35 Burst results for "Christine N P"

J&J Covid-19 Vaccine Authorized for Use in U.S.

Ric Edelman

00:37 sec | Last week

J&J Covid-19 Vaccine Authorized for Use in U.S.

"Third vaccine against Cove it the pandemic after the FDA gave emergency use authorization, Johnson and Johnson's one shot covert 19 vaccine was authorized last night for adult 18 and over here is more from ABC is Christine Sloan biting, calling the authorization and encouraging development and in a statement, adding There is light at the end of the tunnel, but we cannot let our guard down now or assume that victory is inevitable. And unlike the other two covert 19 vaccines already authorized here, the United States, Johnson and Johnson's vaccine on Lee requires one

Johnson Christine Sloan FDA ABC United States LEE
Police investigate racist hack that disrupted Ben Franklin High students' virtual field trip in Philadelphia

KYW 24 Hour News

01:04 min | Last week

Police investigate racist hack that disrupted Ben Franklin High students' virtual field trip in Philadelphia

"And the school district or investigating after a virtual field trip Monday morning by students at Ben Franklin High School was hacked and Students were subjected to suggestive images and inappropriate language. It happened as three dozen students from Ben Franklin High School were on a virtual field trip to Lincoln University. According to a letter to the school community from Franklin Principal Christine Barelli. The link provided by Lincoln was hacked by someone quote dressed in a tire associated with a well known hate group. The feed was cut off by Franklin staff, but not before students were exposed to a person making racist comments and showing suggestive pictures of young woman. School staff reported the incident to police in Philadelphia and in lower Oxford Township where Lincoln is located. In a statement, District spokeswoman Monica Lewis said safeguarding the health and well being of students is the district's top priority and that students and families are encouraged to share any concerns they have with principal Borelli. Like Denard. Okay, Whatever the news Radio

Ben Franklin High School Christine Barelli Lincoln University Oxford Township Franklin Lincoln Monica Lewis Philadelphia Borelli Denard
How to Grow a 6-Figure Business in 6 Months

Entrepreneur on FIRE

03:47 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Grow a 6-Figure Business in 6 Months

"Christine. Say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with fire nation. I am so excited to be back with j. l. d. and each one of you and i believe that the hardest part of growing sicker business. You love is allowing it to be easy. Doesn't have to be hard but we were taught that it does right. We're taught to be really good employees and so what our brains to try to keep us safe when we start dreaming about getting not first traction in our businesses. That's what makes it hard not the fact that you're not capable. I mean. sometimes. I ask myself like what is the path of least resistance here. Why am i making this difficult for myself. Like what feels light. Not heavy. And i'll tell you fire nation. I am keeping all the things they feel light and feel easier in my world right now and i'm releasing the things that feel heavy feel hard because it doesn't have be difficult and we're talking about a pretty cool topic how to grow a six figure business six months working ten hours a week and i just want to talk about the realistic -ness of making six figures working ten hours a week. Break that down for us christine. Yes this is all about simplifying like you said what feels light right. You only need two things in order to have the foundation of a six figure business like you need a clear niche and you need an aligned. High ticket offer providing some kind of service whether as a coach as a consultant as a service provider freelancer marketer. Virtual assistant opium social media manager. One of those things. That's all that you need in order to be able to start going out and offering it you need to things. Fire nation a clear niche and that clear niche aligned with a high ticket offer of some former service. That christine was talking about right there. And what's really powerful that for me. Is i see a lot of people today. Saying john like man. I want to launch podcasts. Like interview entrepreneurs of that and listen entrepreneurs on fire fails if i launch it in twenty twenty with my same skills that i had in two thousand twelve i. I won in two thousand twelve because it was a niche. It was void. I fill ditz. And that's why that one got traction. So what is a specific niche. The can be clear and defined for you. Fire nation that. How can you weave in an aligned like that word aligned. High ticket offer of a service that makes sense because right now man. I'm c. n. Christina kinda wants you to chime in on this because i'm seeing a lot of people doing things the wrong way which is like they're working so hard for these like really low ticket offers and just you know having to get like a hundred thousand sometimes even more than that of the sales of these low ticket offers for it even to add up to any kind of meaningful money and like every sale is tough like it a lot times. I found that a low ticket sale because sometimes even be harder than hydrogen sale. And we gotta get into that kind of specifics too. But what do you think about this. I completely agree. I have like a what not to do right. And it is literally what you just said. Don't write a book or start a podcast. I don't download every freebie and try to piece together. A business plan from them. Don't create a bunch of low priced products and start offering them all and also like. Don't tell yourself you don't have enough time because it's almost never time problem. It's a clarity problem. Like if you knew what to do you would just go do it already. Which is why if you know what to do. You can do it in ten hours a

Christine Christina Kinda John
How do we help hydrate our skin?

Allure: The Science of Beauty

04:09 min | 2 weeks ago

How do we help hydrate our skin?

"Hey everyone welcome to the science of beauty. a podcast from allure. I'm michelle lee. The editor in chief. And i'm jenny by executive beauty director. And on this podcast we're gonna be diving into the science behind beauty and the products that we are always talking about an testing at a lower. Today's episode is all about hydration. And because we're taking this deep dive into the world of k. Beauty hydration as possibly the most important topic. That's right michelle and in our previous episode on layering. You heard dermatologist. Marie jin talking about the importance of hydration and how layering can help lock in moisture. So how do we help. Hydrate our skin in the first place to answer that question and more with dr christine lee. A senior research and development manager with age see our partners in producing this episode. Christine can you introduce yourself and tell us a bit about your background and pristine lee on the senior. Rnd manager overseeing unilever space. care business. In north america. I received my phd in two thousand in physical chemistry from the university of florida. And then i joined. Unilever and of worked on the hd brown for about two years so christine agency is based in seoul south korea. And i know you work really closely there with researchers. What can you tell us about. What's trending beauty right now. So in asia a lotta. The skincare formulations can karan's really focused on achieving bright hydrated glowing skin in korea specifically hydrating formulas are really key to rejuvenating the skin so it looks and feels smooth and soft but in addition in asia consumers just are so familiar and comfortable with multi step routines really elaborate application techniques. Like they talk a lot about double cleansing deep massaging. They'll even talk about like rubbing product in with your knuckles. They talk a lot about slapping and patting and tapping. so they're you know they're just really familiar and comfortable with application techniques that we don't talk about in the us as much. The other thing too is really interesting. About the asian consumer is the way the words they use to describe the look and feel of their skin that they're looking for so they'll talk about or glassy or porcelain skin and that much of this is really foreign to the american woman but it just really shows kind of the level of involvement Asian women have in their skincare routine. It's like my perfect skin. Everything you're saying. I'm like yes. Yes yes more of that please. You mentioned hydration which is of course the topic of our episode today as basic as it seems. Can you just define hydration for us as it relates to skin. I mean short really. Hydration pretty much means increasing the skins water content really at the end of the day. Dry skin is more than just a lack of water. When your skin is dry or dehydrated it can start to appear flaky doll. It really starts to feel uncomfortable tight irradiated. It can start to feel like you're getting more sensitive. This really is indicating a much more fundamental breakdown in the Healthy biological processes that are intended to keep skin soft and supple and smooth skins normal renewal processes slow down in absence of sufficient hydration which then leads to further dryness than it starts to pull your skin into this downward spiral alright. I don't love where this is going. What happens in the downward spiral. Our skin's natural explanation processing slowed down which leads to an accumulation of skin cells on the surface and these kind of accumulated or aggregates of skin cells. Start to form flakes which are another indicator of dryness and drier skin surfaces also lead to increase surface texture roughness which traps light which causes the skin to lose translucence and appeared dull and lifeless whereas hydrogen scan on the other hand is smooth radiant feel softer more elastic. More comfortable touchable. So it's not religious the dry or white hydrated it's really kind of biologically related. Wait supposed to versus comfortable. Soft smith hydrogen.

Marie Jin Dr Christine Lee Unilever Michelle Lee Korea Asia Jenny University Of Florida Karan Michelle Christine Seoul North America LEE United States
UN envoy calls on Myanmar junta to step back from violence

UN News

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

UN envoy calls on Myanmar junta to step back from violence

"The un special envoy on myanmar has called on the country's military leadership to step back from violence and respect human rights and the rule of law amid ongoing protests against the takeover by security forces. Two weeks ago special. Envoy christine schreiner bergener made her appeal to myanmar's deputy commander in chief so when underlining that the world is watching closely and that any form of heavy handed response is likely to have severe consequences. You in spokesperson filed heck said on monday protests across me on my have grown steadily since the first of february military takeover and arrest of top political leaders including a state councillor. Aung san suu chee and president when went there have been reports of excessive force by police and military against demonstrators as well as of arbitrary detentions

Myanmar Envoy Christine Schreiner Berg UN Aung San Suu Chee Heck
Crab speeds up destruction of coastal salt marshes

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 weeks ago

Crab speeds up destruction of coastal salt marshes

"Along much of the eastern. Us grassy salt marshes provide a buffer between ocean and land but rising seas threaten to overtake these marshes and burrowing crab is speeding up their destruction. Small populations of the purple march crab have long lived in southeastern salt marshes but the small crowds were typically spread out across the landscape as sees rise. High tides flood parts of the marsh for longer each day and the crabs cluster in these areas because they liked the wetter softer soil. When they start to congregate in really high densities not only are there. Burling impacts really amplified so they turn the martian to swiss cheese but they also overgrazed the vegetation and create mudflats in the marsh. That's christine angelini of the university of florida. She says that without grass roads and tidal creeks for more rapidly. And what this is doing is turning a marsh that usually is sort of a continuous grassland into a fractured grassland. That has many title creeks or longer tidal creeks than what has historically been there salt marshes help buffer inland areas from storm waves and floods. So if they're damaged or destroyed the marshes may no longer protect the coast.

Christine Angelini University Of Florida United States
Funeral procession held for Boston firefighter Michael Ricci

WBZ Afternoon News

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Funeral procession held for Boston firefighter Michael Ricci

"For a fallen firefighter. Boston Firefighters were in Marshfield today to honor and remember Mike Ricci was killed late last month and now his wife, Christine, is charged with his murder. Boston Fire Today tweeting out their respects. Remembering Mike reaches a friend and a brother, as well as a co worker. They say they hope his legacy of friendship, respect, bravery and humbleness. Humility lives on in his Children, and it's 6

Mike Ricci Boston Marshfield Christine Mike
Investors get lessons, not profits, from GameStop frenzy

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:40 min | 3 weeks ago

Investors get lessons, not profits, from GameStop frenzy

"Over the past few weeks the world watched as individual wall street investors rushed to buy shares in the struggling video. Game retail chain game stop. It was sold as a chance to punish wall street. Deletes especially those who bet that companies will fail. This is called shorting game stops share values. Climb to dizzying heights and then fell again. Virtually all of those market games evaporated washington post personal finance columnist. Michelle single terry talked about that. With no king. So a lot of newer investors younger investors are fascinated by the story of game stop stock and it has led some of them to get involved to put their money into the market for the first time that on its face is not necessarily a bad thing young people investing. But you have some concerns. What are those you know. I'm not a big fan of using investing like a game and what's happening with is really speculation is not the tried and true way that the average person who's like saving for retirement for example creates well for themselves. They do it. Slow and steady over decades really and with diversification often through mutual funds low index mutual funds. And so. i know that's not a sexy or exciting story for the children or young adults but the reality of it is that that's how they should be investing the mistakes that small investors are making when they jump into the market and scoop up a hot stock or get involved with something like game stop. What are the pitfalls that you see so the analogy that i use that. I think that they will identify with this. It's like when you go to las vegas casino and there are people who are winning. You hear the bells go off in the slot machines like yeah. That could be me. But that's not not like a casino. Sure they're gonna be winner. Sure you're gonna read the news stories about someone who invested gang stock in paid off the student loan debt but for everyone of that person. There are so many more who are going to lose money. They're going to invest money. Did they can't afford to lose and they're going to walk away. Not the better for your recent column. You spoke to an expert. Who made what would appear to be a very boring suggestion. But she claims it is not christine. Benz says buy some shares in a low cost s and p five hundred index fund. And you the buyer. We'll see that you are a part owner of what. So you're part of apple net flicks tessler all the major companies that. You're very familiar with the exciting ones. You know amazon. The problem is that when you buy a mutual fund you don't see the guts of it you know it's like putting together a stew and you got all the tomatoes and carrots and all that kind of stuff you're eating is great but then this though but when you look at the pot and you see it all you like carrots and there is beefing there. That's what an index fund. When i'm talking about the stock market and investing in and having money for your future i don't look at what the news is hyping. That's like the casino. Why when you hit it at a slot machine. Does the bell go off. Why would i want to let someone else know that. I've made money because they want to. They want other people to think they can win too. But we all know that the house always wins but the regular people who are not in the casinos. Who are he just walking on the strip and enjoying the you know as long as vegas without the gambling. They're investing in what people consider boring. But bahrain can make you a millionaire.

