35 Burst results for "Christoph"

DAOs Back In The Spotlight with Professor Aaron Wright

Epicenter

03:33 min | Last month

DAOs Back In The Spotlight with Professor Aaron Wright

"You've been in the ecosystem a very long time so you you were here. When the dow the entire the dow thing went down way interested in dallas. Before that do that kind of kick it off for you. Yeah i mean. I actually was an avid reader of bitcoin magazine. Way back in the day. And i remember Dan larimer writing about decentralized autonomous corporations which was kind of the precursor to douse. I thought that that was a fascinating concept. The thought being that you can use at that time that bitcoin blockchain and an interesting implementation called colored coins to begin to represent the structure of a corporation as using blockchain to kind of record interests in the entity using those interests to to think about how to transfer assets had build controls into a corporation using smart contracts. I thought it was absolutely fascinating and kind of all clicked together as not surprising when when metallic and others began to veto venture towards thirty. Am and dow's became an important part of that story. Right does appear in the white paper. There was lots of conversations around. is that the community. I began to think about. I was equally fascinated and the dow itself was really i expression of that interest right So a theorem Was just recently launched for the most part even though it took some time to get the on tests nats and a whole bunch of other technical hurdles. But you know i really thought it was great that christoph and and team began to really push. Here they wanted to build a was in the white paper. They wanted to explore what these new digital organizations can look like and the dow is really the first grade experiment in that area. I i remember even before the dow launched seeings or demos and other things by the sparkle team dealing with you know a theam slash iot related devices which i thought were incredibly cool and i think to everybody's surprise though. The dow just was much more successful. Than i than. I think anybody would have imagined right. It was supposed to be kind of a a small experiment. It became a massive experiment and then he had a kind of a spectacular. Finish at which i think was Was great in terms of automating people's minds about the possibilities of a theorem at but at the same time highlighting a number of the challenges and but technical and then over subsequent months has lawyers and other folks began to to get some regulatory challenges as well so it you know i think it was the first great use case for theory was dow's and i do think people had a bit of ptsd. How after the dow and they were kind of free to play around and divan and start. Start to see what this ecosystem look like. There was obviously developer teams like the arrogant team and the dow stocks team. That were that were pushing forward. But i think people put to to the side as we saw token sales and other other kind of crypto economic systems began to be exported in twenty sixteen seventeen eighteen. But they're back great houser coming back to focus. There's a lot of activity in the dow space that i think as you know folks are beginning to pay attention to and if you are a developer or somebody that's interested in boxing technology. I imagine that it's probably worth your time to start to dig in here and think about what may be coming over the next couple of months and years.

Bitcoin Magazine Dan Larimer Bitcoin Blockchain Blockchain Dallas DOW Christoph Houser Boxing
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

07:37 min | Last month

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"If it turns into full. Vr but as a brand if you can if you have something that can be sure that immersive way. I would highly recommend to do it. Because that's the way to stand on the other thing too is. If you i in your industry people will cover it. The trade press coverage You know mainstream might cover it other Media sites might cover it because they're always looking for news and the definition of news. Is it something new. You remember the days back in the day when media companies actually wrote about When when companies get responsive websites so until launched their new responsive website. That used to be news. I mean seriously like all over the place and today it's like if you don't have a response of websites people think that's crazy you know. We need to to get into the twenty first century and of course rusty brick. That's his twitter handle berry. Schwartz was on the show last week or earlier. This week And he talked about how you know. Now you have to have A mobile side. That's comparable to your your main side so don't have that emdad. Authentic storytelling that net but have Make sure your site is as same content and it's easily accessible from mobile but anyway hats off to espn espn sky. Cast the other thing i would mention. I almost forgot about it. So there's no announcers so the main channel announcers they're not carrying them on this channel. Which is i. don't care honestly every once in a while they'd come on but you're just listening to the to the stadium announcer which kind of interest. And not sure why why they made that decision. But it's fine. When i watched i think it was the chiefs game. Maybe a rule was but it was a manifest game last weekend and they were on amazon life and amazon life to quality that amazon amazon prime and the quality of amazon prime was not nearly as good as direct. tv feed which. I'm watching tonight's game on and also the nfl games. But they had three announcers so one was to to guys One was two women. I think it was kramer in inner creamer and somebody else and that was a third one was called the scout feet. Which i'm not actually sure who was talking on there. But it was more of a conversation and they also were live streaming to twitch at the same time they were having a conversation on twitch. of course we're live streaming to twitch tonight as well So it's kind of interesting. So i listened to the scout feed most of the game. It was ca- i i enjoyed it. My wife didn't enjoy quite as much as i did. But then the the The quality wasn't as good to all the visual right. Because it came over the internet. I guess And we have pretty fast internet now also Not sure what was going on there but the point is kind of with new ways to share content. Come up with new ways to engage with people and then you know. Hopefully that draws attention to your product draws attention to your company draws attention to be a trendsetter or You know front runner in the industry. And whatever you're offering to people and can be helpful so that's my thought on what we can learn from this guy cast And you know we'll see how it evolves Somebody said you can already watch the nba in virtual reality. Remember who said Been fred faulkner. He has he has a according to read podcast. If you wanna listen to that but i. I haven't seen that. Not a big big into the nba. But i certainly think. Vr is part of the future. And why shouldn't brands get on it you know. Brands are currently I see more and more brands. Do life livestreams. I see more and more brands do podcast. I mean there's like one point. Three million podcasts out there something like that The one problem with some of those mediums. You have to stay in front of people you have to keep doing them so if you do one podcast a year or one podcast to a quarter or something like that. Probably not enough right so just something to think about. That's why i tied altogether with the livestreaming. And and the podcast. So now we have vr. We'll see how it evolves of course there's other areas we have to focus onto like voice and you know we still gotta write things. People still read content as well. But i wanted to share those quick thoughts here on this Special broadcast january. I i dunno time. It's eight o'clock. Pm central time the podcast version will trigger in a little bit here as well and then yesterday i mentioned to you guys that There's a special episode coming out with some guest sharing what we should focus on and twenty twenty one. That's being pushed to sunday now so If you're wondering where that episodes. Listen on sunday and You know they're still episodes publishing to like january twenty six without any mark recording so we do have We do have a lot of things in the queue. Really appreciate all the guests. If you have guessed idea let me know. Sent me a message. Don't send me a lengthy pitch. Email sent me a direct message on twitter. C trap Or connect on lincoln. If you're connecting only please make sure you tell me what you heard me. Don't send me one of those spammy messages. Like some of those sales people do. I'm christoph trap Why stayed in clemson still ongoing as we're live streaming just a start in the second quarter and really guys say hats off to espn for the sky. Cast the one thing. I wonder if networks are going to do more and more of this You know there might be an additional cost. I don't know We'll see but a lot of these games. Now have the skycam so shouldn't be that difficult to pull off. I mean you need that secondary channel. So i'm not sure everybody has that but You know fox's fox. Owned by fox sports is that the same are those the same companies. I don't know if they are. They have the game on one channel and then the other other thing on the other one of course on. Nfl game days. When you got all those games Might be a little more trickier to do but something to think about for all you. Business story tells christoph trap thanks for listening. Thanks for tuning into the livestream until next time. I'm currently accepting requests for future virtual and onsite keynotes and workshops in twenty twenty alone. I've spoken in singapore and virtually of course. Thanks cove it. I can't wait to get back on the road. And if we still can't get on the road and twenty twenty one. I would be happy to speak at virtually face reach out to me. See trap at gmail.com. Authentic storytelling dot.

amazon fred faulkner espn Schwartz nba twitter kramer chiefs nfl Brands fox christoph clemson lincoln christoph trap Nfl singapore
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

05:29 min | 2 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"That's going to look bad on us but we we liked the idea that maybe you know like if switcher was on amazon and we could sell it on there we would say hey. We'll try it out and you know if they want to give it to us. We we talk about so you need to do. You need to have used the product though you can talk about anything right so for example i could talk about electronic so you can use whatever talk about. I mean i do have a tripod in front of me here right. I got an ipod ipad. Case i could talk about that. Could talk about other. You know tripods about a ring light and by the way talking about cost my ring light. I didn't even by. That's my twelve year olds. And i just steal it. Yeah we should have your twelve year old on yours livestream. there's nothing to sell more ringlets than to have a child on amazon live. That's another little marketing tip for you. Christoph yeah that's that can be a struggle so tomorrow on the podcast. If if you're watching today on the livestream episode two to fifty three on the podcast. You see the link at the bottom there. It's actually legal issues to consider in podcasting chat with the podcast lawyer. That is gordon fire mark. So we had a really good discussion. And i stood my ground. I'm doing everything correctly. And he said no. You gotta do this. And this and this and this. So i learned and i'm open to feedback my friend. So here's my question for you guys. Though he said every time money gets involved it can get messy. So let's say. I'm bringing on if i bring on my daughter. No discussion right. I mean we same household. We'll figure it out or she can probably have it unless it's all of a sudden ten thousand dollars of a commission i guess but that's a ways to go but what kind of agreement do we need to come up with..

amazon Christoph gordon
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

04:17 min | 2 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"The crappy time because one of has to take it so but i you know i'm not gonna make habit to take phone calls at eleven o'clock at night or nine o'clock at night or something like that but every once in awhile it because somebody has to. How about personal preference on how to work in window world so when you when you said you wrap it up five thirty or six o'clock and i'm like ooh that's really kind of late and i know some people will go that's not late at all christoph and but see i what i usually do. This in my schedule is different right. I got meetings and climbing meetings and whatnot. But you know what i do is really self directed like i got to finish things. I gotta get them published. I gotta do respond to clients so usually my wife gets up at five o'clock in the morning. Roughly i'll get up maybe five thirty or six. Maybe six thirty some days. I just kind of roll out of bed and and start working right. Everybody else is going out the door and then three thirty or so. I wrap it up. Everybody is home. And i guess. That's my boundary. Yeah i applaud you for that. I mean i boundaries. If i was living this ten years ago would have been vastly different because all my kids were home right. Now we're empty so the ability to shift your boundaries and apply your boundaries based on how you're living the one thing as as i mentioned i build into my days of workouts. I have a one hour block in my calendar stays where i'm gonna work out because i care about my physical house so the other thing i've adapted to your your question about personal preference is we're all wired with what are called all trading and rhythms and the science behind. That is that we all only have a mental capacity of about ninety to one hundred twenty minutes to go full-on deep. I've work before our starts to work from a deficit and what we need to do is step away. Go get a drink of water. Go for a walk. go for break. Leave your devices on your desk. Go do something for fifteen minutes and let your brain recover from the exhaustion of that ninety nine hundred and twenty minutes sprint and then you can come back and go for another ninety to one hundred twenty minutes now..

