35 Burst results for "Christopher Don"

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:24 min | Last month

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific. American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yada. Our solar system is far from the only way to put together stars and their planets. They feel look at all the stars in our galaxy the Milky Way. More than a half of the stars are forming multiples meaning that there are more than once tar in system astrophysicist. Jay. Han. Bay of the Carnegie Institution for Science he has studied one of those systems with three stars. It's called GW Orion is and it's freshly formed on the a million years old. Yeah. It's really really young. Yeah. It's a baby bay says if you translate that million year lifespan. To that of a human, it's the equivalent of a week old baby and how many week old babies do bump into. If you just walk around your neighborhood, there's really little chance that you me the baby weighs one week old right. So first of all, it's hard to find these systems. They are pretty rare ban. His colleagues got lucky spotting this one using radio telescopes they were able to image the. Star system and they say, it differs from our own solar system in more than just star account in our solar system. For example, all eight planets orbit the sun more or less in a single plane. Think of the Sun as the center of a vinyl record with the planets strung out along the grooves in contrast as team discovered that the stars in this triple star system are ringed by clouds of. Dust in multiple warped and misaligned planes picture three-dimensional gyroscope rather than a two dimensional vinyl record. The observations in the journal Science those rings of dust will presumably go on to form planets as the star system matures and base as astronomers have indeed observed other more mature star systems with planets orbiting in these misaligned planes, and we want each under tenth if that happens at the time those planets worn or. Some evolutionary thing over you know billion years, the findings suggest that weirdly aligned planetary systems are born that way and that stars in their embryonic planets can be all topsy turvy even in their infancy. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty. Seconds Science I'm Christopher Don Yata..

Carnegie Institution for Scien Christopher Dodd Jay Christopher Don Yata
Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

60-Second Science

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Documentaries are known for their sweeping natural vistas. This does their amazing footage seriously. How did they get that shot in often soothing baritone of Sir David attenborough strain incontinent what those documentaries don't do though is show the realities of environmental destruction historically particularly BBC documentaries have shied away from that Nikki Rust is an environmental social scientist at Newcastle University in the UK Russ studied work by the BBC in the World Wildlife Fund which had teamed up with Netflix to make what they said would be a whole new kind of production. They wanted it to reach. I think a billion people and that it was going to revolutionize nature documentaries except for the fact it may be that attenborough would be the narrator the Netflix series our planet aim to be different because it promised to reveal the threats facing wildlife in the natural world so did it deliver liver rust and her colleagues analyzed scripts of our planet along with three recent. BBC Series Planet Earth to Pimple Dynasties Twenty into hyenas and Blue Planet to spider cramps and logged everything they saw on the screen turns out planet only talks about threats and successes successes a bit more than Blue Planet to fifteen percent of the script did focus on the woes of the natural world but very little devastation was actually shown on screen. The spite being filmed the analysis is in the Journal people in nature. The lead author of the Study Julia Jones was in Madagascar at the time where net that flicks were there filming and she knows that they were there filming the destruction of Habitat and burning and lots of mental devastation so they've got fatigue is just unfortunately it wasn't chosen to be included. It's not clear if that's really a bad thing. Though we still don't really know whether showing environmental tragedies on screen green motivates people to support conservation but what climate change communication has taught us. Ross says is that the ideal way to motivate audiences is with optimism tinged with trepidation. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata BBC David Attenborough Netflix World Wildlife Fund Nikki Rust Julia Jones Attenborough Cramps Newcastle University Ross Scientist Russ UK Madagascar Sixty Seconds Fifteen Percent
Andrea Townsend, Christopher Don Yada And Christopher Dodd discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Andrea Townsend, Christopher Don Yada And Christopher Dodd discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm christopher dodd yada. Cholesterol affects one third of american adults but it's not just us studies have indicated they cholesterol is also on the rise in other animals and in all of these studies that idea was well they hypothesized that was probably due to interactions with people and eating our food but they didn't actually show that andrea townsend is an avian ecologist at hamilton college and upstate new york and and she found that crows did have higher cholesterol then rural crows but then she took the next logical step in her research she went to mcdonald's we'd pick up one hundred and twenty-five twenty five burgers at a time once one of them wanted to know what we needed all these burgers for and then i started to explain they just kind of waved me away halfway through so of course she needed all those cheeseburgers to feed the crows and to monitor their diet to determine if eating are fast food really does raise the birds cholesterol so the way you supplement your nestling is we'd go to their nest trees and we toss the cheeseburgers three a day predefine day under their trees and then the parents immediately swoop loop down pick up the burgers and bring them to the nestlings and as you might expect crows that dined on cheeseburgers did indeed have higher cholesterol than cros who did without but here's the surprising thing higher cholesterol didn't actually affect crowe's chances of survival over a three year period in one population birds with higher cholesterol were arguably googly in better condition than other crows meaning chubbier. Their results are in the journal. The condor crows can live more than fifteen years and townsend says maybe maybe a high cholesterol diet makes its mark later in life as humans and if you're still wondering why study this i would say this is an important question because there are are lots of other species that also live in urban areas and eat our food and some of them are endangered so it isn't important question how will our food affect the health of wild animals and as we urbanize more of the globe our dietary influence might have even wider effects as for townsend grows are known to be highly skilled it recognizing humans and she says the study made her a celebrity during the study especially when i was walking around the crews would follow me around campus. They often just just follow me around campus anyway they follow my car and then i was getting some notoriety on a broader scale with cros so i would go into getting gas and the crows on the gas station would be calling a special car. Yeah i think just for me and it seemed like a recognition call after after all a free lunch sure does seem like something to squawk about. Thanks for listening for scientific american sixty seconds science. I'm christopher don yada.

Andrea Townsend Christopher Don Yada Christopher Dodd Hamilton College New York Crowe Mcdonald Sixty Seconds Fifteen Years Three Year
London Crawling with Drug-Resistant Microbes

60-Second Science

01:34 min | 1 year ago

London Crawling with Drug-Resistant Microbes

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. If you're a Germaphobe navigating the city there are certain certain mandatory rules of engagement use a paper towel to shield your hand as you touch the bathroom door handle lift toilet seat covers with your shoe touch buttons at A._T._M.'s and crosswalks awesome walks in elevators with a knuckle. The back of your hand never a fingertip. I know this because I am that person and a new study in the journal scientific reports somewhat justifies is my behavior because when researchers in London sampled all those kinds of surfaces in public shopping centers and train stations and common areas in hospitals what they found was a whole a lot of antibiotic resistant bacteria lurking there scientists swab sites all over London and ended up with six hundred samples of staphylococcus bacteria of those nearly half were resistant to two or more commonly used antibiotics like penicillin and Erythromycin and the hospital samples had significantly more drug doug resistant microbes which makes sense because hospitals are a place where they use a lot of antibiotics but if there is a silver lining here it might be how few staph bacteria were multi-drug-resistant drug-resistant in public places a mere forty seven percent because a few years back one in the same scientists swabbed London hotel rooms in found that eighty six percent percent of the staph bacteria. There were multi-drug-resistant which may not help you sleep easy. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata Staph London Germaphobe Penicillin Erythromycin A._T._M. Sixty Seconds Forty Seven Percent Eighty Six Percent
Scientist Encourages Other Women Scientists to Make Themselves Heard