Washington Post Michelle Terry Las Vegas Benz Christine Amazon Apple Vegas Bahrain
Fans prepare for unprecedented Super Bowl weekend amid pandemic

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | Last month

Fans prepare for unprecedented Super Bowl weekend amid pandemic

"By now, the Super Bowl is completely different from previous championship weekends because Of the pandemic. Here's NBC's Christine Sloan in Tampa. The safety precautions are already in place of the 75,000 seats inside Raymond James Stadium on Lee 22,000 will be filled with fans, including 7500 vaccinated Healthcare workers invited by the NFL, Everyone in attendance will be required to wear masks maintain social distancing. And will receive a P P E kit and

Christine Sloan Super Bowl Raymond James Stadium NBC Tampa LEE NFL
The Role of Business in Political Change, with Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

Accelerate!

05:11 min | Last month

The Role of Business in Political Change, with Christine Lagorio-Chafkin

"Christine. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. Let's pleasure talk to you. we're you recently. Wrote an article title inc magazine titled business leaders spoke up after the capital riot. Will their voices remain strong. So first question. I have for you is. Was that really a strong response by business. Yeah i i think that it was at i sort of a subtle response and then all of a sudden the the sort of numbers of responses grew and grew and snowballed so quickly. I just had never seen like this. This letter signed by close to two hundred. Ceo is urging congress to accept the election results and ensure no further delay in the orderly transfer power than the business roundtable the us chamber of commerce. The national association manufacturers like everyone was speaking up and it was almost as rush to just show support of our democracy which is not a crazy idea. Of course the sheer numbers. If you looked at twitter users everyone and linked in you start every business leader just putting their foot down and saying. This is unacceptable I don't think it was overly shocking in that. Like i said like every business wants on kind of order and and any instability is bad for business right like this. It wasn't a political statement. At first it was just a hey like respect the rule of law And and i think that you know business did step up in in a way there. And i thought that that was sort of meaning fall whether it was a hugely political choice. I i think is is still up for debate at so. It seemed like that also came the last minute. I was sort of building to ahead and and seemed to me. In many cases came serve even after the fact and after the factor january six and I dunno seems are opportunistic to me to some degree and that you know how much of the business response was shaped by the prospect of bill. Democrats both senate seats in georgia and and sort the desire to be in the good graces. Now they're going to be the party empower every time. We see the transition of power from party to party. We see And i think silicon valley is a really good good kind of bellwether of this obscene. it Every every transition and now that silicon valley has so much lobbying power to money invested We've seen that shift already Just like we did for years ago. it seemed more subtle than and now it because of the instability and because of the events of january six like it was very abrupt and we saw it immediately we saw. Vc's tweeting just very very much more political than you know the leaders of banks and Very big businesses. But they were. They were tweeting Very politically and i think that they opened up a bit more right and they felt a lot more freedom to if they were already democrats Speak their mind for sure. Well yeah it's so our struck me. Was i guess still surf. How few are individual business. Leaders spoke out. I mean there are certainly the collective groups in the business groups. You've had that letter signed by ceo's but seemed like sarajevo. A safe thing to do is we came into the beginning of january and the the past administrations still seem to be doubling down on their their story about the the elections are one Trying to say it as nicely as possible. It seems to me it's like geez. How did why do january sixth bridge too far now if what you really value is stability above all things in the case of business you know you want predictable markets and the like that you sell into. Yeah it seems seems like almost too little too late given the impact that could have because there are some school thought and we'll get into it. The businesses actually should be playing a larger role in societal and political change. I think that that's really interesting. And of course true. I think that you know for me. As a reporter. I follow what happens on social media And what how these these big social companies work and how the smaller social companies work as well and watching. I think exactly how you say that. Was you know why january sixth the bridge too far. You can say that exact thing for for twitter and trump's account right and her for how facebook responded to the you know political ads and misinformation about the election. You know there were so many times previously when they could have made the right calls there and failed to. And how did it get to a little insurrection of the capital. You know to for everyone to say oh wait. This is too much we should have done. Yeah it's not like the warning signs were there areas.

Inc Magazine Us Chamber Of Commerce Christine National Association Congress Twitter Silicon Valley Senate Georgia Sarajevo Donald Trump Facebook
Pope seeks to encourage musicians silenced by coronavirus

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:37 sec | Last month

Pope seeks to encourage musicians silenced by coronavirus

"Had some words of encouragement for musicians of struggling through the pandemic. ABC is Megan Williams in Rome Adventure song by Christine and the Queen's was a 2020 hit, but most musicians have been hit hard cheese. On Thursday, The pope urged musicians not to lose heart during the corona virus pandemic when concert halls have been closed, practicing made difficult, and many have lost jobs and human contact. In the video message for the fourth International Conference on Music, the pope highlighted the plight of musicians who have found themselves without work force to find other jobs to get. By Meghan Williams. ABC NEWS Rome Rising

Megan Williams ABC Christine Rome Meghan Williams
Historical Costuming with Dr. Christine Millar of Sewstine

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:08 min | Last month

Historical Costuming with Dr. Christine Millar of Sewstine

"Climb christine. I go on the internet as so steam. And i am a lot of things really. I am historical costumer who focuses on digital embroidery and extremely detailed trim. But i'm also a physician by trade. So i do work in a hospitals as anesthesiologist through this pandemic and i also do a god. I also have a youtube channel. Where i talk about how to create these things and really. I also focused on instagram. And so i just wanna take a moment and again. Thank you for being here. Because i do not know how you do all these things. You're also a mother of an adorable. I think he's too now toddler so i just want to thank you for taking the time to be here especially with everything you have going on. Oh my god. I can't believe. I forgot to mention the family. Yes mother and game. So i just want to kind of learn a little bit more about you. Do you have an earliest memory of clothing. That might have stuck with you over the years. Did you first realize the transformative power of clothing. I love to ask people this question. Oh my okay. So i was born in korea and i came to the united states when i was three and a half so i have a lot of memories of sitting in korea watching american disney movies like the little mermaid as well as There's an anime cult candy candy. I don't know if you've ever heard of it. But it's basically a yellow haired american girl who wears fluffy roughly dresses all over the place. And i was so obsessed with pink ruffled gowns especially after areas pink dress in little mermaid that my aunt actually got me a nine petty bridesmaid dress for like a little four year old girl and i was so big on me and i remember wearing it for the first time and it was the most happy moment of my childhood and from there on i think i just became obsessed with drawing in trying to capture addresses and the older i got i the more i realized what i really wanted to do was not just draw these dresses but actually had to wear these dresses. Yeah and i'd love to hear a little bit more about that. Because i think everyone probably has their own unique origin story about how they came to historical costuming. How did it all start for you. I believe you kind of started in caused play to if i'm not incorrect. That's exactly it. I initially started in. 'cause play. I noticed i was doing a lot of costuming for some of my favorite power. Females like the tana princess leia. you know Firefly characters and that's where i started end but the real one that i really want to make was katrina from sleepy hollow particularly that black and white striped dress that she works for about fifteen seconds in the end. I initially made it in college end to turn out right but you know i loved it enough that it. I just realized that my favorite movie costumes were all historically based and once. I realized that it was really easy to just kind of focus on that i kind of went. The steam punk route and did a lot of eighties bustle dresses. One of which. I got into the new york times style section when i was in college and that gave me the like the positive energy boost i needed to religious focus all my energies into historical. And that's not to say. I still don't do 'cause play in fact i'm working on a cost play right now for another power female a sister of battle for more than forty k which seems like a completely turnaround but to me. It's just you know more of the same like you know detailed female power stuff and i'm not cost player or historical costumer of but i come from a career as a costume supervisor in a costume designer i started in theater and then i got into film and tv but i have this just incredible appreciation and fascination with these communities both the 'cause play community and historical costuming community. They're not necessarily mutually exclusive as you attest to you. Know they are really quite intermingled. A lot of the times. Even though. I don't participate in these communities. I really really anxious. I just think it's so cool do so for those who may not know. Can you please tell us a little bit more about this worldwide historical costume community and cause play community and maybe just kind of start by defining those things. 'cause i don't think everyone may know the difference. That's a really good point. So i say cost play his costumer like everybody knows but so cost player. Is someone who makes costumes for movies. Tv shows games sort of like established Ip already out there. So you know someone who's a cost player making a princess leia costume versus on historical customer may take a museum piece or a picture from say like an old fashioned panel and try to recreate those so it's different goals so the cost player tends to try to make things as screen accurate as possible or take their own spin on a two degree while the historical customer is all about trying to get things to look historically accurate or correct the historical time period. But these are vague goals. You know everybody has their own specific goals when it comes to costuming which is really one of the most delicious parts of it. Yeah and i think just seeing how many all these people all around the world who have been introduced to through instagram. That's how i became familiar with you and a lot of your peers was just through instagram. And the para social media but admits so many wonderful people and so many people who have incredibly different approaches to as you mentioned these same historical or cause play approaches so just so cool so you yourself have built this incredible online presence for yourself you instagram and youtube as you mentioned at so steen is your handle. And you're really just showing all of these various historical dress projects that you've created at your in home studio which is just incredible. I love you can tell us a little bit about your selection process. What is your inspiration between starting these different projects so omen inspiration from everywhere and think. There's always about fifteen different projects night years going through my head at any point in time so a lot of times. What'll happen is i will learn something about or i will be able to actually procure a certain fabric. So for instance right now. I'm working on the dressed. That marie antoinette whereas in the two thousand and six the couple of film marie-antoinette in the chapel or the church which has the strawberries on it. This particular fabric is woven in italy. It's based off of seventeen eighties. Waistcoat in a museum collection. Somewhere in this particular fabric was actually used in about three different films including the original dangerous liaisons movie and it is so hard to get if you can even buy it. It usually runs about three hundred euros a meter so for me. That is like you know. I might be a doctor but i can't. I can't spend that much right on top of it. It wasn't even like procurable. Until very recently i was able to actually buy it because Not the original. But some other company on oetzi started making a knockoff of it. And i don't know how legal his is but on the other hand. It's based off of original waistcoat. And the you know the trademark on run out like two hundred fifty years ago so the fact is you know this. Other companies started offering. It was very similar. The colors are almost identical slightly. Different here and there but it was so close and the fact that they were able to offer it at a significant discount from the original price meant that it went from being pipedream in the back of my head to something. I could actually do now so a lot of times. It'll be that i finally find. The fabric actually comes available or in the case of the strawberry dress which i turn into which is strawberry regency dress. I always want to make address. But i really didn't like the roses on the original inventory. Not because i dislike roses. Or i think it's ugly. I've just digitized so many roses but then suddenly the strawberry gus went. I like i can just turn those roses and strawberries. And no one's gonna care or mind. So i was able to do that as well. So it's all about what becomes available to.