christoph sprint
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

04:22 min | 2 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"It's interesting because you know. I used to work life balance. Men that everything kind of integrates right. You can leave. Worry you can take your kid somewhere but then you also work at night and maybe partially. That's true but you know. I mean you work constantly nonstop and it's it's very draining so a couple things that i've done now is i. Actually i don't have my work email on my iphone on the one i use for personal things you know. It's turned off. It's on the computer. If i need something and of course today is different because we're all stuck at home because of this wonderful twenty twenty and colbert and all this stuff. So it's not like. I'm traveling anywhere you know. Currently but what other things can people do. How can you know how can they have that. Better work life balance before Before your kids are grown up and you miss their childhood. Yeah that's a great question. Christoph and one of the things that i talk about first of all. I don't really believe in work life balance because it's so unachievable. I think we spend an inordinate amount of time trying to get to the state of balance in. It's the smallest little thing that pushes off balance again. And i actually talk about that in the book. So when i talk about his work like boundaries and i've had some people say well it's really just semantics but i don't believe that it is because boundaries are harder to move in there more defined plus the thing with boundaries that stick and i've been living this by now for about three years probably a little bit longer. Is you do it in community so my wife and i have established boundaries on how we wanna live on our work on our time together. All of our kids are grown and gone but when they were home we had to left at home. When we started down this road of the time we want to spend with them. So what does the boundary while the you start with saying. What are the things. I value and your list. You'll be surprised when you took surely talk about the word value you'll be surprised at how little that led how small that list is so for us. It's we value our time together We value our spiritual emotional mental and physical health We now our business so we value our work that should be included and then we avow. We've value time with our kids and with friends and also our hobbies we live in colorado. We do a lot of outdoor So now that we have defined all that how do we put in timeframes or time blocks to protect those. So for instance my work. I start working every day most days at about eight. Am and then. I'm done almost every day by five thirty to six. That is a boundary now during that workday. I'm not going to catch up with friends amount on my social media playing around. You know i'm not doing whatever you would do in your personal life within that..

colbert Christoph colorado
Contemporary public art: who is it for?

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:33 min | 3 months ago

Contemporary public art: who is it for?

"Louisa. When i look back over the newspaper dot com archive in in relation to christoph boucle. What i found was a lot of fierce debates mentioned in the articles about him often involving authorities as well as art world people. He wants to create this kind of control. He doesn't need so so tell us about this latest controversy. Why is it such conservancy. It starts off by the venice biennale in two thousand nine hundred nineteen when we will all of us walking through the arsenal and that was a vast rusting boat on the key side. Not in water. That's not an unusual thing to see. It looked kind of weirdly home amongst the other sort of naval paraphernalia around in the snarly but then of course there was no notice nothing to identify it. If diligent you look up in the catalog but unite was very mysterious but of course word of mouth soon came through this was indeed a work and art not a piece of rusting boatlift over by the navy it was balkan nostra it was cooled and it was actually the very boat which had been leaving libya for its louis laden with excess. Don't know how many of the thousands immigrants trying to get it collided with portuguese freighter. Got into trouble and sunk killing everybody. Pretty much on board. I mean it was an absolute atrocity slash disaster. The boat was then taken by the italian navy to sicily where there was an incredible detailed forensic investigation on all of the bodies of the victims many of whom were trapped in the hall of the boat. They'd be impacting. It was it was a trafficking boats. It was a horrific horrific scenario There was a forensic detailed investigations to who the identity of these people were many of their families traced and so they learn to the terrible fate of relatives now. I didn't quite know how this happened. But then time passes from two thousand fifteen. Somehow a deal is struck with the sicilian town of augusta where this both ended up in the naval base to bring it to the venice biennale as an exhibit. Christopher cal had signed a contract with the town of augusta that he could borrow the boat for yeah it would be exhibited has been and then he would return it a year later so the boats there everybody feels extremely conflicted about some people said it was a brilliant idea that shows how decadent the art world is how decadent our world is how uncaring we are. It was kind of appalling. I felt the boat was parked right by the cafe. So you start swinging europe roles and your and your cappuccinos. Perhaps not knowing there was in effect the site of mass atrocity a mass grave. Right beside you. So was it makes us think about our place. In the world on carrying thought about crises unfolding very close to us or was it. An exploitative opportunistic attention seeking Profile raising artwork by christopher. Koop and as you say he does have form in this respect. He's done other things. He's crushed landed a mosque in venice inside the catholic church for another being all for the icelandic pavilion. Several years ago he also set up community centers on controversial other things in tasmania. We'll probably talk about in a minute. So but this was a big one and yes it's very raw and the debate in the controversy still rages but the latest part of. This debate is a year on from the being ali. The boat is still. There is a dispute between the being early organization and bianco and he's gallery well absolutely yes. Because as i said he signed a deal with the city in town of augusta. Maybe you know. Maybe money exchanged hands. I don't know but anyway but the deal was that the boat would then come back to augusta where apparently it was intended to be the centerpiece for memorial park with the consent of the relatives. Also in all kinds of rumblings around the time in the been on it was stated apparently the families had given their permission for this boats to be used or some families are given their permission. I mean gardeners specific. But that will talk of permission. But now there's the boat the biennale a now say they have been hassling buco since november last year to bring this boat back to honor his agreement to honor the contract with cillian town of august. Gustave saying they want the boat back as well now sources close to buco say that because he never talks to the press which is another thing we can talk about minute They say apparently the boat was damaged in transit coming venice so it's going to be impossible until the cradle support is fixed for it to come back again to augusta so buco is now trying to get insurance to pay for this either from the benaroya. Who said no go away or probably problem rudely or indeed from the shipping company. But i mean. I would say that you know only ethics about whether you actually share bin ali or not. I felt squeamish. I think we're dead. People are concerned it starts to get very problematic. Any put all those ethics to one side. You honor the agreement to the families you on the agreement to the place from whence you lent it and if and if the cradle got caught up and pay for it or you make your gary who house involved not show for penny or two to cough up and pay for it you know. I draw lines more lines in the sand. Whatever want feels about artworks raising profile of terrible crises. Apparently there's talk about taking the boat to brussels to show how come the the eu have been ignoring the immigration crisis. I mean lofty motives. But you know this is a place where over thousand people died.

Christoph Boucle Augusta Christopher Cal Venice Biennale Venice Italian Navy Louisa Libya Sicily Biennale Navy Koop Bianco Tasmania Catholic Church Christopher Memorial Park Europe Cillian Gustave
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

04:53 min | 3 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"It's destiny and worked for your network. So what is it that you get most engagement on and if we talk about for example finding prospects or connected with new people it might not only be about getting a lot of engagements. It's maybe more about how many new Quest do i guess or how. Many new people are reaching out to me to buy my products but yet find things. Escapee is that you want to the measure and and may completions with And then so dusting on one side were working doesn't work but don't put yourself into a situation where you don't feel comfortable at all on a big fan of pushing boundaries and and you should sometimes force yourself to do something you you're might be a bit afraid of but don't go too far you need to be audible with creating the content in a way that works for you otherwise it's not going to sound natural. It's it's not gonna be interesting for people to listen to or to read. It's because they can see or read or hear that you're not one hundred percents convinced yourself so does is not are important elements. And what is the future. I mean I think the future is debts. We will understand better and better what works for people. And what doesn't work. And there's a good chance that you will have in the future connections with people that love to receive voice messages and you will record voice Communicating with them and other people like to get video from you and you will recall the video and there will also be people who like to get messages and you will send messages. So it's more. I think we're willing to situation where we're going to focus on the individual. And what do they prefer. Would you prefer so we can choose between all those options the right way to indicate in the best way possible regarding getting more connection requests. Don't send me a lame requests. Hey christoph i noticed both of us that means so i thought we want to connect..

christoph
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

04:47 min | 3 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"It changed all the time i mean. I'm just looking at anchor. Which is what we use to record an anchor. Just change something while we're recording. And so how do you. How do you kinda mix those two in In any kind of the wiki you show. Yeah i think this brings up a really good distinction here and whiskies are very very powerful in terms of sharing facts in data in a perhaps like processes but as things change. They require additional hands on and and effort as you just mentioned christoph. So i think if you were to go up one level from The data asset-backed right the facts. In the data's i think one thing that you can do to kind of cement the overall sentiment around those facts is is really developing a story around it and think that is where the need to to really understand. What why are you doing this like. Why are you documenting this process. It's it's typically because it's lead to some sort of result and ethics stories are really really good way to cement a lot of the fact telling in in data a knowledge transfer in ways that are the kinda transcend the wikki itself right. So i think if there's a way for organizations to Not just collect data not just a share data but also Piece of information into a Overarching story that makes the new hire on boarding process. Much easier that makes the customer success strategies. Much easier I think really building around That that whole tactical part of communication especially internal comms if everyone's telling the same story Everyone understands why. Why and everyone. I under- understand You know what you're trying to achieve so Think that was where. I would differentiate between the wikki and then developing internal stories that help guide the organization forward as well for your small to medium sized retail and drop us a message at trap and g mail dot com.

christoph
The curse of knowledge and how to follow better internal communications tactics