60-Second Science

02:36 min | 1 year ago

Scientist Encourages Other Women Scientists to Make Themselves Heard

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd if you attend science conferences, ever pay attention to who in the audience asked questions, geneticists Natalie, tell us did. And she noticed something off the entire first day of the conference. I was the only woman to ask a question, and I thought, wow, that's kind of weird. Right. So being a scientist she decided to systematically study who ask questions at scientific conferences together with colleagues at Stanford University where she was based at the time and others at Emory University in Atlanta, she recorded more than two thousand questions from hundreds of talks at eight different scientific conferences, after assigning, either male or female, designations to question asker, which the researchers acknowledging the paper doesn't fully capture the spectrum of gender identity. They found that women ask far fewer questions than Representative result based on their numbers. In fact, you need about eighty five two. Ninety percent of your room to be women before fifty percent of your questions. Come from women, but tell us did identify a possible solution halfway through the biology of genomes conference in two thousand fifteen tell us started tweeting, some of her preliminary findings about how few women had been asking questions compared to the relative numbers at the meeting that information sparked a public discussion and policy change from the conference organizers who instituted a new rule that the first question at every talk had to come from scientists still working towards her PHD in the hope that, that approach would produce a more diverse set of question asker, and it worked before our intervention about eleven percent of questions came from women, which is one third of what you'd expect after our intervention. You get more like thirty five percent of questions. Coming from women, it's actually what you'd expect from that audience, the analysis is in the American journal of human genetics and tell us says that strategy of simply publicizing the. Problem has been effective at other conferences to getting more women to not only attend, but to participate in scientific conferences, a lot of women have messaged me and said, oh, you know, I asked my first question at a conference when I saw this work or stuff like that. And I hope that, that means that people are taking advantage of that, incredible opportunity to really add their voice, not just their face in the conference photo to that scientific community. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Natalie Christopher Dodd Scientist American Journal Of Human Gene Christopher Don Emory University Stanford University Atlanta Representative Sixty Seconds Thirty Five Percent Ninety Percent Eleven Percent Fifty Percent
Scientists Fool Flies with 'Virtual Tastes'

60-Second Science

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Scientists Fool Flies with 'Virtual Tastes'

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. There's a scene in the matrix, where the character cypher talks about the illusory experience of eating a fine meal. I'm Ben you on the steak and he said, I know this doesn't exist. I know that when I put it in my mouth, the matrix is telling my brain that it is juicy and delicious taste so good. I prefer virtual reality to the cruelty of the world. Ignorance is bliss. Recounting that scene is Carlos Ribeiro, a neuroscientist at the Champalimaud foundation in Portugal. He has a special interest in that scene, because he has essentially recreated that phenomenon in fruit flies who did exactly doing to the flash. Here's how it works. He and his team raised genetically engineered flies, with tastes neurons, that can be turned on and off with red and green light that kind of process is known as Octo genetics. His team fed the flies bland food, which they understandably disliked. But then the researchers made the flies in light to turn on sweetness perceiving neurons and the flies gobbled up the food, which to them now, tasted sweet. The team was also able to do the same with bitter, neurons flies got bitter food, which they avoided, but the scientists then turned off the bitter neurons, and all of a sudden, the flies changed their minds until we have used this to create completely virtual tastes reality for our flies. The experimental. Details are in the journal. We live. So why do this? We really want to understand how the brain uses sensory taste information to make feeding decisions. And also, what goes wrong in a beef for example, or when there are other diseases, which are related to nutrition. He also imagines we could someday use, gene therapy techniques to plug senses back into the noses or tongues of people who've lost the ability to smell or taste, but for now that is like the matrix firmly, the realm of science fiction. Show me. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata BEN Champalimaud Foundation Christopher Don Carlos Ribeiro Portugal Sixty Seconds
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata, humans can spread disease by sneezy, but less well known is the wheat plants ability to do something strangely, similar from its leaves basically analogous to humans me is in terms of you have very fast and sudden expulsion of droplets that contained the disease or pathogen inside of it. And they kind of thrown away from the surface Jonathan burrito. A mechanical engineer at Virginia Tech, he and his team were studying the ability of wheat plants to expel spores of a common pathogen the wheat rest fungus from their leaves via this unusual mechanism. So the inoculated we'd plants with the disease created do on the plants leaves, and then studied the ensuing action with high-speed microscopy. Here's what they saw the leaves are extremely hydrophobic meaning water beads up to minimize contact with the surface and win two or more jobs, touch energy gets released in the form. Of catapulting action, which sneezes the droplets into the air several millimeters above the leaf surface. The droplets can then be picked up by light breezes or simply fall and spread to other plants. The process is surprisingly effective, at launching spores. The researchers figure each leaf can launch a hundred spores per hour during a morning, do the results and photos of the jumping drops are in the journal of the Royal Society interface. Next break oh and his team want to see what happens if they spray stuff on the leaves the changes the way do forms for if we painted a wet ability of the lease, but they're no longer super hydrophobic now to do drop will be unable to jump when they grow. They sort of claim to the leaf surface and not be something anymore. Such treatment could perhaps put a stop to wheat sneezes and slow down the transmission of disease. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don yada.

Christopher Dodd Yata Christopher Don yada Virginia Tech journal of the Royal Society sixty seconds
Wheat Plants "Sneeze" And Spread Disease

60-Second Science

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Wheat Plants "Sneeze" And Spread Disease

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata, humans can spread disease by sneezy, but less well known is the wheat plants ability to do something strangely, similar from its leaves basically analogous to humans me is in terms of you have very fast and sudden expulsion of droplets that contained the disease or pathogen inside of it. And they kind of thrown away from the surface Jonathan burrito. A mechanical engineer at Virginia Tech, he and his team were studying the ability of wheat plants to expel spores of a common pathogen the wheat rest fungus from their leaves via this unusual mechanism. So the inoculated we'd plants with the disease created do on the plants leaves, and then studied the ensuing action with high-speed microscopy. Here's what they saw the leaves are extremely hydrophobic meaning water beads up to minimize contact with the surface and win two or more jobs, touch energy gets released in the form. Of catapulting action, which sneezes the droplets into the air several millimeters above the leaf surface. The droplets can then be picked up by light breezes or simply fall and spread to other plants. The process is surprisingly effective, at launching spores. The researchers figure each leaf can launch a hundred spores per hour during a morning, do the results and photos of the jumping drops are in the journal of the Royal Society interface. Next break oh and his team want to see what happens if they spray stuff on the leaves the changes the way do forms for if we painted a wet ability of the lease, but they're no longer super hydrophobic now to do drop will be unable to jump when they grow. They sort of claim to the leaf surface and not be something anymore. Such treatment could perhaps put a stop to wheat sneezes and slow down the transmission of disease. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don yada.

Christopher Dodd Yata Christopher Don Yada Virginia Tech Journal Of The Royal Society Sixty Seconds
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. A lot about how what you eat will affect your microbiome. Probiotics prebiotics stuff like that. But your skin is swarming with microbes to and the grooming products, you use might affect what's living there? That's according to a study in the journal EMC biology further tests. Researchers recruited six men and six women, the volunteers left their skin alone for the first three weeks except for a light body wash and then for the next three weeks, the participants apply to modern skin-care arsenal. Sunscreen and skin lotion into perspiration and foot powder. Finally, the volunteers returned to their usual routine. Whatever it was each person for another three weeks throughout that time. The scientists swabbed volunteers faces in forearms, armpits and feet. And they did chemical in genetic analyses of the samples, the lotion, and sunscreen, did not appear to alter the microbiome, but they found counter-intuitively that the anti per sprint and foot powder, actually boosted the diversity of microbes in the armpits, and in between the toes. Perhaps, because those products change nutrient and moisture levels and thus create conditions that foster a wider variety of tiny occupants. The researchers also found that different skin care routines, altered, the types of hormones and fairmont's present on the subject skin. And they hypothesis that someday personalized skin-care recipes could be tailored to individuals to alter our Ramones in a systematic way thus making us more attractive to others or less attractive should anyone need to lessen their Kevorkian. This alert Rian word which means they're lure update on amoun-. Amoun-. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata Christopher Don EMC biology fairmont Rian three weeks sixty seconds
Antiperspirant Boosts Armpit and Toe-Web Microbial Diversity