Tana Princess Leia Korea Instagram Youtube Christine Disney Katrina The New York Times United States Oetzi Marie Antoinette Antoinette Italy
New Acting U.S. Attorney Named For Atlanta

Morning Talk with Martha Zoller

00:34 sec | Last month

New Acting U.S. Attorney Named For Atlanta

"There's a new top federal prosecutor in Atlanta Curto Erskine, the first assistant U. S attorney in the Atlanta office is stepping in is acting U. S attorney for the Northern District. Erskine taking over from Bobby Christine, who's been the U. S attorney for the Southern District of Georgia since 2017 and who became the acting U. S attorney for the Northern District on January, 4th. Then President Trump tapped Christine to head the northern district after the sudden departure of U. S attorney BJ Pack, No word on why Christine has stepped aside and a lawyer in Georgia preparing to

Curto Erskine U. Bobby Christine Atlanta Northern District Erskine President Trump Georgia Christine Bj Pack
"christine n p" Discussed on Crack the Customer Code

Crack the Customer Code

05:54 min | Last month

"christine n p" Discussed on Crack the Customer Code

"Adam. You know we've talked a lot about how changes that we encountered in twenty twenty affected customers. But you know who else. They affected everyone. Everyone including customer experience leaders. Yes one hundred percent the people who were leading these organizations who were trying to figure out. How do we adjust. How do we react. How do we keep our leaders focused on the customer experience when all these other things are happening. And that's why. I'm so excited about the conversation that we're about to share with christine rhymer from surveymonkey. She works with these leaders all the time and really goes out of her way to listen to them. And it's just there's so much in here. I am so excited. Knows great interview and she brings brings a wealth of data which is fantastic. Because obviously she's surveymonkey they have the data they bring the receipts right. Gene-o and yeah. I mean that's been one of the things we've talked about with clients and it's just. How do you predict how plan for howdy strategies for a future when you know that is always about projecting forward a pattern Th that's all leadership for the future is and you know outside of some innovation generally trying to figure out which what are my percentages in which patterns or going to apply. And how are they going to play out and when the pattern is completely just wrecked right. It doesn't exist anymore. How do you project that future so you know. Christine brings some lessons from a lot of discussions and a lot of data about like what we're executives facing. And what did they do. What were the things that were most important in customer experience last year as everyone tried to figure out this uncertain future. Yeah absolutely impressive. I should say certain future. But they had certain president. Yeah i think we're in for uncertainty a while so we can say present and future so there are lessons in this episode for nail And for and for the future. I would say so. So let's get started. Let me tell you a little bit about my friend. Christine rhymer seasoned executive with a unique blend of product marketing customer success and enterprise systems experience leverage to lead high-performing cross functional teams to deliver world class customer experiences as the vice president of customer experience. Christine leads survey monkeys customer experience program community and thought leadership to drive growth and innovation prior to joining survey monkey in two thousand sixteen christine held a variety of cx leadership roles including intuit's professional services team for digital banking and the customer success for into it health. Christine began her career in enterprise. Business systems and data management where she aligned cross functional teams to deliver measurable business outcomes. Christine leverages her customer centric and bias to action approach to help organizations transform customer feedback into action to improve the customer experience to drive growth. Hi christine were so happy. You're here with us today for being here. Thank you so glad to be here. Jeannie an atom. So great have you. I know you have tremendous insights a working with serving a monkey as you do. Because i sure you've seen a lot of data so i'm going to get straight to the million dollar question here. The early part of twenty twenty one. How has customer experience change as a result of the covid nineteen pandemic. It's it's a great question. Adam and and you know honestly. I can remember sitting at my desk in april going. Oh dear lord like for all the date i have. I have not navigated. What do you do when you're not sure to me. It's you ask for feedback right and so actually very in april. I gathered a dozen custody of the top customer experience leaders. That i knew and i asked him that very question. What are you doing different. And so we'll talk about an. I'll give you kind of three headlines of what i saw early in the pandemic that true that influenced customer experience in twenty twenty and then sort of t ap at least what i'm seeing heading into twenty twenty one grio. The first thing we saw was a bunch of folks in headlights. Saying i can't actually focus on the customer experience if my employees are not in a position to deliver so it was so funny those initial conversations when we try to talk about. What are you doing different for your customers. It all came back to the employee experience. So things like are they set up to work from their homes. Assuming most folks not all right. The result essential workers but most folks then shifted. How they do their work to home. So do they have the right tools. Are they a the able to manage their customers. Privacy etc so really really tactical setting employees up for success but then on top of that making sure employees were positioned slash trained to show up to the customers with empathy. So right you're talking to a customer in march and april and there in new york city. How are you and they're a restaurant or they are a travel industry. How we showing up with that right Both the policies as well as the expectation setting to show with your customers. We know empathy matters but my goodness this year. If you're not showing up human first before business right you're just missing the mark and we've seen this both in the conversations As well as you know in terms of how you show up digitally

Christine last year christine one -o
Christine Rimer On Learning From The Data

Crack the Customer Code

05:54 min | Last month

Christine Rimer On Learning From The Data

"Adam. You know we've talked a lot about how changes that we encountered in twenty twenty affected customers. But you know who else. They affected everyone. Everyone including customer experience leaders. Yes one hundred percent the people who were leading these organizations who were trying to figure out. How do we adjust. How do we react. How do we keep our leaders focused on the customer experience when all these other things are happening. And that's why. I'm so excited about the conversation that we're about to share with christine rhymer from surveymonkey. She works with these leaders all the time and really goes out of her way to listen to them. And it's just there's so much in here. I am so excited. Knows great interview and she brings brings a wealth of data which is fantastic. Because obviously she's surveymonkey they have the data they bring the receipts right. Gene-o and yeah. I mean that's been one of the things we've talked about with clients and it's just. How do you predict how plan for howdy strategies for a future when you know that is always about projecting forward a pattern Th that's all leadership for the future is and you know outside of some innovation generally trying to figure out which what are my percentages in which patterns or going to apply. And how are they going to play out and when the pattern is completely just wrecked right. It doesn't exist anymore. How do you project that future so you know. Christine brings some lessons from a lot of discussions and a lot of data about like what we're executives facing. And what did they do. What were the things that were most important in customer experience last year as everyone tried to figure out this uncertain future. Yeah absolutely impressive. I should say certain future. But they had certain president. Yeah i think we're in for uncertainty a while so we can say present and future so there are lessons in this episode for nail And for and for the future. I would say so. So let's get started. Let me tell you a little bit about my friend. Christine rhymer seasoned executive with a unique blend of product marketing customer success and enterprise systems experience leverage to lead high-performing cross functional teams to deliver world class customer experiences as the vice president of customer experience. Christine leads survey monkeys customer experience program community and thought leadership to drive growth and innovation prior to joining survey monkey in two thousand sixteen christine held a variety of cx leadership roles including intuit's professional services team for digital banking and the customer success for into it health. Christine began her career in enterprise. Business systems and data management where she aligned cross functional teams to deliver measurable business outcomes. Christine leverages her customer centric and bias to action approach to help organizations transform customer feedback into action to improve the customer experience to drive growth. Hi christine were so happy. You're here with us today for being here. Thank you so glad to be here. Jeannie an atom. So great have you. I know you have tremendous insights a working with serving a monkey as you do. Because i sure you've seen a lot of data so i'm going to get straight to the million dollar question here. The early part of twenty twenty one. How has customer experience change as a result of the covid nineteen pandemic. It's it's a great question. Adam and and you know honestly. I can remember sitting at my desk in april going. Oh dear lord like for all the date i have. I have not navigated. What do you do when you're not sure to me. It's you ask for feedback right and so actually very in april. I gathered a dozen custody of the top customer experience leaders. That i knew and i asked him that very question. What are you doing different. And so we'll talk about an. I'll give you kind of three headlines of what i saw early in the pandemic that true that influenced customer experience in twenty twenty and then sort of t ap at least what i'm seeing heading into twenty twenty one grio. The first thing we saw was a bunch of folks in headlights. Saying i can't actually focus on the customer experience if my employees are not in a position to deliver so it was so funny those initial conversations when we try to talk about. What are you doing different for your customers. It all came back to the employee experience. So things like are they set up to work from their homes. Assuming most folks not all right. The result essential workers but most folks then shifted. How they do their work to home. So do they have the right tools. Are they a the able to manage their customers. Privacy etc so really really tactical setting employees up for success but then on top of that making sure employees were positioned slash trained to show up to the customers with empathy. So right you're talking to a customer in march and april and there in new york city. How are you and they're a restaurant or they are a travel industry. How we showing up with that right Both the policies as well as the expectation setting to show with your customers. We know empathy matters but my goodness this year. If you're not showing up human first before business right you're just missing the mark and we've seen this both in the conversations As well as you know in terms of how you show up digitally

Christine Christine Rhymer Adam Intuit Jeannie New York City
Global shares mostly up on optimism for stimulus from Biden

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:48 sec | Last month

Global shares mostly up on optimism for stimulus from Biden

"The idea of a big US stimulus under Biden has boosted global stocks to record highs. US. Equity markets hit record highs yesterday. The U. S stock 600 is up 7/10 of 1% of the start of European trading. The Xetra Dax equally gaining 5100 up by Half of 1% We watching the Bloomberg daughter spot Index because that optimism about stimulus dragging down the dollar weaken 1/10 of 1%. The pound is stronger 3/10 of 1% surprisingly resilient perhaps the main one. Spot. 37 is the cable rate of the Europe 1 21 22 will be in the eyes off the E. C. B as we have Christine Lagarde and her team meeting today. As for bond markets this morning US years to one spot 08%, Germany is it negative 53 basis points and Italian BTP is dropping two basis points

Biden United States U. Christine Lagarde Europe Germany
New York City reschedules 23,000 vaccination appointments due to supply issues

Mark Levin

00:35 sec | Last month

New York City reschedules 23,000 vaccination appointments due to supply issues

"Dose coronavirus vaccine appointments because of lack of supply. Mayor de Blasio is calling on state and federal officials to allow for second dose is to be used so more appointments don't have to be canceled. My frustration is ah lot of vaccine 65,000 doses sitting in a refrigerator on artificial reserve when we need them right now. Now, the mayor says they're running out of doses, and there's also a slight delay in this week's Moderna shipment. He's confident, though the supply will ramp up in the coming weeks under the Biden administration. I'm Christine Marks for

Mayor De Blasio Biden Administration Christine Marks
4-Step Self Care Breathwork Protocol To Beat The Blue Monday Syndrome]]]]]

My Seven Chakras

05:14 min | Last month

4-Step Self Care Breathwork Protocol To Beat The Blue Monday Syndrome]]]]]

"It's monday morning here on main street. Vancouver it's dry. It's cloudy and the weather is still an crisp. I woke up at five. Am did my morning. Routine had accord shower. And i'm feeling great right now. How you doing recently. I came across the term blue monday. Which is a name given to. The third monday of the year due to the combination of both christmas blues chord dark nights at least here in the northern hemisphere dismal results from the new year's resolutions that some of us have set and the arrival of unpaid credit card bills entered offered all in most parts of the word were still in a lockdown socially isolated mentally stimulated because of all the social media apps and there's a mass hysteria about the virus. And i know that it is very hard for most people around the world to deal with. And that's why i decided to put together a four part breath work protocol for you to try out. It is guaranteed to make you feel better. Promise me that you'll do this. And then you will reach out to me to give me some feedback. I want how it went for you. And how you fared after your promise. Now before we get started. I wanted to give a shoutout to magda who reached out to me with an email a few days back. And here's what you said jay. I started listening to your podcast. After i was recovering. From my niece edgy in may two thousand and twenty. Your show was my one. Stop shop to all things spiritual and bronzed on from there. Researching and learning about all sorts of different topics is much of wealth of knowledge from your shows. Many thanks for shedding it. All with us mukta. Thanks mugged up so glad that you get value from our shows and i appreciate you listening. I also wanted to quickly answer this. One question from kendall christine from our podcast. Facebook group is asked me this question. If someone's typical unconscious breeding Is impacted by trauma. How does one this store regular breathing patterns without actively making the self conscious and aware of their red twenty four by seven. And that's a great question and there are many ways to look at it. A simple way to look at it is when we expedient drama of any kind it creates an emotional signature that is stored inside our body as it a minor for us to avoid experiencing similar negative experiences in the future. It makes sense right so the body wants you to a wide. Negative expedients are another drama. Potentially in the future in so it's sort of adding a minder. Storing it in the body and this dramatic expedients how you breathe because we're always on the lookout for danger. Something suspicious on a stimulant that can lead to eight relapse off that same expedients typically when we breathe shallowly at his breathing only to the chest and not all the way down to your belly were unconsciously on a state of alert our fight or flight which is associated with high stress levels. High blood pressure and constricted blood vessels by learning how to correct our breathing consciously breathing diaphragm medically and breathing nearly through the nose rather than through the mouth. Were training our body to relax and active the rest and digest system. Initially you're doing it consciously but then over a period of time it becomes unconscious now. This breath work along with visualization and mantras and some journaling and other practices can slowly but surely release the health drama. So that your body is convinced that there is no danger and that you can breathe fully and easily just like any other habit through practice through repetition and self love you will unconsciously start breathing correctly in a way that supports your health and white daddy. For example at night. I is small piece of tip o'neill like a three m. micro poor small tape on my lips. Go train myself to breathe through my nose. Evil while i'm sleeping. I've endured that to snore sometimes at night and this advice from the book breath by james nestor has really helped. Correct my nocturnal breathing. Batons but again. Sometimes good habits can take time to farm and you need to shower yourself with self love index small steps baby steps because that will make all the difference. I hope that makes sense scandal. Thanks for asking me that question. And with that being said let us begin with our four step breath work protocol step one do and bianca younger literally means self love and it is an ira vedic self-care practice of oil massaging yourself to balance your dossiers. Relax nova system and make your skin glow. There are many ways to do this and some can take one or two hours. But i'm gonna give you the short and simple method. That will take about ten to fifteen minutes. Firstly