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

04:08 min | 3 months ago

The curse of knowledge and how to follow better internal communications tactics

"Day we wanna talk about internal communication strategies and tactics. So it's interesting to me. Is that we focused so much externally. How do we get more leads. How do we build the brand. How do we get out there. How do we schedule things. How do we automate. Oh my goodness i mean you can just. That's that's all we Spend time focusing on it. Seems like sometimes but internal communications matters as well whether you're small company. Big company whatnot And today's guest trend. Anderson is the chief operating officer pre right dot com and he focuses on growth through storytelling. So he had me right. Right there with that tagline and you may have assumed but what's great about. Trent is i ran across him again on social media. He was sharing something about internal communications. And i thought. I should ask him to come on the show and share his wisdom's with you guys trent. How's it going today. It's going very well christoph. Thanks for having me on today. Awesome Always glad to have experts like you on the show. So let's talk about internal communications. It can't be hard right. Focus on that especially when when we're also gotten hole in the medium sized companies of external communication wide. Why does internal. Why does it matter than what are some tactics. Yeah i think internal communication often gets overlooked like you said because of prioritization is on on external right. How do we get more leads. How do we get more clients. How do we continue to grow. Well it's all fine and well and those are all kind of like leading metrics to look at but the lagging metrics i think is internal comms in the the effects of vision or lack of vision or clarity or lack of clarity with where organization is going. And if you're like me you've probably been in an organization before that was doing everything right externally but internally there were huge huge issues and usually started from top down or Or from a leadership position in wasn't able to communicate internally why we were doing the things that we were doing why we were up. Prioritizing certain Initiatives and all that good stuff so i think a lot of internal communications Really manifest itself through the curse of knowledge and typically when we talk about internal communications. It is driven by leaders. It is usually a top down. Approach and as these leaders are sitting in their war rooms and deliberating strategy in tactics. Really fun corporate buzzwords They usually have the curse of knowledge. And for those that don't know what the curse of knowledge is is Basically they have such intimate knowledge of a given Piece of information that they assume the rest of the organization also understands that and really. It isn't the case so You've probably seen the clip from the office. Where oscar is telling michael what his options are afford utilizing the surplus budget for the year and comes back and says explain it to me. Like i'm eight and oscar tried to do that and then michael comes. Back does now extent like five while the oscars way of explaining what a surplus bunch it was Was the curse of knowledge right. So oscar is an accountant for anybody who doesn't know the office by by the way. Go see that net flex. Because i think there's a lot of business lessons learned their case. Oscar has the curse of knowledge because he is crunching numbers. All day understands how to read a financial report. Michael clearly does not right. So oscar had to simplify his message so much more to get it across and ineffective communication with michael. So i think again drawing this back to the curse of knowledge it really comes down to assumptions that are made about what everybody else understands about the business versus the actual reality.

Christoph Trent Anderson Oscar Michael Oscars
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

03:28 min | 4 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"That, you know, he kind of gave the example like once you know covid-19 past and then we're able to travel and and see each other in person again, you know consider like if you if he's in DC and he has a meeting in Chicago. You gotta get up early for a flight potential flight to let you use, you know, take the flight sleeping and uncomfortable Hotel bed. Wake up the next day go to a meeting that may last an hour come all the way back home and potentially do that all again on on the return flight. So, you know, yep. Do that meeting via Zoom. I think you'll pick that one hundred percent in at the time. So I and you know, I think it's going to be interesting as we get into the post-pandemic world. And I know this isn't necessarily the the, you know, topic of conversation, but I think these kinds of live streams will be you know, a little more, you know, a little more par for the course and maybe kind of mixing in some of that more off and on-site production with stuff like this. It's very very hope so right we I tell you it's it has been a lifesaver just to do more lifestreams because you know, I get to talk to people other than my kids and my wife love them, but you know, we were together for six months at our house. So I do the exact same thing. I just have the headphones in and then from there, you know, obviously we're a life right now. And then I I take the video file. Sometimes I hack it up put it on Instagram TV fifteen years. Videos actually 60-minute videos can now go on there so we won't get to 60 minutes so I can use the whole thing on their relatively low effort also relatively low numbers but wage and it's another channel right where people can find it. So I do that and then I I extract the audio and put it put the podcast together upload that through anchor 220 different channels. And then I sometimes write an article not always, you know, currently I got one podcast per day and the reason is because I'm speaking so many were networking were many people here. I don't want them to wait until eight months from now to hear their podcast. You know what I mean? Like this podcast will publish probably I would think next 7 to 10 days. But if you had to wait, we do a livestream now and then the podcast publishes, you know now it's October it publishes in February. You would be like why right? It's just weird when wage That happens. I think I think that's what's interesting about leveraging, you know, live video for podcast production because you know to your point Christoph a lot of the a lot of the office at Casa at a recorded, you know, you record it, you know, you batch record them and then, you know, four or five six months later, you know, it's actually published. You know with with this you sort of get into double duty, you know, a double exposure, you know out of that one, you know that one production you're doing a live interview, you know right now with the two of us, you know, it's going out to all these channels. You're also going to you know, put it up on podcasting and and even if it was something that took three or four or five six months, it wouldn't necessarily be that big of a deal because you know, people are listening to it now, they're listening to it.

Chicago Christoph
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

05:20 min | 4 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"Tips do you have people not to over? Think it right and actually start sharing. Knowledge. Or trying to get to the point how do we? You know we can't have a six month planning process every time we need to make any kind of point anyway right right and this reminds me my favorite quote about this hour Einstein of all people who said if you can't explain it's simply you don't understand it well enough. And this is one of the reasons I developed. The I believe that test to help people oil their point down in one of the reasons I like that Albert Einstein quotas because it councils us that to get to the point, it's not just about putting words in thinking Oh, this is more so just make this shorter. It's really about understanding what your point is and that process if you do it deliberately and if you use the I, believe that tests or just ask yourself what is the why? You will find yourself subtracting more than you're adding in getting down to the really root of your point, and that's the goal to make it smaller not bigger. And then when you create your communication, just find ways to support that point. Don't leave that point don't have multiple points. China Devil points sometimes I have clients who though say something like this is a great idea because it will make us more powerful efficient, successful effective. Efficient of memorable. SMART. Brand worthy. You know they'll say nine different things in heads. They'll think, oh, this is good. The more information. The better I'm just saying nine things instead of one thing and that's GonNa be better right it's like a Christmas tree ornaments more vibrant it'll be. A pathetic actually not the truth. Audiences need fewer details they needed simpler. Something often say Christoph is if you tell audience many things, they may remember none. Tell them something they may remember some. To, one thing and they will remember all. So you may points but separate delineate them first I'm to talk about how this affects our organization. After that, we're GONNA discuss what I believe. This could have an impact on the world. In finally, we're going to look at some tactics. Each of us can take to advance this issue and our costs. So see how I put space in chapter breaks between each of those points. So yeah, there are over thinkers out there and you need to sort a divorce yourself from it. But not by saying I can't over think this you know very few people can correct themselves by saying stop doing that it's like smoking or lifetime yourself nuts. That's not going to happen. So what I like to do is give people tools that enable them to boil something down. For example, unnaturally fast talker. That's my challenge for stuff I work on, you're going to be working on that. Till my last day. But I can't improve by telling myself Joel unique stop.

Albert Einstein Christoph Joel
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

04:52 min | 4 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"And author of content performance culture. How's everyone doing? Thanks for listening to another episode we are continuing with four episodes a week. And people listening. So we'RE GONNA, WE'RE GONNA keep pumping, amount, insuring all this knowledge and having all these great guests today I wanNA talk about how to make a point what's the point? How do you get to the point sounds simple enough but of course, nothing simple anymore if it ever was, we don't want to say that good old times. Um Today's gifts is at communications executive Joel Schwartzberg who will help us unpack that topic and see how can we communicate better and move forward Joel going swimming luck results. Thanks for having me on. You Bet. So making make points all the time sometimes I have to repeat myself quite frequently but. You know tell tell me about. What are we talking about when we say we WANNA make a point and and how how do we get there right well, it's not an unfamiliar word. We use it all the time. In fact, we're often telling people hey, get to the point or what your point. But the problem I noticed in my fifteen years of public speaking consulting and actually noticed it several years into my training was then while people are making speeches and they're making comments and remarks, they often don't know what point is because they reveal they don't have one. And when speakers ramble or when storytellers ramble soccer's they're not confident or public speakers is most often because they don't know what their point is or what eight point is. Most people confuse points for things like. Titles ideas, concepts sometimes chapters. catchphrases. And these are not points because appointed a proposition, you can make a case for defend or illustrate is not a topic or such. and. It's best articulated through an example. Let's take podcasting something you know about The word podcasting is not a point. So if I as Christoph which the point of your top today, a new said podcasting. I wouldn't know..

Joel Schwartzberg Christoph executive
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

05:40 min | 4 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"From what I found you could use one of the out of the box templates and whatever tool that you're using have the image of the of the shirt or the pant or the shoe that you're doing. Nice header text above image header text below. Think of it very simple. Think of it as like building a website in the year two thousand, that is the absolute safest. Safest space that you can live in, and then if they click on a button to the call to action, you can take them to your page. We have all of your html five elements floating around and you've got your CSS three animate and opacity and things you can do all your fancy stuff there. But putting that in the email just is more more risk than anything and most importantly is. It can. It can rack up a price. It can rack up a cost pretty quickly as well. Just in the back and forth design teams and the development teams. Marketing. Teams it adds up really fast. And of course, when you have the executive inner there, then they are tempted sometimes to put everybody to approval hell which just adds time right and left So I have had success to with the just the textiles because. I don't know why and you can maybe give me some insights on that but one of my best email campaigns maybe ever was I was participating in the core, a pulse summit virtual summit. Of course, you know there's I don't think there's any offline events anymore nowadays but and so they gave me the email list after the the thing was over and I. Send everybody. Literally, it was like three sentences maybe in L. Hello thanks for attending the summit. Didn't even say thanks attending for mice not to set you know if if you missed my session, here's a video linked to the video. It wasn't in there. It was an embedded right or whatever we're picture, and then it said my book is currently on sale through today. Click here to buy it, and then you know it was on sale for like another day content performance that online not currently on sale guys but you can check it out there. You'd be surprised how many people click on that link to buy the book right and I didn't do anything I didn't even show a picture of the book. I. Didn't do anything. I don't even think I said what the book was about. Why did it work? You know I've got some I've got some interesting theories on that. One I think with the text based emails, it does come across well, it can come across more authentic, especially depending on the tool that using that. So we talked about in the marketing automation space or email marketing space, the personalization. In email that just says. Even a very impersonal way also, hey, Christoph has you. It's been a minute since we've connected I wanted to share my new book right that comes across way more authentic way more real way more interpersonal of me emailing you. Christoph as a person where maybe you don't know did this come from his?.