60-Second Science

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Antiperspirant Boosts Armpit and Toe-Web Microbial Diversity

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. A lot about how what you eat will affect your microbiome. Probiotics prebiotics stuff like that. But your skin is swarming with microbes to and the grooming products, you use might affect what's living there? That's according to a study in the journal EMC biology further tests. Researchers recruited six men and six women, the volunteers left their skin alone for the first three weeks except for a light body wash and then for the next three weeks, the participants apply to modern skin-care arsenal. Sunscreen and skin lotion into perspiration and foot powder. Finally, the volunteers returned to their usual routine. Whatever it was each person for another three weeks throughout that time. The scientists swabbed volunteers faces in forearms, armpits and feet. And they did chemical in genetic analyses of the samples, the lotion, and sunscreen, did not appear to alter the microbiome, but they found counter-intuitively that the anti per sprint and foot powder, actually boosted the diversity of microbes in the armpits, and in between the toes. Perhaps, because those products change nutrient and moisture levels and thus create conditions that foster a wider variety of tiny occupants. The researchers also found that different skin care routines, altered, the types of hormones and fairmont's present on the subject skin. And they hypothesis that someday personalized skin-care recipes could be tailored to individuals to alter our Ramones in a systematic way thus making us more attractive to others or less attractive should anyone need to lessen their Kevorkian. This alert Rian word which means they're lure update on amoun-. Amoun-. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata Christopher Don Emc Biology Fairmont Rian Three Weeks Sixty Seconds
High School Cheaters Nabbed By Neural Network

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 1 year ago

High School Cheaters Nabbed By Neural Network

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata, the English language version of Wikipedia has almost six million articles. And if you're cheating student that's six million essays already written for you footnotes and all except plagiarism isn't really ineffective tactic just plug the text into a search engine and game over. But what about having a ghostwriter at a paper mill composer final essay, STAN dot K two recent software cannot detect this kind of cheating. Stefan luanne is a data analyst at the university of Copenhagen in Denmark, where he's based ghost writing is a growing problem in high schools, so Lawrenson and his colleagues created a program called ghost rider that can detect the cheats at its core is in neural network trained and tested on a hundred and thirty thousand real essays, from ten thousand Danish students after reading through tens of thousands of essays label as being written by the same author or not the machine taught itself to tune in to the characteristics. That might tip off cheating, for example, did a student's essays share the same styles of punctuation. The same spelling mistakes were the abbreviations, the same by scrutinizing inconsistencies like those ghost rider was able to pinpoint cheated essay nearly ninety percent of the time, the team presented the results at the European symposium on artificial neural networks, computational intelligence and machine learning. And there is one more aspect here that could help students your high school, essays presumably, get better over time as you learn to write and the machine can detect that the final idea is, of course, to try to detect students who either at risk, the because that development and writing style is not as you would expect teachers could thus give extra help to kids who really need it while sniffing out the cheaters too. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don yada.

Christopher Dodd Yata Stefan Luanne Christopher Don Yada Stan Dot University Of Copenhagen Wikipedia Denmark Analyst Lawrenson Sixty Seconds Ninety Percent Mill
Preserved Poop is an Archaeological Treasure

60-Second Science

01:47 min | 1 year ago

Preserved Poop is an Archaeological Treasure

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata for a longtime archaeologists have dug for the shiny stuff the sorts of artifacts that belong in museums. They like poach. They like jewelry and gold and stuff like that appears Mitchell, a biological anthropologist at the university of Cambridge Mitchell spends his time looking for something decidedly different from such handmade relics that thing he seeks preserved piece of human feces, copper lights as they're called are dried or mineralized pieces of poop and Mitchell and his team found some prime specimens in a trash heap at the ancient settlement of cattle Hoya. That's in modern day, Turkey and dates from six thousand to seven thousand b c Mitchell's team ground up the poop samples with a mortar and pestle then dissolve them and use Microsoft's to filter out particles of various sizes, the presence of certain molecules tip them off that it was indeed human. Poop in two of the samples, they found the intact eggs of whip worm and intestinal parasite that's far more likely to. Flourish in settlements than among people who poop and then move along down the road to a new location. The discovery thus gives us a glimpse of how human health may have changed as hunter gatherers started to adopt a stationary agricultural lifestyle. It's only by looking at these earliest villages. These earliest towns that was set up in the Middle East that we can really start to understand how when humans change their lifestyle to different way of getting food how it could increase or decrease their risk of different kinds of diseases. The results are in the journal antiquity and the findings prove that ancient poop is flushed with details about ancient civilizations. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Mitchell Christopher Dodd Yata Christopher Don Middle East Turkey University Of Cambridge Microsoft Sixty Seconds
Music May Orchestrate Better Brain Connectivity in Preterm Infants

60-Second Science

02:38 min | 1 year ago

Music May Orchestrate Better Brain Connectivity in Preterm Infants

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata fifteen million babies are born prematurely, every year worldwide in some cases, the early births can be life threatening or cause developmental issues. They have more attention deficit difficulties. They can have a higher risk of having autism, and in general, sort of socio emotional regulation issues, patriot who appear attrition and neonatologist at the university hospital of Geneva now she and her colleagues have evidence that a simple tool could help those Preterm babies brains develop music. But before you queue, the Amadeus, I felt about multifold. This is very complex musical structure, and I could hardly magin that such a immature brain would be able to fully capture the complexity of Mozart, so instead, she recruited the harpist Andrea's, vol- inviter, who worked with neonatal nurses to determine which sounds would most stimulate infants brains. He then composed the suite of three eight minute long tracks, which the nurses played twenty Preterm babies using wireless headphones embedded in little baby caps. Each baby heard five tracks a week for about six weeks on average then hoops team used MRI's to visualize activity in the baby's brain's, and what they found was that premiums who listen to tunes had brain networks, that more closely resembled, those of full term babies compared to their counterparts who didn't get the treatment, the music listeners had greater connectivity among brain regions, such as areas involved in sensory and higher. Order cognitive functioning, indicating that music listening might have enduring effects on brain development. The details are in the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences. Of course, many questions still remain. I'll watch dilation to that was stimulation, given the right way would be much better. If it was. Something more lively than the recorded music was too simple. Or could it be more complex, but hoop? He said, one thing parents can already do his sing to their children. Plus, she said it doesn't really matter if you can carry it too. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Christopher Dodd University Hospital Of Geneva National Academy Of Sciences Christopher Don Andrea Sixty Seconds Three Eight Minute Six Weeks
Icy Room Temperatures May Chill Productivity

60-Second Science

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Icy Room Temperatures May Chill Productivity