Kendall Christine Magda Vancouver JAY Trauma Facebook James Nestor Neill Bianca
The Desire Factor with Christy Whitman

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

05:25 min | Last month

The Desire Factor with Christy Whitman

"Nama stay and welcome to live love engage. I am gloria grace rand today. I have got a lovely guest with us. Who is going to be talking about. Couple things talking about Becoming an energy master and also about a new book that she has out there. Wealth is coming out In april so First off. I want to welcome christine wittman to loving gauge. Thank you gloria. I'm so happy to be with. You will be are delighted to have you. I'm looking forward to this for quite awhile and let me share with you. Our lovely listeners viewers on youtube. Who this wonderful amazing talented woman as she is a transformational leader celebrity coach and love attraction as well as a two time new york times bestselling author not just amazon folks. Now this is york times. This is the big time Author of the art of having all an taming. Your alpha bitch loved him even allen. She's also the author of the international bestseller quantum success and as i mentioned a little bit earlier. She's got a new book. Called the desire factor is going to be out on april twenty first twenty twenty one She's also appeared on bunch of news programs today. Show morning show. She's attacks tock She's had her articles published. A lot of major magazines like people seventeen women's day and as a as an enough. She's the ceo and founder of quantum success learning academy in quantum success. Coaching academy which is a ten month law of attraction coaching certification program and she has helped over three thousand life coaches and helped countless others to unlock their power to manifest. Which i think we will probably also talk about here today. so i i'll christie. Tell us a little bit about Being an energy master first off like what what is that actually And and then what do we need to do to become. I guess what is it. Why is it important. Maybe that's yeah what is it. It's fair actually. Yeah that's a great question. I would big question when is it. Is you know you get to be the woops. Did i go out there you go. That was interesting. It shifted screens. I don't know why did that. So yeah energy mastery is really about you being the the employer of your life and therefore your creations and so we. Our consciousness is what creates our reality. We know this by universal laws by knowing that everything is vibration. Everything is energy and when we look at burley break breakdown what is our consciousness. It's what we say what. We think how we perceive or believe what we feel. And sometimes that's a big one because we don't wanna feel. We suppress our feelings. So we're still attracting from that place and then how we act and those are the things that we have influence over. We don't have influence over. What our partners are doing or how we want to change them or all the other things that are outside in what's happening in the world but we have a choice in how we respond to those things so mastering our own energy is really understanding. That you know life isn't sometimes full array moore's unicorns. Unfortunately there are things that happen right. We get sideswiped by information. We hear things in his could be shocking to the system and it's being able to feel the feelings to process them to choose the thoughts that we wanna feel really getting into a place where we are deliberately in tune and in check with our own energy because you know it very much looks like we're physical beings. We are right now. We're also energy and the way that we bring in energy is that we're energy. Receivers were always receiving an energy. We have trillions and trillions of cells at all have receptor sites on them that are needing energy and what most people do is they go out into the universe they go out to a grocery store and they get inundated by you know frequencies in energies in waves or maybe they call their mom or they call their friend. The friend is fear of something. So you're getting this energy that's coming into your system but if you're the one deliberately choosing the energy that you want to bring in now those receptor sites and the cells are filled so other people's energy bounces off because you are already filled so it's like urine energy receiver. You're an energy container right. We don't wanna to receive an energy and give it away receive an energy hold it ourselves. And then we're also energy transmitters and that's where the ways that we talked about we transmit energy by the words that we say by the thoughts that we think by the motions by the actions that we take by the perspective and all of that then by law of attraction comes back to us because if everything is waves of energy and it is quantum physics has shown it. Modern science has shown it. Einstein talked about it rate. Everything's waves and particles of energy. If we're the ones creating our reality by what we're sending out were the ones that are mastering our

Gloria Grace Christine Wittman York Times Quantum Success Learning Acade Coaching Academy Gloria New York Times Allen Youtube Christie Amazon Moore Einstein
"christine n p" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

06:46 min | 4 months ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Murder Minute

"Times the next day on january first nineteen eighty. Five durham regional. Police took over the investigation about a month later. They zeroed in on a suspect. Next door neighbor twenty-three-year-old g moron who was described. A quote. weird type guy. Morin still lived at home with his parents. Worked as a handyman kept. Bees played the clarinet and didn't have much of a social life in fact he'd never had a girlfriend on april. Twenty second nineteen eighty-five after several interviews with police. Gay paul morin was arrested for the murder of christine jessop but morin had an alibi. His time card at work showed that he had clocked out. At three thirty two pm the day of christine's murder and he was witnessed at several locations including the grocery store a lottery ticket center and the gas station. His parents brother-in-law testified trial. That more in arrived home at about five thirty pm and that he stayed there the rest of the night in february of nineteen eighty six gay. Paul morin was acquitted at trial the following month. The crown appealed the verdict and in june of nineteen eighty seven. The ontario court of appeal ordered a new trial on may twenty eighth nineteen ninety. The second trial against gay poll morin began on july thirtieth nineteen ninety. Two be paul. Morin was found guilty and was sentenced to life in prison. Unlike other child sex offenders morin was kept with the general population. He refused protective custody or segregation and morin maintained his innocence in nineteen ninety-five morons. Legal team ordered tests of his. Dna against semen found on christine's close when he was first charged a decade earlier. In nineteen eighty-five dna analysis was in its infancy but by the mid nineties. The technology had significantly advanced. The dna test results proved with certainty that gap. Paul morin was innocent on january. Twenty third nineteen ninety-five more and was formally acquitted of all charges and was released from prison for his wrongful conviction key. Paul morin received compensation of one point two million dollars. I myself new and my husband knew that he was innocent. Mourns mother ida said we could account for him and twice. We've written to that effect once at the first trial and once at the second is a terrible thing not to be believed. The truth was not enough and that is unfortunate in october of twenty twenty police once again knocked on key. Paul mourns door. They said we'll be brief. But we just want to apologize to you about what happened to you over the years. We have found the person responsible for christine jessop murder on october. Fifteenth twenty twenty. Police officials announced that by using a new technique for tracing criminals through the dna of their relatives. They had confirmed that christine jessop was killed by a family friend. Calvin calvin hoover's. Dna was a match to the semen found on christine's underwear he was twenty eight at the time of christine's murder after thirty six years christine's family reacted to the news. Kenny jessop christine's older brother described his feelings to the global news. Relief that we finally have the answer. We waited for angry about who it is frustrated. Sad he said like anything in this case it couldn't be a simple answer. It had to be someone we knew. Well calvin hoover his wife. Heather and their children were friends of the jessop and the families used to get together for barbecues. Hoover even sister'd in the search efforts pristine and attended her wake and funeral. There were three people. My mother told that morning when we went to visit my dad in jail and that christine wasn't coming. Ken said but he had forgotten. That hoover's wife was one of them before they left for the visit. Their mother janet had phoned their father's lawyer his boss and who first wife heather would she was on the phone with hoover's wife christine was having a tantrum wanting to see her father. Ken said she hadn't seen her father in a month. And she was told christine. You're too young. You can't so hoover's wife sympathized with that and must've told hoover and passing. He saw his opportunity his chance and he took it. There was nothing random about this..

paul morin Kenny jessop christine christine jessop Calvin calvin hoover murder Heather durham regional ontario court of appeal Bees ida Ken janet
"christine n p" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

02:09 min | 4 months ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Murder Minute

"On the afternoon of wednesday. October third nineteen eighty-four at three fifty. Pm nine year. Old christine jessop was dropped off by the school. Bus in queens village on -tario canada. Her parents weren't home. Her mother janet and fourteen year old brother. Kenny were out visiting her father who was in prison. Christine wanted to go visit him to. She begged to but her mother said no. She said that christine was too young to be visiting the prison. Christine brought the mail inside. The house placed it and her backpack on the kitchen counter and walked to the convenience store nearby to buy some bubblegum. It was the last time that she would be seen alive. Christine had plans to meet up with a friend that evening at the park but never showed up wind. Janet and kenny returned home from the prison. Christine was nowhere to be found. They searched the park and called her friends. There was no sign of her. I knew something wasn't right then. Janet said to see tv news about an hour and a half after we got home. I thought this isn't right. She'd be may be hiding somewhere playing a game something like that. I got a little concerned than when you can't find her anywhere in the park along the street. You know there's something wrong. Janet called the police soon. Christine jessop 's face would be on every newspaper and television set. york regional. Police believe that christine was likely abducted by someone close to the family. Someone christine new.

christine jessop janet Kenny canada york
"christine n p" Discussed on Black Women Travel Podcast

Black Women Travel Podcast

02:40 min | 4 months ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Black Women Travel Podcast

"This beauty and food and imbibing am also want to ask you how can listeners support your work? Yeah legislators can definitely support my work by listening to my podcast birth. Shimmer foreign which is all about elevating and affirming the voices and stories of black women living and thriving abroad they're incredible stories that everybody should hear they should just hear them because there's a strange misconception that you know, what black women don't travel like, yes, we do offer been we've been traveling black women don't live abroad. Yes, we do. If we do live abroad. It's out of some kind of struggle and strife know we we move abroad because it is we want to for adventure for career for Love on a whim. You know, we it's so important for us to see ourselves and I thought the podcast because it shows it shows us in Aldis different capacities in a different stages of life. I think is really important for us to see ourselves. Not only you know thriving abroad but you know struggling cuz sometimes a struggle, you know, it's adulting a different language a different country. But you know, seeing ourselves chuse ourselves intentionally create a life that works for us or trying to intentionally cultivate a life that works for us. And I guess so so important so long that is how you can support the work come on and check out flourish and the Fords and thank you so much. We really appreciate you being open and sharing your story with wage is well, thank you so much for having me and asking me questions that I was like, I don't even know the answers to But it was very interesting and I I hope that the listeners enjoyed it because it was fun. Well, I will list your podcast and your website and the show off so that people can connect with you and we really appreciate you again, and we'll see you in these internet streets for sure for sure. Thank you so much Wanda. Thank you Christine. All right by them, but.

