Why So Many Christians Have Left the Faith' With Michael Brown

"Are ate more books. You know, people say that about me and it's like, no, no, no. That's not true of me. But you, there are certain people that I don't know how you do it. But this one, the title, it's very provocative title. And again, brand new book, why so many Christians have left the faith. So let's talk about it. I have my theories. What do you say? First, let's recognize there is a problem. You know, there's some say, well, if the true Christians, they won't leave either way, a lot of people are dropping out. Prominent leaders have dropped out fully apostasized, pastors, worship leaders, cemetery professors, don't believe the Bible anymore. We hear the stats about profession Christians dropping at a rapid rate in America, young people dropping out of church. So there are lots of different reasons. There are some who say, look, look, Eric, Jesus prophesied that there'd be an anti falling away. And this is just the expected falling away. Well, it's a falling away. There's no question that it's happening. But to just say, well, it's the final thing. There's something we can do about it. No, I don't believe that at all. And for sure, there are a number of different factors. And what I do in the book Eric is I try to break down all the different factors because everyone has their own story. Each person has their own story. And I try to shoot why this is happening and then how we can address it. So for example, one of the big issues, you've got a great book about atheism. One of the big issues is that the new atheists that really sprung up about 1516 years ago. Bestselling book, Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens, Daniel Dunn. What happened was the memes, the quotes, the ideas, the mindset of those books kind of trickled down to the general public. So that 12 year olds are talking about I'm not going to listen to a Bronze Age God and some antiquated book and everyone thinks the Bible is hateful and bigoted and so on. So the sentiments trickled out,

Daniel Dunn Richard Dawkins Christopher Hitchens Sam Harris America Jesus Eric First Each Person Bible Bronze Age ONE 12 Year Olds 1516 Years Ago GOD Christians
Is the W.E.F. 'Utterly Atheistic'? Larry Taunton Weighs In

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:50 min | 2 months ago

Is the W.E.F. 'Utterly Atheistic'? Larry Taunton Weighs In

"To Larry Taunton. Larry, you are touching on so many important things, right? This globalist agenda, this idea, you said it's assumed that God is not part of the picture. It's a secular view. Their post conversation. I mean, for sure, but I mean, look, the elites have been for decades, but the point is that here they're converging on this place. And what's interesting is when you ask the guy, okay, so you see ethical problems. What do you base that on? Where do you get ethics from? And this is the fundamental question. If you don't believe in the God of the Bible, where are you coming from? And people, what interests me is that people know there's such a thing as right and wrong. They just don't know where they get that from. And they're now willing to probe whether it has any validity. They just will quote that because it's clear. Well, the lord has written his law upon the hearts of men. And my argument for God's existence is not just the design argument, the external argument, but that if you're Stevie Wonder and you can not see a creation, God has not conspired against you because he has written his law up on your heart. That's Romans two 15. That's the argument to the grace effect. That was the whole of my argument with Christopher Hitchens, that let's set aside the design argument. Christopher, you know that God is real. It's why the Bible says that you're a fool to say that there is no God. Says it twice in the psalms. And the reason for that is because it is encoded into you. You have to deny you have to suppress what your whole being is screaming. So it takes someone who is especially smart to construct silly arguments like the string theory and multiverses and this kind of stuff in order to convince themselves that there is no God.

Larry Taunton Larry Stevie Wonder Christopher Hitchens Christopher
Leftist Writer Sam Harris Admits to Ignoring Hunter Biden Laptop

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:57 min | 7 months ago

Leftist Writer Sam Harris Admits to Ignoring Hunter Biden Laptop

"I'm not sure if you're familiar with the writer Sam Harris. I first encountered Sam Harris in the early 2000s. Well, no, the I should say around 2007, 2008. Why? Because he was one of the trio of prominent new atheists. The group included Christopher Hitchens, whom I knew well going back to the 1980s and 90s, Richard Dawkins, whom I don't know, but whom I know of, and I was familiar with Dawkins, his work, now having read almost, well, most of it. And Sam Harris was the third of this group. At that time, a student of neuroscience now he's completed his neuroscience degrees. And he has kind of wandered into politics over the past decade or so, and presents himself as this kind of progressive skeptic who is willing to take on some aspects of the left and woke culture, but at the same time firmly on the left. And Sam Harris, I noticed was trending yesterday on Twitter and people were talking about it, and I see a little clip of Sam Harris. And I'm not gonna blame the clip, but this is basically what Sam Harris says. He goes, listen. In the 2020 election, the supreme goal was to get rid of Trump. And then he goes, I really don't care if Hunter Biden was a crook. I really don't care if they suppress the story and censored it. I really don't care if all of it was true. I really don't care if, in fact, if there were dead children lying all around the floor, I'm using actually a Sam Harris's words here. He goes, it was worth it. And the thrust of this argument, which by the way, is not mentioning it in part because it's not Sam Harris alone who thinks this. This is a widespread way of thinking on the left. It's the I called it by any means necessary way of thinking.

Sam Harris Christopher Hitchens Richard Dawkins Dawkins Hunter Biden Donald Trump Twitter
Why Dinesh Just Trended on Twitter

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:27 min | 9 months ago

Why Dinesh Just Trended on Twitter

"So yesterday I'm scrolling through Twitter and I noticed trending on Twitter. Number one, dinesh. I'm like, could it be a different than that? I'm not aware I've done anything trend worthy. And in fact, I called W I go, hey, listen, I'm trending on Twitter. She goes, oh no. Because usually usually far in some bad side, it means I've gone really close to the line and done something a little bit questionable. Debbie goes, it means you poke the bear, yeah. Evidently, I poke the bear. Well, now obviously I'm really happy when I was trending with the movie. 2000 meals was trending for a while. The national trending, the Souza was trending and all of that, of course, had a kind of purpose to it. But sometimes I'm trending for no evidence purpose. So this was the case yesterday. Well, here's how it started. You have this guy Richard ojeda. And he goes, a few think 2000 meals is valid. You may be part of the poorly educated. So this is kind of what got me and I'm like, well, okay, you know, if you consider the movie to be something that is made by an appealing to the poorly educated, let's compare credentials. So here's my tweet. Let's compare your educational credentials to mine. And now I'm laying it on here, obviously. Ivy League graduate from Dartmouth policy analyst at the Reagan White House, research scholar at AEI and the Hoover institution at Stanford, author of more than a dozen highly acclaimed bestselling books, and then my punchline. Now you go. Let's see how your credentials dead silence from the guy, but evidently it kind of, you know, it poked the bear, the left gets all stirred up and so on and so first of all, well, this is one of the nicer responses, which is hey dinesh, I may disagree with you on many things, but your background is undeniably accomplished. He goes, my issue is never your education. It's rather your slavish commitment to your worldview that ab initio, meaning from the beginning, excludes anything contradictory to your position. So he's implying I'm some sort of a dogmatist who's so close minded. I can't see the other side. Now I think if you listen to this podcast, you can see that first of all, my interests are pretty wide. I'm very often reading ideas at a completely different than mine. Even in my Christian apologetics, I read extensively the atheist. I don't just mean Christopher Hitchens and Dawkins. I read Nietzsche, I had been schopenhauer. I need Hume. And I quote all these guys in my work. So the idea, so I reply to this guy and I say I wish you knew me a little better 'cause I don't do

Twitter Dinesh Richard Ojeda Reagan White House Souza Debbie Hoover Institution AEI Ivy League Dartmouth Stanford Christopher Hitchens Dawkins Nietzsche Hume
Eric Chats With Freedom Fest Founder Mark Skousen

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:35 min | 9 months ago

Eric Chats With Freedom Fest Founder Mark Skousen

"I don't normally debate, but I do a lot of speaking and I'm excited about freedom fest and I'm excited about the fact that I have the founder, the man behind the whole thing, Mark scows and is my guest right now, Mark. Welcome back. Well, thank you. And speaking of this debate that you're having with Michael Shermer, I will tell you, you know, you say you don't like debates and Michael Shermer is actually a true seeker. He is not like Christopher Hitchens and some of these other atheists who are absolutely adamant. This is the way it is. In fact, he's had his own kind of Supernatural experience that I told you about and hopefully you will bring this up in this debate. But he is a truth seeker and I think that's the kind of thing we do at freedom fast. Freedom fest is the world's largest gathering of free minds. So we don't like people who come and have a closed mind on whatever topic it is. We want people to have an open mind. For example, we have every year a mock trial, the mock trial this year is drug legalization on trial. But we put capitalism on trial. We put the Republican Party on trial foreign policy on trial, public union, John trial, and you get both sides of the views. It's a wonderful way to find out, well, what is the truth? So you have it's a mock trial yeah, so we have a judge. We have a could we put could we put Mitch McConnell on trial and have a mock execution? Actually, we'll talk about that

