35 Burst results for "Christopher Dodd"

How some doctors ended up prescribing fewer pills

60-Second Science

02:03 min | 9 months ago

How some doctors ended up prescribing fewer pills

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata used to be when doctors prescribe a drug. They'd open up a a book summarizing drugs and dosages or go by memory for the common stuff but nowadays now you can type in whatever it is and then placing an order via computer. See you type in an order of the name of the drug. And it will pre populate everything one Carlos Monte as an emergency medicine physician at San Francisco General Hospital. He also studies decision making in healthcare. He says for an antibiotic default dose programmed into a doctor's computer might be pretty standard but for pain. The the number of opioids prescribed might vary a lot depending on the patient and their type of pain. Well we wanted to look at is whether and to what extent the precepts the default upsetting that we had in the electric medical record influence provider prescribing specifically would lower defaults resulting fewer opioids being prescribed. Soman toys team systematically changed the recommended opioid pill number defaults in the computer systems of two hospitals in the San Francisco Bay area during an eight month period rid. Each hospital's pre existing defaults were twelve and twenty pills respectively. The researchers dialed in new defaults of five ten fifteen or an unspecified number of pills compared to doctors prior prescribing habits. The new default settings resulted in fewer opioid pills prescribed overall and fewer prescriptions shins exceeding the maximum recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. So this is suggestive that hospitals other departments clinics can change the setting England impact opioid prescribing. Pretty much immediately as the really low constantly prevention and can be done really quickly. The results are in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Russian internal medicine. Definitely not a silver bullet. The epidemic has a lot of different issues that need to be addressed in this one small tool so that we can use to address. There still could be a useful prescription for physicians.

Carlos Monte Centers For Disease Control An Christopher Dodd San Francisco General Hospital San Francisco Bay Yata Soman England Journal Of The American Medica
Marine Mammal Epidemic Linked to Climate Change

60-Second Science

02:31 min | 1 year ago

Marine Mammal Epidemic Linked to Climate Change

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata the Arctic because warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet meaning more and more sea ice is melting every year concerning the rapid loss of see I sat there for a lot of reasons. Tracy Z Goldstein. A researcher and conservationist at UC Davis she says one of those reasons is animals like ice seals. Need the ice to haul out on and give birth and other reason. As the Arctic warms the fish the seals eat maybe moving to deeper and colder waters so the seals have to travel further to hunt them for the combination of all of that over time is probably going to affect their health and their body condition and that will make them not just underweight but also more susceptible to diseases diseases may also be encroaching the upon Arctic marine mammals because spotting a trend here Arctic sea ice is melting coli unintended consequence of all of that but yes You know when they I used to be an ice bridge certain populations would remain separate from each other and so they couldn't come in contact and give each other they bacteria viruses etc but once those channels thought it to open animals were able to move further and came into contact with new species that they had not come in. Contact with in the Post Goldstein. In her colleagues documented the spread of a disease called called fo seen distemper virus from two thousand one through two thousand sixteen. It's related to the measles and causes skin lesions coughing pneumonia seizures and sometimes death in in marine mammals Goldstein's team scanned historical and Contemporary Marine Mammal blood samples for antibodies against the virus. They also hunted for evidence of live infections nasal swabs taken of mammals and they found that flare ups of the virus were linked to years with extreme losses. NCI's suggesting that open waters. Aided the spread of the pathogen perhaps along the melted coastline north of Siberia. Their analysis is in the journal scientific reports mammals that depend on ice to survive may already be slated for extinction and as the Arctic melts. Goldstein says in more frequent epidemics like this viral one could hastened the blow but humans may also be affected up in the Arctic. People subsist subsist on these species so they really rely on these animals for their livelihood and wellbeing and as those animals disappear as their habitat disappears. That's is also going to heavily affect humans in that area so overall I think overall health of the environment and the animals and the people up in the Arctic over time it's just going to continue to deteriorate

Tracy Z Goldstein Arctic Researcher Christopher Dodd Underweight Uc Davis NCI Sixty Seconds
Tiny Worms Are Equipped To Battle Extreme Environments

60-Second Science

02:47 min | 1 year ago

Tiny Worms Are Equipped To Battle Extreme Environments

"At Toyota we believe that American veterans have the strongest credentials on earth especially when you consider that they spend years gaining valuable experience by putting their lives on the line to protect the country they love and the people that live here but that doesn't always mean finding a career path is easy. That's why Toyota has partnered with hiring our as Europe's to help over one hundred fifty thousand veterans and military spouses connect with employment opportunities. We are Toyota. USA. This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata in the science. It's fiction story June. The Desert Planet Iraq is inhabited by enormous fearsome sandwich shops they blast out of the dunes to swallow vehicles the whole they also look familiar to Caltech geneticists Paul Sternberg. We look like nats anything in pop culture has relationship doors. We follow nematodes toads of course are much smaller than sand worms most never told you can just barely see and there are a lot slower these worms are probably take one hundred years to get across the US if they could could do it and they went continuously day and night even so they're pretty scary when you look at them up close. Sternberg and his colleagues had a hunch they might find nematodes lurking in one of California's most extreme extreme habitats Mono Lake on the east side of the Sierra Nevada it super salty alkaline and loaded with arsenic and previously known to harbor only two animal species easies brine shrimp and Alkali flies so the researchers took soil samples at beaches around the lake and indeed they found eight species of nematodes living there so we just I went from two animals to at least ten species so that's Kinda striking so are they going to be others the lake yeah people should go look photos and details are in the journal current Biology Sternberg. His colleagues were able to culture one of the worm species in the lab and they discovered it could survive five hundred times the dose of arsenic they would kill a human but they also found that even nemo toads that weren't from Mona Lake seemed to have the genetic ability to resist the lethal element meaning. The worms may be Natural Boron extrema files us from the worms perspective invading a host. That's a harsh environment so I think there's some general ability than Emma toads to adapt to harsh environments like Doc. Maybe Mars I have a fantasy that we should send Amadou's. We really interesting. He could get the codes to photosynthesis or carry photosynthetic organisms and then worth talking about of course that's scenarios in the realm of science fiction for now. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dunya.

Toyota Paul Sternberg Mono Lake Christopher Dodd Yata Mona Lake Journal Current Biology Sternb Christopher Dunya Europe United States Amadou Usa. Emma Sierra Nevada California Sixty Seconds One Hundred Years
Corals Can Inherit Symbiotic Adaptations to Warming

60-Second Science

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Corals Can Inherit Symbiotic Adaptations to Warming

"Komo Alicia Burke host of that made all the difference a new podcast from Bank of America join me as I talked to Ken Burns about the moments that inspired his work as a documentary dementri filmmaker. You can find that made all the difference anywhere you get your podcasts. This is scientific civic. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata Marine Heatwave in two thousand sixteen killed off a full third of Australia's Great Barrier Reef the largest coral reef system in the world and it's terrible watching your favorite ecosystems slowly. Di Carli can't go is a marine biologist at the University of Southern California Nia who's studied that coral bleaching event bleaching occurs when the waters around corals become too cold or too salty or too hot but mostly too hot and then the symbiotic algae that live inside corals which are photosynthetic food factories abandoned the coral which causes them to die because they're losing their nutritional source so they're essentially starving to death but coral can house multiple species of algae some more heat tolerant than others so sometimes in the face of stress the heartier algae proliferate delivery and that change offsets the damage caused by the exodus of the more sensitive species have processes called shuffling chemical in her colleagues studied shuffling in corals roles affected by the two thousand sixteen bleaching bet on the Great Barrier Reef and they found that adult corals can actually pass those reshuffled. Al Go residents along to their offspring in in their eggs pointing to a possible way. Successive generations of coral could adapt to warmer waters. If your mom can kind of crime you for the environment that you might be experiencing presumably would improve your fitness. The details are in the journal scientific reports so can this help corals beat back bleaching the pace of climate change and the frequency and intensity of the stress events is such that I don't think this is enough in face of so many threats. Even this trick may fail to provide relief for the reef. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Indonesia.