Aldis Wanda Christine
"christine n p" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

05:40 min | 7 months ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Everything's Coming Up Simpsons

"Had a sense of what professional buzz that's valuable to and telling stories. I interviewed people or whatever for for Joe or anything it's just like the people who also had other lives that aren't comedy are always almost always just more interesting. And have more to say than people who you know. Obviously, it's not a blanket rule, but but that's just my experience. Yeah do you oh? Sorry. I was going to jump into your IMDB and ask you feel like you know being on teams and doing you see be steph having that like arsenal of sketches mapping your, do you think that was? Really helpful in getting the job on Kroll show and getting your other writing jobs, just having a big stack of things that you've already tried. Totally I mean, yeah our was Saturday night live and for sore and that was kind of. The reason behind law teams to was just to give people stage time but to give writers and opportunity to build a packet and put things on the and so when you know I got asked us omit for snl had sketches that have been tested in front of audiences I I can't remember like Like. Or five sketches going back I can't remember honestly but like half of them were probably. What up on their. Feet already. been in admitted Internet video that I included whatever interest Scotch. So that kind of finding your voice etcetera etcetera, a super helpful especially to get to getting that job and And then from there, it's just like. You can. Include things that you. Worked on that are on the show, but you can also just be like look if you WanNa, like know what my deal is like this sketch from UCB's like me in a nutshell river and I remember to actually about the other day like in that was going back to what you're saying about like. Gender Equity in the writer's room. Like they were. I was under no like false assumptions. I knew they were looking for a woman no-one said that to me explicitly, there was like a million little cues and things that were said that should have been said but like I do remember at the theater like. There were definitely people who are more experienced than me who were quote unquote ready than I was. Male and female and. You know but it I'm the one that got it and. Part of my leg drive has been like prove that I deserved that. Not necessarily even about the specific place it was just that it was a professional job enjoying the union and getting agent I remember a friend of mine somebody said to him one of his students that I got the job because I knew abby Elliott. Which is true. But only because I had taken a UC class with her, that's how the extent of how much I knew her and she remembered my work recommended me among other people she had recommended. Somebody said to him like, Oh, well she. She, just got the job and she knows her and they and they were looking for a woman or something and my friend was like she also had like the best pack you. You'll ever read like she was wrong. Yeah. Thank. God, they said that yeah, it's. It's really it was really meet like it is true. That was one of the amazing things about being at a theater where you're putting scratches on their feet. All the time is that you are as ready as you're gonNA be, and now I understand like you're never ready you're never going to be ready always waiting for permission and just like fucking do it frank right. So. Yeah. So to answer question like absolutely like having work. So when someone says something you could hear. ME Totally. Invaluable. It's the only. Yeah, and also like the quantity of stuff you know I feel like are we say about writing pilots in specs and things like that? A pilot is a little bit more that you know it's almost as if your creativity is an iceberg and I at the top is like the most wretched terrible things. And they're always going to be rhetoric things at the top and you just need to like break them off and get to the meat of it is which is you know putting pressure on yourself that this is your first pilot or this is your first sketch packet and just like having that muscle memory built into your fingers of okay. I'm able to actually breathe in be myself on these pages for the constant question of am I doing it right and I I need you to like me and I need you to hire me but it's like when? You just have that quantity that practice whether you're doing at UC I guess can anymore New York but you know there are so many other means of forming writers groups online or you know doing things in your own way just dust the cobwebs often get to you know what's going to be great about your work I. Don't know I feel like that's the writing advice that I can see apply that only sketch pilot but you know stand up at all of it telly and working with other people is so much a part of any writing job Yaun. for tea and stuff like and so when I teach. Giving advice it's always like. Being in a writer's room a skill. As, well, and like learning. Learning. How to give notes? You you can be like the best writer in the world, but if you're not fun to work with. No. Thank you so..

abby Elliott writer Joe UCB Kroll IMDB snl frank New York Yaun.
"christine n p" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

02:47 min | 11 months ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"Don't tell me hi I'm Neva. I'm from Houston. Hey Neva in Houston. How're things oh it's okay. It's getting warm again. So you really humid. That'll happen and so are you normally in Houston or is that where you chose to shelter in place so actually. I'm a senior in college. This is my last week of classes like I. Yeah it's crazy. I went to school up in Ohio and I actually drove back home. A couple of weeks ago really. Are you able to do the traditional sort of college graduation things with your parents like for example Binge Drinking You know I've have them before. I don't know they're like pro binge drinking yet. We'll see one way to find out. Go for it. Neither do a keg stand with mom. Exactly welcome to our show. Bill Curtis is going to read you three news related limericks with the last word or phrase missing from each year job of course fillon that last word or phrase correctly on just two of the limericks. You'll be a winner a graduate if you will of our rigorous program. Are you ready to play? I think as ready as Oliver be. I think you're right. Here's your first limerick in quarantine. I seem to grow lux and my forehead lines once again. Show shocks to keep skins perfection. I need an injection. So give me emergency. Talk rank the colleges to the scars reporting that their clients are calling and begging from her botox injections even though the offices are closed now without botox known forgiving celebrities. That just got embalmed look. The faces of celebrities quickly collapsed. The good news is Justin. Bieber has just landed a role in the new cocoon reboot. We've just learned Robert. Downey junior has actually been a Sharpei the whole time. We're all staring at ourselves on zoom all day mean. Of course we're going to feel a little crazy about the way our face looks. I've never been more familiar with my own frigging face. I honestly thought this was just me? But I'm beginning to realize it's not that when you're on zoom call and you're not talking. You're always just staring at your own face. Absolute horror amazement fascination. I would be shocked that there's a Hollywood doctor that wouldn't make house calls for Bo talks. I mean you're talking. You know how much money they're willing to pay for you to come in and give them a shot. I would guess a Hollywood Sharpei is getting better treatment than most of us right here right now. You kidding me Neva. Here is your next limit. This middle seat might squeeze by knees hard as a flyer. I'm droplet and wheeze scarred. To keep US contained their reworking. The planes the seats will all come.

Houston Oliver Hollywood botox Bill Curtis Justin Ohio Bieber scars Downey Robert Bo
"christine n p" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

05:05 min | 11 months ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"Whoever came up with that idiom should have been more specific. The kerfuffle centered around the paper's longstanding advice column. Ask Aunt Alice. But after thirty years of no complaints. Alice's record was blighted. On April twenty-seventh by careless features editor who inadvertently swapped advice for two unlucky letter writers the I only identified by her pseudonym desperately seeking shelter had written in about a problem she had encountered with the freshly adopted shelter dog. The dog had been causing trouble at home chewing up furniture scaring their neighbors children and otherwise terrorizing the letter writers family. What was the moral thing to do? According to Aunt Alice the only thing that could be done was to put on a fresh face of makeup. Get a blow out and try to remember what made her sexy to him. In the first place confused readers might question why aunt? Alice suggested dressing up for a troubled dog. But this is of course because this response was meant for the second letter writer of the week who was writing about what to do about a husband with a wandering eye to this reader and Alice suggested daily treats as a reward for good behavior or a swift visit back to a shelter even if the offender was eventually put to sleep for good. The goof only appeared in the physical copies of the paper and the paper swiftly apologized in the correction the following morning but one hopes the damage was done. Perhaps the wife with the cheating husband really should've left her husband. And who knows maybe a nice dress once in a while really would have improved the dog's behavior and Alice screws up advice for a dog and a marriage. You're next story of a news. No no comes from Amy Dickinson. An actual advice columnists. This is a tough time for newspapers. I mean leaving your house to pick up something of an unknown origin which has been handled by unseen hands and then to carry that thing into the house and pass it around to family members but still newspapers are trying trying to win over younger readers when staple is the spot. The difference feature you know two photographs or drawings that contain tiny differences and the reader has to spot them. It's really a throwback to a simpler time when people didn't go out much family spent a lot of time together playing games and baking sour dough bread. The time exactly like this time come to think of it so pity the Baltimore Sun from fells point to Federal Hill Riverside and inner harbor. Readers picked up last Sunday's paper and could not spot the difference in the spot. The difference feature to the naked eye. The two pictures of a boy brushing his teeth looked exactly the same because they were exactly the same spot. The difference had one job and much like these strategic national stockpile. It did not deliver this week. The Baltimore Sun had to notify readers correction the images in these spot. The difference feature in the Sunday editions were mistakenly the same image and not in fact. Different the Baltimore. Sun regrets the error. A spot the difference photo game with two identical photos. Your last story of the media mess up comes from Alonzo Boden the Ames. Iowa registered received a simple order from the regional fried chicken place Klux Chicken. A simple atwood a promo coupon for twelve chicken nuggets. Two dollars for the first week of spring are as they like to call him Klux Nuggets. Somebody didn't proof. Read the work. So the register printed sixty thousand coupons offering one hundred twenty nuggets for two dollars and Hungary islands lined up in front of the store before it even opened. Bob Read the manager knew. He had to honor coupons but he also knew he didn't have enough chicken to sell a hundred twenty nuggets for two dollars and stay in business. Bobby wanted FRY cooks. Had A simple idea. Make the nuggets smaller. Bobby said he could run chicken through the meat grinder and get long small round strips of chicken similar to straws then cut those into small bits and fry them. Bobby showed how he could get as many as two hundred tiny morsels out of a single breast and so was born. The chicken duck one quarter inch bites of delicious fresh chicken and one hundred. Twenty of them for two dollars was not only an attractive price. It was actually profitable. The chicken dots were a huge hit. Manager Bob Reid is now planning to expand to multiple locations and bobby to FRY. Cook is now Klux. Shefty cuisine. No word on the fate of the coupon man over at the Ames register all right. I want a chicken dot so bad right now actually sent a really good so here are your choices. June from Joachim Booster. The story of how an advice columnist messed up her advice for the dog and troubled marriage from Amy Dickinson. How the Baltimore Sun had to apologize for printing a spot. The difference photo game with two.

Aunt Alice Klux Chicken Nuggets Baltimore Bobby Amy Dickinson Bob Reid Alonzo Boden advice columnist editor Joachim Booster Hungary Shefty writer Iowa Federal Hill Riverside Klux Cook
"christine n p" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

02:03 min | 11 months ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"Ventilators but they will use it to keep meat. Companies going wait. There might be a chicken nugget shortage. Get Me Mayor mccheese on the red phone but you know what maybe he just is. Keeping the meat plants open so that rocky will have a place to train Anna. Here is your next quote as long as we can do the Astros. That was a comment about. Who's planned to have a season this year after all NOT NASCAR? Oh you are nerd that about you and I. It's the sport the ask the Astros play basketball. No it's not. It's not basketball. Shot just me baseball. Yes scary baseball is coming back. Everybody's really bored with nothing to watch. Which makes them think about baseball. Which is how. They used to be bored with something to watch. According to the latest proposal we might get a baseball season this year. Although it'll be very different not interesting but different. I'm I'm always shocked when I go to a baseball game first of all that I'm there and second of all that baseball seems largely to be about the interstitial 's to me like there's so many like little skits that go on and games now it's like they're trying to distract you from the baseball so here is the proposal there will be three new leagues arranged regionally so players would have to travel far. We'd have great. New rivalries that have say mets versus dodgers. We'd have Tampa Bay versus whatever that other team in Florida is new rules And the League's will mean that players won't have to travel so far from home they'll be able to spend every night back at their own homes. I don't know what that will do for the quality of play but it will be terrible for adultery. You're going to have you know with this regional baseball thing. The players are actually going to have to trade regional groupies..

baseball Astros basketball dodgers NASCAR Tampa Bay rocky mets Florida Anna
"christine n p" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

02:38 min | 11 months ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"Quiz tastes great more billing. Bill Kurtis on his your host handsome very old man. Who so much free time. He started writing his own. Intros Peter mccue bill delivered. Thanks everybody and thanks as always to our producer Mike for standing in for all the people who love us by playing that this was the week we were scheduled to go and do our show in Buffalo New York so in honor of Buffalo. We've done two things first. We've invited the actor. Christine Baranowski proud buffalo native to join us for not my job. Later on an second I have coded myself from head to toe in spicy wing sauce. We always want to find out how you might taste so break quarantine in your imagination by calling us at one eight. That's one eight eight eight nine two four eight nine two four. Let's welcome our first listener. Contested higher wait wait. Don't tell me this is Anna and I'm calling from beautiful Golden Colorado. How're things in beautiful Golden Colorado? Where I believe if I'm not mistaken you have some sort of brewery. Yes we have Several of those the largest one being cords of course but they are gorgeous outside. I can see the mountains from my window. Yes and what do you do there when you're allowed out of your house I am an electrical engineer for the spacecraft Orion which is the world's only deep Deep Space Human exploration. Only hitting. So you're helping to build the Orion which is supposed to take us to Mars right. Yes that is crack so I work as a test engineer. I do software and electrical integration and next year we are launching for the Moon Camilleri. And how does one get a ticket? I'm just saying if you can put in a good word for me. I can help you win this to say it might have to do that all right. Welcome to the show and let me introduce you to our panel. This week I up a comedian. Who is podcast is called urgent care? And he's the CO host of the new singled out on Qube. It's Joel Kim Booster. How talking next. It's the syndicated advice columnist behind. Ask Amy Amy Dickinson Anna. I'm in awe of what you're doing. It's quite amazing and a comedian. You can see at nowhere comedy club the first all digital comedy club. It's May seventh at ten thirty eastern tickets at nowhere. Comedy Club Dot Com. It's a Lonzo Bonin. Hello Nice to meet in rocket science. That's very cool Anna. Welcome to the show. You'RE GONNA play..