Christoph executive
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

04:57 min | 5 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"Christoph Trap, your host and author of content performance culture. Thanks for listening. Really appreciate you making the time four times a week episodes currently because we're trying to catch up and people are still listening. So why do we? Why should we slow down really really appreciate you four for see an interest finding interest in these shows today's episode i WanNa talk about yet another channel that you may or may not have to focus on it I know like an already see some heroes out there. Yup there's more and more channels. But this one I haven't thought about too often or or more recently ain't I probably kind of 'em neglecting it quite frankly I tried to back onto it It's not podcasting case you guys are guessing at home what I'm talking about here. Obviously, it's not belonging per se it's not writing books. I just put that one out earlier this year content performance that online. But it's the channel or by the way it's also not instagram. Real I love Instagram Brielle's I just wasted three hours watching twenty nine fifteen second videos or whatever it's been to twenty nine hundred. Today I want to talk about medium. Asked the author of make money on medium to join me on the show to to pull back the curtain and tell us why do why should we care about medium? What we do there? How do we tie it into our cope? Creek once publish everywhere strategy welcome to the show Nicole acres Nicole how's it going? I'm quite well, how are you today Christoph? Hanging in there as I keep saying I, go from I love being at home all the time to how the CAN I get out of here. Turn Right. It is and it's certainly an interesting time..

Christoph Trap Nicole Creek
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

05:03 min | 5 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"Saw you talk about unlinked let's the we do another show he goes oh yeah. Sounds good win and then some people like. A ten step email exchange right. How Do, we record record? which way do I face the camera? What is this? You know what I'm saying, what are the questions? Send me the questions and then you have to have a prep meeting. So it is interesting to kind of see the different personalities and those telltale signs how they're wired right to an to an extent. I guess absolutely absolutely and and we need to look at when they're asking those questions. They don't care about those questions that is their personality that is deep need. Someone isn't trying to be difficult when they say okay. When where, how, much what are the questions? They're just risk averse they want to be extremely well prepared. So they are giving you the right thoughtful answer. It is their innate need. When We. If. We can start to. accept. And appreciate and embrace all those different personality types. We're going to have better teams. Hit It is it is interesting to try to figure out how do people were they wired? So. You really figure out what people people's goals are and I mean, let's be honest. Not Everybody is looking out for the greater good of the whole group or the whole company right? What's in it for me? I've seen that and not to go not to digress too far into. How some sales people paid right. But if salesperson is paid a commission on just one specific sale, but that's sale is not the best sale for the company. If you think you know what I mean, why would they ever sell something else? If they're paid just by that sale, which is a bigger sale does that make sense or is that too? Oh, absolutely. No absolutely, I mean, there are two schools of thought on this right Follow the money. You'll start to see. Why people behave a certain way based on what kind of rewards they're getting? I worked with a really great consultant. Kim Wilkerson for many years and she always said what you reinforces what you get. And what you don't is what you lose. So, we're going to reinforce that you get paid commission on some thing that's really bad for the company. That's we're going to get. So now you need to start to say, okay, what what behavior do we really want to reward and how do we reward that? So it is for the greater good. I think your original question there Christoph was there are some people who are just in it for themselves?.

Kim Wilkerson Christoph consultant
Netflix Announces Cast for New 'Pinocchio' Animated Musical

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

Netflix Announces Cast for New 'Pinocchio' Animated Musical

"For the new live action version of Pinocchio has been announced. Perhaps you haven't been telling the truth, Pinocchio. It's not your father's Pinocchio. Netflix says that newcomer Gregory Man will assume the title role of Pinocchio along with you and McGregor is Cricket and David Bradley is Gepetto. Other cast members include Christoph Waltz, Tilda Swinton and Cate Blanchett. Oscar winner Guillermo del Toro will direct the Stop motion animated musical. The story will be set during the rise of fascism in Mussolini's Italy. We'll rake off CBS News

Pinocchio Guillermo Del Toro Gepetto Tilda Swinton Cate Blanchett Christoph Waltz Mussolini Gregory Man David Bradley Cbs News Oscar Mcgregor Italy Netflix
Christophe Georges and Bentley Americas

Cars That Matter

05:16 min | 7 months ago

Christophe Georges and Bentley Americas

"This is Robert Ross welcoming you to another episode of cars that matter that I have a very special guest from faraway. Actually, we're a video conference from Los Angeles to France and I'm here with Kristoff George President and CEO of Bentley. Kaz Christoph. It's wonderful to have on the show welcomed Angel Belt For me Today City my pleasure not seen one another for A. Long Time I. Think the most reason get together was for the launch of one of the very auspicious continental GT's at a dinner back on the East Coast. Since that time a lot has happened you were president and CEO at the time, and then you took over as global director product and marketing for period, and then back into the hot seat in America's with. Visits to come back. Well, obviously I thought there was some great work to do. You're kind of an outlier in the world of automotive executives because you've been with Bentley for a long time in. August, the meals. You fell in. Love is Bentley's did you do change talk about authentic? So yes, I joined than say nine G H was one months after was opening the twenty two years ago change away. On any memoir I can change this. By. Just been fascinated and I don't see that being spent for such you came on really at the let's call at the beginning of the new Bentley chose her none was on a roll he had acquired. That year spent Lee was brand new and it was an opportunity to a new chapter in the book of a mark that had been around since one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety S, and this is what we didn't again when they joined in Nj one monsalve Sango peltier's alcohol petty. We massively invested in effectively and new projects like energy with open pets right and this was the start of win. We need it just time to develop talent twin told us to knock. It's that when we introduced it in two, thousand four, each was immediately You'd success enemies in foil immunity del business by affect. Austin. So we took a change of scale company is these new coach Delta G.. Qoriniasa I should remember that launch and has been a perennial favorite of American. Luxury consumers ever sense the continental gt really did move the needle and deny fe on it to the title of your food, which is cows reach metals. That's GAL reach muddles ends easterly of. Today's Account Bacon they quickly a classic. The Guy Industry, you can name a few bullshit. Evan would be a Nike. That's right. beginner naked. It really did my simple definition of echo nosy cheese. All nuts it's hush money when you launch a new. Next Generation of existing cal people asking the question what is new is a new designs, a new feature specification, thick nosy. Belfer once on. So and when you are launching as a next generation of America, the question of from people is them right and that's a very simple way to who gets it's UNCALLED SALTA GT. As they quickly achieved that these estate us was a marketplace it. Absolutely did and what's remarkable is that even under the aegis of a new company or a brand new Bentley showing, say it really hearken back to the roots and the heritage of certainly Bentley's greatest post-war car the continental yes. In that was a remarkable fastback design that was the greatest. Yes. Well, literally continental tour and remains a hugely important collector Carta de as a Calgary says benzine spacious of. Gt was tight and nineteen, fifty, two on. This was at the time the fastest Faldo coop in the markets what became as win. So we took a lot of this inspiration even in terms of design on Galyon even you reaching down way but you can see since relation and you know when you are walking luxury, it is so a sunshine that you as laid back to some good fundamentalists, VN and soup. Stones Having Open Mitch's being nutshell for so many years. It's true. Of course, a couple of years ago you launched what you call the new continental and what I. Think's remarkable about it is that so many times refreshes or new designs don't capture the essence or beauty of their original but this car looks better than ever. Yes, it's remarkable. Thank generation So again, be put tough attention on no changing Zoe. A with his major success of counseling Tennessee these combination of luxury foam of issue Becca, butte package, which allows you to Exalt Dumb of driving shoe. This package is a four wheel drive Paktika spaces appoint foles bet foremost Asia's unique. Place, this was. Full success with fell school

Bentley Kaz Christoph America President And Ceo GT Robert Ross East Coast Los Angeles Kristoff George France Global Director NJ Guy Industry Nike Calgary ZOE LEE Austin Galyon Asia
Closed for vacation: France faces new virus testing troubles

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 7 months ago

Closed for vacation: France faces new virus testing troubles

"Virus cases rising in France but the European nation is struggling to administer enough tests to keep up with demands one reason many testing lab so close so that this stuff can take some of a cation just the signs of a second wave of building docks is an expose the vacation crunches just possible knowledge of web pages and Francis testing strategy a strategy that even the government's own virus advisory panel this week disorganized an insufficient ER Dr Christoph prud'homme says one of the problems is not enough skilled workers well yes there is a lack of what is to do the testing if we don't ask all the health workers to be available by mobilizing them there are just not enough people the other problem is organization Pritam has cooled out these no health agencies occurs okay to organize testing so that it's not the citizen who has to take his van and tried to call seven or eight laps in order to get an appointment Karen Chen must look fronts

France Dr Christoph Prud'homme Pritam VAN Karen Chen Francis
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

05:25 min | 8 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"Six hundred dollars. You can get this badge or something like that. Has that ever happened to you? have. You heard that. I mean we are in the business of developing our building and launching our own badge. On vacation program that does cost money, so not all are free. And some of the more premium ones out there that are really can make an impact on. Say Your career. And leveling up maybe to the next job the you're probably not going to go find a free certification for that. But what I what I meant what I'm saying though in this so okay, let me back up a little bit so in the model i. think you just mentioned. I still have to do the work. It's kind it's like Cornell right like I still have to pay for it I still have to do the work. I still have to pass the tests so totally that totally that works. That's fine. But then I also see some companies and we won't naming names here I'm that sometimes they just reach out to people and say you know we've already claimed to or or identified you as this person, and for only whatever the amounted. Batch without doing any work I. mean that is. We would not recommend that right. I mean people have to show that there know what they're talking about and not just give them a badge because they have a credit card. Yen that goes into the history of digital badges in. It's bailed pretty drastically over the last few decades. Is People awarding badges without any? The evidence rigor like justice, any practicum or curriculum based so everyone getting a badger everything, and then bad has become devalued. US show up to a market conference in you attended sessions. You Got Badge road. What is that accurate mean, or you're just? Your name is Christoph Trap and you had content marketing and your job title on Lincoln's get bad. It doesn't mean anything to anyone. That's can actually Digest that information fat so..