Great Barrier Reef Christopher Dodd Alicia Burke Ken Burns Christopher Indonesia Di Carli Bank Of America University Of Southern Califor Australia Sixty Seconds
Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

60-Second Science

02:20 min | 1 year ago

Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Documentaries are known for their sweeping natural vistas. This does their amazing footage seriously. How did they get that shot in often soothing baritone of Sir David attenborough strain incontinent what those documentaries don't do though is show the realities of environmental destruction historically particularly BBC documentaries have shied away from that Nikki Rust is an environmental social scientist at Newcastle University in the UK Russ studied work by the BBC in the World Wildlife Fund which had teamed up with Netflix to make what they said would be a whole new kind of production. They wanted it to reach. I think a billion people and that it was going to revolutionize nature documentaries except for the fact it may be that attenborough would be the narrator the Netflix series our planet aim to be different because it promised to reveal the threats facing wildlife in the natural world so did it deliver liver rust and her colleagues analyzed scripts of our planet along with three recent. BBC Series Planet Earth to Pimple Dynasties Twenty into hyenas and Blue Planet to spider cramps and logged everything they saw on the screen turns out planet only talks about threats and successes successes a bit more than Blue Planet to fifteen percent of the script did focus on the woes of the natural world but very little devastation was actually shown on screen. The spite being filmed the analysis is in the Journal people in nature. The lead author of the Study Julia Jones was in Madagascar at the time where net that flicks were there filming and she knows that they were there filming the destruction of Habitat and burning and lots of mental devastation so they've got fatigue is just unfortunately it wasn't chosen to be included. It's not clear if that's really a bad thing. Though we still don't really know whether showing environmental tragedies on screen green motivates people to support conservation but what climate change communication has taught us. Ross says is that the ideal way to motivate audiences is with optimism tinged with trepidation. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata BBC David Attenborough Netflix World Wildlife Fund Nikki Rust Julia Jones Attenborough Cramps Newcastle University Ross Scientist Russ UK Madagascar Sixty Seconds Fifteen Percent
Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

60-Second Science

02:21 min | 1 year ago

Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata seems like anytime you see a squirrel. It's busy doing something pink headed somewhere scrounging for food and being out in about all the time also means era tasty morsels for a lot of different predators. Keith target a behavioral ecologist at at Overland College. He says squirrels scan their surroundings for hawks and owls cats and foxes but they also have another surveillance system. They eavesdrop on nearby. Birds BIRT's eavesdropping on alarm calls or eavesdropping on chatter is a cheap and easy way to supplement the information that they have access to because it's free it's produced by other individuals in the environment. It's publicly available to any organism that has the cognitive ability to recognize interpret that information tarvisio colleague Marie Lillie tested that ability by riding around town on her bicycle stopping when she found a squirrel then she'd set up her equipment play the fearsome fearsome scream of a red tailed hawk and then either play the casual unworried chatter of songbirds chiefs or ambient noise as a control all the while she observed the squirrels behavior and she noticed that when squirrels heard the reassuring chatter of songbirds following the Hawks doc scream they relaxed more readily. Imagine this if you're walking in a crowd and everyone seems pretty happy and content and they're chit chatting with beach other. You might even subconsciously take that as information that all of those eyes and ears apparently seem to perceive the environment as being safe and we think the squirrels might be listening in on bird chatter in the same way the details are in the journal plus one and squirrels give back to the community to with their own alarm calls which might help other eavesdropping animals but in busy urban environments Tara and says that rich fabric brick of animal communication risks being drowned out by the loudest animals around us. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds sites. I'm Christopher.

Hawks Christopher Dodd Yata Marie Lillie Overland College Keith Tara Sixty Seconds
Andrea Townsend, Christopher Don Yada And Christopher Dodd discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Andrea Townsend, Christopher Don Yada And Christopher Dodd discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm christopher dodd yada. Cholesterol affects one third of american adults but it's not just us studies have indicated they cholesterol is also on the rise in other animals and in all of these studies that idea was well they hypothesized that was probably due to interactions with people and eating our food but they didn't actually show that andrea townsend is an avian ecologist at hamilton college and upstate new york and and she found that crows did have higher cholesterol then rural crows but then she took the next logical step in her research she went to mcdonald's we'd pick up one hundred and twenty-five twenty five burgers at a time once one of them wanted to know what we needed all these burgers for and then i started to explain they just kind of waved me away halfway through so of course she needed all those cheeseburgers to feed the crows and to monitor their diet to determine if eating are fast food really does raise the birds cholesterol so the way you supplement your nestling is we'd go to their nest trees and we toss the cheeseburgers three a day predefine day under their trees and then the parents immediately swoop loop down pick up the burgers and bring them to the nestlings and as you might expect crows that dined on cheeseburgers did indeed have higher cholesterol than cros who did without but here's the surprising thing higher cholesterol didn't actually affect crowe's chances of survival over a three year period in one population birds with higher cholesterol were arguably googly in better condition than other crows meaning chubbier. Their results are in the journal. The condor crows can live more than fifteen years and townsend says maybe maybe a high cholesterol diet makes its mark later in life as humans and if you're still wondering why study this i would say this is an important question because there are are lots of other species that also live in urban areas and eat our food and some of them are endangered so it isn't important question how will our food affect the health of wild animals and as we urbanize more of the globe our dietary influence might have even wider effects as for townsend grows are known to be highly skilled it recognizing humans and she says the study made her a celebrity during the study especially when i was walking around the crews would follow me around campus. They often just just follow me around campus anyway they follow my car and then i was getting some notoriety on a broader scale with cros so i would go into getting gas and the crows on the gas station would be calling a special car. Yeah i think just for me and it seemed like a recognition call after after all a free lunch sure does seem like something to squawk about. Thanks for listening for scientific american sixty seconds science. I'm christopher don yada.