Amy Amy Dickinson Anna Bill Kurtis Buffalo New York engineer Golden Colorado Peter mccue Lonzo Bonin Christine Baranowski Moon Camilleri Joel Kim Booster Qube advice columnist producer Mike
"christine n p" Discussed on Coming Out Stories

Coming Out Stories

10:33 min | 1 year ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Coming Out Stories

"Basis. One is the right to private life and the other <hes> was sev- right to to marry because both wanted to marry in terms of their acquired gender what changed to heterosexually so so mark crease a lovely man if he was going to marry a toll he wanted to marry a woman caroline causey a beautiful model and tv hostess. If she wanted to marry about she was engaged to marry a man on the yukon. Hello they had reasons valid reasons to go all out of european caught fume right suppress reported it and although both of them lost they started a conversation shen and god's people who were interested in civil liberties entrusted people like us alex carlile who those days was the liberal booth democrats home affairs spokesman and he in fact almost too to meet mark and any friends of his and they went to to meet him him in parliament and he encouraged them to set up an activist campaign so that was the point in time in nineteen ninety-two where suddenly transpeople had an activist activists campaign there was something we could do was something we could work on and a we had a lever we could use the law because unlike everybody else the law aw doesn't do fake news doesn't do hysteria. It's interested in the facts and the facts in our case. We're very much on our side. It was was a terrible injustice so we could keep going back to the courts with different examples of people being discriminated or put out of work and they would listen and now favor the right level which they did then government had to do something so in nineteen ninety six the european court of justice this ruled that it was sex discrimination to dismiss somebody because they were were undergoing or had undergone gender reassignment that meant that the new labor government in nineteen ninety-seven had to do something about it and as a result of that we got the first legislation to protect trans writes out of it was really important for you to get involved in the maximum. I got involved in nine hundred ninety three so i was really at the heart of that and seeing how we <music> how we move this forward and how exploited come on more than concern you've got an m._b._a. Yeah sometimes i look at that at the top of the stairs and nothing yeah okay. I'm official announced for your campaigning work. It was it was <hes> it was warded because my colleagues and i then got very closely involved with civil servants and ministers to help craft the gender recognition bill and <hes> for a couple of years at at the beginning of the noughties and job really was to make sure that the government could get it through parliament without getting scratch on them <hes> and so oh. I think a grateful government and grateful queen decided this award and my colleague steven wetzel he had an o._b. As well and we accepted those because we cassia instinct is to say well. This is what's <hes> empire in. It and it's bad connotations bucked. I remember when angela mason who one of the first chief executives of a stone wall was awarded it was obi day a nevada about one thousand nine hundred ninety nine and i remember that he was all over the the b._b._c. the whole day and all over the press and and i thought yeah actually this is the mark that's what she did was worth doing. It was important mattered. People talk about the issues again so and so in stephen and i deciding to accept our owners. It wasn't really a farrar egos. It was sa- societe okay well. If we accept these we are actually acknowledging. Actually and people are actually able to see that people who devoted their spare time to the right solve this tiny group of people. You know that was something that was worth doing and was worth honoring while so we have come a long. Why haven't worry but i think it's fair to say the still a long way to go for trans rights in this country. Where do you think the company should be focused on what you think what should change for transpeople after after the gender recognition act we did it. We did actually sort of step back and say well here. We were totally focused on that. What on earth do we do now. <hes> <hes> and it took us a while to work out and we sort of made a little list well. There's still some legislation to sort out because it was incomplete. We were still vulnerable in places assist so that's one thing the way that the press reports transpeople and media features transpeople. That's a big important issue and the other one was <hes> the elephant in the room which was the all our interactions with the n._h._s. and with doctors in general were complete disaster area area so we needed to work on that as well so the first few years after the a gender recognition act we we'd sort of pushed on those things and then i think think when did we reach the end of our personal tether. I've had already burned out once and i was feeling gonna burn out again. We started to fall out with each other and i felt by about two thousand seven stroke kate's that it was time to let young people have ago 'cause we were by then. We were now fifties. We retired ourselves out and actually we also want to have lives so i actually made it known that i wanted to step step down and retire and i wanted a new generation to come along for just one thing. Even though i've grown so much over the years getting awards does help with you your self esteem. I'm still that kid who grew up in a world that thought that what i was this was dirty and vicky and i think that affects how you approach how vigorously you can demand full equality whereas young people they grown up with the rights that we'd one for them. They don't have any of that baggage they actually. Let's see that. I deserve this stuff. Young people are far more in your face. Young people are amazing onto also autho frigging polite springs minassian smell also question really unsure you know all these rights have been worn is berlin but obviously still difficult colt to accept your gender sometimes and people growing up in difficult families in difficult situations. What word of advice would you give to a young person struggling and trying to come to terms with their gender identity and not failing able to to speak out. Oh goodness while i. I guess i say look at my own life. It didn't and have the best of beginnings but look ended up the you can be the person that you're destined to be but don't feel that it all has to happen straight away or take your time and i know that's a very difficult thing to say to young person but actually spending time like i did to to actually organiz my employment so that i wasn't going to become destitute y- to plan okay i'm going to do this. What are the steps. I need twitches project and along the way of course learn about your own history <hes> well as well aw i was going to bring it in any way chris dot org books are available. We'll certainly start with this one britain before creating it had never been a book that could just iman place. Tell a trans person or their family or their allies what we've been through that story. I just told you and i think it's an inspiring story because it's full of so many really good role models of people who've grown up at each stage each of that and i think if you read that then i think you'll know how to manage your own transition and this this really exciting journey because i think the message of hope would be the you might think of being trans is being a bit of obama. You know it's a bad and to be to be dealt but actually it isn't because we will get to do something that the vast majority of human beings never get to do your most most human beings get issued agenda when they're when they're born and they're supposed to stick with that so they ll grow up they live their entire life experiencing only half of what it is to be a human being now. I didn't much enjoy experiencing the other half. Although it's great to have spent some mm time in the boys showers 'cause i learned a lot from that but sir and i had the perfect disguise i think i understand gender jonah level the i guess other people may not do because of that experience seeing it from both sides and there's so many layers to that we could do an entire other podcasts to it but as a result and because of the person it's made me struggling through hard times finding resources finding finding and being surprised by what i could do. I would never trade it. People might say wouldn't you pass wish that you'd been just been born and go and grown up and down the usual stuff well yeah. That's that's one way of living alive. I won't decry it because that's what half the population gets to do but i've actually thought i'd been handed a really bad hand but actually it's turned out to be such an exciting journey of discovery very i'm a better person than i could ever have been had i not been challenged in this way beautifully optimistic and positive words and so thank you so much for tokens coming out stories christine burns m._b._a. Thank you and get the book and author of trans britain transparent uh-huh.

britain alex carlile caroline causey european court angela mason sa- societe stephen steven wetzel official obama nevada berlin vicky kate
"christine n p" Discussed on Coming Out Stories

Coming Out Stories

12:58 min | 1 year ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Coming Out Stories

"It was an opportunity see around in my head you know when you've got near worm out same same sort of thing and i'd say yeah. I'm gonna go there this wednesday. An untold people was big. Group initially wasn't but it grew so i remember towards the beginning of the eighties. I think they used to be about thirty. People there on. This isn't relevant to your story but i'm just interested in other people might be how how many were people that were born all the identified as female and how many were around. You've got to distinguish between people who went to that group and what the community might be because because justice desires tend to think. I'm not sure whether this group is for me because the group was dominated by people who just cross stressed once a week and it was their relaxation accusation and they sat around and they talk about steam engines and computers which is a different thing but i as i've written in my book trance trance britain transsexual people with such a small community. That's biggest can't be choosers. We didn't have are group's but it must be nice to even have that safe space where you could trust as a woman unbearable buy yes that must have been caught revelation for really it. It was and i and i actually haven't home to me because one of the things you might think to yourself yourself as well. Maybe i could just be a cross dresser can contain it to the occasional evening and then put it away in a box and the that's what's that that will be enough and that won't mean the potential of losing my friends losing my job losing everything <hes> what you thought you expect otherwise otherwise i was in a research student in manchester in the mid seventies us enjoying myself. I was producing a radio show for radio manchester. I i was doing my research. I liked the people i worked with but i didn't think anybody would accept me if i she said you know i'm going to transition very me woman so what changed because at some point you obviously did well in nineteen seventy six. I came very close to the first attempt to transition permanently. I actually found found a doctor and quite scarily. The doctor just said yeah. We think you'll transsexual and there's somebody i can refer you to come back next as we can. Tell me if you want me to do that and that was so scary that i actually gave up my p._h._d. Study and ran away effectively. Oh because someone giving you the it meant facing up toward the prospects. I'm pretty sure what prospects would be that. You know that i wouldn't be able to continue. Can you being a research student or go onto a lecturer i wouldn't <hes> be allowed near a microphone on the b._b._c. again on all those things things and so in a way actually make became a self fulfilling prophecy because ran away from all of them anyway page and then transitioned insights it was so it was just it having once you've sort of acknowledged yourself much the this is what you are then you put it back in the bulk those combined the only going away was an act of desperation saying to myself. I'll get a job in industry and i'll make another start and we'll have no more of this. He ran away. What did you go. I got a job with a computer company called international computers. His mother went join them. As writing courses and books down in windsor didn't stay very long because it was <hes>. It was very lonely. Only there even are surrounded by colleagues and so i ended up managing to engineer within the same company to come back to manchester so i could be near the people are left. So at what point did you admit it to yourself and then actually tell other people. This is what we do. The next stage was. I got so desperate that i actually told my parents again. I was trying to sort of cut off my lines of escape from myself. <hes> so i got very drunk one night about three o'clock in the morning i rang my parents and and <hes> i was again i res. I always seem to do this stuff kneeling on the carpet with the phone in front of me and my father answered the phone and i said ah i gotta tell you i want. I want to be a girl. I want to be a woman. I think i love that looking back. You said you better speak to your mother so she came on the phone and what she said to me as always stuck with me. She said darling that we made you own. Whatever you all will love you and it is an. I actually become quite distanced from my parents. I don't know whether that was because i was angry with them for the perceiving that they would be a baria that because i thought if i come out 'cause that moment on that phone call i thought about to lose my parents you know am i have seen them see 'cause that happens so often to people <hes> but so that's a mark my desperation that i actually felt comes to the point that i was actually prepared to lose my parents. How old were you at the stage. <hes> i'm just trying to think that one through who i think that was around about nineteen eighty-two so i was just under thirty gosh so you had waited a long time because i'm very good. Sorta tried to distract myself i was i worked very hard. I had these mitigating ways of <hes> of of trying to pretend tended was just something i could handle detects up to anything they did because i went down to see them. <hes> they lived in ken still <hes> <hes> they met me staying and i remember we said spent the evening <hes> sitting having drinks and chatting and talking about everything amum just immediately <unk> clicked into this my daughter they were fat credibly good at that i'd completely misread them so they never mistreated to do after the because i'd i just assumed from things that you pick up from listening to what they say when they see something on television or what they read in the papers ooh that they would disapprove and because they had been disapproving about other things not about me but they certainly disapproved disapproved of things that my older sister done so i just expected that that was gonna be the monarch i don't know whether from from that experience with my sister they'd sort of learned and thought that we should we should just loosen up a bit in some respect from and even today law parents struggling miss gender that ah i think yeah they they they had to work to try and get themselves some information. My mum was proud of the number of local police that she could go cultivators friends so she went to see a local sergeant and she told him and he explained it all to her and her guessing it from an official official. She looked up to really <hes>. Yes this go sergeant okay. That's okay. This is has a name is a condition and the sergeant able somehow rally if if he'd said god say hold them there until i get the handcuffs been different. So did you ever come out at work then they started planning for that again. I thought that the chances were that's. My colleagues wouldn't know what to what to do with me. <hes> so i mood changed my work to being self employed a such a an i._t. Consultancy if my own on the basis i couldn't sack myself clever and <unk>. I set about making myself so essential to my clients. They would have to think twice three times about just letting me go so actually when i did finally take the the final step saying okay. This is on this particular day. I'm going to be christine forever that they had actually had a company meeting. One of the clients and managing director told the staff look this is happening to this person and we are going to accept her and if anybody has any trouble with that you come and see me so i i have been incredibly fortunate richner over the years that all the all the terrible things i knew could happen didn't happen and invite quite the reverse. I've been charitably privileged and having been associated with people who have acted like the grownups. It's very interesting isn't it. It's so different to coming out with o._j. Obey in the you know. You really plans for it didn't you. You knew that there was one day where your name your gender gone and you were going to present this christine and that was it and you sort of you plan for that for years as well. It's it's you cannot avoid coming out. When you're trans early calls unless you move overnight then people are going to know that something has changed. I think you can succeed in being gay or lesbian for a very long time without telling your colleagues and in fact i know that in in in in companies that i dealt with you know as soon as you you know christine's trans i would have the the gays and lesbians wins in that company coming in coming in buttonholing me that friend <hes> and they weren't out but so in the sense they were observing serving me with really real interest to see how their colleagues so interesting that you all came to still be out because i know certainly a lot of trans people is just all about passing and they won't acknowledge the past gender and they don't necessarily want to talk about it. But why did you see things. I i tried that i was very fortunate alternate in the very quickly i was able to to pass and go go invisible and <hes> in a line of work whereas constantly meeting new clients <hes> in a way it was simpler and it was simply for my for my big clients who was sometimes recommending me to just your let's all just accept christina's genus christine and please don't bring it up because that i make awkward conversations for us <hes> so there was a lot of encouragement and then i was living in in a very conservative part of cheshire as well so in a way i felt it was safest to to be in what we call stealth <hes> <hes> and then number things started to happen where i realized that if somebody isn't standing doing something then it's never going to get any different. One of the characteristics of trans history is the all the way from the setting up of the very first support group in nineteen sixty six all the way through to the end of the eighties so that's about twenty five years nothing progress other than people having support groups where you could go and meet people and you could talk and you so you exchange anecdotes about how somebody had had petrol to what nothing of progress in terms of rights and society like something think. How can we change this because they didn't seem to be any maine's normally. If there's a social wrong then you might go to the press and somebody and would you take your calls while the press wasn't interested in that they got away of writing about us and it was the freaks on sunday. You could go to an m._p. But it was this was the time section twenty eight. There were no votes for m._p.'s and getting involved with with transpeople so yeah. How would you begin when everything is against you. How would you begin to change that so in your mind it's important to be visible so that at least people know about you and we'll talk about aged changed it walls reading the reports of to trans people who'd actually found something we could do and both of them had ended up going to the european court of human rights to argue for the fact that they have no privacy because whenever somebody wanted to see your birth certificate that would immediately out you in those days you couldn't marry in a way that's <hes> wouldn't stand out a mile the government at the time it was saying saying that's gay relationships were pretended a not valid would was saying to people like me that i could marry a woman and they have a same sex marriage because they were concerned. Administratively that was that was that was a that was a a heterosexual marriage marriage it was it was mad so these two went went to court on the same basis..