Michael Shermer Mark Scows Christopher Hitchens Mark Republican Party John Mitch Mcconnell
Dinesh D'Souza Debunks "The Most Secure Election in American History"

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:07 min | 9 months ago

Dinesh D'Souza Debunks "The Most Secure Election in American History"

"My friend dinesh d'souza dinesh welcome. Hey, Eric, how are you? I'm always excited to talk to you because I want to get kind of a fresh update on where things are. There are still people in this country and you know it better than I do who if you talk about the idea that the election was stolen, fraudulent, a mess, a travesty of American liberty. There are people that say, shut up, don't talk about that. Your conspiracy theorists. I mean, people will not stop. And it's a depressing thing when you leave reality and you just have competing narratives. I would at least like to think that my narrative is grounded in reality. But you deal with this all the time. People that simply refuse even to discuss it intelligently. They don't dare to discuss the details. And so where are things right now with regard to the great film 2000 mules that have been seen by so many people? Yeah, Eric, let me offer a comment on what you just said because I remember her years ago in one of my debates with the atheist Christopher Hitchens, he kept saying that there's no evidence for God. And I said, all right, how would you react if such evidence like hit you in the face? So for example, if you were to challenge God and say, you know, tomorrow morning, we print your name on the moon. I am God. If you challenge God to do that, and the next morning you looked outside or the next evening, you looked outside and it said, I am God on the moon. Would you then confess that you've been wrong all your life, admit that there is a God and agree to transform your life in congruence with this new fact? And you could tell it's sort of startled him because he realized that the answer to that question was no. In other words, he realized that he would not admit it. He would then say, well, some aliens obviously did that to confuse me. You know, in other words, he would find his mind as supple enough to look for some other explanation. Why? Because he was emotionally dug in. He couldn't concede that he was wrong, even if reality, as you put it hit him in the face. And I think the election fraud issues like that. A lot of people think their dogmatically committed and they have been since the election. This is the most secure election in history. Well, how do you know that? Have you done a comparison of all the elections to show that this one had less fraud than all the others? No. Well, how can you say it's the most secure election? Well, that's because the guy at cisa, the cybersecurity agency says so, but what evidence is he provided? None. So when I'm getting at is that from the beginning, you have this dogmatic assertion that this was a safe election. You had a regime of censorship to back that up. This has been a problem for the movie. How do we navigate around those walls of censorship? And lots of people are to this day committed to this evidence and no matter what you show them, they're not going to change their

Dinesh D Souza Dinesh Eric Christopher Hitchens Cisa
Dinesh Clarifies a Few Things About '2000 Mules'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

04:56 min | 10 months ago

Dinesh Clarifies a Few Things About '2000 Mules'

"Let's go to our next question, listen. Hey, dinesh, I'm a big fan of yours. I just listened to your episode about responding to Ben Shapiro and while I respect both of you greatly, I noticed you didn't answer two of the questions that he posed and saw recapitulate them and hopefully you can either address them on the podcast by no time is limited or in your upcoming book, but the first is, do you have control states, in other words, did you see this pattern of behavior in states like Mississippi where you wouldn't expect fraud because that may call things into question? I'd be interested to see if you looked at deep blue or deep red states to see if you saw such patterns. And then the other thing is, could you please name these nonprofits where the mules were obtaining the ballots? Those appear to be conspicuously absent from the film. Again, I'm a big fan of yours, particularly your debates with Christopher Hitchens. And look forward to hearing your response. Thank you. Certainly, those are both very good questions. And I will take them in sequence. So let me begin by addressing the issue of the controlled comparison. Now, truth vote did not do that. They did not do, let's say the blue states and the red states. And the reason they didn't is simply because of lack of resources. I mean, this geo tracking data is available, but it's also very expensive. True the vote got a $2 million grant from a big Republican donor, and they were able to deploy most of that money, not all, but most of it, to purchase singing a pretty large ream of data of cell phone data. They picked 5 kind of large urban areas and I think you know the ones that are the swing states. And they're not the whole state. They're the battleground. They're essentially the democratic urban precincts of those states. And their hypothesis, of course, was that was that this is where the fraud is likely to be. If that's going to be fraud. And remember they were responding to a whistleblower in Georgia who came forward and said, I was basically running this kind of a racket in Atlanta. And he described how he was paid. He was described to other people, did it, but he didn't want to give his name. And so the geo tracking was aimed at confirming this larger operation. So you asked the question, why do true the vote focus on these areas? And the answers because these are areas of high suspicion. Now, again, if you have all the resources in the world, then you say, listen, I'm not just going to put my cops outside the bank. I'm going to put cops everywhere in the country. I'm going to run a kind of widespread controlled experiment. And although that's ideal, it's really not necessary for the purposes of what they were trying to do. They were trying to essentially verify whether the whistleblower was right and coordinated fraud operations were being conducted in these inner cities. Now, are there other coordinated fraud operations being run elsewhere? Maybe. But quite frankly, it's not easy to run those kinds of operations outside of the cities because they rely on tight control. They rely on the ability by the way. If you think about the way these stash houses are getting votes, they're getting their fraudulent ballots from nursing homes from campuses from homeless shelters from kind of large apartment buildings where you go door to door, ask people to sign an absentee ballot requests have the absentee ballot then sent to you not to them so you can vote on their behalf. So these are all the ways you can look at this from earlier voter fraud cases. This is basically where the democratic fraud stores get their ballots. They're like experts at this. So the Ben Shapiro point is kind of interesting, but I would say irrelevant now, one thing the truth about did do, I think, a much more intelligent control comparison. And that is that once they found the mules, and they found that, let's say, between October 1 of 2020 and election day, November 3rd, the mules were following this pattern of going to these drop boxes, here's what true the vote did. They bought data in a controlled period for those exact same mules. So in other words, they wanted to see if these meals in their normal life, when it's not election time, do they happen to follow the same pattern of life? Did they, for some unexplained reason, go to those same places, stop by those exact same locations. And the answer is no, they didn't. So, and I think a very creative way true the vote was able to show that even for the mules themselves, this was anomalous behavior in their own pattern of life, a behavior that was limited to the election period. In other words, they were being paid to do something specific in that period. This is not something that they habitually or kind of chronically did

Ben Shapiro Dinesh Christopher Hitchens Mississippi Georgia Atlanta
He won a trip to space. Then he gave it away to a friend

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

He won a trip to space. Then he gave it away to a friend

"The the the the real real real real winner winner winner winner of of of of a a a a ticket ticket ticket ticket on on on on a a a a SpaceX SpaceX SpaceX SpaceX flight flight flight flight last last last last year year year year has has has has come come come come forward forward forward forward he he he he gave gave gave gave his his his his seat seat seat seat to to to to his his his his college college college college roommate roommate roommate roommate Kyle Kyle Kyle Kyle Hitchin Hitchin Hitchin Hitchin is is is is forty forty forty forty three three three three a a a a Florida Florida Florida Florida based based based based captain captain captain captain for for for for delta's delta's delta's delta's regional regional regional regional carrier carrier carrier carrier endeavor endeavor endeavor endeavor air air air air his his his his dream dream dream dream came came came came true true true true out out out out of of of of the the the the blue blue blue blue tens tens tens tens of of of of thousands thousands thousands thousands of of of of people people people people to to to to buy buy buy buy tickets tickets tickets tickets for for for for this this this this statistically statistically statistically I'm I'm I'm not not not gonna gonna gonna have have have that that that much much much of of of a a a chance chance chance but but but he he he got got got his his his chance chance chance but but but hips hips hips in in in top top top SpaceX SpaceX SpaceX weight weight weight restriction restriction restriction of of of two two two hundred hundred hundred fifty fifty fifty pounds pounds pounds miles miles miles will will will give give give it it it to to to somebody somebody somebody I I I know know know who's who's who's a a a spaceflight spaceflight spaceflight guy guy guy and and and that's that's that's as as as Christopher Christopher Christopher Hitchens Hitchens Hitchens friend friend friend went went went in in in his his his place place place that that that is is is Chris Chris Chris embossed embossed embossed again again again the the the mission mission mission specialists specialists specialists fiction fiction fiction says says says it it it wasn't wasn't wasn't easy easy easy when when when the the the SpaceX SpaceX SpaceX flight flight flight took took took off off off in in in September September September I I I don't don't don't want want want to to to show show show what's what's what's actually actually actually going going going on on on not not not that that that I'm I'm I'm trying trying trying to to to lie lie lie to to to anybody anybody anybody but but but you you you can't can't can't just just just try try try to to to keep keep keep the the the stone stone stone faces faces faces a a a candy candy candy gratitude gratitude gratitude sim sim sim Bronski Bronski Bronski offered offered offered to to to take take take personal personal personal life life life Ms Ms Ms into into into space space space for for for Hitchin Hitchin Hitchin I'm I'm I'm at at at Donahue Donahue Donahue