Andrea Townsend Christopher Don Yada Christopher Dodd Hamilton College New York Crowe Mcdonald Sixty Seconds Fifteen Years Three Year
Secrets of the Universe Trapped in Antarctic Snow

60-Second Science

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Secrets of the Universe Trapped in Antarctic Snow

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm christopher dodd yada. In the summer of two thousand fifteen strange delivery erupted opted munich germany twenty five boxes of still frozen snow sent all the way from antarctica the reason for shipping eleven hundred pounds of snow from the bottom. Some of the world scientists were hunting for interstellar dust which might hold clues about our place in the universe so i think scientists did was melt the snow and then filter sir it for fine particles analyzing the remaining dust with mass spectrometry they found traces of the isotope iron sixty which is primarily produced in two ways by exploding loading supernova or by cosmic rays zapping interplanetary dust but it's also produced in nuclear reactions here on earth by bombs or nuclear reactors so to determine how much of the stuff was truly interstellar from beyond our solar system. The researchers used other isotopic clues to screen out quantities of iron sixty produced by nuclear nuclear reactions in cosmic rays and they still had some iron sixty leftover to account for this stuff produced by supernova just looking at something which is on our own planet none something which is so far away in happening so many years ago. I mean that's pretty amazing. That's why i relapse lots for dominic coal experimental nuclear physicists at the australian national university his team reported the results in the journal physical review letters cole cole says this iron sixty might be showering down on us from the local interstellar cloud the patch of space the solar systems moving through right now and if the cloud contains material <unk> produced by supernova cole says it could be the ancient remnants of exploding stars included the structure and formation of the universe. Luckily we can investigate negate it all by hunting for dust right here on spaceship or thanks for listening for scientific american sixty seconds science. I'm christopher indonesia.

Cole Cole Christopher Dodd Christopher Indonesia Munich Germany Australian National University Physical Review Dominic Sixty Seconds Eleven Hundred Pounds
Artificial Intelligence Sniffs Out Unsafe Foods

60-Second Science

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Artificial Intelligence Sniffs Out Unsafe Foods

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm christopher dodd yata food and drug administration has to recall hundreds of foods is every year like cookie snack packs with chunks of blue plastic hiding inside or salmonella tainted taco seasoning or curry powder laced with lead he can take months before a recall is issued but now researchers have come up with a method that might fast track process leading to early detection and ultimately faster recalls the system relies on the fact that people increasingly by foods and spices online and people tend to write reviews of products they buy online which are like breadcrumbs to food safety officials sniffing out dangerous products. The researchers linked f._d._a. Food recalls from twenty twelve to twenty fourteen to amazon reviews of those same products they then train machine. Learning algorithms comes to differentiate between reviews for recalled items and reviews for items that had not been flagged and the trained algorithms rebel to predict f._d._a. Recalls three quarters of the time name the also identified another twenty thousand reviews for possibly unsafe foods most of which had never been recalled. The results are in the journal of the american medical informatics informatics association. The world health organization estimates that six hundred million people worldwide get sick annually from contaminated food and more than four hundred thousand people die from it so having tools that can enable us to detect. There's a lot of actor and hopefully investigated and <hes> do recalls faster would be useful not just in the u._s. Other countries around the wall show study author elaine and soya see of boston university. She did add one caveat. Even recalled hauled products can still get five star reviews so stars alone. Don't tell the whole sickening story. The proof and fortunately may still be in the pudding. Thanks for listening for scientific american sixty seconds science. I'm christopher indonesia.

Christopher Dodd Elaine Christopher Indonesia Salmonella Journal Of The American Medica Amazon Boston University Sixty Seconds Three Quarters
Stare Down Gulls to Avoid Lunch Loss

60-Second Science

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Stare Down Gulls to Avoid Lunch Loss

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds sites. I'm christopher dodd yata. No trip to the beach would be complete without a swarm of hungry goals but don't get distracted because one of those goals may soon go after your food. There's a very small proportion russian of extremely bold individuals that seem to ruin the reputation of the whole species notre bogert animal behavior researcher at the university of exeter. She studied the food snatching habits of goals in seaside towns in the southern u._k. And she found that very few only the boldest would actually take the bait or make that the the bite the experiment went like this a researcher crouch near goal and then sat out a plastic bag of french fries for those brave goals that then started to approach. The researcher either stared straight at the goal as in i._c._u. Thief or the researchers simply looked away and it turns out staring down the gulls made them hesitate twenty one seconds on average bridge before approaching the fries. The results are in the journal biology. Letters and goals aren't the only ones who behave better when being watched a two thousand six study found that people paid three times as much for their drinks at an unintended honor system coffee bar when just an image of staring eyes was displayed nearby as for the gulls gobert points out that we need to learn to live with them because the particular species she studied the herring gull is on the u._k.'s red list of birds of conservation concern. The thing is people. Don't want to have a seaside holiday without goals there so it's just finding ways to harmoniously live with one of the only wildlife species we still have around in these coastal areas so don't turn back on the goals she says both figuratively for conserving the species and of course literally for conserving. Thanks for listening for scientific american sixty seconds science. I'm christopher dodd yada.

Researcher Christopher Dodd University Of Exeter U._K Crouch I._C._U Sixty Seconds Twenty One Seconds
London Crawling with Drug-Resistant Microbes

60-Second Science

01:34 min | 1 year ago

London Crawling with Drug-Resistant Microbes

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. If you're a Germaphobe navigating the city there are certain certain mandatory rules of engagement use a paper towel to shield your hand as you touch the bathroom door handle lift toilet seat covers with your shoe touch buttons at A._T._M.'s and crosswalks awesome walks in elevators with a knuckle. The back of your hand never a fingertip. I know this because I am that person and a new study in the journal scientific reports somewhat justifies is my behavior because when researchers in London sampled all those kinds of surfaces in public shopping centers and train stations and common areas in hospitals what they found was a whole a lot of antibiotic resistant bacteria lurking there scientists swab sites all over London and ended up with six hundred samples of staphylococcus bacteria of those nearly half were resistant to two or more commonly used antibiotics like penicillin and Erythromycin and the hospital samples had significantly more drug doug resistant microbes which makes sense because hospitals are a place where they use a lot of antibiotics but if there is a silver lining here it might be how few staph bacteria were multi-drug-resistant drug-resistant in public places a mere forty seven percent because a few years back one in the same scientists swabbed London hotel rooms in found that eighty six percent percent of the staph bacteria. There were multi-drug-resistant which may not help you sleep easy. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata Staph London Germaphobe Penicillin Erythromycin A._T._M. Sixty Seconds Forty Seven Percent Eighty Six Percent
Male Black Widows Poach Rivals' Approaches

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Male Black Widows Poach Rivals' Approaches

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata for male black widow spiders. Finding a mate is risky risky business. They have to go on an epic journey. Catherine Scott in Iraq knowledge EST at the University of Toronto. If the population she studies on Canada's Vancouver Hoover Island she says the spiders only twelve percent chance of surviving their scramble over sand dunes implants and they have very poor eyesight and their traveling at night so one way males find females is by sniffing from afar the fair Ramon perfume on their webs but Scott has now discovered an alternative way males find mates by subjecting the spiders to a race for each male before he started. We weighed him in on a tiny scale and we painted him with racing stripes and measured the length of his his legs. We had a finish line of fairmount omitting females and we released males at various distances from those females to see whether they arrived out of females. Weber not and how fast they got their what suppressor was at the males that started farthest nearly two hundred feet away actually traveled fastest towards females else and the reason they poached the pads of their rivals. WHO's been continuous. Soak drag lines as they move. These spiders are much more adept at walking and running on silk than they are on the ground so we realized that maybe the males that we released far away from the females were encountering. These silk highways left by rival males else and running along them. The details are in the proceedings of the Royal Society. B and follow up experiments in the lab confirmed that male black widows are indeed willing to risk a run in with a rival to win a chance to pass on their genes a chance that makes it worth traveling along the Silk Road. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Indonesia.