manchester christine european court maine cheshire lecturer windsor engineer christina self employed m._p. ken managing director official twenty five years one day
"christine n p" Discussed on Coming Out Stories

Coming Out Stories

12:44 min | 1 year ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Coming Out Stories

"Burn for what goes on media. This is coming out stories about one of the most important conversations of your life. I'm emma goal. Swell from christine burns m._b. An author of trans britain journey from the shadows. She first came out in nineteen fifty eight at the tender age of four. I have come out so many times. Where do you start which one is the one. I start with nowadays because what i'm doing now is saying that actually when i was born in nineteen fifty four sixty five was about the time that a lot of stories about transpeople started coming into the into the mainstream when i was about four aw four and a half maybe just before i started school so i can pin it quite well. Remember telling my mom that i wanted to grow up to be a lady. She was very good. She just sort of brushed it off and made a little bit of fun than than i got quite upset and ran off upstairs and madonna came and saw later and <hes> but it was sort of they've they they treated it very lightly and i realized telegraph to me that that this wasn't something you said but he was there very strongly family and you said it your neglected the four this is probably the earliest coming out of coming to full but i immediately went back in to yeah because because you you get these signals from from the grownups around you and from school as well that these are there certain things you don't say or i guess they just want aloft often they did and i i was a child who is easily embarrassed and i was quite quiet and shy and so i i just took it in filed it as say that and of course this was the nineteen fifties wouldn't have had any points of reference narrowly not like parents might have today nineteen fifty eight say just just after i was born there was a story in the press of a transport mcchord roberta cowl and that was quite famous and it'll so being somebody called christine jorgensen in who is globally famous for her transition. I mean my parents didn't read the newspapers very much anyway. I guess you came to find out about those women a lot later on i don't i mean actually if we split forward from ford four years old twelve years old nine hundred and sixty six parents of pub. I used to have a lot of time. I'm a my hands which actually was quite good because it meant that i could <hes> dress up if i wanted to <hes> without anybody sort of catching me but i remember that that used to send me to get the sunday papers and as soon as i got the news agency there was a sign outside. I said my life as a as a as a girl or my life is a woman. This was the story of april ashley in the papers and you immediately spotless if you if you are trans you are such a tuned to seeing anything like that so i got grabbed. The papers ran home and again. I can picture the exact scene in the kitchen kneeling on the carpet. My parents are downstairs serving customers. I'm reading all about april ashley and as you said we didn't have any points of reference other than maybe saying female impersonators on the television you you know i've forgotten these danny larue gosh which is the same thing so but it is. Everybody got their points of reference. Yeah that's it. That's all you understand about. Transpeople is is <hes> is a man who cross dresses for for entertainment. You know that so yeah and the in in in that moment i discovered a that i wasn't the only person like me in the world because i did actually worry that that was uniquely freakish and that's there was a name for people like me and because i was reading it in the news of the world that it was a very bad thing to be because so that'll be going on from time immemorial and that's the only way that the press actually reported trump's people in those days as well. They hit on a formula going back to around about about nine hundred fifty eight. They've found that they could sell sunday papers by doing shot. Kara exposes transpeople in the sunday tabloids that was that was how we were represented so she hadn't chosen to speak to the socialist. Historian is sort of just roberta uniquely had actually chosen to sell a story. I think she needed the money <hes>. I've been told what she got for. Her series in the picture post in nineteen fifty. I four was in today's terms about two hundred thousand pounds wow so she did well out of that. These were these were big stories. They the first stories as it happens but they were they were the time when suddenly the press noticed that transpeople existed okay so just one on something you said a moment ago so between i just put the answer full you knew yes. He wants to grow up to be a woman on the edge twelve in the anyone but between those times you said you were you were dressing up as he did yes because my <hes> my eldest sister who's ten years older than me that had left home many years since i am quite a lot of close was still in in in in dressing tables wardrobes so i actually had a complete water but to play with and i had hours and hours and hours on my own ah five nine parents go to pub- when i was eleven years old and i had to learn to knock off to myself so i do my homework and the rest of the evening with mine so i could yeah. I wasn't completely unsupervised which has a degree of freedom. I think most children of that age would never have had. Did you ever get cold at annot. I know what you're doing now and i don't think there was any suspicion of it's very careful again. I think that probably tells you that i knew that this was something that would would bring the the ceiling down the bring the sky down on me if what he knew an avenue where we get those intimations from because i've listened to two other people you've interviewed and it's the same sort of thing that we all know. That's what we are apparently is bad what i think particularly for the gay people <hes> and the l. g._b. Of our community the hearing in the playground old time you know even now kids in payment go ooh that chair is gay you know and they're being told constantly from a young age gay is bad but i didn't even think that probably at school. They were saying anything about transmitted invisible. They quite often called me ago and they had two goals name for me sometimes because i think children actually before the adults reading me because because my mannerisms because of the way i talk because i've quiet and i was bookish bullet yeah oh yes yeah. I've i've got i can. You wrote a book on bullying. I go and i went to a lot of schools. That was the only thing that saved me to send my parents were moving around a lot because they were buying houses to renovate innovate we lived in them and when they renovated the house they sold it for profit and they don't do something bigger. They're working their way up from <hes> our working class beginnings beginnings so i was constantly experiencing new schools and having to be sucked out by new groups of children and i very quickly became the kid hit the got bullied and when the female names to hurt you. Did you feeling <hes> yeah 'cause. I news meant to hurt so so i took it hurt and i was trying to deny myself. I mean you realize you've got something that that makes you. I don unconfined polite word for it really but you know you you know you're the world's tens of freak therefore you don't want to be that i wanted to have thursday says and what he wanted to do was scrapped. Be ordinary so i guess it was a very long process then go from that sort of scared twelve year old at least realizes there's someone else out when you're not the only person in the world trans tonight actually arctic closing it as a teenager on adult. Yes the next step was when i was eighteen i i left home. We're we're in the south east of england and came up to manchester to go to university. I came here in one thousand nine hundred seventy two and being him more or less ever since so. I think ah i can claim to be an order now about your stories that you just say once university re studied with allen schering's colleagues computer science. I couldn't really get more gay again. I didn't realize looking back had i realized i think i would have had a very different existence. I write in university nine hundred seventy two at the time that the gay liberation front in manchester was beginning to find its feet but it was a very straight environment. I remember my very first night. In a hole residence. The chair of the residents association of our whole stood up dinners and gave instructions about the places this is to avoid which were essentially the precursors of <hes> of canal street avoid guys for a lot of people going to university and being away from the family as a chance to you. Pay them true selves. Did you ever feel that was possible. Yes increasing infant my first couple of years living in whole so you're actually you're very constrained because as people wander in and out all the time you actually have even though you have a room. You don't have much privacy. So what are you doing anything to eliud coke avert vertically. I roots because i'd i'd got herself. <hes> some <hes> some wheels got. I got a call and that mentor who get away in play into into remote places where i could just imagine being me. It's very it's very amateur. It's a feel ashamed of how ashamed i was but there were no role all models the only role models actually were having read about april ashley in the newspapers and that wasn't a good thing and then in nineteen seventy four so i was twenty then there there was a an autobiography by a times journalist john morris who had spent the better part of ten years transitioning and they both ended up going to a surgeon in casablanca and i don't know if anybody's old enough to remember this but but in the in the nineteen seventies we didn't go abroad it are the only way to go abroad was probably joined the armed forces. We didn't have holidays in in your car or whatever until the very first package to accompany came along at different times yes so the thought that you would go to who somewhere in north africa. I only knew about casablanca because of the film <hes> so i always think about the place in black and white so the whole the whole thing surgery probably saved up your each. It was something that a different kind of people did but you knew about other transpeople and did you have any attempts concerts paris and that's that's another thing that happened in nineteen seventy four a group of just being set up in manchester on kemp street had no. I had no difficulty remembering the address that's i went there and i saw two staked out from across the road saw people coming and going and hearts going through the chest and i am i going to go in shop. Eventually i plugged park down the courage and <hes> knocked on the door and actually what do you ask for you. Know is <hes> you you the transsexual group or whatever 'cause people were transsexual. Transgender lewis on <hes> so i went in and there was a back room i remember there. It was fairly cd. There was <hes> there was a seti with springs coming out of the sofa. <hes> there were cracked mugs with the tea it it was very much about just people just being relieved to meet meet. Somebody sells well. It must have been huge relief because this must be the first time that you've met another adult and and also i talked to be people and actually find some some some connection so that was kind of your first coming out as trans and really coming out oh definitely to myself in a way as steer to go to that actually meant acknowledging to myself that i wanted to talk to people like myself and how old way at this stage twenty sixteen years of knowing not being able to turning a bonus plus along white jeez yeah so what happened after that well again i left it a few years because because actually being able to go and see that group periodically was sort of like a safety valve..

transpeople manchester christine burns danny larue casablanca christine jorgensen madonna ford trump england lewis paris allen schering Kara times john morris north africa
"christine n p" Discussed on Chat Sematary

Chat Sematary

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Chat Sematary

"Everyone chat cemeteries back today. We're talking all about the novel Christine, and Katie Schaefer is joining me to discuss it this novel came out on April twenty ninth nineteen eighty three. So we're making our way through the eighties year. And it feels like a pretty good time to be a Stephen King fan. Wouldn't you agree? Katie. I definitely agree. That removes and books and all kinds of things coming out at this time, it really feels like the eighties is the time period when things relate ramped up for Stephen King. And I'm not saying he is necessarily slowed down by any means nor have the adaptation as we both. Well, no. But this feels like okay he is getting into his cocaine fueled groove. I guess you could say and a lot of rain crazy things are coming out, and with Christine, you have this car who becomes one of the main characters in the book, and I think. When he takes certain things like that. You know, when you take a house and make it into a character or a car or something, you know, he does this in a different way because the car literally comes to life. It's not just your everyday average card like you can have in some things and still have it feel like a character. So I think that's something that made this unique. And it was pretty long book. It's not as long as the stand or anything by any means. But for what it is. It was pretty long and the first edition hardcover was five hundred twenty six pages. I believe my paperback copy was a little shorter than that. It was a little over five hundred. Yep. I I again, I listened to the audio book for this. And it was about fifteen hours which is short for king book. But not it still a hefty listen. Yeah, I can imagine. And I would venture to say it probably took me close to fifteen hours to read the book to and you know, that's kind of nice that you have that comparison there. Like, you know, I put this many pages into it. But you have an exact amount of time that you put into the book. So it's like, yes, I have spent a lot of time with Christine lightly. Yes. Oh, gosh. And at times it felt like it was going of much slower than yet didn't hours..