Florida Delta Spacex Kyle Kyle Kyle Kyle Hitchin Hitchin Hitc Christopher Christopher Christ Hitchens Hitchens Chris Chris Chris Bronski Bronski Bronski Donahue Donahue Donahue
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Is hard to remember right now four to 5. He asked after the children and my father, Howe's Edwin, tell him I ask. I worry about him, because I love him. I want to hear him. Slightly down the page he wrote what he wanted me to bring him from our guesthouse in Houston. Nietzsche, mencken and Chesterton books, plus all random bits, paper, maybe in one hold all bag, looking the drawers, bedside, et cetera, up and down stairs. That night, a deer family friend arrived from New York and was in the room. When, in one of his nocturnal interludes of wakefulness and energy, Christopher flashed an open, wide smile around the tube still running down his throat, and wrote on his clipboard. I'm staying here in Houston, until I'm cured, and then I'm taking our families on a vacation to Bermuda. The next morning, after they took the tube out, I came into his room to find him smiling his fox like grin at me. Happy anniversary, he called out. A nurse came in with a small, white cake, paper plates, and plastic forks. Another wedding anniversary. We are reading the newspaper on the terrorists and our sweet in a New York hotel. It's a faultless fall day. Our two year old daughter is sitting contentedly beside us drinking a bottle. She climbs off her chair and squats down, inspecting something on the ground. She pulls the bottle out of her mouth, calls to me in points to a large motionless bumblebee. She is alarmed, shaking her head back and forth as if to say, no, no. No. The bee stopped, she says, then she makes a command. Make it start. Back then, she believed I had the power to reanimate the dead. I don't recall what I said to her about the bee, what I do recall are the words make it start. Christopher then lifted her into his lap, and consoled and distracted her with a change of subject and humor. Just as he would, with all of his children, so many years later, when he was ill. I miss his perfect voice. I heard it day and night, night and day. I missed the first happy trills when he woke. The low octaves of his morning voice, as he read me snippets from the newspaper that outraged or amused him. The delighted and irritated, mostly irritated, registers, as I interrupted him while he read. The jazz tone riffs of him talking down the line to a radio station from the kitchen phone as a cooked lunch. His chirping high note greeting when our daughter came home from school, and his last soothing pianissimo chattering on retiring late at night. I miss, as his readers must, his writers voice. His voice on the page, I missed the unpublished hitch, the countless notes he left for me in the entryway on my pillow. The emails he would send while we sat in different rooms in our apartment, or in our place in California, and the emails he sent when he was on the road. And I miss his handwritten communiques, his innumerable letters and postcards. We date back to the time of the epistle, and his faxes, the thrill of receiving Christopher's instant dispatches. As a checked in from a dicey spot on some other continent. The first time Christopher went public and wrote about his illness for Vanity Fair, he was ambivalent about it. He was intent on protecting our family's privacy. He was living the topic, and he didn't want it to become all encompassing. He didn't want to be defined by it. He wanted to think and write in a sphere apart from sickness. He had made a pact with his editor and chum graydon Carter that he would write about anything except sports, and he kept that promise. He had often put himself in the frame, but now he was the ultimate subject of the story. His last words of the unfinished fragmentary jottings at the end of this little book may seem to trail off, but in fact, they were written on his computer in bursts of energy and enthusiasm, as he sat in the hospital using his food tray for a desk. When he was admitted to the hospital for the last time, we thought it would be for a brief stay. He thought we all thought he'd have the chance to write the longer book that was forming in his mind. His intellectual curiosity was sparked by genomics and the cutting edge proton radiation treatments he underwent, and he was encouraged by the prospect that his case could contribute to future medical breakthroughs. He told an editor friend waiting for an article. Sorry for the delay, I'll be back home soon. He told me he couldn't wait to catch up on all the movies he'd missed, and to see the king Tut exhibition in Houston, our temporary residence. The end was unexpected. At home in Washington I pulled books off the shelves, out of the book towers on the floor, off the stacks of volumes on tables. Inside the back covers are notes written in his hand, that he took for reviews and for himself. Piles of his papers and notes lie on surfaces all around the apartment. Some of which were taken from his suitcase that I brought back from Houston. At any time I can peruse our library or his notes and rediscover and recover him. When I do, I hear him, and he has the last word time after time. Christopher has the last word. The words of Christopher Hitchens widow, Carol, blue, written in Washington, D.C., in June of 2012. I can think of no better way to finish the broadcast than to play this clip from the November 18th, 2010 debate that happened at prestonwood baptist church big megachurch in Dallas, Texas. The debate was between Christopher Hitchens and William damsky. This was near the end of the debate, and I just love this segment so much that I actually grabbed a part of it and incorporated it into the now familiar intro for the thinking atheist podcast. Christopher Hitchens, November 18th, 2010. At prestonwood baptist church, the final words of.

Christopher Houston Chesterton New York Howe Edwin Bermuda graydon Carter California Christopher Hitchens Washington, D.C. prestonwood baptist church big Washington William damsky Carol Dallas Texas prestonwood baptist church
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

09:02 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"But suppose that I'm there, maybe one person tribunal, depending on your view of the Trinity. I would say, I hope you noticed that I didn't try and curry favor that I was honestly unable to believe in the claims made by your human spokes persons. Now do I get? Any understanding. And if that doesn't work, well, then I don't know. But I'm not going to try anything servile. I'm resolved on that point. It would be more comforting wouldn't it, and more comfortable. Which the servile? No. To make an accommodation to have some belief in a possibility of this not being the end. Well, as long as I don't have to take the word of other humans. On what are the necessary propitiation and gestures I have to submit myself to. In order to qualify, in other words, there are many, many discrepant religions, all of whom say only if I support them, or endorse them. Will I qualify? Well, now I don't know that there is no such thing as consciousness without the brain, for example, there was no such survival. I'd very much doubt it. But let's say we don't know enough to say it's impossible. I would say what is impossible is that other humans can know what the conditions are, whereby you qualify for survival. That I do know is false. Do you fear death? No, I'm not afraid of being dead, that's to say, there's nothing to be afraid of. I won't know I'm dead. My strong conviction. I won't. And if I find that I'm alive in any way at all, that'll be a pleasant surprise, not quite like surprise. And I was reading the book mortality, this compilation of Vanity Fair essays published the year after hitch's death, I was struck again by his words, and how nobody could string a sentence together like Christopher Hitchens, but I was also struck by the afterward, which was written by Hitchens, widow, Carol, blue, and what a beautiful writer, she is, as well. And in the afterwards she wrote about her husband and here's what she said, she said, on stage, my husband was an impossible act to follow. If you ever saw him at the podium, you may not share Richard Dawkins assessment that he was the greatest orator of our time. But you'll know what I mean, or at least you won't think she would say that. She's his wife. Offstage, my husband was an impossible act to follow. At home at one of the raucous, joyous, impromptu, 8 hour dinners we often found ourselves hosting, where the table was so crammed with ambassadors, hacks, political dissidents, college students, and children that elbows were colliding, and it was hard to find the space to put down a glass of wine. My husband would rise to give a toast that could go on for a stirring, spellbinding hysterically funny 20 minutes of poetry and limerick reciting a call to arms for a cause and jokes. How good it is to be us. He would say in his perfect voice. My husband is an impossible act to follow. And yet now I must follow him. I have been forced to have the last word. It was the sort of early summer evening in New York when all you can think of is living. It was June 8th, 2010 to be exact. The first day of his American book tour. I ran as fast as I could down east 93rd street, suffused with joy and excitement at the sight of him in his white suit. He was dazzling. He was also dying, though we didn't know it yet. And we wouldn't know it for certain until the day of his death. Earlier that day he had taken a detour from his book launch to a hospital because he thought he was having a heart attack. By the time I saw him standing at the stage entrance of the 92nd street why that evening, he and I and we alone knew he might have cancer. We embraced in a shadow that only we saw and chose to defy. We were euphoric, he lifted me up, and we laughed. We went into the theater, where he conquered yet another audience. We managed to get through a jubilant dinner in his honor, and set out on a stroll back to our hotel through the perfect Manhattan night, walking more than 50 blocks. Everything was as it should be. Except that it wasn't. We were living in two worlds, the old one, which never seemed more beautiful, had not yet vanished. And the new one, about which we knew little except a fear it had not yet arrived. The new world lasted 19 months. During this time of what he called living dying Lee, he insisted ferociously on living, and his constitution, physical and philosophical, did all it could to stay alive. Christopher was aiming to be among the 5 to 20% of those who could be cured. The odds depended on what doctor we talked to and how they interpreted the scans. Without ever deceiving himself about his medical condition, and without ever allowing me to entertain illusions about his prospects for survival, he responded to every bit of clinical and statistical good news with a radical childlike hope. His will to keep his existence intact to remain engaged with this preternatural history was spectacular. Thanksgiving was his favorite holiday, and I watched with awe, as he organized, even as he was sick from the effects of the chemotherapy, a grand family gathering in Toronto, with all his children and his father in law, on the eve of an important debate with Tony Blair about religion. This wasn't occasion orchestrated by a man who told me in the hotel suite that night that this would probably be his last Thanksgiving. Not long before, back in Washington, on a bright and balmy Indian summer afternoon. He excitedly summoned his family and visiting friends on an outing to see the origins of man exhibition at the museum of natural history, where I watched him sprint out of a cab and up the granite steps to throw up and a trash can before leading his charges through the galleries and exuberantly impressing us with the attainments of science and reason. Christopher's charisma never left him, not in any realm, not in public, not in private, not even in the hospital. He made a party of it, transforming the sterile Chile, neon lighted, humming and beeping and blinking room into a study and a salon. His artful conversation never ceased. The constant interruptions, the poking and prodding, the sample taking, the breathing treatments, the IV bags being changed. Nothing kept him from holding court, making a point or an argument, or hitting a punchline for his guests. He listened and drew us out and had us all laughing. He was always asking for and commenting on another newspaper. Another magazine, another novel, another review copy. We stood around his bed and reclined on plastic upholstered chairs as he made us into participants in his socratic discourses. One night he was coughing up blood and was wheeled into the ICU for a hastily scheduled bronchoscopy. I alternated between watching over him and sleeping in a convertible chair. We lay side by side in our single beds. At one point we both woke up and started burbling like children at a sleepover party. At the time, this was the best it was going to get. When he came to, following the bronchoscopy, after the doctor told him the trouble in his windpipe was not cancer, but rather pneumonia, he was still intubated, but avidly scribbling notes and questions about every conceivable subject. I saved the pages of paper on which he wrote his side of the conversation. There are sweet nothings, and a picture he drew on the top of the first page, and then pneumonia, what type? Am I cancer free? Pain is hard to remember right now four to 5. He asked after the children and my father, Howe's Edwin, tell him I ask. I.