Catherine Scott Christopher Dodd Yata Silk Road Christopher Indonesia Vancouver Hoover Island Iraq University Of Toronto Royal Society Weber Ramon Canada Sixty Seconds Two Hundred Feet Twelve Percent
Tourist Photos Help African Wildlife Census

60-Second Science

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Tourist Photos Help African Wildlife Census

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Tracking wildlife is a tough job. Take the case of a one eared leopard named Pavarotti for this guy. A very very big beautiful mail and you had a very very deep deep roar and so the end after Roy Kassim Rafique a wildlife biologist at Liverpool John Moores University so you see the crack of dawn and I would find his tracks. You know it's always tracks and try and find him. One day I went out and I was looking for and it tracks to offer ordered through this like woodland area and before you knew it the wheel of his Land Rover was stuck in a warthog burrow. He wasted several. Several hours getting it out and then on the way back to camp he bumped into some local tour guides in their safari guests who'd had way better luck spotting Pavarotti and basically they laughed and they told me that morning Rafique then realized that tourist wildlife sightings might be. UNTAPPED source of information about wild animals so he and his team worked with a Safari Lodge in Botswana to analyze twenty five thousand tourists photographs of wildlife. They use those as sightings of lions spotted Hyenas Leopards Cheetahs and wild dogs. Dogs they then compared those data to the estimates they made with traditional wildlife biology tactics stuff like camera traps and track surveys and Colin stations where they play sounds of distrust animals in the middle of the night and see who pops by it turned turned out that the estimates from tourist photos were just as good as those gleaned from traditional methods and the tourists were actually the only ones to see elusive cheetahs. The researchers would have missed the cats without the citizen science data. The results are in the journal current biology.

Roy Kassim Rafique Pavarotti Christopher Dodd Yata Liverpool John Moores Universi Land Rover Colin Botswana Sixty Seconds One Day
One Small Scoop, One Giant Impact for Mankind

60-Second Science

04:19 min | 1 year ago

One Small Scoop, One Giant Impact for Mankind

"Have you ever wanted to speak another language. Whether you want to speak Spanish French or German Babbel's ten to fifteen minute lessons can get you speaking confidently and your new language within weeks babble spaced repetition method gradually build your language skills so so you intuitively remember what you've learned. No wonder battle is the number one selling language learning APP in the world. Try BABBLE FOR FREE GO TO BABBLE DOT com or download the APP. That's Babbel B. A. B. L. DOT com or download the BABBLE APP to try for free. This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. The Apollo missions brought back eight hundred forty two pounds of Rock and soil from the Moon nearly early twenty two hundred different samples but there's one sample that planetary scientists monoxide Wadhwa says is the most interesting of all Apollo one zero zero eight five Neil Armstrong collected it on Apollo Eleven. He was about to step back into the lunar module and. He turned around and just he had this rocks and he saw little spaces and there and he knew that these geologists on earth would be just so excited to study these materials just scooped up. I think nine scoops of soil that he put into the box six and it became one of the most well-studied samples of the Apollo mission she says geologist named John would at the Smithsonian noticed white flex of rock in the soil which he identified as Iraq type called a north of site and include him into the Moon's ancient past and this casinos quite a leap of imagination but he proposed that the whole of the moon had at one time in the past somewhere close to four and a half billion years ago been almost covered with a global magma ocean ocean of lava and so this was a revolutionary idea at the time because people had thought that the moon had formed cold and so it completely changed their idea about how the moon farmed how the terrestrial planets form like the Earth is well. You know really changed a lot about our. Our understanding of planetary science but WADHWA has a second and more personal reason to appreciate this sample. I met my husband because of this rock. My husband is Scott Parazynski. He was with NASA as an astronaut for seventeen seventeen years from nine hundred ninety two two thousand nine and after his retirement from NASA he actually he's a mountaineer as well and he had always aspired to climb Mount Everest Scott's boyhood heroes were Neil Armstrong and the climber Edmund Hillary who made the first confirmed affirmed incentive Everest with his partner tenzing norgay in honor of them he wanted to take a moon rock from Apollo eleven to the top of Everest and to bring back and never some rock at the time Wadhwa was the chair of the NASA committee that grants access to the samples for scientific purposes but this request she says was definitely out of the ordinary and I just remember it because it was a really funny discussion the committee hey what happens if that moon rockfalls Donna Crevasse you know and and not that race Scott would be. Going Down with them with that moon rock of but Scott made it to the top Wadhwa never met him and moved on from the lunar sample committee but then a year or two later she saw a friend suggestion pop up on facebook. You might know Scott Parazynski and I respect took said hey how did your expedition go and did you return the moon rock to NASA and he sent me this note back saying well. Actually I didn't send the Moon Rock back to NASA. I actually sent it to the International Space Station along with an ever summit rock and if you ever happened to be in Houston I would love to meet you and thank you for making that possible and so I happened to meet him and that was that I was that that's how we met and so Neil Armstrong's last minute scoop of moon-dust brought to people together here on earth and upturned our understanding of how the moon and the earth itself got here. There's something in there about one small scoop for A.

Neil Armstrong Moon Rock Scott Parazynski Wadhwa Nasa Apollo Eleven Babbel B. A. B. Christopher Dodd Yata Geologist Mount Everest Everest Tenzing Norgay Facebook John Edmund Hillary International Space Station Houston Iraq Donna Crevasse Partner
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yada it straight out of a horror movie. An aunt infected with a fungus starts behaving strangely it crawls his high as it can in the forest grabs elite for twig in its mouth and bites hard enters into this death. Grip phenotype is what we call it colleen mangled molecular biologist at Penn State and a couple of hours after initiation of that behavior the ant will die the fungus known in his office quarter steps then each through the corpse and sprouts a stock from the ants body to release more spores and infect more aunts. It's a harsh way to go. It's not ideal definitely not ideal mangled in her colleagues wanted to get to the bottom of why the ants. Let's do this specifically. How did they get their death grip so they dissect it infected Anson zoomed in on their jaw muscles with electron microscopes they saw that the fungus had invaded and grown into John Muscle cells perhaps to suck up nutrients and they spotted lots of mysterious mysterious tiny particles which might be produced by the ants immune system or by the fungus has away of communicating with the muscle and forcing it to contract whatever the mechanism they found that the ants jaw muscles had contracted so hard they'd been irreparably damaged?

Christopher Dodd colleen sixty seconds
Investigating the Zombie Ant's "Death Grip"

60-Second Science

01:44 min | 1 year ago

Investigating the Zombie Ant's "Death Grip"

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yada it straight out of a horror movie. An aunt infected with a fungus starts behaving strangely it crawls his high as it can in the forest grabs elite for twig in its mouth and bites hard enters into this death. Grip phenotype is what we call it colleen mangled molecular biologist at Penn State and a couple of hours after initiation of that behavior the ant will die the fungus known in his office quarter steps then each through the corpse and sprouts a stock from the ants body to release more spores and infect more aunts. It's a harsh way to go. It's not ideal definitely not ideal mangled in her colleagues wanted to get to the bottom of why the ants. Let's do this specifically. How did they get their death grip so they dissect it infected Anson zoomed in on their jaw muscles with electron microscopes they saw that the fungus had invaded and grown into John Muscle cells perhaps to suck up nutrients and they spotted lots of mysterious mysterious tiny particles which might be produced by the ants immune system or by the fungus has away of communicating with the muscle and forcing it to contract whatever the mechanism they found that the ants jaw muscles had contracted so hard they'd been irreparably damaged?