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd yada, a few years ago, scientists determine that our thermostats are sexist namely. That office. Climates had been optimized for a hypothetical room full of forty year old hundred fifty pound men using standards developed more than fifty years ago, and that ends up leaving a lot of women in the cold, call the ballot thermostat, right? Tom Chang, a behavioral economists at the USC Marshall school of business, he says, it goes beyond comfort for women. It seems that it's not just a matter of comfort. But it also affects their productivity Chang, and his colleague tested that link between temperature and performance by quizzing five hundred forty three German students on basic addition skills, and word scrambles in rooms that varied from sixty to ninety degrees Fahrenheit. And if you went from, let's say, the low sixties to the mid seventies, you saw an increase in female performance of almost fifteen percent, one five not five zero which I found. Markedly large as much larger than I had expected the effects tapered off after the mid seventies. But men on the other hand had a small decrease in performance about three percent as temperatures rose to the mid seventies, the results are in the journal plus one and there's a chance. These findings might explain things like disparities test scores on the SAT the longstanding gap in performance between high school boys and high school girls on the map portion of the SAT's approximately four percent. So given the effect size refinding. That's three degrees. Difference in indoor temperature still, he says, I wouldn't go running off writing policy off of one study. But it seems Cynthia Nixon had the thermostat dialed in just right last year. The actor turned politician was preparing to debate Andrew Cuomo as vita for the democratic nomination for New York state, governor debate venues are usually kept pretty chilly. But she requested a more balmy. And perhaps cognitively friendly, Seventy-six degrees. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Tom Chang Christopher Dodd Usc Marshall School Of Busines Cynthia Nixon Christopher Don Andrew Cuomo New York Sixty Seconds Ninety Degrees Fahrenheit Seventy-Six Degrees Hundred Fifty Pound Fifteen Percent Three Degrees Three Percent Four Percent Fifty Years Forty Year
Ancient Gum Gives Archaeologists Something to Chew On

60-Second Science

02:27 min | 1 year ago

Ancient Gum Gives Archaeologists Something to Chew On

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. You're probably not too interested in what some people call. ABC gum already been chewed, but for archaeology such gum as long as it's really old is genetic gold mine. It's bit. Like, I guess Jurassic Park Italia. 'cause Shuba a graduate student in archaeology at oops. Ali university in Sweden, she's referring to that famous clip from the movie about how Jurassic Park scientists extract blood from a mosquito trapped in amber being Dino, DNA, except in this case, it's human DNA and it's not trapped in amber. But inside exceptionally old chewing gums found at the site of an ancient hunting, and fishing village on the west coast of Sweden. The samples look like chewed up wads of modern day gum, but don't think Wrigley's, this detritus is black sticky. Tar distilled from birchbark 'cause Shuba has tasted modern day version sin isn't eager to try it again. Liz, I'm faith for it. So why chew on something so unpleasant? Maybe because they're gum wasn't for fresh breath. It could use it to seal your boat or like seal your thoughts. So it's kind of everyday use substance, many of the gums have teeth marks too. So perhaps, they chewed it to help shape it and intern develop. A habit despite the taste that today's tobacco chewers might relate to 'cause Shuba team extracted and sequenced DNA from the ancient gum, and they found genetic evidence of three different gum chewers two women and a man. It's the oldest human DNA found in Scandinavia dating to about eight thousand b c and because it more closely resembles the DNA of hunter gatherers from western Europe than from eastern Europe. It also provides hints about how people ended up in what's now Sweden the results are in the journal communications biology. The gum could still hold other clues about ancient diets or the bacteria. These people had in their mouths so given that we can learn so much from chewing gum. Is it really that bad to stick it to the bottom of chairs and tables, you know, for the benefit of future? Archaeologists still think that one should not without any place just like that. So I think you should definitely throw it in the but I won't blame these guys who who spent as out to those years ago. They did a good job. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Sweden Christopher Dodd Yata Shuba Jurassic Park Italia Jurassic Park Christopher Don Wrigley ABC Ali University Europe LIZ Intern Graduate Student Eastern Europe Scandinavia Sixty Seconds
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata Antarctica is known for its great expanses of white and not just snow if it's fresh coming to be still white or pinkish eventually all turns Brown Monty Brown. Steph boekhorst is an ecologist at via university in Amsterdam in the initially white stuff. He's talking about is penguin poop to firstly notice of it is the smell, basically, you're squishing. True. Puddles would you I guess mouth? But it's actually just poop and up producers that really strong ammonia smell 'cause you can really smell from for miles away. But it's not just the smell that travels on the wind ammonia contains nitrogen a- valuable fertilizer. So the winds carry nourishment to nearby mosses and lichens and that in turn supports teaming communities of the largest fully terrestrial animals in Antarctica, invertebrates, like spring, tales, and mites. Boekhorst and his colleagues took air and plant samples around the poop piles and. I found this airborne ammonia fertilizer enriches life as far as a mile away. The full details are in the journal current biology in the work makes it easier for scientists like bow course to remotely estimate in articles biodiversity, they don't have to go to all these different field sides. You can actually basically sit at home. Take these pictures with satellites and then get an idea where the highs by the should be along the peninsula. Of course, doctors have long taken a stool sample to get medical information about a patient, and now ecologists will be able to use imagery to track feces and predict it's beneficial effects at the bottom of the world in short don't pooh-poohed the PU. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Steph boekhorst Antarctica Monty Brown Christopher Don Amsterdam sixty seconds
Penguin Poop Helps Biodiversity Bloom in Antarctica

60-Second Science

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Penguin Poop Helps Biodiversity Bloom in Antarctica

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata Antarctica is known for its great expanses of white and not just snow if it's fresh coming to be still white or pinkish eventually all turns Brown Monty Brown. Steph boekhorst is an ecologist at via university in Amsterdam in the initially white stuff. He's talking about is penguin poop to firstly notice of it is the smell, basically, you're squishing. True. Puddles would you I guess mouth? But it's actually just poop and up producers that really strong ammonia smell 'cause you can really smell from for miles away. But it's not just the smell that travels on the wind ammonia contains nitrogen a- valuable fertilizer. So the winds carry nourishment to nearby mosses and lichens and that in turn supports teaming communities of the largest fully terrestrial animals in Antarctica, invertebrates, like spring, tales, and mites. Boekhorst and his colleagues took air and plant samples around the poop piles and. I found this airborne ammonia fertilizer enriches life as far as a mile away. The full details are in the journal current biology in the work makes it easier for scientists like bow course to remotely estimate in articles biodiversity, they don't have to go to all these different field sides. You can actually basically sit at home. Take these pictures with satellites and then get an idea where the highs by the should be along the peninsula. Of course, doctors have long taken a stool sample to get medical information about a patient, and now ecologists will be able to use imagery to track feces and predict it's beneficial effects at the bottom of the world in short don't pooh-poohed the PU. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Steph Boekhorst Antarctica Monty Brown Christopher Don Amsterdam Sixty Seconds
U.S. Coral Reefs Do $1.8 Billion of Work Per Year

60-Second Science

02:01 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Coral Reefs Do $1.8 Billion of Work Per Year

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Jatta. A physics lesson may be the last thing on your mind, as you relaxed the ocean. However, if you're sitting on a lovely Hawaiian Bj with your mind tie, and you're looking off shore, and you see twenty foot waves and people surfing on them. And you notice that it's only lapping up on the shoreline here with teeny little waves. That's the reef working to dissipate that energy, Mike Beck. Studies. The intersection of engineering ecology economics and finance at UC Santa Cruz. And he says reef sacked a whole lot like our human built coastal infrastructure to tame the energy of incoming waves. They essentially act just like a low crested submerged breakwater, that's an engineering term. But it means that they're really good engineering models for describing the benefits of res and those models are the key behind a new report from the US Geological Survey with Beck is one of its authors. The. Researchers modeled hypothetical storms hitting coastlines in areas with off shore reefs like Florida Hawaii and Puerto Rico they studied how reefs of various heights would dampen waves and holdback flooding, and they found that every year the country's reef save the US estimated one point eight billion dollars in direct flooding damages and other economic losses that dollar numbers important because it allows reef rebuilding projects like gluing little healthy coral nub ins, undamaged reefs to tap into billions of dollars of federal money set aside for hurricane in disaster resilience, if you can rigorously value, the benefits of any of these habitats you can unlock any of the funding mechanisms that would have typically been applied to developing a seawall or a breakwater. That's a win win for life below the water and for those of us who live on land as well. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Mike Beck Christopher Dodd Jatta United States Santa Cruz Hawaiian Bj Christopher Don Puerto Rico Florida Hawaii Sixty Seconds Eight Billion Dollars Twenty Foot
Could Air Conditioners Help Cool the Planet?