Christopher Hitchens Vanity Fair Trinity Hitchens Richard Dawkins hitch Carol Christopher heart attack cancer New York Tony Blair Lee museum of natural history Toronto sprint Chile Washington drew
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"This is becoming an issue for you, I just think is excessive. What do you mean by that? What do you mean by that? That I'm more personal. Let's bring it on. No, there's no way that you end up there. What I'm saying is sure. You know, I've lived through this personally and you've been fidgeted is what you're saying. I've been what? You've inflicted it or officiated at it is what you're saying, isn't it? Well, officiated yes, inflicted no. A few more clips and I think appropriately, some clips nearing the end of hitch's life as he was speaking more in retrospective, you know, he was getting reflective and kind of looking back on his life and talking about his journey through esophageal cancer in a very candid way, this clip is from BBC's newsnight program hosted by Jeremy paxman, this was about a year before Christopher Hitchens died he'd already been going through chemo. He'd lost all of his hair. He lost quite a bit of weight, but he was being interviewed in his home and asked in this clip about Islam. Conflict is intrinsic to human history. Yes. And there will be some further conflict, many people say it has already begun and it's the conflict between the west and sort of islamo fascism. Do you think that is a conflict which can be lost by the west. Well, first on conflict, you're completely right. It's unavoidable and I'm glad of that because I think it's desirable. Especially in the United States, there's a huge privilege given to the word unity. Or unification. The party because it's a very various and multiface society, it's a big need for good manners. But if you say I'm a unifier, not a divider, you expect and you usually get applause. I'm a divider. I think only division can cause progress. You'll say the politics for division. Politics is division by definition. If there was no disagreement, there was no fight, there had been a politics. So the illusion of unity isn't worth having. And anyways, unattainable. What I do think of as the greatest crisis greatest conflict at present is it's a version of the old conflict, which is between totalitarianism and free thought. Which is in other words between theocracy and the enlightenment and the foreign which this is currently being played out. You could define as the west versus Islam, but it's not quite so, within many Islamic countries there are people who have a greater respect for pluralism and then there are people in Britain who would like to censor me for criticizing as that. For example. But roughly you described the outlines correctly. Yes, I refuse to be told what to think or how let alone what to say, all right, by anybody, but most certainly are not by people who claim the authority of fabricated works of primeval myth and fiction and want me to believe that these are divine. That I won't have. That's the original repudiation. The first rebellion against mental slavery comes from saying this is man-made. It's not divine. And to be clear about what you're talking about here, you're doing that the Bible and the Quran. Yet, we'll add the Torah. Yes. Yeah. All of these are works of fiction. All of these are depraved works of man-made fiction. And in what way does saying that you find the Quran laughable? Laughable in places. In what way does that help the spread of reason? Oh, well, I think mockery of religion is one of the most essential things. Because to demystify supposedly holy texts that are dictated by God and show that they are man-made, what you have to show there internal inconsistencies and absurdities. And one of the beginnings of human Emancipation is the ability to laugh at authority. It's an indispensable thing. People can call it blasphemy if they like, but they, if they call it that, they have to assume that there's something to be blasphemy. Some divine work. Well, I don't accept the premise. Jeremy paxman had another interesting question for hitch about this just in case what if there is actually a God, don't you want to sort of take your poker chips and push him over here on the table just in case. Here's how that went. A lot of people in your position might take Pascal's wager. They might say, I don't know whether I'm right or wrong. Yes. But if I accept the possibility of there being a purpose and a God, I can't lose either way because there isn't I've lost nothing, and if there is, I gain. Yes. Why haven't you done that? Well, I thought about Pascal's wager and wrote about it in my book, long before I became possibly mortally sick. And what I said about it was this. Shall we just quickly state what it says? Yes, please. Well, Pascal was a great mathematician and one of the founders of probability theory actually. I think it's his lowest point is what's called his wage or sometimes his gambit where he says rather like a huckster. What have you got to lose? You win everything if you bet on God. And you've everything to lose if you're wrong. Well, what does this involve? If it's correct. It involves a very cynical God, and a rather stupid one who will say, ah, I noticed you make a profession of faith just there. And I also, because I'm God. I know why you did. Because it was in the hope of winning favor with me. Well, that's fine. You'll therefore get it. That seems to me a rather contemptible thing. And necessarily therefore to entail a rather contemptible human being. He says, I don't really believe this. I have no faith. But what can I lose by pretending to God that I do? I might get a break. I mean, this is pretty low, isn't it? If I'm surprised to find when I pass on from the state of cheers. That I'm facing a tribunal. Which you notice, by the way, you're not allowed to bring a lawyer. There's no jury. There's no appeal. I mean, this is all together unattractive. White people want it to be believed that God is this way. I don't know. But suppose that I'm there, maybe one person tribunal, depending on your view of the Trinity. I would say, I hope you noticed that I didn't try and curry.

Jeremy paxman esophageal cancer Christopher Hitchens hitch Pascal BBC United States Britain Trinity
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Near the end of the broadcast I'm going to read for you the afterward in the book mortality that was published a year after we lost hitch. And again, that book features 7 different essays that were originally published in Vanity Fair, but the afterward was written by Carol bleu. The widow of Christopher Hitchens, as she speaks about her husband in her own words. And I was just so moved by what she said. I want to read those words on the broadcast for you in just a few. Here's some typical Hitchens fireworks. This was back from the Connecticut forum in 2009, hitch is on stage with several people, including a rabbi rabbi Harold Kushner, and they got into it on the issue of circumcision. The things that a normal morally normal, even if they morally average or mediocre person, would not unprompted do. For example, hold down their daughter at the age of 6, tear off her underwear and cut her genitalia with a sharp stir. They wouldn't do that if they didn't think God was telling me to do it. All the mullahs or the if it's a boy, the rabbis weren't telling them to do. One of the reasons why I have the lurid subtitle I do, my book, the original is a poison is that it makes ordinary moral people. Compels them. Forces them in some cases orders them to do disgusting wicked, unforgivable things. There's no expiation for the generations of misery and suffering. That religion has inflicted in this way and continues to inflict. And I still haven't heard enough apology for.

Carol bleu Harold Kushner Christopher Hitchens Hitchens hitch Connecticut
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"How much you love God and appreciate true north by holding a knife to your firstborn's throat to prove your devotion can stand up now will be regarded by my brother as someone who's not moral to serious. And now you see the Jeff to which now you see the jet. Now you see the jets into which religion wants to throw you. I don't know if you could really hear it, but Peter Hitchens is on the other side of the stage. He's about to pop an O ring over there, and he was saying the knife wasn't used. Right? I mean, no, of course it wasn't traumatizing to the child that he was almost murdered by his father, of course it's a reasonable request because at the end of the day, the murder was not carried out. This is Peter Hitchens in microcosm, I think. But another clip that I found really interesting Christopher Hitchens during this debate goes even deeper into why the idea of a totalitarian religion a high control authoritarian religion, like Christianity, Islam, et cetera, are such terrible and immoral ideas. Here's what he said. You may wish to be a DS as my heroes Thomas Jefferson and Thomas paine were. And you may not wish to abandon the idea. That there must be some sort of first or proximate cause or prime mover of the known and observable world and universe. But even if you can get yourself to that position, which we, unbelievers maintain is always subject to better and more perfect and more elegant explanations. Even if you can get yourself that position, all your work is still ahead of you. To go from being a deer to a theist, there was from someone.