Christoph Trap Cornell Lincoln
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

05:32 min | 9 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"Quite a bit is within marketing communities that I'm in within slack and there's a lot of. On a specific subject outside of the thread in it you're right, it could get pretty confusing. So how do you so what I try to do is I try to I. Don't want to say repeat everything ember, responding to, but if somebody talks about you know. Christoph why do you think why are we not talking more about the navigation bar? Right for calls to ask. Instead of just writing back because nobody cares right because you know what I mean, that's a little. To say to a client, but realistically even if I say that in a nice way, they might take it in that exactly I set. That's true. That's true so. So, is it? Is it really as simple as just saying? The reason I wouldn't recommend that. We focus much on the navigation bar when it comes to calls to action is because all these I've seen. This shows that hardly anybody clicks on anything of the navigation bar other than the career page period period. Gets the point across right in. ME. Tell me if you disagree. I don't think it is too much trouble for to repeat your point. especially with copy and paste in our clipboard on on our computers and whatnot Ideally you will hope the conversation stays within. The threat but. I don't think it's too much trouble for for those instances. So the the couple of other points you brought up. There is you have the well defined. Hooper people correct. And so that's probably a problem I. I'm a big guy in in. Transparency right so everybody it's. It's okay with me of everybody sees everything. Doesn't mean so. The problem comes in when they chime in. Right, and how do you? How do you define that? Make sure so. Let's say you have I. don't say an executive, but maybe a level down. Who isn't really part of the conversation? But they have that access because we believe in transparency, and they choose to insert themselves into the discussion I know that wouldn't happen in slack necessarily because something to bite you in, but you know base camp or whatever it can happen, how do you? How do you make sure to keep the conversation to the group? That actually should be talking about this great point. It actually did happen slack for me one time, and and our General Forum at the change. The channel name to General Form for all to see. And and and make it pretty. That that's..

Christoph Hooper executive
"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

03:36 min | 9 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"Business storytellers it's Christoph. Trapped your host and author of content performance culture. Thanks for joining me for another episode of the show today. Let's talk about communications, especially as it relates to project management, so whether that's with clients or internally am seeing more and more companies. Thank you for doing that to US correct in well-designed project management tools, and of course there are many of those. Base Cam Jira Saana. The list goes on and on and on. So. How do you communicate? In that kind of environment, of course, it's mostly based and today's expert that ask on the show is Chris Craft. He's the CEO of now media based in. Atlanta Chris. How're you doing? I'm doing well. Thanks for having me crystal. And Tell me if I'm mischaracterizing your reaction, but when I ask you to come on the show to talk about, how do you communicate better? Here's some of the issues. I've seed. You agreed right. There's a lot of issues with communication happening out there over shore. every APP wants to. You to allow desktop notifications. We have email. We have the project management tools that you name We have slack. It can be overwhelming. So when you so this actually hit me. How hard it is to think about communication in those tools is because the notifications that you're talking about, and then some of them have email notifications which I hate eight email, yeah! It right if I can just turn it off, I do, and I don't use any email notifications for any of those apps I just got the APP. Notifications turned on, but I think what happened. Is I was traveling somewhere? Of course as we were recording this hardly anyways travel anywhere. But in those good old days I guess. I'm sitting somewhere and I see something pop up and made sense in the little vacuum fried, and then I replied in that vacuum, and then somebody else read my replies, but they didn't see the previous notification, so they reply to what I was saying and based on what they currently were thinking. It was something totally different, right? So. How do you like I mean? Is it really a simple as always candidates setting the? Setting the expectation and kind of responding to, or how do we get around having this truly crappy communication happening? Great question so internally at now media of we don't do much in email Communication is between our team and our our clients internally. We do a lot with slack. And in what we do to get around the issue that you just brought up. Is We have our slack? Channels really highly define. Of the few people who are in those specific channels. no the the mode of communication in the methodology for the most part. We're pretty good as a creating threads for specific conversations and keeping the conversation within those threats. Every once in awhile the the response outside of the threat, and that's understood, but it hasn't been that much of a problem where I've seen that problem happen..

Chris Craft Christoph Atlanta
"christoph" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

05:08 min | 10 months ago

"christoph" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Like a classic cartoon gibberish. Like a hit Hubba now. That's that's a language that said no no no real real. Real confused gibberish. Is there something that you wish you had known going into being a movie star that you may have gotten to know or learn to now that you've you know you've had your ten or twelve years or whatever it is in the in that part of your life no you know because because it's not a it's not a A finished product. It's it's still believe it or not A living process and it still has ups and downs of different kinds. And it depends on on a what you choose to take seriously. Isn't he you or is it what you do? And I make very strict distinction between the two. Because if if it's me that I'd take seriously I get bored very quickly and if it's what I do that I'd take seriously I stay alert and so I much much prefer the ladder. Do you think there's a chance you'll slip into another profession accidentally? Well I started directing and I wanted to do that for a long time but I never may be. Maybe my my respect for proper not for directors please an mind you not directors at all but for what directing should be. Maybe that sort of Put a little bit an obstacle between in my approach. There you know so I was always a little hesitant to just go and claim and say Nah I I'll director thank you very much. Lou Volva What do Because I've I've been on the receiving end of bad directors for so many times that I that I actually have some form of reverence for the ideal of the profession and I had the immensely good fortune to get jobs as an actor with people who deserve that reverence. That sort of took the time and didn't allow me to pursue. You know the the direct thing on on on Maya Level M. I was so lucky to work with literally the best and that then put you know the bar so high for me that I that I chickened out the but I do it anyway. You know I'd do it because you've not most of what you do you do despite Despite of whatever it is that wants to keep you from Christoph Waltz. I've so enjoyed your work. I'm so grateful that you took the time to be on Bullseye. It was really cool to get to talk to you. Thank you so much for enduring. My meandering Christoph Waltz from his home in Berlin most dangerous game his newest project is streaming now on qube which is short for quick bites. That's the end of another episode of Bullseye. Boza is produced at the homes of me and the staff of maximum fund in and around Los Angeles California. Where my colleague k? Seuss captured in his house. A Shiny Tokushima now a shiny POK mon. My notes indicate is a lot like a regular pok mon but in rare different colors. This particular POK MON was yellow instead of Brown. So congratulations to hey seuss. Hopefully we'll get a big head and quit his job. Role on the show is produced. By speaking into microphones. Producer is kept Ferguson. Hey Soussan Brosio is shiny associate producer. We get help from Casey. O'brien and Jordan Kaolin are interstitial. Music is by Dan. Wally also known as Dj w our theme song is by the go team. Thanks TO THEM IN THEIR LABEL MEMPHIS industries for letting US use it. We're also on facebook twitter and Youtube which is searched for bullseye with Jesse Thorn. You can keep up with the show there and I think that's about it just remember all great. Radio hosts have signature sign off Bullseye. With Jesse Thorn is a production of maximum fund dot org and is distributed by NPR..

Bullseye Christoph Waltz Jesse Thorn Seuss US Boza MEMPHIS industries Lou Volva Soussan Brosio NPR Wally facebook director Los Angeles California Producer Casey Brown Dan Youtube
Anna of Untamed Borders Teaches Locals to Ski in Afghanistan

Counting Countries

04:14 min | 1 year ago

Anna of Untamed Borders Teaches Locals to Ski in Afghanistan

"Have a brief conversation with Anna. She has a unique job besides is being a tour guide for untamed borders. She's a ski coach in Bamiyan Afghanistan teaching locals how to Ski. Untamed border specializes alizes and bringing travelers to challenging. Locales like Afghanistan Samaya in Iraq check out their agendas on their website. And right now now. Here's my conversation with Anna. He welcome to accounting countries. Please take a moment introduce yourself. Hi My name is on Savannah where I live on a fire I like to travel abroad and in life free time I like the Pumpkins pumpkins interesting. Anything to do with Halloween. Not really I just like the Pumpkin CDO traditions living. Yeah Okay so besides travel. I understand you are really passionate about skiing. And you've worked as a ski teacher for several seasons plus in Switzerland. I know you've also met some interesting people in Switzerland when you were a ski coach. Tell me about three of them fister still. He is a Swiss journalist journalists. Who enabled me to come to spend the first time? And he was the one who started this project a one C up and the the to say remind friends from Dallas and the best years for Benetton suggest in Asia Around who are now. My Co workers. Keep Up Okay and as he cites side note I understand. There is a documentary. Made about the two skiers. What's the name of that documentary? The light shines okay. It's pretty cool. I just saw that the other day so you should check that out and I know Afghanistan. Ghanistan was high on your list to visit for quite a long time and Kristoff. You just mentioned in. Switzerland gave you the opportunity to travel there in February. Three of two thousand sixteen. What brought you there? What did you do when you got to Bamiyan so it was really cool their helicopter and so the big snowcapped mountains and then I stayed there for a month? I worked with the Ski Club Club. And we organized against challenge inge. Okay and just for some further background. Christoph is one of the founders and supporters of the Bamiyan Ski Club and the idea behind the club is. What's the club doing in by me on we are basically Young people from surrounding villages is to spend their free time in winter when they don't have school to learn some new activities into her funding was now and we need to know a little bit about Balmy on. How many meters high is this area? There's a lot of mountains so gunmen lies. One two thousand five hundred meters that's valley and when we go skiing we start in two thousand eight hundred meters high and we go from there We have to say also that there are no lifts so we start down we walk up and then we see them. Some good exercise besides Kristof. Untamed borders is also one of the supporters of the Bamiyan Ski Club and and when you went to Afghanistan in February of two thousand sixteen you also became part of the untamed border steam and you guided several travelers who came to Afghanistan for the ski challenge at that time. Tell me a little bit about working with untamed borders and guiding in travelers. Who are coming to bomb young to participate in the Ski Challenge? I actually got quite a lot of interesting people to ski here And some of them are very well traveled. Some of them are good skiers. It's rarely the whole package. One person But they're always always surprised and amazed by mountains here and I everyone has so far on. I've been here his really enjoyed. There's a

Bamiyan Ski Club SKI Afghanistan Bamiyan Afghanistan Anna Switzerland Ski Club Club Skiing Bamiyan Kristof Fister Asia Christoph Iraq Inge Dallas Ghanistan Kristoff One Two Thousand Five Hundred
How Do You Develop Good Weather Decision-Making Skills?