60-Second Science

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Could Air Conditioners Help Cool the Planet?

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata air conditioning and fans account for a full ten percent of the world's electricity usage or to put it another way. Not of that you pump around rolling did Meyer, a chemical engineer at the Karlsruhe institute of technology in Germany and other thing that takes a lot of pumping air around. He says carbon capture because the concentration of CO two in air is evidently, quite low even though it's enough to cause climate change. It's only four hundred parts per million. So he says why not retrofit air conditioners with modules that capture carbon several companies already make materials that strip carbon dioxide from the air you then need to convert that captured CO two into hydrocarbons, that's an energy intensive process. But didn't Myers vision is that we'd use clean carbon-free renewable energy to power that step do this on a large enough scale, and you could produce significant amounts of this synthetic renewable. Oil did Myron his. Colleagues calculated that if you outfitted the AC system of the fair tower, a large skyscraper in Frankfurt with these carbon capture devices, the buildings units alone could produce an estimated fifteen thousand barrels of synthetic oil a year the full right up in the journal nature communications is called crowd oil not crude oil. And if the idea gets traction, it could transform the devices that cool our homes and offices into machines that help cool the planet, or at least stop warming it up while chilling us down. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Meyer Christopher Dodd Karlsruhe Institute Of Technol Christopher Don Myron Frankfurt Germany Sixty Seconds Fifteen Thousand Barrels Ten Percent
New Model Aims to Solve Mystery of the Moon's Formation

60-Second Science

02:08 min | 1 year ago

New Model Aims to Solve Mystery of the Moon's Formation

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata on July. Twentieth. Nineteen sixty-nine humankind. Finally, set foot on the surface of the moon fifty years later, a big mystery remains how the heck the moon got there in the first place for decades the thinking on that has been that four and a half billion years ago, a Mars sized proto-planets smashed into the earth when the dust settled our moon remained forged from the debris of earth and that other object. The problem is as scientists have taken more and more precise isotopic measurements of the moon. They've found that it's nearly identical in composition to the earth. Not some other object a problem that I've been advertising as a nice topic crisis. Jamie Losch studies planetary impacts at Purdue University. Now, he says a new theory in the journal nature geoscience may at least point to away out of that isotopic crisis of the moons. Chemical isotopes so closely resembling earth's here's the idea. The authors a team of Japanese scientists right that maybe in those early days of the solar system. The earth was sloshing with oceans of magma, then when the Mars sized objects slammed into those Moulton seas their models predict a lot more earth derived material gets injected into orbit in the form of scorching vapors temperatures of tens of thousands of degrees. And so that expands at speeds that exceed the escape velocity of the earth, and in that way, injects material into orbit around the earth that material rapidly coalescence and bingo you've got a moon. Malaysia says there are still a few kinks to work out in the scenario. Still. He says it's a step forward. Think of it as a major clue in a murder mystery or something like that it could be true clue toward the answer. Could be of the -ception. We don't know yet. So it could be that we Nastro naught started walking on the moon and a half century ago. They were really leaving footprints on the remains of the primordial earth. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd Christopher Don Jamie Losch Purdue University Malaysia Murder Sixty Seconds Billion Years Fifty Years
River Dolphins Have a Wide Vocal Repertoire

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 1 year ago

River Dolphins Have a Wide Vocal Repertoire

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Freshwater dolphins live in many of the world's biggest rivers from the Amazon to the Ganges and they differ in a lot of ways from their better known ocean-going cousins, they have a flexible neck, they have different types of teas speak and also move their flippers independently in different directions, so they can swim backwards. Gabrielle Miller son does a marine biologist at the university of Saint Andrews in Scotland when I decided that I wouldn't be a biologist used to set it that I wanted to study dolphins and being born in the Amazon Nevis only metro to go for the riverdell since he says another thing that sets his study subjects apart from marine. Dolphins are their calls. Over several years. Mila Santos has recorded. The sounds of argh Wyan river dolphins came calling at the mall because Uber fish market. That's on Brazil's token teens river, then using sound analysis software his team fished two hundred and thirty seven distinct sound types from the recordings indicating the dolphins have a wide repertoire, the call collection published in the journal peer Jay has only a few whistles instead three quarters of the collected. Sounds were short to parters like this one. Produced by a female calf has she rubbed her head on her mother's belly. It's a call. That's more similar in structure to the ones orcas and pilot whales make to identify a family or social group then to the social whistles of marine dolphins. These are older lineages, right? So issue understand how these communicated we might have a sense to understand how the communication system evolved in different Lena Joseph cetaceans, meaning perhaps these calls between mother and calf are like the river dolphins themselves and Evelyn relic. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd Yata Amazon Nevis Amazon Wyan River Mila Santos Christopher Don Gabrielle Miller Evelyn Relic University Of Saint Andrews Lena Joseph Scotland Brazil JAY Sixty Seconds Three Quarters
Gluten-Free Restaurant Foods Are Often Mislabeled

60-Second Science

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Gluten-Free Restaurant Foods Are Often Mislabeled