Peter Hitchens jets Jeff Christopher Hitchens Thomas paine Thomas Jefferson
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"By the Roman pontiff. During the counter reformation, that came in 1995. And for silence during Hitler's final solution or shower. As well as, in 1999, coming in just under the millennium jubilee wire, an apology for the burning alive in the main square of Prague of the great Czech Protestant Jan hus. Since that big fiesta of forgiveness that began in culminated, I might say in 2000. Fiesta forgiveness fiesta of asking for it. The papers is also asked to be forgiven for the sack of Constantinople and the massacre of Byzantine Christianity in April 1204, as part of the fourth crusade. The anathema on all Eastern Orthodox Christians as unbelievers heretics and people dwelling outside the health of the church was lifted only in 1964. I call your attention to that. He also expressed the story about the murder and forced conversion of Serbian Orthodox Christians in the Balkans during the Second World War. And it doesn't end there. There are smaller but significant equally significant avowals of a very bad conscience. These have included regret for the rape and the torture of orphans and other children in church run schools in almost every country on earth from Ireland to Australia. And I'm pleased to see that due reconsideration is now being given and may in fact have been given to the hellish I choose the word carefully, doctrine of limbo, St. Augustine's cruel and stupid disposal problem, solution to a nonexistent problem that is to say the destination of the souls of unbaptized children. Up until now, Catholic parents have been taught that's where they're on baptized children went, a form of torture that's sometimes worse than the physical. Now it seems that this piece of augustinian sadism is undergoing reconsideration as well. But remember, this is from a church that on the whole Canada. We sued wait a more direct admission, for example, I give some suggestions of my own, while we're at it. I would like them to take back the concordat made with Adolf Hitler the first treaty here of a sign, giving the church a monopoly over education in Germany. In exchange for the solution of the Catholic center party to give the Nazi Party a clear run. I'd apologize for the latter and packed with Mussolini myself, also the first treaty of assigned by that fascist dictator. I would also think I'd want to reconsider the fact that father tzo, head of the Nazi puppet stadium Slovakia was a priesthood hurly orders. That the Croatian fascist puppet state the state of anti pavelic was also operating under full clerical protection and disguised as was the regime of general Franco and the dictator Antonio. Salazar and I'd also want I really think I would beg forgiveness for this. I don't think the German church should have asked Hitler's birthday to be celebrated from the pulpit every year until he died. Probably my second favorite debate took place back in 2008 at the hao instain center for presidential studies it was April 3rd 2008 as Christopher Hitchens debated his own brother. English journalist and author Peter Hitchens, who is a political conservative and an evangelical Christian, so these two brothers exist in the same universe and it's kind of awesome, and they're on stage and they're clashing against each other. And I'm going to play a longer sound by here in just a second. But the debate is worth watching if nothing else for the soul exchange where Christopher Hitchens is talking about the obscenity of admiring the biblical Abraham, the blindly obedient servant of God who was prepared to take a knife to his own sons, throat. Let alone to the number of boy children who die every year. Because of the covenant, the hideous governor that's imposed upon them by mosaic law. Which also, I might add, celebrates every year. In all three monotheisms, the decision of a father to put his knife to his son's throat. Because that's how much he loves the dictator. Now, I find this wicked, and I won't have my belief called frivolous. And any one of you.

Jan hus Hitler Catholic center party tzo Prague Balkans pavelic St. Augustine hao instain center for preside Adolf Hitler Nazi Party Ireland general Franco Mussolini Christopher Hitchens German church Australia Slovakia Salazar Peter Hitchens
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Point? Right from the very beginning I wanted to serve the poor purely for the love of God. And to give them what the rich people get with money. I wanted to give to the poor for the love of God. They didn't have enough drips. The needles they used and reused over and over and over and you would see. Some of the nuns rinsing needles in under the cold water tap. And I asked one of them why she was doing it. She said, well, to clean it. And I said, yes, but why are you not sterilizing it? Why are you not boiling water and sterilizing your needles such as? There's no point. There's no time. That's a clip from the 1994 documentary series, which was aired on channel four in the UK, it was produced and hosted by Christopher Hitchens, it was about Mother Teresa called hell's angel. And the female voice you heard was actually someone who had volunteered at Mother Teresa's missionaries of charity and had seen the atrocities taking place firsthand her name was Mary loudon. But when this thing came out, I mean, people just exploded. Holy shit, you can't criticize Mother Teresa, right? Mother Teresa's the saint this wonderful grandmotherly woman who just wants to help poor people and be charitable in the name of God. Christopher Hitchens was having none of it and he helped to peel back the facade to reveal the hard reality behind the marketing campaign and man as the church spin marketing Mother Teresa since whenever. Hitch was not a fan of the institution of the Catholic Church he participated along with Stephen Fry debating against a couple of Catholic apologists. It was a debate that was sponsored by intelligence squared the question was is the Catholic Church a force for good in the world, and in the clip hitch was talking about how Pope John Paul the second had had to come forward a few decades ago and make apologies for centuries of atrocities committed by the Catholic Church. If you're going to be a serious grown-up person and appear to defend the Catholic Church in public in front of an educated and literate audience, you simply have to start by making a great number of heartfelt apologies and requests for contrition and forgiveness..

Mother Teresa Christopher Hitchens Teresa Mary loudon Catholic Church UK Stephen Fry Hitch Pope John Paul
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

06:29 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"It sounds like you're intelligent to really believe that literally. I understand your faith, but that animals, all those animals were on the boat. Come on. Come on. We're in work. We're animals. And we are primates. And we talk. Yeah. By the way, by the way, that's also where presbyterianism used to be. They used to say we want it. Now we know everyone agrees we are. No, I would want to agree we evolved. Never want to agree that the cosmos is created by an explosion. Probably without us in mind. And we're very likely not the object for divine design. Okay. You might be more modest to think that we are. All right. One of the things I would want to maintain is that Christians aren't going to make any headway by trying to split the difference between faith and unbelief. If you have unbelief and faith and you split the difference, you just get a muddled form of faith or muddled form of unbelief. I'm not interested in trying to dilute the Bible to make it acceptable to people. So if I'm a Christian, then I do a Jesus, believe what he taught. And that sort of thing that's what a Christian should what about this idea of Jesus, Christopher, you don't buy it at all, I take it. Well, I don't think he was the son of God. You don't. No, I don't think his mother's. I don't think his mother was a virgin and I don't think he died and was resurrected or revived or resuscitated. None of that. None of that. And even if he was, by the way, any of those things he would only have that in common version of birth, miraculous circumstances, mysterious death, with many, many other mythological figures, it wouldn't prove even if it could be proved, wouldn't prove his doctrines were true or moral or ethical, which I don't think they are. Does it surprise you to know that Einstein probably believed in God? That's pretty simple. I absolutely know that the contrary is true. Well, I sound very, very clearly. He was a pantheist or possibly a deist, he did not believe in a personal God a God of religion. He didn't believe in a God who could intervene in human affairs, would not suppress, would take side in the war. Would care what you ate. Now you and I both heard it, right? Pastor Wilson is making a faith claim saying that well you can't water down faith. You have to believe on faith. Because if it's halfway, then it's not really faith. So I believe because it's true and it's true because I believe it, but he would never not once allow in Islamist or a Hindu or somebody of another faith to use the same standard. They believe by faith, it's true because I believe it. I just know it in my heart. Pastor Wilson would not accept that, but he will accept it and stand on it for his own religion of Christianity. It's typical. Christopher Hitchens was not a fan of Mother Teresa. This was a change of perception in my own life. I actually was encouraged after I heard Hitchens, criticizer, I was encouraged to go do my own digging on the subject. And I realized I was one of those people. One of those people who would rush to defend the character and reputation of Mother Teresa without knowing anything about her. I couldn't tell you anything, except she was Catholic, and she was born in Calcutta, and that's all I knew. Christopher Hitchens was asked about it back in March of 2011, this was 9 months before his death he was interviewed by Steve kroft of 60 minutes. Well, you called Mother Teresa, a fanatical fundamental fundamentalist fanatic in the fraud. A fanatical Albanian dwarf lying thieving already lying thieving Albanian dwarf. That was I admit. An exercise of seeing how far I could go. But why did you want to do it? It was about celebrity culture. Now, Mother Teresa started with a reputation of being a saint and therefore everything she did had to be reported essentially. Thus the fact that she took money from the duvalier family dictatorship in Haiti. Who must have oppressed the poor more than any other dynasty in history. Somehow wasn't a fact because it couldn't be true because the saint wouldn't do that. What about Princess Diana? Well, with Princess Diana trying to remember what she said about Princess Diana. Well, I compared to a landmine. Well, there's a horrible joke about a landmark yesterday. Yes. She was in Angola on her landmine campaign. And there was a hushed reverend BBC commentator who said, think about minefields is that they're very easy to lay. But they're very difficult and dangerous. And even expensive to get rid of. Now, the perfect description of. Prince Charles first wife. You wrote it. And it was printed. You're young. Now I think the lady Diana thing is another example of where Christopher Hitchens and I part ways. I know that she was far from a saint, there are many criticisms about the monarchy, which are hugely relevant and valid, but you know, I see her story is one that deserves our sympathy and say what you will about her, but she used her celebrity and influence to genuinely try to alleviate suffering, removing the land mines that entire campaign being just one example. And I think that as merit in it deserves our sympathies. I don't think her tragic story belongs in the same conversation or at least in the same context of a Mother Teresa, someone who constantly spoke about the beauty of poverty while jet setting on junk bond money and living like a rockstar while within her houses of the dying there were people handcuffed to beds and being given medications with syringes washed and tap water. I don't think that those two examples exist in the same universe. I'm just saying. Mother Teresa's flagship institution is her home for the dying. A hospice which purportedly sweetens the last moments of otherwise destitute lives. My initial impression was of all the photographs and footage I've ever seen of belson and places like that because all the patients had shaved heads. There are no chairs anywhere. They're just these stretcher beds. And they're like First World War stretcher beds. There's no garden, no yard, even or nothing. And I thought what is this? This is two rooms with 50 to 60 men in one 50 to 60 women and another. They're dying. They're not being given a great deal of medical care. They're not being given painkillers really beyond aspirin and maybe if you're lucky some brutal or something for them for the sort of pain that goes with terminal cancer and the things that they were dying of, and I thought, what's the.