Christopher Dodd Colleen Sixty Seconds
Attractive Young Females May Have Justice Edge

60-Second Science

02:38 min | 1 year ago

Attractive Young Females May Have Justice Edge

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata eight years ago. The jury in the trial of Casey Anthony announced their verdict as to the charge of first degree murder verdict as to count one. We the jury find the defendant not guilty so say we all anthony had been charged with murdering her two year old daughter but like the murder charge the jury's decision for additional charges of aggravated child abuse and aggravated manslaughter. We're again guilty and that created this huge outcry Christopher Ferguson clinical psychologist at Stetson University in Central Florida not far from where the trial occurred. It was kind of like this narrative that you know she got preferential treatment maybe not on. Purpose but yeah so the jury was more sympathetic to her because she was this pretty young female and that kind of conflicted with people's impression of who a murderer as mock trial studies have. Suggested that attractive people have an edge in the criminal justice system so ferguson and his colleagues looked into that stereotype using data from the National Longitudinal Study of adolescent to adult health. The largest long-term study of people who began participating in the study as is teens the interviewers asked the youths a multitude of questions and also raided the respondents degree of attractiveness a measure. That's been used to examine links to health and wealth in this case Ferguson and his team looked at a subset of nearly eight hundred respondents. And examined the correlation between attractiveness and arrest conviction and sentencing after controlling for things like gender race and socioeconomic status they found that attractiveness did have a protective effect but only for females girls or women who are. are more attractive or less likely to be arrested if they had committed a crime and less likely to be convicted if they were arrested for that crime however it did not have any impact on their sentencing so once they were convicted. Attractiveness conveyed no further benefits the results are in the journal Psychiatry Psychology and law. It's just a correlation of course and there are limitations. The attractiveness ratings were an average of four different interviewers assessments made over a dozen years but beauty as they say is in the eyes of the beholder.

Christopher Ferguson Casey Anthony Aggravated Manslaughter Christopher Dodd Journal Psychiatry Psychology First Degree Murder Stetson University Murder Central Florida Sixty Seconds Eight Years Two Year
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yada when you walked with a backpack. You know how the stuff inside sways from side to side now. Scientists have figured out how to tap into that motion to generate electricity city. Here's how it works. Picture pendulum mounted to a backpack frame and stabilized with springs on either side. The packs weight is attached to the pendulum so the pendulum swings side to side as you walk gears then use that swinging motion to drive a generator and the generator spits out electrical current to charge a battery volunteers carried that pack while walking on a treadmill and they wore masks to measure the flow of oxygen and carbon dioxide walking with a slightly swaying twenty pound load device did not significantly affect volunteers. Here's metabolic rate compared to win. They carry the same weight fixed in place in fact the energy harvesting pack reduced the forces of acceleration they'd feel in a regular PAC which might mean greater comfort for a long hike and the device did produce a steady trickle of electricity the operative word being trickle because if you up the load to forty five pounds the passive motion of the pact could fully charge a Samsung Galaxy S. ten smartphone only after twelve hours on the trail. The details are in the journal Royal Society.

Christopher Dodd Samsung Royal Society forty five pounds sixty seconds twelve hours twenty pound
Backpack Harvests Energy As You Walk

60-Second Science

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Backpack Harvests Energy As You Walk

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yada when you walked with a backpack. You know how the stuff inside sways from side to side now. Scientists have figured out how to tap into that motion to generate electricity city. Here's how it works. Picture pendulum mounted to a backpack frame and stabilized with springs on either side. The packs weight is attached to the pendulum so the pendulum swings side to side as you walk gears then use that swinging motion to drive a generator and the generator spits out electrical current to charge a battery volunteers carried that pack while walking on a treadmill and they wore masks to measure the flow of oxygen and carbon dioxide walking with a slightly swaying twenty pound load device did not significantly affect volunteers. Here's metabolic rate compared to win. They carry the same weight fixed in place in fact the energy harvesting pack reduced the forces of acceleration they'd feel in a regular PAC which might mean greater comfort for a long hike and the device did produce a steady trickle of electricity the operative word being trickle because if you up the load to forty five pounds the passive motion of the pact could fully charge a Samsung Galaxy S. ten smartphone only after twelve hours on the trail. The details are in the journal Royal Society.

Christopher Dodd Samsung Royal Society Forty Five Pounds Sixty Seconds Twelve Hours Twenty Pound
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd if you attend science conferences, ever pay attention to who in the audience asked questions, geneticists Natalie, tell us did. And she noticed something off the entire first day of the conference. I was the only woman to ask a question, and I thought, wow, that's kind of weird. Right. So being a scientist she decided to systematically study who ask questions at scientific conferences together with colleagues at Stanford University where she was based at the time and others at Emory University in Atlanta, she recorded more than two thousand questions from hundreds of talks at eight different scientific conferences, after assigning, either male or female, designations to question asker, which the researchers acknowledging the paper doesn't fully capture the spectrum of gender identity. They found that women ask far fewer questions than Representative result based on their numbers. In fact, you need about eighty five two. Ninety percent of your room to be women before fifty percent of your questions. Come from women, but tell us did identify a possible solution halfway through the biology of genomes conference in two thousand fifteen tell us started tweeting, some of her preliminary findings about how few women had been asking questions compared to the relative numbers at the meeting that information sparked a public discussion and policy change from the conference organizers who instituted a new rule that the first question at every talk had to come from scientists still working towards her PHD in the hope that, that approach would produce a more diverse set of question asker, and it worked before our intervention about eleven percent of questions came from women, which is one third of what you'd expect after our intervention. You get more like thirty five percent of questions. Coming from women, it's actually what you'd expect from that audience, the analysis is in the American journal of human genetics and tell us says that strategy of simply publicizing the. Problem has been effective at other conferences to getting more women to not only attend, but to participate in scientific conferences, a lot of women have messaged me and said, oh, you know, I asked my first question at a conference when I saw this work or stuff like that. And I hope that, that means that people are taking advantage of that, incredible opportunity to really add their voice, not just their face in the conference photo to that scientific community. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Natalie Christopher Dodd scientist American journal of human gene Christopher Don Emory University Stanford University Atlanta Representative sixty seconds thirty five percent Ninety percent eleven percent fifty percent
Scientist Encourages Other Women Scientists to Make Themselves Heard