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd yada a lot of restaurant menus these days. Have gluten free options. Problem is many of the dishes may not be gluten free at all about a third overall. Thirty two percent of gluten-free labeled restaurant foods had gluten found result Benjamin lead. Well, I guess renter. Allergist and epidemiologist at Columbia University. His team got that one third number by crowdsourcing data from eight hundred four restaurant patrons who used hand-held. Gluten testing devices to scan more than fifty six hundred restaurant food samples from across the US the devices can detect gluten it's slightly lower levels than the maximum concentration. The FDA allows for packaged foods twenty parts per million. So there could be some harmless, false positives in the data. But we suspect given that large proportion that this is clearly a bigger problem than in packaged food where probably less than two percent of all packaged food has detective. Able gluten of greater than twenty parts per million. The results are in the American journal of gastroenterology and for those who need to avoid gluten for health reasons level has these tips food that was tested around dinnertime was more likely to have gluten detected than food earlier in the day and avoid allegedly gluten free pizzas and pastas. He says which scored more violations than other dishes, more than half of all pizza and pasta dishes tested positive for gluten. So a salad for lunch might be a safer bet. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd American Journal Of Gastroente Christopher Don FDA United States Columbia University Benjamin Sixty Seconds Thirty Two Percent Two Percent
"christopher don" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"christopher don" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"And I talk an awful lot about what it is about some kids out there who just seem to have it together who who understand the beauty of life in about giving back to the world. And what is it? Well, you know, I think father Christopher Don Lee, who we're going to call in right now probably knows a little something about watching a high schooler a child change from maybe a little self absorbed into a giver because you know, a lot about move a mountain missions tell everybody what this is in. Welcome to Katie k. Are you Wendy Moore? You thank you so much for having me on here this afternoon really excited after I tell you. I've been listening to k decay in the evening mostly for over thirty years. The first time I've been on the radio. Thank you for having me on. All right. Yeah. I'm excited. So no, yeah. Obviously, you know, we we run to stop prophets called move them out and missions and our goal co founder, Dan Gallagher, myself our goal and our board. Excellent board all or many helpers. Are our goal has been really to help transform the future of Pittsburgh in ways of face in service. And so what we do is. We we've connected for many years now with a organization down in Jamaica. We go down there. We take trips up same trips is usually we'll hear about taking vacations we go down, and we really helped to serve the most vulnerable. We've been we've been going down. Now for four years. We started four years ago with our with our mission trips, and we took nine children nine nine high school kids down the first year and this year, we're taking over seventy chums. We're really excited about that. And and some of those are also the the college students who after their time in high school said, you know, father we want still go. Can we make this happen? So this year I'm going down for three weeks in a row at the end of may going into June. And these these these young men and women. Yeah, you hit it on the nose, Wendy. They are truly transformed. Big yet. It I love it. What do they do when they're there? I mean, when you're talking about, you know, the most vulnerable we're talking disabled or abandoned children or young mothers in crisis, describe what what they do when they're they're. Absolutely. Thank you. Yeah. So when we go down there, you know, one of the first things that we do is. We will first before we go down we meet with the kids, you know, last week. We had a nice all day Saturday. You know, they all came. It was amazing. We we prepared. You know, we went down we serve the poor in Pittsburgh at Saint Mary mercy at the red door reserved we brought in people in Sydney or need food. And we we serve them lunch. We went up, and we did some icebreakers which I'm not very good at it. All but today, they had a good time getting to know each other. So that when they go down they can already kind of have a strength and relationship, it's one another, and then we went and we prayed. When we go down, you know, we kinda hit the ground running right away. You get down there late at night right in the morning, you go, and you serve you serve breakfast. And I'll tell you who were serving over twelve communities down also Jamaica, and who were serving are like you said the most vulnerable. He's our children for the most part who have been thrown away in their culture. These are children who really have that throwaway culture. His you know, that that mustard Sheikh community down in Jamaica founded in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight by this Monsignor, Gregory, an amazing in energy energetic, man, he said, you know, my goal in life is at no child will ever be abandoned twice will ever be abandoned twice. So what he does is anytime, you know, a parent single parent or just parents they they can't or they won't take care of their mental you're physically handicapped child will they take them in their community. They have over four hundred residents that we call them four hundred residents and. They have so many staff and volunteer who helped them as well. And especially these these ladies there called cheese affectionately, you know, the nurses are called aunties. And I can't tell you. How many of our young women are now who are in college are studying to be nurses because of that influence, and I think that's just beautiful. But we do we go down. We spent half today with the actual residence. So half of the day there in morning or the afternoon, you know, playing games just connecting with some, you know, physical touch connecting with some, you know, singing songs putting on skits, making fools of ourselves. Having a good time in taking them also into prayer. It's really based on face. There's a adoration chapel in everyone of the houses. And so we pray with them and the other half of the day. We do manual labor. You know, the the workers down. They're they're they're really they're good to us, you know, recognizing that we're not skilled laborers. But we'll we'll we'll do the best we can. And so we go, and and you know, we'll we'll help actually this year movement missions is donating funds to build a house. House for for one of the residents. I love we're going to go down. Yeah. Down we're going to actually physically built the house. I love they you skipped out quickly of a wedding rehearsal to chat with Mardian. May. I couldn't ask you any questions because you did such a beautiful job telling us what you do. And I hope people check you out. And I wanna thank you for your time father. I just want to say we're having our our our fundraiser on on may on may third at the Duquesne university ballroom. We'll be having great Irish music drinks and food and.

Jamaica Wendy Moore Pittsburgh Christopher Don Lee Katie k Dan Gallagher co founder Duquesne university ballroom Mardian Saint Mary mercy Gregory Sydney four years thirty years three weeks
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. One of the biggest drawbacks too wearing a smartwatch is. How often you have to take it off to charge it? But here's an idea. How about charging it with a power source? That's pretty ubiquitous nowadays wifi. Why signals all around us and most of them are just wasted shoe? John an electrical engineer at MIT writing in the journal nature. He and his colleagues describe a device called a wreck Teno designed to capture energy from wifi signals and turn them into direct current electrically. The tenant consists of a small golden Tanna about the size of an ST card which converts variety of wireless signals, like wifi bluetooth and cellular LT into an AC signal next three atom thick layer of molybdenum dice fide converts that AC signal into usable DC electricity. That layer is called a Rectifier slap it on the antenna. And the result is the wreck ten. The devices flexible, and using typical home wifi signals it spits out about forty micro. Watts enough to light up a simple LED display or power a biosensor. It's not enough juice for power, hungry, smart, watches and smartphones. Jess yet, but Jong says their next goal is to build an array of wreck tennis to power larger devices. The scientists also envision a smart city where buildings bridges and highways are studded with tiny sensors to monitor their structural health each sensor with its own wreck tenor. So it never goes dark. We can in some sense ring intelligence to almost area object around us, and that kind enable ubiquitous sensing because his smart city becomes a lot less intelligent when it runs out of juice. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd Yata John Christopher Don MIT Watts engineer Jess Jong Sixty seconds sixty seconds
"christopher don" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"christopher don" Discussed on The Ben and Ashley I Almost Famous Podcast

"I just saw my name pop up on we'll use this. I just sold. My name. Pop up on my Google alerts and says breeze. Mitch an article with has been mentioned your name, and it's an article with Lauren Zima. About how Bree our last guest mentioned that. Yes, she was had a crush on on denies. So that's really sweet Bree. Thank you again for that. But I thought it was weird that she has got the fun that popped up on my computer. Hey. Moving on. Ashley this episode with Colton was one that I was very envious of at times. And also really happy that I'm not the bachelor ever again at other times. And let me tell you why I off Singapore. I love the idea Singapore. I would love to go to Singapore. I'm very envious of that. But jumping right into the first date. I'm really glad I'm not the bachelor because there is no way in hell. You're getting me to bungee jump off. That thing I really felt that moment like I could feel them with that in their soul. Like, I'm actually going to step off this thing and just free fall on. Did you do anything like that on your season though? No, they must know that. I would I would have been like I'm out like love ain't worth this fund. Jared bungee jumped with Clare on paradise. Really? Yeah. But it was a lot less of a fall. And it was over water. Which to me like it was over ocean water, which feels a lot safer for me. It's I texted cold last night. And I was like dude, I'm really glad that you're the bachelor like you're doing a great job for so many reasons, but also because of that, right? There is something they would have never been able to give me to do. Really didn't. He was too eager. I don't think he will either. But he held his own. So anyways that was my take away from the first day. I mean, tastes great. She's very beautiful. I'm glad that this this worked out for them. But I had anxiety for fifteen minutes following this date just trying to process the fact that they were jumping from their legs, you know, hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of feet with the idea. This was helping them find loves that silly. It's really just that they can use all the cliches like I really feel like I'm falling in love. Oh, that's good point. John. Falling. Process. I'm surprised they could do that. I thought that just the network television has gotten a lot more strict on what they can and cannot do on these shows for like a legal purposes. So I'm surprised that that can still exist. But it must be safe. I mean, I guess now. Interest is getting into a car. No. Well, yeah. Probably a lot less imagine. I hope so. But. Yeah. Tesa in Colton. They have a connection. I think he's into resume Menton last week. Ashley, you can really tell who calls into. And who is not if there's one thing he's doing. I don't know if it's a bad or good thing. It just you can really read who he's into. Yeah. I agree. Well, I think it's fun for the audience. Yeah. He's resigning. It seems shouldn't. He's he's he's really door. Then let's see what else. Do we have been is episode? The group day it was like the biggest group date ever. And of course, Hannah was sad. Because that meant that Kaelin was going on the one on one this is where a lot of drama between Courtney and Demi happened. I have to say that wall. Demi is annoying and presents herself very young. I thought Courtney was really condescending. In this episode the scene the episode and she. According to like. She how do I wore this? There is a method to getting time with the bachelor during group dates, and if you want time, and you fight for time you get time the whole playing hard to get thing does not work when it comes to the bachelor we saw this with Christopher Don during Becca season who wanted to be pursued by Becca. No, the cast has to pursue the lead in this case. Correct. There's twenty plus people like you don't have time to play hard to get an honestly just to be clear. I have I bet cold and had no clue that he even had not talked to Courtney. You're so in it..