Pastor Wilson Mother Teresa Christopher Hitchens Princess Diana Teresa Steve kroft Einstein Christopher Hitchens Calcutta Angola Haiti Prince Charles BBC Diana belson terminal cancer
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"That? Because we have no choice but to have free will. That's one of the things I always liked about Hitchens. I think most of his fans enjoy the city pulled no punches. And, you know, there was a time I would have thought that was a pessimistic view of the world, you know, oh, it's a temporary life. It's all meaningless kind of thing, but now when I think hitch would agree with this when you see the temporary nature of our existence in a universe that really doesn't care one way or the other, then it's on us to make the most of the moments. It's on us to assign a sense of purpose and do not waste it. It was back in 2008 that Christopher Hitchens teamed up with a pastor. And they wrote a book called is Christianity good for the world and of course they each took opposing points of view. That book inspired a 2009 documentary film. And to promote the film, Christopher Hitchens and pastor Douglas Wilson, toured the United States. It was a debate and lecture tour, and they both ended up on headline news on the joy behar television talk show. So let's talk about the ten commandments, for example. Do we really need the ten commandments to be good people? I mean, I know not to murder somebody. I didn't need to be raised Catholic, even though I was, to know that. Right. Part of the problem that we come up against is that we have been inculcated in the ten commandments, the tenants of the tank commandments for many centuries. And then we kick the ladder away. We've climbed climbed up to this kick the ladder away and say, look how high we are. Well, I don't think it is self evident that you shouldn't murder or commit adultery. What did people do before the ten commandments? They didn't murder would kill everyone. Otherwise, we wouldn't be here. But no, look at the crime rates. If sin disappeared overnight, if somebody waved a magic wand and send disappeared, our economy would collapse. We are what do you say to that? Chris. That doesn't maybe say anything. I have some toughest stuff to say. Go ahead. Well, first, the story isn't true. The wandering in the desert, the exotic. That's the Jewish version of the Christian mythology. It's worse than talking snakes. The analysts have the analysts of Confucius, written long before, say to people, what the golden rule is. Don't do to others what you wouldn't want done to yourself. The first three or four commandments are all saying you must fear someone you love a heavenly dictator. They're not moral at all. Then there are two or three that are self evident. Don't kill their murder rather, don't steal and don't commit perjury. And then the others are putting women on the level of beasts and saying they're among the chattels of your neighbor you mustn't cover it. It's a Bronze Age tribal agriculture. Really? Well, let's go. Go at this from another angle. Take the code of hammurabi and the analects of Confucius and the. Tooth for tooth is lex talionis was given because it used to be before that, a life for an eye, a life for a tooth. All right, strict justice was imposed to keep these things from escalating out of control. But the reason you have all these codes enforced by armies and police departments and that sort of thing is because people don't obey them naturally and spontaneously. What do you say to that Christmas? For example, they're a new world. There's no commandment against genocide. There's no commander against slavery, very common at the time. And no command saying parents should respect be nice to their children. Why is this? Because in the next chapter, the so called children of this terrifying God who exacts compulsory love are going to be ordered to commit genocide against the malachites and the midianites in the mobiles. They're going to be ordered to enslave them. And they're going to be ordered to kill all their children in the name of God. Don't have a commandment. This is not very good. So this is completely relativistic. Also a part of that very same exchange. The question of who carries the burden of proof? When it comes to God, who has the burden of proof. So does a Ford automobile have the burden of proof of demonstrating that there was a Henry Ford or that there wasn't, who has the burden of proof and a lot of this debate is actually scrambling for the high ground of who has to do the proving who has to do the maintaining. Who carries the burden of proof. Now, for who do you think Harry is the best? I believe the one who denies the self evident fact that God exists and created the world. That I think that that is the person who has the burden of. You say it's self evident? Yes. Self evident to those. Those who believe. Those who believe those who don't believe, you know, if you watch this movie, collision, it's sort of like watching a diving competitions in the Olympics. The Romanian judge comes up with a completely different score, two points, ten points. So this is the sort of debate where atheists go to it and I think Christopher carried the day and believers go to the debate and they think that the Christians. There may not be a solution to this, so I think there is one. I mean, I can't avail myself of the almost beautiful circularity of pastor Wilson's argument. And I wouldn't want to shirk any burden of proof or disproof, but it does seem to me that if someone says, if I judge agree with them, I might be condemned to internal punishment. And that snakes talk virgin children and dead men walk that extraordinary claims due requires extraordinary orders. What atheists say is not that there is no God. We couldn't possibly prove that. We say there has never been any evidence. There's never been a convincing philosophical argument that there is such an entity. In fact, we say there is no Supernatural dimension. The natural world is much more wonderful. But you don't pass you. You don't really believe that snakes talk and that Noah had all those animals on the boat, do you? Yeah, I believe the Bible. I'm a Christian, so I believe that..