60-Second Science

02:36 min | 1 year ago

Scientist Encourages Other Women Scientists to Make Themselves Heard

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd if you attend science conferences, ever pay attention to who in the audience asked questions, geneticists Natalie, tell us did. And she noticed something off the entire first day of the conference. I was the only woman to ask a question, and I thought, wow, that's kind of weird. Right. So being a scientist she decided to systematically study who ask questions at scientific conferences together with colleagues at Stanford University where she was based at the time and others at Emory University in Atlanta, she recorded more than two thousand questions from hundreds of talks at eight different scientific conferences, after assigning, either male or female, designations to question asker, which the researchers acknowledging the paper doesn't fully capture the spectrum of gender identity. They found that women ask far fewer questions than Representative result based on their numbers. In fact, you need about eighty five two. Ninety percent of your room to be women before fifty percent of your questions. Come from women, but tell us did identify a possible solution halfway through the biology of genomes conference in two thousand fifteen tell us started tweeting, some of her preliminary findings about how few women had been asking questions compared to the relative numbers at the meeting that information sparked a public discussion and policy change from the conference organizers who instituted a new rule that the first question at every talk had to come from scientists still working towards her PHD in the hope that, that approach would produce a more diverse set of question asker, and it worked before our intervention about eleven percent of questions came from women, which is one third of what you'd expect after our intervention. You get more like thirty five percent of questions. Coming from women, it's actually what you'd expect from that audience, the analysis is in the American journal of human genetics and tell us says that strategy of simply publicizing the. Problem has been effective at other conferences to getting more women to not only attend, but to participate in scientific conferences, a lot of women have messaged me and said, oh, you know, I asked my first question at a conference when I saw this work or stuff like that. And I hope that, that means that people are taking advantage of that, incredible opportunity to really add their voice, not just their face in the conference photo to that scientific community. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Natalie Christopher Dodd Scientist American Journal Of Human Gene Christopher Don Emory University Stanford University Atlanta Representative Sixty Seconds Thirty Five Percent Ninety Percent Eleven Percent Fifty Percent
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. A lot about how what you eat will affect your microbiome. Probiotics prebiotics stuff like that. But your skin is swarming with microbes to and the grooming products, you use might affect what's living there? That's according to a study in the journal EMC biology further tests. Researchers recruited six men and six women, the volunteers left their skin alone for the first three weeks except for a light body wash and then for the next three weeks, the participants apply to modern skin-care arsenal. Sunscreen and skin lotion into perspiration and foot powder. Finally, the volunteers returned to their usual routine. Whatever it was each person for another three weeks throughout that time. The scientists swabbed volunteers faces in forearms, armpits and feet. And they did chemical in genetic analyses of the samples, the lotion, and sunscreen, did not appear to alter the microbiome, but they found counter-intuitively that the anti per sprint and foot powder, actually boosted the diversity of microbes in the armpits, and in between the toes. Perhaps, because those products change nutrient and moisture levels and thus create conditions that foster a wider variety of tiny occupants. The researchers also found that different skin care routines, altered, the types of hormones and fairmont's present on the subject skin. And they hypothesis that someday personalized skin-care recipes could be tailored to individuals to alter our Ramones in a systematic way thus making us more attractive to others or less attractive should anyone need to lessen their Kevorkian. This alert Rian word which means they're lure update on amoun-. Amoun-. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata Christopher Don EMC biology fairmont Rian three weeks sixty seconds
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata on July. Twentieth. Nineteen sixty-nine humankind. Finally, set foot on the surface of the moon fifty years later, a big mystery remains how the heck the moon got there in the first place for decades the thinking on that has been that four and a half billion years ago, a Mars sized proto-planets smashed into the earth when the dust settled our moon remained forged from the debris of earth and that other object. The problem is as scientists have taken more and more precise isotopic measurements of the moon. They've found that it's nearly identical in composition to the earth. Not some other object a problem that I've been advertising as a nice topic crisis. Jamie Losch studies planetary impacts at Purdue University. Now, he says a new theory in the journal nature geoscience may at least point to away out of that isotopic crisis of the moons. Chemical isotopes so closely resembling earth's here's the idea. The authors a team of Japanese scientists right that maybe in those early days of the solar system. The earth was sloshing with oceans of magma, then when the Mars sized objects slammed into those Moulton seas their models predict a lot more earth derived material gets injected into orbit in the form of scorching vapors temperatures of tens of thousands of degrees. And so that expands at speeds that exceed the escape velocity of the earth, and in that way, injects material into orbit around the earth that material rapidly coalescence and bingo you've got a moon. Malaysia says there are still a few kinks to work out in the scenario. Still. He says it's a step forward. Think of it as a major clue in a murder mystery or something like that it could be true clue toward the answer. Could be of the -ception. We don't know yet. So it could be that we Nastro naught started walking on the moon and a half century ago. They were really leaving footprints on the remains of the primordial earth. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd Christopher Don Jamie Losch Purdue University Malaysia murder sixty seconds billion years fifty years
"christopher dodd" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Everyone's child an overflow crowd of more than five hundred gathering to support the family of seven year old jasmine bars the event a fundraiser for the family, but another purpose. Organizers say is even more important keeping Jasmine's death on people's minds. The father of a missing eight month old boy in San Antonio, Texas has been arrested and police are looking for a female suspect in the case police chief William McManus, the family is not cooperating as is the father Christopher Dodd Bula, not cooperating the father left the car running with the child inside and went to buy water at a gas station leaving the door open. Police say a woman walked by hopped into the driver's seat. And drove off there are worries over the safety of groundwater near military bases in Georgia. Due to a toxic firefighting foam used by the us air force recent test at the state's three airbases show extensive environmental contamination. The air force says Georgia's drinking water is safe. But experts and residents don't really believe that this is CBS news national mortgage lender. Quicken Loans apply simply understand fully mortgage confidently. Licensed in all fifty states equal housing lender. NMLS number thirty thirty. Hey guys can hear from the hip hide cast today's growth who would win a three mile bicycle race in eleven year old girl or last year's winner of the tour de France. It all depends on the bicycle it depends on their vehicle both on a ten speed in the pro racers gonna win every time but put the race around a tricycle in the eleven year old wins every time you see. It's not the driver. It's the vehicle when it comes to generating revenue. It's exactly the same. If you have a job or a.

Jasmine Georgia Christopher Dodd Bula us William McManus CBS San Antonio Texas eleven year eight month seven year
"christopher dodd" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Is everyone's child an overflow crowd of more than five hundred gathering to support the family of seven year old jasmine bars the event a fundraiser for the family, but another purpose. Organizers say is even more important jazz newsdesks people's minds. The father of a missing eight month old boy in San Antonio, Texas has been arrested and police are looking for a female suspect in the case police chief William McManus, the family is not cooperating as is the father Christopher Dodd Bula, not cooperating the father left the car running with the child had side and went to buy water at a gas station leaving the door open. Police say a woman walked by hopped into the driver's seat. And drove off there are worries over the safety of groundwater near military bases in Georgia. Due to a toxic firefighting foam used by the US air force recent test of the state's three airbases show extensive environmental contamination. The air force says Georgia's drinking water is safe. But experts and residents don't really believe that this is CBS news progressive insurance pick from a range of coverage options with the name your price tool to find a price that works for you. Find out more at Progresive dot com. Hey guys can hear from the hip hot cast today's growth who would win a three mile bicycle race in eleven year old girl or last year's winner of the tour de France. It all depends on the bicycle it depends on their vehicle bulletin, a ten speed in the pro racers going to win every time but put the race around a tricycle in the eleven year old winds every time you see it's not the driver. It's the vehicle when it comes to generating revenue. It's exactly the same. If.