Tesa Courtney Bree Singapore Demi Ashley Clare Google Lauren Zima Becca Mitch Menton Christopher Don Colton Jared John Hannah Kaelin fifteen minutes
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata satellite imagery, like Google earth. Makes it easy three colleges halfway round the world to check up on tropical forests see a legal roads and logging stuff like that. But the info is limited satellite. Data often tells you what happens after it's happened Rhett Butler, the founder of manga bay dot com. That's an environmental science news website in a perspective piece in the journal science. He and his colleagues write that sound recordings could supplement satellite data as another conservation tool. You can actually set up alerts, and so you can hear things like chainsaws will gunshot in real time. So you can get out ahead of a potential deforestation before it occurs. Small audio recorders some of which are solar powered and hooked to cell phone grids for data. Upload also gave ecologists the ability to eavesdrop on jungles biodiversity over time. You're in a primary forest, you'll tend to see. All the frequencies of soundscape occupied by different species. These insects bodes calling moles. Bob's things. Like that. As a comparison. Here's a four. Spot after selective logging meaning some trees were cut others left. Standing. As you move into more deserve ecosystem, you start to see more gaps across the frequencies about soundscape certain insects dominate and the diversity of calls declines as disturbance increases. And while the human error is perceptive algorithms are a much more powerful tool to comb through thousands of hours of data to get a richer picture of changing tropical biodiversity. And so that's kind of where you get the scale ability as if you can create signatures for certain species or or animal groups, and then run out algorithm that matches those patterns against all the sound data nowadays many industries, like cattle farming palm oil soybean and paper. Production are committing to zero deforestation goals, which can be hard to measure, but by coupling satellite. Data in camera traps with audio recordings ecologists can keep their eyes and ears on what's going on in the jungle. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yada.

Rhett Butler Christopher Dodd Christopher Don founder Bob sixty seconds
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yatta Yatta, come and desert in Chile is one of the driest spots on earth. Sometimes can't even see any life at all. I say it was a key. Those guys were really boring because nothing to see Armindo us boost was born and raised in the comma, he's now in Astro biologist at the Spanish national research council's center for Astro biology, and he says with closer inspection. Life can be found there microscope. Another to see metro recently in those giants places in either Tacoma, then in two thousand fifteen and again in twenty seventeen freak storms from the Pacific flooded. The comma ten times, the usual amount of rain fell turning some of the driest parts of the desert into lagoons, but the desert's hardy microbial life didn't exactly burst into bloom looking at it microscope. I couldn't see anything. So what does Jesus pricing? I was expecting to assume two things moving all around. Round. But it could see anything in fact after sampling three of the newly submerged areas his team found only a quarter of the microscopic species they'd previously isolated in the desert region. Perhaps he says because the water killed the rest through a process called as Modig shock. So it doesn't have the mechanisms to get all the water that is going to sell to to get it out. So they start inflicting small anti burst out. Their results are in the journal scientific reports the microbial massacres should serve as a cautionary tale. He says as we search for similar dry adopted lifeforms on Mars because several of the life detecting experiments performed by the Viking Landers involved. You guessed it, adding water, and it would be tragic if we killed the first extraterrestrial life we found. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd Yatta Yatta Chile Christopher Don Tacoma Astro Armindo sixty seconds
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata healthcare isn't just a benefit of the modern human age. It goes way back all the way even to the and earth. All's we imagine that they will have been cleaning wounds, dressing wounds, penny spike, ins, a paleolithic, archaeologist at the university of York in the UK. They may have used things like splints when you've got sort of broken limbs. We know they had some forms painkillers and they most likely needed him because remains of Neanderthals show that most individuals seem to have suffered a serious injury, at least once the key detail being that those injuries didn't always kill them. Spike inner team catalogued more than thirty cases of Neanderthals who'd been injured but didn't die of their wounds to investigate the pattern of healthcare in pre modern humans, and they concluded that healthcare may have been key to Nandor falls colonizing extreme environments and pursuing dangerous prey like mammoths and woolly. Rhinos house guy wasn't just. Something cultural finance towels. It also performed an ecological function. It allows them to punch above their weight as a predator. Their conclusions are in the journal quaternary science reviews, and the results are just one more reminder that Nandor shared many of the qualities we think of as uniquely human, except, of course that they never made it out of the place to seat. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Christopher Dodd Nandor falls quaternary science Christopher Don Nandor painkillers university of York UK sixty seconds
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata last summer's total solar eclipse sliced, right through Columbia, Missouri. It was remarkable as a biologist. I generally reserved that word remarkable for biological phenomena. Candice Gaylon is based at the university of Missouri in Columbia and being a biologist. She thought, why not use this astronomical phenomenon to study a biological one specifically as the skies darkened would daytime pollinators like bumblebees and honeybees colleague quits what better activity during clips and go out with record or record the bees. So Gaylon s. four hundred citizens scientists including young students to place audio recorders in sixteen flower patches along the path of totality in Oregon, Idaho and Missouri when they analyze the audio, they've found that during partial eclipse be buzzing, continue. But win totality hit. The bees went silent. And only the conversational buzz of human observers could be hurt. Then as the moon passed and the sun again lit up the sky, the bees regained their buzz. Four right up is in the annals of the animal logical society of America. Gaylon and her colleagues did notice one strange detail. The individual buzzes lasted longer than normal during the partial eclipse periods. Perhaps Keelan says because the bees were flying more slowly to navigate darker conditions, or maybe they were just returning to their nests thinking the day was through. It's hard to tell from the recording. She says, which is why come the next American total solar eclipse in twenty twenty four. She'll be back out listening. Once again, Mike, you reacted he's never satisfied. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Candice Gaylon Keelan Missouri Christopher Dodd Columbia university of Missouri Christopher Don Mike America Oregon Idaho sixty seconds
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata every year. Twenty million tons of salt are dumped on roads and highways across the US to eliminate ace and airlines spray up to a thousand gallons of antifreeze on anyone plane to Diaz it by now, scientists have come up with what might be a more environmentally friendly alternative. We've often heard the expression is time to fight fire with fire wiping. Now it's time to ice with ice Jonathan burrito. Studies, fluid mechanics had Virginia Tech and what he means by that is if I, if growth is inevitable, why not design certain areas of plane wings or roads or h fact systems specifically to attract ice to control the chaos and keep ice forming moisture away from the rest of the surface. In other words, use is itself as antifreeze to test that idea. He and his team used lasers to get tiny grooves into aluminum surfaces. Those grooves once filled with water and frozen. Turned into tiny stripes of ice which indeed kept the rest of the surface eighty to ninety percent frost free, even an incredibly humid cold air was happening as the ice striped areas are just so attractive to the moisture, but kind of tractor beams all the moisture that is going toward the surface kind of tractor beams at toward the stripe regions. Cref horrendously such stop the intermediate areas if you design at right, just stay completely dry. He can find the results in some cool time lapse videos in the journal ACS Applied Materials and interfaces Brecqhou and his team have already patented the tech if it proves viable after more RND might make our wintertime fight against frost, allowed more environmentally friendly. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Virginia Tech Christopher Dodd Christopher Don US ACS Applied Materials Diaz Brecqhou sixty seconds Twenty million tons thousand gallons ninety percent
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata homo. Sapiens are nowhere near the fastest runners in the animal kingdom, but what we lack in speed, we make up for in endurance and we're specially equipped to go the distance. We've got bigger but muscles than other primates we lost most of our for two and sprouted lots of sweat glands tau bus cool off scientists believe our endurance running abilities began to appear to three million years ago around the time. The genus homo came about and a new study suggests that a mutation in one key gene had something to do with it. The mutation in what's called the c. m. AH gene, altered the types of sugar molecules. The decorate the surfaces of every cell in our bodies which in turn may have made our muscles less prone to fatigue. Researchers have now found that mice spread with that same, you take action can run longer without tiring compared to regular mice and mice with gene alteration also logged more miles running on their. We. Heels apparently for fun, and they had more capillaries in their back leg muscles which would increase the delivery of nutrients and oxygen. During endurance exercise, the complete stats are in the proceedings of the Royal Society b. It's unclear if this small genetic, tweak endows humans with the same benefits as the mice. But if it does could help explain how early humans got a leg up on their competitors for really to lakes. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Christopher Dodd Christopher Don Royal Society c. m sixty seconds three million years
"christopher don" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"christopher don" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Swearing, at four and then del Potrero the number three seed. Against for DASS go at six. Tomorrow's feature match pitch number two Federer against the talented but way over the top enigmatic Nick. Curious about stralia Federer advanced yesterday in straight-sets walk curious lost. The first set to air bear from France. Was down to five in the second and clearly not trying when. The chair on pyre step down to the court to talk with them for, about a minute during, the break asking if. He were okay trying to pep him up curious rebounded immediately After and won the match, in four sets federal was watching umpires role to, go down from the chair but I get. To what he was trying to do he behaves the way he behaves and then you as an empire to don't go and speak like that it was not just about how you feeling not, feeling so well I go, back to jail was there, for too long Compensation conversations can change your mindset, so. So that's why won't happen again from Roger Federer to. Christopher Don ESPN it was interesting that, he didn't talk from up in the empire STAN he got down right level with Nick and had a heart to heart and after that the whole match changed around. I wouldn't be very happy if I was his opponent you don't you don't. Wanna be seeing. This happening all the time especially we've seen this with Nick when he's not trying it. He's the, greatest guy off the court but he has like he just fights with himself and, he, doesn't always, give one hundred percent air bear who lost the match, said that was not the umpires job he. Should stay in the chair and he should be sanctioned as a result. Here's John McEnroe I completely could see where he'd be frustrated, particularly when he ends up losing the Mets I mean. It's a bad look all around, and hopefully something will change where they just say look your default that. If you don't give an effort from the beginning this has, been, going on for years this. This isn't the first time That this has happened this is like the twenty fifth time with Nick curios the US Open's. Referee in chief umpire were reviewing what happened yesterday as was the. Grand, slam board well stand it's great for ratings I'll be watching stir the..