Stephen King Christine Katie Schaefer cocaine fifteen hours
"christine n p" Discussed on Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

"Anyway. He's like, hey, you know, I just was wondering when you come in by here. And I was like coming what he's like. Yeah. Aren't you coming in? I said, yeah, I'll be on a couple of days. He goes. Oh, oh, you doing some other stuff lawyer in Florida? I'm like, yeah. I'm flying a Florida on Saturday. Well, this is on Wednesday. And he died on Friday night nuts. That's. The facility called and left of voicemail. Smell is. Phone. It was like. Notification don't. Furnish training somewhere or text. Is there a green reaper emoji though? Oh my God for real. Well, we hit about. So many dark subjects do you have like your happiest most rewarding EMS moments. Do you have any of those like God? It's like a really just a feel good moment when we met each other at the fire. Marriage vomited. Excuse me. Will I grab? No friend. Oh, wow. We are fucked up. We came up with all these terrible stories. We can't. I mean, I I had the pleasure of working in kind of a lovely seaside community. And I worked there for a while over a year, and I had a really great partner on that shift, and there's a a local Starbucks that we would go into coffee in the morning after you know, after we did our little morning routine. N one day. A patient's adult child actually approached me in the Starbucks, and I'll tell you what I honestly don't remember this patient. I don't know who this was. But the daughter came up to me and said, you helped my mother like nine months ago, and thank you so much for what you did you know, she she felt so cared for. And that is one of the few times that I've actually like had the big thank you. And it really it. Just kind of drove home that whole people really don't care if I know the protocols, I know, I know the protocols, but they really give a FOX about how I make them feel. So that's kind of you know, know, the protocol. So that you can make people feel like you really give Faulk about them. That would be my feel good and non non EMS people sank your humus providers. They need it. Thank you think your EMS providers because you see people so fleetingly that you're whisked off somewhere else. And like the thing I would hate the most is like you would sweat, and do you would just be like panting and everything and you bring someone back from the dead in this code or whatever and you drag them out of a car wreck or whatever turn them over and they go, oh the fire department, save them. And we were different than the fire department in really, right? Exactly. Oh my God. I didn't even like show up until we were done in like, it's not that. I want a gold star. It's not about glory. It's a little thank you goes. A long way aren't going gonna wrap it up because it's like. Work. At work hours. Thank you guys. So so much for talking with me rich, you left like one of the first reviews for the podcast, and it meant so much to me. So thank you guys. So so much end anyone else's listening? Please leave a review for the podcast really helps out. I mean, a lot to me share the podcast that would be great too. And if you wanna follow the podcast on social media, you can reach out to me on Twitter at antidotes pod. My Twitter is Christine N P. Although I don't really use it Instagram antidotes podcast Andy Facebook group, which Mira plugged earlier is antidotes stories in medicine group. Also the page which is similar, but not nearly as cool as the group predicts missive, and then a group of for the awesome. Well, I'm gonna be posing the episodes, and everyone can maybe ask you questions or just chat about the episode when it airs, and as always thank you to Peter Hopkins for the amazing custom interim it and anyone who wants to reach out to me. You can always do so through social media or send me an Email at antidotes podcast at g mail dot com. Thank you guys so much for listening. I will see you all next week.

Starbucks Twitter Florida Peter Hopkins partner Faulk Instagram Andy Facebook Mira Christine N P. nine months one day
"christine n p" Discussed on Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

"But we turn kit the shit out of you know, in dresses wounded that we took the end cap guys. Well, but you know, like, we definitely responded more emotionally because that was like, hey, that's one of our own. Yeah. Of course, that's the whole reason why you like, you know, you kinda keep certain people at arm's length while you're overseas. Now that being said, you take that mentality as a medic in you translate that to pediatric cardiology, you know, you need to release these to get them to trust. You. You can't really keep them at arm's length emotionally, they relate he more doing the opposite. By like, you kind of being emotional with them and kind of connecting with them in that regard. So that was a huge takeaway a huge difference for me from the civilian side to the to the military side was like a lot of these kids in impatient. Especially like, I built a relationship with because they needed them to. Trust me for me to do my job. Well. Well, thank you for letting me take up so much of your Saturday night. Oh, yeah. No, not a problem at all. Not a prominent. Thank you for having me. This has been a nice conversation sale before we go. You're actually a singer songwriter. And you make the podcast amazing. Custom inter music that we heard at the beginning of the episode, and I'm going to be playing one of your original songs at the end of the episode. Do you wanna plug your social media, and you too? I do have a music to channel. I have so few followers that I don't even have a easy short YouTube name, but WW Pete sing things dot com. 'cause I'm Pete. And I occasionally sing things in then post them on the internet. You can follow that that address will get to there. So. Yeah. So I did a bunch of videos last year because I was trying out for the voice at the urging of my sister-in-law, and it was it was super fun. I used to play music when I was a lot younger I kinda stopped because I was like in the military and stuff I just kinda got back into it was a lot of fun. So I think I'm going to actually start doing it again really soon yet Pete sings things dot com. And yeah, thank you for having me. I appreciate spend a lot of fun. Thank you for being here. And if anyone wants to listen to more episodes, they can subscribe always give some ratings or reviews and follow us on social media, Facebook and Instagram are antidotes podcasts. Twitter is antidotes pod. Might Twitter is Christine N P, and I will see on this week. The. The. In the. Now.

Pete Twitter YouTube Christine N P Facebook Instagram
"christine n p" Discussed on Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"christine n p" Discussed on Antidotes, Stories in Medicine

"Hey, everyone. Welcome teary special bonus episode of antidotes. This is your host Christine. Did you not get enough heart-wrenching and mildly depressing stories on Monday? Well, now, you can have them on Thursday. So where do you health care is like being part of a family, and when you meet someone or talk to someone this also nourish your also EMT, you're medic. And even if you've never met them before all of a sudden you start swapping stories, and it kinda gets a little bit out of hand. And you'll just keep going hailing. I recorded the story about Jane, and we had such an amazing reaction from Monday's episode nurse. Jane that I wanted to share these some of the additional stories that and I talked about after we were done recording. Just as I was about to hang up. She goes away. I have one more quickly story about when I worked to cardiac arrest in Saudi Arabia. We started talking and Ono I need to record this. And then this entire bonus episode came. About. So I thought you guys like to hear it. And I just wanted to say again, hailing I can add it on social media. So if anyone out there has some really cool or really heartwarming moving stories of their own, and you wanna tell them on the podcast, please do get in touch with me. I would love to talk to you doesn't matter where in the world, you are we will figure out sometimes like I did with highly and book get you on the show. I really wanna hear what you have to say send us an Email at antidotes podcasts at chemo dot com. Join the Facebook group antidotes podcast, follow us on Instagram antidotes podcast, or send us a tweet at antidotes pot or me Christine N P, and we will definitely find time to talk, and I'm sure we will have plenty of stories to share if you guys like these bonus episodes if you wanna hear more stories like this lettuce. No. And as always, please give us some reviews and ratings, so we can have more people listening sharing the stories are enough of this on. Onto the story of the cardiac arrest in Saudi Arabia. So this one you're in Saudi. Yeah. I was working in Saudi Arabia actually as teacher now. Okay. So nothing has been left behind in the UK lift Ephrata teacher a university on the women's campus previously, which is that it's separate. But yeah, sounds very strange place to me. Well, so yes, it was kind of it was the end of the the work day. I was in my final class. I'm the student in my class. I didn't know any of this was going on kind of give you the the preamble of up to what happened with me. So she didn't fall on while in a class. She she had a halt condition anyway, eighteen years old friends taken to the cafeteria to dislike give into in a drink and see how she goes came a bit more while to somebody went to the clinic, we compost with a doctor a couple of nurses in the nose came like a wheelchair or something to come and get a they started taking HUD to the clinic in the wheelchair. So I I left my class about five minutes because I really needed to go to the bathroom. If I was up, sleet, desperate. I was like, okay. Goes we're gonna finish now. So I I raced to the bathroom as I write. I'm okay now as always welcome back to my office. I into colleagues so one of my friends because we worked with the complete in the same building. So we would just have chopped together. As I walked back into my office everybody that knows ominous walk into my office and one of my colleagues Haley, the CPR when someone downstairs, and I'm like, what the hell are literally through my bags. I was like she was in the courtyard so race downlist signal. Get out. Rice down the status get out into the courtyard, and obviously a big crowd of people. So I kind of woke up to the edge of light. What's happening? I can see them during Licey PR on this eighteen year old on a so I'm like, right? She doesn't look good colour ATL. You don't see peer. And so they've there's like an oxygen tank next to a mosque over a mouth and the doing chest compressions, and I'm just looking at this whole situation thinking this isn't right bag valve mask or Lakers, number breathe..

Saudi Arabia Jane Christine N P Lakers Facebook Ephrata Ono Instagram UK Haley eighteen years eighteen year five minutes
"christine n p" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"christine n p" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Christine glossy Ford says she has some conditions before G tasks defies good morning. I'm Terry bell. This is the ten o'clock report on NewsTalk eleven thirty w I s n the woman accusing supreme court nominee Brett, Cavs sexual assault wants the FBI investigation before she testifies in a Senate hearing will she or won't she testify? That's been the question of the past few days, the attorneys for Christine blassie Ford, initially said she was prepared and willing to testify that she was sexually assaulted by Brett cavenaugh more than thirty five years ago. But now they say she won't testify until the FBI investigates the allegations. Now, the Senate Judiciary committee scheduled a hearing for Monday for both Ford engines cavenaugh to testify, but Ford's attorneys say an investigation will ensure that the crucial facts in the case are assessed in a nonpartisan manner. Or chairman Chuck Grassley is pushing back on that saying in a statement, Dr Ford's testimony will reflect her personal knowledge in memory of events. Nothing. The F. Or any other investigator does would have any bearing on what Dr foretells the committee? So there is no reason for any further delay. Fox's Garrett Tenny reporting Milwaukee police are investigating a shooting that happened last night on the city's northwest side. One man was killed around eight thirty in the area. Fifty third and Fairmount checking the Bryant heating and cooling sports scoreboard. It's the brewers and reds at Miller park tonight from your local roofer the over the top roof dot com news center. I'm Terry bell on news talk eleven thirty w I s I'm Dan Donald for pillow windows and doors of Wisconsin that fall chill is in the air. And I know nobody wants to think about it. But winter will be here before, you know, it that's why now is the time to get the replacement windows that you know, you need and pages. Two point nine nine.

Christine blassie Ford Ford Terry bell Brett cavenaugh FBI Senate Judiciary Senate Chuck Grassley Miller park assault Milwaukee investigator Garrett Tenny chairman Bryant brewers Wisconsin Dan Donald Fox