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

05:50 min | 1 year ago

How Do You Develop Good Weather Decision-Making Skills?

"Do you develop good weather decision making Skills Gilles. I'm afresh private pilot and watched other also fresh by private pilots go out on a day where the Tar noted fifteen to twenty not winds with gusts up to thirty knots and so on on another occasion. I stayed on the ground when the light rain was passing through which probably wouldn't have been a problem. I know that it's better safe than sorry but after getting my license I often struggled with the decision making regarding the weather so I want to find that sweet spot between safety and confidence to go out and learn and experience. Do you have some tips. I do in fact Christoph so thanks for sending this question in the first thing I want to say is. You're absolutely right better safe than sorry. There are no old bold aviators and I always say it's better to turn around and walk away and live to fly another day right so in the beginning I think you should accept a certain amount of the of a certain amount of cancelling and then looking up from your chair on the beach and saying you know what I probably could have gone flying today. That's going to be okay. We're just GONNA tolerate that that is better than you've. You've probably heard the other saying that it's better to be you know on the ground around wishing you were in the air than in the air wishing you were on the ground and until you experience that second thing of being in the air wishing you're on the ground you you really can't appreciate how true that statement. Is You really want to avoid being up there in a bad situation and wishing you hadn't gone flying so so how do you do this. How do the professionals make good weather decisions. How do they fly at their level in some pretty inclement weather other and then also know when it's not okay to go and the secret to good decisions too good weather decision making is having a set of objective criteria that that you've decided on ahead of time and you don't have to wait a lifetime to invent this stuff you can certainly borrow it. We've been flying for more than one hundred years and professional operators when they get hired by a company they get handed an operations manual that operations manual is born earn out of the history of the company rights of this company is sixty years old. You're benefiting from sixty years of experience and in that operations manual there are simply. Lee objective rules. If the crosswind component exceeds ex. You may not fly it. You know if the crosswind component is why and and you had and you're below a certain weight you may land right so it's just like this this matrix of Kenai or can't I it is black and white so the first exposure that you have to what we're going to now call personal minimums conduct professionals. Call it the operations manual in general aviation world. We call impersonal minimums in the first exposure. You have two that are the endorsement is the endorsement that you're see. If I gave you a for example I typically endorse my students for they solo for a fifteen nut headwind limit a seven to ten not crosswind limit depending on the student five thousand foot ceilings and six miles visibility ability. Is it safe to fly in San Carlos when the ceilings are less than five thousand usually it is but I am going to give them in kind of a short leash to begin with and then slowly length in that in the process really doesn't stop after you. Get your private certificate so that's critical developing a set of personal minimums. I often lecture though and I'll ask the audience audience. I'll say how many people out there have heard personal minimums all every hand in the room goes up and I'll say well how many people out there have personal minimums and stick to those personal mm-hmm and the vast majority of hand stay up but when I say how many people have actually written those personal minimums down on a document commit to them and keep keep that documents so they can continue to refer to it and revise it over time and at that point most of the hands drop so the hard part in our world is forcing your own compliance with the personal minimums that you've decided ahead of time are your limit. You know if I pack the kids up if I tell myself hey my limit is thirty knots of wind. I'm not GonNa go if the gusts succeed thirty now. That's my level right in the kind of planes flying and I hey you know tell my wife. We're headed to Palm Springs. We packed the car and we load the kids and we drive to the airport and we get all set. I get down there at preflight the airplane everybody's all set my mother-in-law inlaws name what time you guys arrive in there on the rap and I go get the aid us in its gusting thirty one. Do you think there is not an extreme amount of pressure sure to just go fly that mission on and I can't I literally can't I have to think of it. As though I work for that company that I M my chief repealing that there is an operations manual and that I will get fired if I go flying it is black and white and that discipline is truly the hard apart so to kind of summarize what we said a personal minimums are going to be the secret to better weather decision making you're going to kind of keep them pretty conservative to start and accept a certain amount of days that you cancel unnecessarily and over time you can kind of reduce those minimum. I mean you can kind of like increase. The win limits bring down the ceiling limits. You can make the personal minimums little less conservative but the real hard part heart to have the discipline to force your own compliance with those procedures when there isn't a chief pilot or a boss breathing down your

Christoph Kenai Palm Springs San Carlos LEE Sixty Years Five Thousand Foot One Hundred Years
Why UNICEFs $7 million funding appeal is so important for Afghan children

UN News

03:20 min | 1 year ago

Why UNICEFs $7 million funding appeal is so important for Afghan children

"This is Matt wells at UN news. The UN children's fund UNICEF has just made an appeal for seven million dollars to help treat extremely vulnerable children who are suffering from the worst form of malnutrition, in an interview with you. And uses Daniel Johnson UNICEF spokesperson, Christoph bureauc- explains how the agency provides help throughout the war-torn country and what could happen if it doesn't get the funding it needs the situation of malnutrition of children, ghanistan is alarming. They are two million children in the country, which from acute malnutrition, among them, six hundred thousand children. That's from severe acute malnutrition a child at severe suffer from Seattle magician in child that needs urgent treatment, or the wise in my life on stance is extremely weak. You can get sick very easy and one in two children in Afghanistan is not vaccinated. So you're telling me, children are going to die within a few weeks unless you get this funding. Well, the problem is that we. Are unique safe. The only provider the sole provider of the treatment for these civilly, acutely, malnourished children, and our nutrition programs are totally underfunded. We need twenty six million dollars in two thousand nine hundred we have half of it, and in three weeks if we don't get urgently seven million dollars that will allow us to buy more than one hundred thousand cartoons of these therapeutic foods that is so lifesaving, we will stop providing this treatment to one thousand three hundred has facilities in Afghanistan. All over the country is in very remote rural areas. That means that civilly acutely malnourished children, who need urgently a treatment will go to these facilities, and will not have treatment, you say all over the country is that anywhere in particular that has been affected by last year's drought, for example, as also forty years of conflict where we're talking really is it rule areas. In Afghanistan were talking about all of the country. Theory. But it through that in two thousand eighteen there was a drought that affected very seriously. Twenty two out of thirty four provinces in the country. And it was mostly in the southwest in the in the northeast. So in this very hardly affected provinces by the drought. We noticed I mean, some data show that the level of severe malnutrition in these provinces have increased of twenty five percent. So for the case of war for children, very difficult year in two thousand eighteen conflict that he's still lasting and children liberal of civil accurately malnourished. Children, six hundred thousand which remained unfortunately, Staten Island, of course many might say, well, it is awful. What is happening in Afghanistan? But just look at Yemen, just look south, Sudan, why is the UNICEF appeal so important today it through that, when you look at the number you can ring the bell for south Sudan, forgiven for Democratic Republic of Congo in. Ghanistan. It's a very complex situation. We need to act in an emergency, but Obse on humanitarian on development level, and we need to act now just to avoid a deterioration of the nutrition's nurse situation of children in all over the country. It will be much more expensive to act when the situation will deteriorate.

Afghanistan Unicef Malnutrition UN Matt Wells Christoph Bureauc Daniel Johnson Seattle Sudan South Sudan Staten Island Obse Democratic Republic Of Congo Yemen Seven Million Dollars Twenty Six Million Dollars Twenty Five Percent Forty Years Three Weeks
Neil Winters, Saint John And Christoph discussed on Bill Handel

Bill Handel

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Neil Winters, Saint John And Christoph discussed on Bill Handel

"And the young and the restless they say goodbye to the character. Played for nearly thirty years by the late actor Christoph, Saint John. Neil winters will be sent off in a four episode story. Arc today that writer says viewers to keep boxes of tissues closest is winters family reflects on his life thing. John died at home in LA this

Neil Winters Saint John Christoph Writer LA Thirty Years
 Germany, France offer to take over 40 migrants from NGO ship

A Public Affair

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Germany, France offer to take over 40 migrants from NGO ship

"Djibouti. France has said it will join Germany and other e u nations taking in more than sixteen migrants on a rescue ship stranded in the Mediterranean. The French interior minister Christoph customer said in a Twitter post that they would act in solidarity and welcomed the African migrants they were rescued off the Libyan coast

Twitter Christoph Mediterranean France Germany Djibouti.
Scattered yellow vest protests against Macron, anti-Semitism