Nick Roger Federer Christopher Don ESPN Mets John McEnroe France US one hundred percent twenty fifth
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"What's that one language? You've always wanted to learn a spaniel Francais deutscher. Well with Babel, you can be speaking your new language within weeks. The lessons are designed to get you speaking confidently and actually remember what you learn. That's what makes it the number one selling language learning app in the world. Go to babble dot com. That's be a BB l. dot com and use offer code curious to get fifty percent off your first three months that's offer code curious, bay spite. This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. When you burn your tongue or cut your cheek, the pain can be intense, but the wound heals pretty quickly compared to injuries elsewhere. That's because all the factors needed to repair a wound or ready to jump into action in world tissue, because a new study shows that proteins called transcription factors which control all those healing elements are present at greater levels in the mouth. You can think of those controlling proteins as theater directors and the healing factors are the actors waiting in the wings. They are ready to go right on the sidelines and the or the Thelia. So the director says, come ahead and then they're just right. Onstage Reimer, ASO, a senior investigator at the national institutes of health. She says that's not the case in regular skin tissue. They have the capability of coming on stage, but they're nowhere close. So you have to go through that step of getting them into stay. Age to be able to go ahead with a function which delays healing. It might be difficult to have the play finished on time and according to the script. Studies in the journal science, translational medicine morass oh, her colleagues also tested this idea by genetically engineering mice to have more of those factors, the directors in their regular skin tissue and sure enough those mice head significantly faster skin wound healing than did control mice, but we can't genetically engineered humans. Instead Meralco says, if we can learn more about who the healing actors are, then perhaps we can find targeted ways of sending those individuals on stage to deliver a better performance for patients. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata director Reimer Christopher Don Thelia investigator Meralco sixty seconds fifty percent three months
"christopher don" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"christopher don" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"You know that is the sixty four million dollar question how did they do it but what's justice important is why did they do it true you're talking moving two point three million stones and historians and egyptologists today say that they did it in twenty years they had to do it in twenty years because it was the burial chamber of kufour who was sometimes notice to yachts well but did he have a identity crisis didn't know who he was you know what other ferro was known by two different names ramsey's you know comment cannot and you can go through the list and it's very hard to find that type of problem with all their the fair yeah so i would say that this was two different people was the architect and the other was the engineer the created whatever that we see is left the skeletal remains of the machine that was once the great pyramid giza you just said machine tell me about that i did a lot of study of chris done lisa was a power plant and there are many different aspects of this like it could have been a microwave generator i believe that it had something to do with sound and christopher don did a lot of work on sound technology and just how the sound travels throughout the great pyramid now an interesting standpoint is that the lower chambers of the subterranean chambers of the great pyramid show significant water damage to the roof of those chambers well they also are able to recreate those passageways to create a ram comp now ram pomp will pump water without the need of a mechanical device wanted crime it continues to pump water so here's this pumping action coming up from the bottom which you know underneath the great pyramid is huge aquifer so there's many many passages of water underneath it if were a power plant what were they using the power four th they have saws and light bulbs and things like that well we're talking electrcity we're talking electric as far as i can see we can seize and modern day examples of what the great great pyramid could have been in the tesla's work with warden cliff power the tesla coils warden cliff itself was over an aquifer and so there's a lot of similarities between the the two aspects there's so much that was missing and like like i.

kufour ferro engineer chris lisa tesla ramsey christopher don twenty years sixty four million dollar three million stones
"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"christopher don" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Whip worm is a parasite that infects half a billion people around the world. It lives in the gut burying its head in the large intestine causing symptoms like nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea. But the worms place residents also reveals a potential weakness. The parasite needs to steal some of our own gut bacteria to thrive Tykes from the host and then Benz it. It seems to generate a population which suits itself. Richard Grenz is an immuno parasitology at the university of Manchester in UK. They have bacteria than they survive if they don't have to. They didn't survive Greenwich and his team studied that phenomenon in mice. Because yes, there's a type of whip worm adapted to them too. And they found that when whip worms hatch, they acquire a fresh microbiome derived from the hosts owned microbiome, but with different proportions of species. Without that host contribution the worms die. But the worms also induced changes in the hosts microbial tweaking it. So the gut is no longer hospitable to hatching to ask. Well, that seems a little bit dogs because maybe the parasite wants to have more of it establishing rather than less. But here's the catch going hatching spree. And the host's immune system's going to take notice and kick all the worms out if the eggs don't hatch is effectively because the pass I'ts all to the good. You don't get as many new whims coming in. So you delay the process of host, immunity being acquired, and then expelling the parasite. So it's a strategy that might have evolved to help perpetuate the life of the parasite. So it could stay that a bit longer. You can find the results in the journal science advances. Greenwich says the findings might someday lead to away to selectively target the worms so that whip worms, no longer mooch off us or our microbes. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Tykes Christopher Dodd Yata Greenwich Christopher Don Richard Grenz nausea university of Manchester UK abdominal pain sixty seconds