Georgia Christopher Dodd Bula US William McManus Progresive dot San Antonio CBS Texas eleven year eight month seven year
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata six years ago. The fish ecology Rodney Rowntree was on skiff in the Peruvian Amazon. He was holding a piranha and his hand underwater in a river filled with other piranhas, maybe hungry once thought crossed my mind a little bit the water was essentially, no visibility. So I did worry a little bit about that. But there was no other way to do it that job he needed to do dishes them for Samford action because Rowntree studies. The sounds fish make his nickname and the name of his company officials center, so his team would catch a fish reel it in and identify it. And then Rowntree would hold it underwater near a hydrophone to capture. The sounds at made like this one from a red piranha. A lot of people called bark. I sometimes thought of as a honk the fish make the sound. He says by pushing and pulling on their swim bladder with surrounding muscles. Overall, Rowntree auditioned one hundred twenty nine Arana's of four different species along with dozens of other river species by catfish, and he found that he could actually differentiate individual Parana species by analyzing factors like pitch and harmonic and number of barks his colleague Francis. Want as presented the work at the acoustical society of America meeting in Victoria, Canada. Rountree also recorded ten hours of underwater sound gapes like this one captured during a piranha feeding. There's a piranha honk he says. Lots of catfish screeching, which suggests that with a bit more study under whatever coatings like this might give us a clearer glimpse of who's doing what murky waters. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd yada.

Rodney Rowntree Christopher Dodd acoustical society of America Rountree Arana Amazon Canada Victoria Francis Sixty seconds sixty seconds six years ten hours
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Introducing simply light. Can you hear that? That's the sweet sound of less sugar and fewer calories? We want to make sure you here. It's less sugar and fewer calories because it tastes so good. This is scientific Americans sixty seconds sites. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata able speak thousands of languages in the world today. And same goes for the bird world. Species has actively its own language, Andy Radford professor of behavioral ecology at the university of Bristol, and they might be similarities between some languages just as there are in the human world. And then there were other languages that sound extremely different. Even though they conveying exactly the same meaning. In fact, some birds are known to pick up on the language of other species in particular, they've learned to detect danger by eavesdropping on the alarm calls of other birds Bradford and his colleagues wanted to investigate how that learning occurs. So they first played in alarm call that fairy Wrens and Australian bird shouldn't be familiar with a computer generated. Alarm call meant to mimic birds as expected. The unfamiliar sound had no effect on the ferry rents, but then the researchers paired this synthetic call with a chorus of alarm calls. The Wren's would recognize. After the training, the sound of the initially unfamiliar synthetic call alone was enough to send the birds ducking for cover. The results are in the journal. Current biology Redford says, the study shows birds can learn from their peers without ever seeing them or a predator. Either. The coolest thing is that you can learn with your ice shot about something really important in the natural world. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher, Indonesia.

Christopher Dodd Yata Andy Radford university of Bristol Indonesia Redford professor sixty seconds
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"What's that one language? You've always wanted to learn a spaniel Francais deutscher. Well with Babel, you can be speaking your new language within weeks. The lessons are designed to get you speaking confidently and actually remember what you learn. That's what makes it the number one selling language learning app in the world. Go to babble dot com. That's be a BB l. dot com and use offer code curious to get fifty percent off your first three months that's offer code curious, bay spite. This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. When you burn your tongue or cut your cheek, the pain can be intense, but the wound heals pretty quickly compared to injuries elsewhere. That's because all the factors needed to repair a wound or ready to jump into action in world tissue, because a new study shows that proteins called transcription factors which control all those healing elements are present at greater levels in the mouth. You can think of those controlling proteins as theater directors and the healing factors are the actors waiting in the wings. They are ready to go right on the sidelines and the or the Thelia. So the director says, come ahead and then they're just right. Onstage Reimer, ASO, a senior investigator at the national institutes of health. She says that's not the case in regular skin tissue. They have the capability of coming on stage, but they're nowhere close. So you have to go through that step of getting them into stay. Age to be able to go ahead with a function which delays healing. It might be difficult to have the play finished on time and according to the script. Studies in the journal science, translational medicine morass oh, her colleagues also tested this idea by genetically engineering mice to have more of those factors, the directors in their regular skin tissue and sure enough those mice head significantly faster skin wound healing than did control mice, but we can't genetically engineered humans. Instead Meralco says, if we can learn more about who the healing actors are, then perhaps we can find targeted ways of sending those individuals on stage to deliver a better performance for patients. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Christopher Dodd Yata director Reimer Christopher Don Thelia investigator Meralco sixty seconds fifty percent three months
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. If you've ever watched a moth flutter clumsily around a light on your porch. The insect might seem like a sad match for predatory bat. The flying mammal is practically of fighter jet in comparison with its sophisticated sonar acrobatic maneuvers, but some moth species have evolved high-tech tricks of their own. For example, their wings have long dangling tales that they're fluttering in space and they're twisting behind them off as the moth flies, creating an alternative, echoing target that the back perceives as a target that it can actually attack ribbon or team investigated that phenomenon by experimentally altering the wings of months with some moths they snip the hind wing lobes entails with other moths. They glued on extra bits of wing, and then they tethered the differently shaped moths wanted a time in a padded darkened chamber, a sort of Klatten to'real ring for. Abouts on the hunt and observe the battle with high speed video and ultra sonic microphones. By the way that echo locating sound has been slowed down ten times so we can hear it. Turns out it was the monce with longer hind wings or wing tales that live to fly another day because the bats often wound up with just a mouthful of tail. And of course these tail ends do not have nutritional value essentially and would not be a wise place for the bat to attack if it really wanted to capture them off. So it seems that these tail ends are attracting bat attack. We don't yet quite know the mechanism, but they seem to be creating an illusion for the bat that that is another place it can attack and successfully complete its its hunting behavior, the details or in the journal science advances. The researchers right that this decoy strategy has independently of all multiple times among different families of moths, which suggests that this sensory illusion is powerful tool in the ongoing of loose Nuri arms race between the hunter and the hunted. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher dot.

Christopher Dodd Yata Christopher dot Nuri sixty seconds
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Introducing simply light lemonade. Can you hear that? That's the sweet sound of seventy five percent less sugar and calories? We want to make sure you here. It's seventy five percent less sugar and calories because it tastes so good. This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Animal kingdom is crowded with species that use sound growls and bellows and roars to signal size. Dogs do it. Red deer, do it. Koalas do it. And now we could add humans to that list because a new study suggests we can size up other people by the sound of their roar alone. First researchers took the circumference of sixty one men's and women's biceps measured their grip strength and their height. Then they told him to let loose Aurore. Of probably describe it as mice haddish version of groundhog day that you can think of Jordan, rain, a behavioral ecology at the university of Sussex. If you just imagine that he acted in China and coming into a small room one after another enrolling at you. You. Yeah, it was an experience on special his team then played those rows back to a separate group of male and female listeners who'd also been measured for strength and size. They found that men correctly rated other men as substantially stronger than them. Ninety percent of the time based on roar alone. Men did tend to underestimate women strength by the sound of their roars and women overestimated men strength. But in general roaring like a wild animal, it seemed like a pretty accurate way to telegraph body size and strength. The researchers also found that regular shouting. Did not seem to have the same effect as a roar. So what we will ring is actually doing is having this executive affect on strength which is very similar to the adept -tations that non human mammals possess that allow them to exaggerate their strength when they roars well, before results and more roars are in the journal I science, the finding could have practical real world applications to, for example, soldiers have roared and battle throughout history to attempt to intimidate the enemy on the US national box of is actually recommends, will ring a defense strategy against Bez. Just hope that the bears hearing is better than their eyesight. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher Dodd yada.