Christopher Hitchens Douglas Wilson Hitchens lex talionis United States Chris Henry Ford Ford Harry Olympics Christopher Wilson Noah
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"And you're nearly there. Again, I've got the link for that entire exchange and all the links for every soundbite in the description box of the broadcast. Christopher Hitchens was born April the 13th, 1949 in Portsmouth, England. He studied at the Lee's school of Cambridge and graduated from baliol college at Oxford, he had degrees in philosophy, politics, and economics. He graduated in 1970. He immediately became the firebrand commentator that we all came to know and love on political issues specifically at first, he wrote for liberal publications like the nation, it was back in 1989 as friend and author Salman Rushdie, received death threats from Islamist radicals over rushdie's book called the satanic verses, Christopher Hitchens, publicly came to rushdie's defense and then he chastised his fellow liberals for not doing the same for being cowards in the shadow of Islamic terrorist threats. Hitch started writing for Vanity Fair in 1992, throughout his life and career Hitchens wrote extensively about George Orwell, he wrote biographies of Thomas paine and Thomas Jefferson. In 2007, he gained international attention with a book called God is not great. How religion poisons everything. And in 2010 he published his own life story in a memoir called hitch 22. It was during that book tour for hitch 22 that Christopher Hitchens was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. 80% of people diagnosed with esophageal cancer die within 5 years of the diagnosis. Christopher Hitchens did not make it past year number two, he succumbed to pneumonia, December the 15th, 2011 at the University of Texas, MD Anderson cancer center in Houston. At his request, his body was donated to medical research, but the cause of advancing science and public health. Christopher Hitchens was 62 years old. He describes his cancer or the discovery of his cancer in chapter one of the book mortality and hitches words he said, I have more than once in my time, woken up feeling like death. But nothing prepared me for the early morning in June when I came to consciousness, feeling as if I were actually shackled to my own corpse. The whole cave of my chest and thorax seemed to have been hollowed out, and then refilled with slow drying cement. I could faintly hear myself breathe, but could not manage to inflate my lungs. My heart was beating either much too much or much too little. Any movement, however slight required forethought and planning. It took strenuous effort for me to cross the room of my New York hotel and summon the emergency services. They arrived with great dispatch and behaved with immense courtesy and professionalism. I had time to wonder why they needed so many boots and helmets and so much heavy backup equipment, but now that I view the scene in retrospect, I see it as a very gentle and firm deportation, taking me from the country of the well across the stark frontier that marks off the land of malady. Within a few hours, having had to do quite a lot of emergency work on my heart and lungs. The physicians at this sad border post had shown me a few other postcards from the interior and told me that my immediate next stop would have to be with an oncologist. Some kind of shadow was throwing itself across the negatives. The previous evening I'd been launching my latest book at a successful event in New Haven. The night of the terrible morning I was supposed to go on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, and then appear at a sold out event that the 92nd street Y on the upper east side in conversation with Salman Rushdie. My very short lived campaign of denial took this form. I would not cancel these appearances or let down my friends or miss the chance of selling a stack of books. I managed to pull off both gigs without anyone noticing anything amiss. Though I did vomit two times with an extraordinary combination of accuracy, neatness, violence, and profusion, just before each show. This is what citizens of the sick country do while they are still hopelessly clinging to their old domicile. The new land is quite welcoming in its way. Everybody smiles encouragingly and there appears to be absolutely no racism. A generally egalitarian spirit prevails, and those who run the place have obviously gotten where they are on merit and hard work. As against that, the humor is a touch feeble and repetitive. There seems to be almost no talk of sex and the cuisine is the worst of any destination I've ever visited. The country has a language of its own, a lingua franca that manages to be both dull and difficult and that contains names like ondansetron for anti nausea medication. As well as some unsettling gestures that require a bit of getting used to. For example, an official met for the first time may abruptly sink his fingers into your neck. That's how I discovered that my cancer had spread to my lymph nodes, and that one of these deformed beauties located on my right clavicle or collarbone was big enough to be seen and felt. It's not at all good when your cancer is palpable from the outside, especially when, as at this stage, they didn't even know where their primary source was. Carcinoma works cunningly from the inside out. Detection and treatment often work more slowly and gropingly from the outside in. Many needles were sunk into my clavicle area, tissue is the issue being a hot slogan in the local tumor Bill tongue. And I was told the biopsy results might take a week. Working back from the cancer ridden squamous cells that these first results disclosed, it took rather longer than that to discover the disagreeable truth. The word metastasized was the one in the report that first caught my eye, and ear. The alien had colonized a bit of my lung, as well as quite a bit of my lymph node, and its original base of operations was located had been located for quite some time in my esophagus. My father had died and very swiftly too of cancer of the esophagus. He was 79. I am 61. And whatever kind of race life may be. I have very abruptly become a finalist. It was many years before his death, and fact it looks like it may have been around the year 2000 or so. Christopher Hitchens did a man on the street thing, somebody had a camera and asked him about fear and life and death and free will. And it's interesting to hear his views on life and death so many years before his diagnosis. Do we have everything to fear including fear itself.

Christopher Hitchens rushdie Lee's school of Cambridge baliol college esophageal cancer Salman Rushdie MD Anderson cancer center cancer Thomas paine George Orwell Hitchens Portsmouth Thomas Jefferson Hitch Oxford pneumonia University of Texas England Houston
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"A cliche when you say it. This person changed my life. But in my case, without hyperbole without any exaggeration, it's absolutely true. Christopher Hitchens changed my life. And I will forever be grateful. It was ten years ago this week that we lost hitch to esophageal, cancer I've actually been planning on doing this broadcast for a long time. And most of what you're gonna hear is hitches voice. I have sort of harvested clips from various presentations and speeches and debates. In fact, it was a debate between Christopher Hitchens and rabbi shmuley boteach at the 92nd street Y that helped to propel me on my own journey. It's not that I was speaking in hitch's voice, it's like he gave me the permission, the encouragement to go out and speak in my own voice and it changed my life. So let's start there. This is a sound bite from that debate at the 92nd street Y in New York City back from 2008 as Christopher Hitchens talks about the pernicious of religion. The clip runs about three and a half minutes. I prefer to argue and I do in my book that the belief in a supreme being or creator is actually a pernicious belief that does a great moral and intellectual damage to our poorly evolved primate species. And I'm hoping that we will in the course of this evening get to the point about the ill effect of religion, but I'm not going to duck the obligation imposed upon me by the motion before us, which is to give the reasons why we're so lucky as to be furnished with so little evidence for such a horrible proposition..

Christopher Hitchens rabbi shmuley boteach hitch cancer New York City
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

Beyond Atheism

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

"Put it. That's the most consistent thing throughout his life and his work in career. And it's astounding. Yeah. Like you. I mean, that his the connection he makes between that atheism or the antitheism and hitches Christopher Hitchens left wing particular brand of left wing politics of international socialism. Defining what it is and how he got there and how it relates to the principles he draws from atheism. Is fascinating and it goes into much greater detail and much better explanation than we can get to anything we could get to here. Yeah. And it also explains one of the best slanders or slurs against Hitchens, the river was from George Galloway, who called him a drink sodden trotskyite pop and Jay. Yeah. Just brilliant. And it goes into discussion even about that. So yeah, the book is very, very rich, gives a great connection to Hitchens politics. And an explainer about what they are and how they relate to the time. And to contemporary politics, what they mean. You know, the thing about the book is that it's just it being about Hitchens. It's a lively read that puts you put you back kind of in, it was great to read about Hitchens again. You forget how fun he is. Just how great he was. Not just in those debates in his writing, how much he enjoyed the adversarial combat of the debate, how much he loved sparring intellectually on the page. Yeah, you definitely got a sense that it really enjoyable for him to kind of be engaged in this intellectual combat sort of and I mean he, yeah, he wrote and spoke with just like a humor. I guess we were saying in the discussion. So on a humor and just like a sort of joy of life and stuff that makes it kind of fun, yeah. Yeah. Which definitely stands out if you compare them to the bulk of the new atheists at that time. Very dour, very self serious. Yeah. Pedantic almost yeah, I guess, I mean, I guess like the other main sort of four horsemen Daniel dennett Sam Harris and Richard Dawkins like they all are more especially denna and Dawkins more in the academic world, whereas I guess, obviously, Hitchens really was more of a journalist and writer and so on..

Hitchens Christopher Hitchens George Galloway Jay Daniel dennett denna Sam Harris Richard Dawkins Dawkins
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

Beyond Atheism

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

"It is available for pre order, it officially it officially comes out on New Year's Eve. So if so, you know, you can't you can't wrap it up and put it under the tree for you. But you can pre order it and print out your receipt and use it as a stocking stuffer. That would actually shows up on New Year's Eve you can take a look at the nice cover art that had to drew at that go out and celebrate New Year's Eve and then with your and then when you're like kind of sluggish, should hug over the next day. Right? Yeah. Anything else you want to plug aside from your book? No, no, I think that's, I think that's good. So yeah, I think you mentioned GTA and ejaculate and all that at the beginning. I don't know, watch the Charlie Kirk to bed it's fun. Right. Yes, all right. All right. Yeah, thanks again for coming on, Ben. Yeah, thank you, good friend. Well, that was fantastic. That was doctor Ben Burgess. Nathan, what's your takeaway from Ben Burgess? Yeah, many things, I guess. Just to sort of pick up on the cancel culture thing we were talking about at the end. But I appreciate his perspective sort of acknowledging this is like a real phenomenon. And it is harmful. But at the same time not remaining on the left about it and not kind of descending into right-wing lunacy or whatever. Yeah, sort of exaggerating how widespread this isn't so on and yeah. So I think that was valuable. Yeah, he had a lot of nuance to it. A lot of the pieces connecting technology to attitudes to working conditions and how all these things are the factor into it. So it's not just. And there's multiple layers, wow, that was that it came on Fast & Furious like most of what he does. What was your takeaway from the Hitchens book? And his discussion of it. I think the really useful thing. I mean, in addition to being a good overview of Hitchens career and stuff, it's also just a good introduction in general to many other topics like one thing I learned more about is sort of the difference between Trotsky eats. Which hitched in the sort of claim to be and stalinists. Which this division goes back to the start of the Soviet Union. And yeah, I think and other things like he said in our conversation about religion and morality and stuff and there's a part about reparations reparations. Just the clintons. Because obviously Hitchens wrote about that. So it's about many of the topics like Hitchens touches on. But then you actually get a sort of introduction to all these different topics as well. Because even in the discussion, we barely touched on Hitchens atheism, which is intense in its long and it's throughout his at least 40 years.