All Things Considered

03:10 min | 2 years ago

Scattered yellow vest protests against Macron, anti-Semitism

"There's been an uptake in anti semitism in France, which is home to Europe's largest Jewish community. Many say the anti-government yellow vest movement has fueled hate speech. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports on how the nation has been shocked by some recent acts of anti semitic vandalism. This week people gathered at a memorial service for a young Jewish man who was murdered thirteen years ago. The ceremony in the Paris suburbs takes place every February thirteenth, but this year. Hundreds of people of all ages and backgrounds showed up to honor Ilan Halimi. They stood together at the spot by the railroad tracks where the twenty three year old was dumped after being targeted kidnapped and tortured for three weeks in two thousand six by a gang seeking ransom. Pederick petita the mayor of sunshine of Daiwa addresses the crowd. He learns he won't Alon means tree in Hebrew. And this is why we planted trees here in his memory. It's this symbol criminals attacked on Monday through this anti-semitic act. They wanted to murder him a second time retiree Isabel, easy and her two friends came to the ceremony from a neighboring town. See revolted, I'm revolted that someone has cut down trees that are the symbol of Ilan Halimi. She says we've thought of him for the last thirteen years, there are just no words for what happened. The French interior minister says anti-semitic acts are up seventy four percent from a year ago. Another occurred this week when to public mailboxes decorated with the portrait of former Justice minister Simone Veil or tagged with swastikas. They was deported to Auschwitz at sixteen. She survived and went on to become one of the country's most beloved figures. French prime minister Edward Philippe called the recent spate of antisemitic. Vandalism sickening to. Swastikas are drawn face in someone spits on the memory of Ilan Halimi. It's a body blow to the whole nation are not knocked out, and we will fight this tooth and nail rabbi Michel, sir. Fatty came to Halley means memorial, sir. Fatty is president of the French Judeo Muslim association and for the last decade he and his Muslim colleagues have been fighting stereotypes about Jews in mostly African and Muslim immigrant communities in Francis. Suburban housing projects surf IT says radical Islam has been behind anti-semitism in France in recent years. But now it seems to be coming from a second source. Sukey still we haven't heard from the classic World War Two anti-semitism in seventy years. But with these recent acts like being written on shop window seems to have made a resurgence has unleashed. And that's something is the best movement political commentator Christoph Barbier says the yellow vest movement has created a dangerous climate busters only fool awesome. With more movement is a roiling cauldron of anger and hatred. He says and the anti-semites took advantage and slipped in and everything's spreads like wildfire on social media including conspiracy theories involving Jews.

Ilan Halimi France Christoph Barbier French Judeo Muslim Associatio Vandalism President Trump Europe Eleanor Beardsley Justice Minister Prime Minister Simone Veil Paris NPR Daiwa Rabbi Michel Auschwitz Murder Isabel
Mystery Surrounds Soap Star Kristoff St. John's Death at 52

America Trends

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Mystery Surrounds Soap Star Kristoff St. John's Death at 52

"Longtime soup star Christopher Saint John has died. No cars has been given. He started in the young and the restless for twenty seven years while I was walking around with a cane. Learning braille living my life in a black hole, stripping down, my wife, you're taking it a bed and you didn't want to hurt me. How long is this going on Jason Carter of entertainment tonight? Christoph was known for his beloved character. No white on restless he was a two time. Daytime EMMY award winner. John was fifty two years old

Christopher Saint John Emmy Award Jason Carter Christoph Twenty Seven Years Fifty Two Years
Mystery Surrounds Soap Star Kristoff St. John's Death at 52

America Trends

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Mystery Surrounds Soap Star Kristoff St. John's Death at 52

"Longtime soup star Christopher Saint John has died. No cars has been given. He started in the young and the restless for twenty seven years while I was walking around with a cane. Learning braille living my life in a black hole, stripping down, my wife, you're taking it a bed and you didn't want to hurt me. How long is this going on Jason Carter of entertainment tonight? Christoph was known for his beloved character. No white on restless he was a two time. Daytime EMMY award winner. John was fifty two years old

Christopher Saint John Emmy Award Jason Carter Christoph Twenty Seven Years Fifty Two Years
Kid Phone Usage: Screen Time Changes Structure of Kids’ Brains, ‘60 Minutes’ Says

60 Minutes

11:08 min | 2 years ago

Kid Phone Usage: Screen Time Changes Structure of Kids’ Brains, ‘60 Minutes’ Says

"If you have kids in wonder if all that time they spend on their smartphones endlessly scrolling snapping and texting is affecting their brains. You might wanna put down your own phone and pay attention. The federal government through the national institutes of health has launched the most ambitious study of adolescent, brain development, ever attempted in part. Scientists are trying to understand what no one currently does how all that screen time impacts the physical structure of your kids brains as well as their emotional development and mental health. Let me know when you're ready twenty one sites across the country. Scientists have begun interviewing nine and ten year olds and scanning their brains. They'll follow more than eleven thousand kids for a decade and spend three hundred million dollars doing it. It's quite an investment. Doctor guy Dowling of the national institutes of health gave us a glimpse of what they've learned. So far, the focus only I started talking about doing this study was tobacco marijuana all drugs. The screen time component really came into play. Because we were wondering what is the impact? I mean, clearly kids spend so much time on screens the first wave of data from brain scans of forty five hundred participants is in and it has Donald Dowling of the NIH and other scientists intrigued here, you can see that there are differences in the patterns, the Moro is found significant differences in the brains of some kids who use smartphones, tablets and video games. More than seven hours a day. What we can say is that this is what the brains look like of kids who spent a lot of time on screens, and it's not just one pattern. That's hassen. It's very fascinating the color show differences in the nine and ten year olds brains. The red color represents premature thinning of the cortex. That's the wrinkly outermost layer of the brain that processes information from the five senses. What is a thinning of the cortex? Mean? That's typically thought to be a maturation process. What we would expect to see later is happening a little bit earlier should parents be concerned by that. We don't know if it's being caused by the screen time. We don't know yet. If it's a bad thing, it won't be until we follow them over time that we will see if there are outcomes that are associated with the the differences that we're seeing in this single snapshot, the interviews and data from the NIH study have already revealed something else kids who spend more than two hours a day. A on screens got lower scores on thinking and language tests. When the study is complete is a possible that a researcher will be able to say whether or not screen time is actually addictive we hope so we'll be able to see not only how much time are they spending how they perceive it impacting them. But also, what are some of the outcomes and that will get at the question of whether there's a dictionary not win. Will you have the answers that you're searching for some questions will be able to answer in a few years. But some of the really interesting questions about these long term outcomes, we're going to have to wait a while because they need to happen that delay leaves researchers who studied technology's impact on very small children anxious in many ways, the concern that investigators like I have is that we're sort of in the midst of a natural kind of uncontrolled experiment on the next generation of children. Doctor Dimitri Christoph is at Seattle Children's hospital was the lead author of the American Academy of pedia. Deatrich most recent guidelines for screen time. They now recommend parents avoid digital media use except video chatting in children younger than eighteen to twenty four months. So what we do know about babies playing with ipads, is that they don't transfer what they learn from the ipad to the real world, which is to say that if you give a child an app where they play with virtual Legos, virtual blocks and stack them and then put real blocks in front of them. They start all over if they try to do it in real life. It's as if they've never done it before it, also, it's not transferable. Don't transfer the knowledge from two dimensions to three don't you? Kristina kiss is one of the few scientists who've already done experiments on the influence screens have on children under the age of two. It's a critical period for human brain development. If you're concerned about your teenager being addicted to their iphone your infant is much more vulnerable and using the exact. Same device your infant is more vulnerable. Because why because the experience of making something happen is so much more gratifying to them. In a small pilot study the doctor cosstalk has conducted on fifteen children. Researchers gave toddlers three toys first of plastic ATar than an ipad that played musical notes. And finally an ipad with an app that rewarded the kids with lights colors and sound. So it a very specific time of the research. Assistant will ask the child to give what they're playing with back to give it to the resources to research assistant. Sixty six percent of the time with their traditional toy the child will do just that with the ipad that simulates that they give it back almost with the same frequency. But with the ipad app that when they push on it, it does all kinds of things they're much less likely to give it back with a more interactive. I've had app the percentage of kids willing to hand it back to the researcher dropped from sixty percent to forty five percent. It's that much more engaging. It's that much more engaging. And that's what we find in the laboratory. It's engaging by design Tristan Harris told us in a story we reported more than a year ago. There's a whole playbook of techniques that get used to get using the product for as long as possible. Harris is a former Google manager. Who is one of the first Silicon Valley insiders to publicly acknowledge that phones and apps are being designed to capture and keep kids attention. This is about the war for attention, and where that's taking society, and we're that's taking technology which wanting for adults four kids. This is a whole other thing. That's where this gets particularly sensitive is developmentally. Do we want this war for attention to be affecting our children? Do you think parents understand the complexities of what their kids are dealing with? No. And I think this is really important because there's a narrative that all I guess they're just doing this like we used to gossip on the phone. But what this MRs is that your telephone in the nineteen seventies didn't have a thousand engineers and the other side of the telephone who are redesigning it to work with other telephones. And then updating the way your telephone work every day to be more and more persuasive until recently, it was impossible to see what happens inside a young. Brain when a person is focused on a mobile device. But now scientists at the university of California San Diego have hacked that problem. How often do you have people come in? Marois? So as often as we possibly can Dr Karen bag is an investigator on that three hundred million dollar NIH study her team is scanning teenagers brains as they follow Instagram. The most popular social media app when we met eighteen year old Roxy ship. She was about to participate in Dr baggage study how much time do you actually spend on screens a check my phone, Freddie regularly. I'd say what's pretty regularly every at least ten to twenty minutes is a conservative estimate. She can't take her phone into the MRI because of the powerful magnets in the machine. So a mirror has been placed above her face to allow her to look across the room at a movie screen displaying images from her Instagram account this way, Dr Baghdad can see exactly which parts of the brain's reward system are most active while using social media. So you could actually see a part of the brain light up when you're feeling good. Yes. From the scanner in the Skinner based on her data and the results from other studies. Dr baggage is among scientists who believe screen time stimulates the release of the brain chemical dopamine, which has a pivotal role in cravings and desire. So you're more likely to act impulsively. And use social media compulsively. Instead of like checking yourself you wanna keep on it to keep getting the good feelings. Teenagers. Now spend on average four and a half hours a day on their phones all that time has resulted in a fundamental shift in how a generation of American kids acts and thinks when smartphones went from being something only a few people had something the majority of people had it had this really big affect on how teens related to each other. Gene twinkie is a psychology professor at San Diego State university. She spent five years combing through four large national surveys of eleven million young people since the nineteen sixties she discovered sudden changes in the behavior and mental health of teens born in one thousand nine hundred five and later generation that she calls I gen- now the first generation to spend their entire adolescence with smartphones. So a lot of them can't remember a time before smartphones existed. There have been generational shifts before in the past. I haven't they're certainly this one's much more sudden and pronounced. Than most of the others. The food was introduced in two thousand and seven smartphones. Gained widespread usage among young people by two thousand and twelve gene. Twenty says she was startled to find that in the four years that followed the percentage of teens who reported drinking. We're having sex fell. But the percentage who said they were lonely or depressed spite it's possible. Other factors may have played a role. But twenty says she wasn't able to identify any that correlated as closely as the growing popularity of the smartphone and social media. It's not just the loneliness and depression from these surveys. It's also that ER visits for self harm like cutting have tripled online girls aged ten to fourteen what our teams doing on their phones that that could be connected to depression. It could be anything. There's there's kind of two different schools of thought on this said, it's the specific things that teams are doing on their phones. That's the problem or it could be just the sheer amount of time. Mm that they're spending on their phones. That's the problem. Finding definitive answers about social media's influence on mental health can be a frustrating. Exercise. Eighty one percent of teens in a new national survey by the Pew Research Center said they feel more connected to their friends and associated social media use with feeling included. But in a month long experiment at the university of Pennsylvania college