Christopher Dodd Yata Christopher Dodd Jordan US university of Sussex Aurore executive China seventy five percent sixty seconds Ninety percent
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata travel the US and you'll hear English spoken in a multitude of ways. And it turns out the same Kengo for songbirds specifically the swamp Sparrow. Scientists have now used those swamps barrow regional dialects together with computer simulations to extrapolate how the Sparrow songs have changed and evolved over time. And they found that certain song motifs could date back hundreds even thousands of years. That's we're frankly, it blew me away. I have to say Steve, no, Wicky a biologist at Duke University. It believe Eriksen in dime once he discovered North America to get as far in north western Pennsylvania, where I was just last week, he would've heard some not many, but some of the same song types that I was just listening to the studies in the journal nature communications passing learned information from generation to generation. That sounds a whole lot like culture. It is culture. These birds are showing a persistence of cultural tradition that is here to for on known and you know, sort of matches that of the best cultural persistence. We might see. In human culture, but Spero's aren't is cognitively complex as humans. He says, implying that you don't need human type smarts to develop cultural traditions. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher Dodd the oughta.

Christopher Dodd swamp Sparrow Eriksen Spero US Duke University North America Steve Pennsylvania sixty seconds
"christopher dodd" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"This is scientific americans sixty seconds science i'm christopher dodd yata many parents are no doubt familiar with their teenagers musical tastes but very few probably inspired enough by them to launch an experiment i listened to some of the music that my the oldest teenage daughter is listening to and i was surprised at how different that music was from what i used to listen to italia comber over an applied mathematician at uc irvine interested in evolution in general and a mathematical description of evolution i saw that studying the evolution of music would be a good idea marovo entertainment analyzed half a million songs released in the uk between nineteen eighty five and two thousand fifteen using online databases that describe songs musical characteristics like rhythm mood and dance ability here the song time the charts in two thousand fourteen that's has a high density in the song shake it off by taylor swift here the two thousand fourteen song that has the low happened stay with me by sam smith overall they found that songs had become less happy over the thirty year span as well as more danceable more relaxed and more likely to have women behind the mic but the big hits buckton number of those trends behavior of successful songs looked almost like separate species they have quantifiable the different features than they had their little trans singles were happier than the norm almost a throwback to earlier times and even more likely to be sung by women the details in the journal royal society opened science comber over his team was also able to predict a song success by judging only its musical qualities about seventy five percent of the time it turns out that you can't predict success to a certain degree of accuracy only based on music so to me that sounded gay positive it means that music matters for some success it's not just money proving that at least when it comes to their musical tastes the kids are alright thanks for listening for scientific american sixty seconds science i'm christopher dodd yada.

uc irvine uk taylor swift sam smith christopher dodd sixty seconds seventy five percent thirty year
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Many parents are no doubt familiar with their teenagers musical tastes. But very few were probably inspired enough by them to launch an experiment. I listened to some of the music that my oldest daughter is listening to, and I was surprised at how different that music was from what I used to listen to Italia coma Roba an applied mathematician at UC Irvine, since I'm interested in every Lucien in general and a mathematical description of evolution. I thought that studying the evolution of music would be a good idea. Team analyzed half a million songs released in the UK between nineteen eighty five and twenty fifteen using online databases that describe songs musical characteristics like rhythm, mood and dance ability here the song that'll time the charts into hundred and fourteen that has a high density in expensive decibel song, shake it off by to swift. Here's the two thousand fourteen that has a low happiness. They with me by Sam Smith. Overall, they found that songs had become less happy over the thirty year span as well as more danceable more relaxed and more likely to have women behind the mic. But the big hits Buckton number of those trends felt the behavior of successful songs looked almost like a separate species of some. They have gone to the different features and they had their little trans. Hit. Singles were happier than the norm, almost a throwback to earlier times, and even more likely to be sung by women. The details are in the journal Royal Society. Opened science Comber over team was also able to predict a song success by judging only its musical qualities about seventy five percent of the time. It turns out that you can't predict success to a certain degree. Voucher seats only based on music. So to me, that sounded very positive fitness. Music matters for some success. It's not just money proving that at least when it comes to their musical tastes. The kids are alright. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher Dodd yada.

Christopher Dodd Yata Christopher Dodd UC Irvine Comber Royal Society Sam Smith Lucien UK sixty seconds seventy five percent thirty year
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"This is science Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. The fossil record is far from being complete library of everything that's ever lived the vast, vast majority of everything that's ever lived has completely decayed away bones and all, even for animals have bones and shells. So fossils -ation is very rare occurrence Dunkin Murdoch research fellow at the Oxford University museum of natural history. But then if you play the numbers game and think about how many organisms have lived than fossils ation is kind of a little too never 'table some things we'll get into the fossil record. But what parts of an organism fossilized and in which stage of decomposition can vary meaning it can be hard to reconstruct a living animal from what's represented in rock. Plus most of the fossil record is bones and teeth to find any evidence of the soft tissue of ancient animals is incredibly rare. So to learn more about that process of decay in fossils ation that. And preserve soft tissue, Murdoch and his team dissect marine animals like hag fish and lamb as as they lie rotting in the lab. The study of how organisms become preserved is called to funny and it can stink. Yeah, it's certainly a very smelly place to work sometimes smelly, but it gives them a step by step, look, how creatures bodies change as they decay. The first signs that the animals decaying the very soft tissues like the guts and the is thought to decay away and then find structures light the gills on than things like the Finns thought to fall off, and you start to see this skin falling apart and eventually all that you're left with our submittal bits of cartilage. And then remnants of the muscle blocks, they break down their work in the journal paleontology and makes the case for why rotting flesh may give a fresh look at the fossil record because what you don't find and the degraded state of them. Cheerio you do find have their own stories to tell about the history of life on earth. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds. Science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata.

Dunkin Murdoch Christopher Dodd Yata Christopher Don Oxford University museum of na research fellow sixty seconds
"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"christopher dodd" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"Mrs scientific americans sixty seconds sites i'm christopher dodd yacht the all one of the things that makes your smartphone so smart is that if you pull it out in the sun it senses that in dials up the screen brightness to compensate but it's not a perfect solution for if you on now bright enough beyond remember how respectability fm no hide is since on wu a physicist at the university of central florida the other problem he says that the brighton screen is that it kills the battery so women colleagues have fabricated a battery sparing alternative an anti reflective screen coding based on the eyes of mouths mantiri third reach we can learn a lot primate tara the thing we when others have learned about math is is that they're bumpy studied with tiny projections that uneven surface reduces the reflection of light off their eyes thought to help the bugs of aid predators ncb better in low light so we wanna seem built a similar surface with tiny dimples to cut down on glare he says the dimpled coating could boost the readability of a screen by five to ten times compared to a normal smartphone screen the details are in the journal optic to the tech hasn't been commercialized yet and that could take a few years which gives researchers time to take advantage of another property of these surfaces their flexible meaning the possibility of curved or bendable displays combine that with the bendy batteries we reported on it a recent podcast and it looks like the smartphones of the future could be set for real metamorphosis thanks for listening for scientific american 60second science i'm christopher anthony out.

wu physicist christopher dodd university of central florida brighton christopher anthony sixty seconds 60second