Ben Burgess Charlie Kirk Hitchens Nathan Ben Trotsky Soviet Union clintons
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

Beyond Atheism

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

"And in that book, taunted as an evangelical who kitchens debated, but also, you know, also they became friends. But often wrote this book about him after he died and in which he suggested that actually hitch and atheist worldview was coming apart and he was like, you know, and he was teetering on the edge of giving it up entirely and who knows what might have happened on his deathbed. And so the whole thing is a very bad taste, but the reason I was thinking about it is what if his pieces of evidence is that he wasn't really. He wasn't really holding strong to his atheist worldview, is that is that he told him he disagreed with Peter Sega or about there being nothing special about humans, but that just seemed like that just seems like a separate question. Yeah. Yeah. That's definitely as a stretch. Can it true atheists meditate? Yeah, I mean, I think if you I mean, yeah, sure. I think that I mean, I think if you're, I mean, if it's like bound up with sort of details of Buddhist or Hindu religious practice that depending on what we're packing into atheist, maybe not. But. Yeah, like if you sit in a certain way and count to your breaths and try to I made all of that stuff good thing to do and there's certainly nothing about it that has to be attached to a certain metaphysical belief. Yeah. And finally, can a true atheist dislike Christopher Hitchens? Yes, for sure. I mean, you know, I've obviously somebody who likes him a great deal, despite. A lot, right? I mean, I think that there's a case for, I mean, it's not like I don't get what the case for not like and it looks like. You know, so but I still like him a lot despite all of that. But yeah, you know, you could be I mean, presumably there are numerous former comrades of his who had who to just completely reviled him after his sort of reaction to 9 11 and his support for the wars and all that stuff who were just as atheist as he was. I mean, I think if I think being a I think that being an atheist of liking some of the stuff about religion might make you a little bit less likely to dislike it. But it's definitely compatible. Yeah. Well, it's a hell of a read. Very insightful. It's a great mix of philosophy, socialism. His story and how he ends up taking that bizarre turn at the end, it illuminated a lot. I highly recommend people checking it out. Yeah, Ben, is it out yet? It is not out yet..

Peter Sega Christopher Hitchens Ben
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

Beyond Atheism

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

"It's complicated, but I do see that as a problem, but it's out right. Yeah. Yeah. You know what? Yeah, this is a very rich untapped vein at Ben, we'll have to have you come back for this because we could go another hour. But now it's going to be time for kind of true atheist. Sure. Which Nathan, it's been so long. How did we describe this game? Well, it's sort of tongue in cheek game asking questions about whether a true atheist can do a certain thing, can a true atheist, for example, say, oh my God, or will they get their atheist card revoked? Yeah. There's no wrong answers. No wrong answers. Yeah. So anyway, there's a couple of questions we'll ask. So Ben, can a true atheist say bless you when someone sneezes? Yes. Yes. That was easy. Yes. All right, doctor Ben Burgess. Yes. Can a true atheist be afraid of death? Oh. Yeah? Okay. That makes sense. All right, okay. This one's sort of relates back to the politics thing. Can a true atheist give their unqualified support to capitalism? Yeah, it unfortunately, I think that's compatible. Oh man, this is good dark. Can a true atheist use goods and services provided by religious organizations? Yeah, I mean, that seems that seems fine to me. I mean, like, I guess, in less maybe the exception is that if it was, you know, if the goods would services were manufactured by like, what do they call it like the project rehabilitation force, the Church of Scientology? If it's something like that, that the somebody is, you know, somebody is actually like bit enslaved by a religious organization that you might, you know, it's not that it's incompatible, you know, not to do it a bad thing is incompatible, sincerely having a certain metaphysical belief, but like, you know, you kind of question if part of what we're packing into true atheist is like, you have some sort of. Value system consistent with kind of robust secularism that might put that a question. Can it true atheist believe in objective moral values? Definitely. Okay. Wait a minute. Oh, they just handed down from God. Yeah, I mean, I think my big, you know, I will just shamelessly plug and say that the second chapter of the book is largely about this exact question, but since my position is very strongly that the two questions are unrelated to each other, God or no God, objective morality or objective or no objective morality that yes, for sure, they could definitely do that. Yeah. All right, next question can a true atheist consume animal products? Yes. Yes, I think so. This is actually also also relevant there because I don't know if you want to get out of the whole thing about this. Actually, or if I should just say yes, we should move on. Well, maybe. Yeah, yeah. Okay, just a tad, right? We'll just the so what of the very few previous books read about Christopher Hitchens was this book, the faith of Christopher Hitchens by Larry Taunton..

Ben Burgess Nathan Church of Scientology Ben Christopher Hitchens Larry Taunton
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

Beyond Atheism

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

"And so I think from a leftist perspective, there's this whole body of work from 1971, which is the very first book with his name on the cover, is actually a collection of essays about by marks niggles about Paris commune that he wrote introduction to to 2001, which is when letters to young contrarian comes out, which is the book where he kind of officially gives up on the socialist politics that defined a lot of his life up until then. He had some, you know, he was pretty ambivalent about it, right? Like it wasn't like, oh, I was so wrong. But it was like, I think the world has changed and this probably isn't on the agenda anymore. But between that, you know, between those two dates, you know, that 30 year period, I think that there's a tremendous amount of work that a lot of young leftists today, people who kind of became political maybe as a result of the first Bernie Sanders campaign in 2006. Might really, you know, I think is worth rehabilitating and kind of take you to look at. And one of the goals of the book is to try to introduce that audience to that body of work that certainly for an atheist perspective. The other half of your question, this is really the main thing that he devoted that last decade of his life too. And there too, I think there's some really interesting work. I've got my criticisms, you know, I talk about in the book. People can talk about it a little bit here. But I also think that he got some very important things right and when he was right, you know, he certainly said it better than anybody else could have. Yeah. I guess this is more on a personal level. What was the first experience that you had with Christopher Hitchens? And what was it that really connected you to his work or what? Was there a particular insight? Was it just the style what pulled you into that to that world? Yeah, so I think there are actually two phases here because I was a weird enough kid that as a teenager I was reading the nation when he was published in their regularly. And so whatever's wrong with that to be the case which was wrong with them. And he had this regular column in there. He and Alexander coburn both did at some times those kind of felt were doing columns. Every other issue. And even at the time, even though some of the stuff that disagreed with, I agree with coburn. Like I thought, yeah, man, this guy is like one of the best writers on the left. But then to a great extent, you know, he kind of followed off my radar and he wasn't somebody that was necessarily following in any great depth until the late 2000s kind of at the tail end of the new atheist era..

Bernie Sanders Paris Christopher Hitchens Alexander coburn coburn
"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

Beyond Atheism

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"christopher hitchens" Discussed on Beyond Atheism

"Movement for better or worse, raise the profile of atheists and non religious people in the early 2000s and 2010s. One of the movements loudest voices was Christopher Hitchens, famous and infamous and equal measure, hitch was perhaps the wittiest, the most vibrant of the atheist four horsemen until his passing in 2011. To talk about Hitchens and the politics of the atheist movement, were joined by doctor Ben Burgess, who was a philosophy instructor at Rutgers university, as well as a speaker and writer. He serves as the host of the YouTube show, give them an argument and writes for jacobin magazine. He's the author of a number of books, including canceling comedians while the world burns a critique of the contemporary left, and most recently, Christopher Hitchens, what he got right. How we went wrong and why he still matters. Ben, welcome to beyond atheism. Yeah, thanks for having me. Yeah, thanks again, Ben for taking the time to talk with us. So just to get started on your book, so it's approaching the tenth anniversary of hitchen's death. And as you note in the book, a lot of younger people might not have any memory of him now aside from maybe like short clips on YouTube and things like this. So maybe just could you give us briefly who was Hitchens and why is he an important person for atheists and also people on the left more generally? Yeah, right. So part of why his interested to be at I wanted to write this book is that he's somebody whose body of work spans a lot of the things that I'm interested in since I'm a, you know, whatever else I have, I'm certainly a huge philosophy to earn. And so arguments about whether there's a God or whether if there's not if that means that we can't make sense of morality, the kinds of things that he spent so much the last ten years of his life argued about are really interested to be, but also I'm a leftist and he was unambiguously for the first 30 years of his career and it's more complicated after that. But I think the maybe the most important reason why he's interested is that he's somebody who was if nothing else, a incredibly good writer and a really and probably one of the best debaters that I can that I could think of, you could see evidence of that still all over YouTube. And so if you're interested in that cluster of subjects, he's somebody who's work, I think you could profit from a big gauge you with. So on the left side over the course of the 90s and going into 2001, he wrote the series of books attacked first Mother Teresa and then Bill and Hillary Clinton and that Henry Kissinger and for my body, it all three of those definitely led to other targets..

Christopher Hitchens Ben Burgess jacobin magazine Hitchens hitchen YouTube Ben Rutgers university Teresa Hillary Clinton Henry Kissinger Bill