Researcher NIH Doctor Guy Dowling Investigator Marijuana Tristan Harris Kristina Kiss Donald Dowling Pew Research Center Doctor Dimitri Christoph Depression Instagram University Of California San D Research Assistant Google Seattle Children
Phones, tablets, and their impact on kids' brains

60 Minutes

02:40 min | 2 years ago

Phones, tablets, and their impact on kids' brains

"Wave of data from brain scans of forty five hundred participants is in and it has Dr Dowling of the NIH and other scientists intrigued here, you can see that there are differences in the patterns MRI's found significant differences in the brains of some kids who use smartphones, tablets and video games. More than seven hours a day. What we can say is that this is what the brains look like of kids who spent a lot of time on screens, and it's not just one pattern. That's it's very fascinating. The color show differences in the nine and ten year olds brains. The red color represents premature thinning of the cortex. That's the wrinkly outermost layer of the brain processes information from the five senses. What is a thinning of the cortex? Mean? That's typically thought to be maturation process. What we would expect to see later is happening a little bit earlier should parents be concerned by that. We don't know if it's being caused by the screen time. We don't know yet. If it's a bad thing, it won't be until we follow them over time that we will see if there are outcomes that are associated with the the differences that we're seeing in this single snapshot, the interviews and data from the NIH study have already revealed something else. To spend more than two hours a day on screens got lower scores on thinking and language tests. When the study is complete is possible that a researcher will be able to say whether or not springtime is actually addictive. We hope so we'll be able to see not only how much time are they spending how they perceive it impacting them. But also, what are some of the outcomes and that will get at the question of whether there's a dictionary not win. Will you have the answers that you're searching for some questions will be able to answer in a few years. But some of the really interesting questions about these long term outcomes we're going to have to wait a while because they need to happen. That delay leaves researchers who studied technology's impact on very small children anxious in many ways, the concern that investigators have is that we're sort of in the midst of a natural kind of uncontrolled experiment on the next generation of children. Doctor Dmitri Christoph focus at Seattle. Children's

NIH Researcher Doctor Dmitri Christoph Dr Dowling Seattle Seven Hours Two Hours Ten Year
"christoph" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"christoph" Discussed on The Big 98

"Got a text requests for Christoph broken halo so me hit you with. That, same Hey Hey Oh Zongol Jeez Man Shot A.

Christoph
U.S. judge halts 3-D printed gun blueprints hours before planned release

Radio From Hell

04:45 min | 2 years ago

U.S. judge halts 3-D printed gun blueprints hours before planned release

"Well Marilyn Manson. Marilyn Manson is coming to town with rob zombie I think the I think Zarab's only well I I, think that is the tour. But I think he, is not doing it, anymore I, think it's just robs all Maryland Maryland, is not doing well, he's who's in Bangor Maine on the tour the Bangor. And and he got. Arrested, but the, but then the Bangor Maine police department said it. Was he didn't get arrested it was a, joke Marilyn Manson. And, a police officer were joking around and he was briefly handcuffed and people took pictures of it and so everybody reported on a video of the handcuffing was. Posted to Marilyn Manson's Instagram account, Lieutenant Tim cotton took to Facebook to say it. Was good clean fun he. Said the, officer at Curtis Greiner is. No longer allowed to, work backstage however except, during Lord, of the dance or something related to, Disney Manson and rob, zombie performed Sunday night wrapping up three day impact festival. Featuring anthrax and slayer So I haven't heard anything about Marilyn Manson being all heater he canceled a couple of shows but the. Tour is still on yeah let's see US judge has blocked the planned release of three d. printed. Printed gun blueprints hours before they were set to. Hit the internet citing with states that sued to halt publication of designs. To make weapons that security screening may not detect US district judge Robert Lynn week in Seattle said the blueprints publication could cause irreparable harm the. US citizens the decision blocked a settlement President Trump's administration had reached with a Texas company which. Initially, said it didn't plan to put the files online these, are files. That people can look at and figure out how to make guns out of. Plastic, using three d. printers go wrong is so bad these are untraceable undetectable ghost firearms that pose a threat to global security some gun rights groups say the Technology is expensive the guns are unreliable. And the threat is being overblown And I wonder, that too in the in the way that, people are screaming about it it's it's sort of smacks of of a let's let's have a, major panic over something. That really is not that. Much to panic. About but I don't, know I haven't looked into it These says it says a r. AR fifteen style assault rifles but then I, heard you can only. Put one bullet in it Now the gun, the? Gun that they're talking about is is. A one bullet gun and, it, doesn't look like any are, fifteen it's a handgun right that's. What I kind, of square looking but I. Heard somebody saying no they've got us style cartridge the cartridge that you can make so you see that's that's what happens here people are purposely making. It, confusing gun in the three d. printer, deal is a one. Shotgun that is kind of bulky and a handgun right now I Great idea no it's not I don't think it's a great idea however let's get our facts wine and not panic over things like this all. Right Let's see One of the teenagers who, prosecutors say played a role in the overdose deaths of to Park, City boys two. Years ago. Remember this Who They say that she was having ecstasy and other drugs delivered from overseas to her home as recently as two weeks ago Two weeks ago a community alert was sent out to Park City parents advising them the damages excuse me the charges. Were being recommended against multiple teens in connection with control and synthetic controlled substances being shipped to them using the dark net one of the. Juvenile's being investigated was also involved in the September twenty sixteen deaths of grant Seaver and Ryan Ainsworth, both, thirteen years old the boys died just. Two days apart after overdosing on synthetic opioid manufactured in China called you four seven seven zero zero also known as pink the teen involved in. The investigation of girl who seventeen Goes to Park City high school Is is being charged, with four counts of drug distribution. Which is a second. Degree felony she's not been charged I don't think me in the deaths of those kids, authorities, think that it was heat heat heat stroke The. Death of a hyper whose body was located in southern Utah Monday night the body of, Christoph poaching of Belgium located by. Bureau of land management..

Marilyn Manson United States Bangor Maine Police Department Lieutenant Tim Cotton Bangor Officer Park City High School Bureau Of Land Management Zarab Maryland ROB Park City Anthrax Maine Facebook Instagram Curtis Greiner Utah China Seattle
Does TV have a future or will the Internet conquer all?

Business Daily

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Does TV have a future or will the Internet conquer all?

"Listen, listen, really carefully. It's quiet, isn't it? We're home. I'm in the kitchen dining area. My thirteen year old son is Namie. He's playing on the computer or do you playing for nine four night? You're coding. He wants to say these play fortnight. He's actually played four because I don't let him play. But anyway, we're gonna go upstairs and we're going to see my daughter, my eleven year old daughter who's in the living room, living room rooms on the floor above the kitchen, and he's onto devices. She's got the laptop open next to her and she's got her ipad in a hands and set of headphones on. What do you do on the computer? I'm playing Minecraft. How long have you been playing Minecraft this evening? Flow like forty, five minutes. And the TV's in the corner is looking bit dust in us because I remember that time we actually sat down as a family and watch the television. The kids will turn own once in a while to play computer games. But really, we rarely ever use the television to watch programs that typical evening seen at my home is bone out in the statistics on TV viewing over the next four years, the amount of traditional television viewing is likely to fool. So says the broadcast audience research board, the organisation that compiles audience measurement and television ratings here in the UK. But it's happening all around the world because these days TV is competing with YouTube, Netflix Amazon, computer games, and the usual tablets and devices founded many homes. A generation is turning away from traditional TV that has huge implications for the broadcast industry. Someone who's been at the cutting edge of it is christoph- Clinton. His company Xtreme provides a platform for all kinds of TV production. Companies to stream shows online directly to the public. It's a service known as over the top or OTT because it bypasses traditional TV broke Costa's known in the industry as linear TV. So does he think the days of his counterparts in linear TV on numbered? I think they have no choice, but to accept an acknowledged the change of consumer habits, right. I mean, if you look at the numbers, we can for example, see that the clover revenue generated by OT services a project to double between two thousand fifteen and two thousand twenty one. The OT revenue grows three times faster compared to traditional linear TV. And you notice a change in the kind of content offered through the services that you develop compared to say traditional linear TV.

United States Five Percent