18 Burst results for "Christina Greer"

"christina greer" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

07:48 min | 3 months ago

"christina greer" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Washington is breathing a bit easier today. Because late wednesday night democratic and republican senate leaders reached a deal to halt the government from defaulting. At least temporarily the short term debt ceiling increase is only good early december. But in the one day at a time. reality that is the norm for our governance. Congressional leaders are sounding triumphant for accomplishing short term. Fix we have reached agreement to extend the debt ceiling through early december. And it's our hope that we can get this done as soon as today. Democratic members and staff negotiated through the night in good face. Show is moving toward the plan. I laid out yesterday to spare. The american people a manufactured crisis legislative action in the capital has a pretty short time horizon but elected leaders are engaged in longer term planning on one thing midterm elections more than a year out from november twenty twenty two contested races in key states are already beginning to make headlines both democratic and republican leaders are strategizing fundraising gerrymandering and prognosticating at a fevered. Pitch all right. Let's talk about it. We've got michael steele former. Lieutenant governor of maryland previous chair of the r. n. c. and host of the michael steele. Podcast welcome back to the show michael. Hey how are you good to be back with you. It is so good. And i totally want to rename your podcast. Man of steel podcast. But you know we can. We can totally talk about that later. I have to tell you we actually start was the original name but what we found was the people just got confused with the actual man of steel like okay. That's complicated yeah. Let's fair enough. We're also here with christina greer from fordham university whose co host of the podcast faq nyc and author of the book black ethnics rage immigration and the pursuit of the american dream. Welcome back christina. Thank so much for having me. Michael and chris. This is for both of you. We've just been talking here about the debt ceiling and we send our young digital producers. Act buying them out this week. We wanted him to talk to some folks so he went around the nyu campus and basically asked people what they knew about the debt ceiling and how it affects them. I just want to take a listen to an answer. That's pretty indicative. Kind of responses we heard for starters. I don't know what it means. But i'm assuming it's talking about the fact that student debt is so high that like it's reaching like feeling that like it shouldn't be so high you know what i'm saying so obviously that's wrong but it occurs to me. The people are not necessarily very invested in a debt ceiling fight. Mike let me start with you. 'cause i guess in some ways the republicans have picked it. Why have this fight. If people aren't even sure what they're fighting about that's why you habit. The reason you have is is easier to Purvey and confusion and to create a narrative that is not exactly historically or otherwise correct. And so you know when you're out here making claims that you know for example. The biden administration needs to do this alone. Well that's never happened. It can't happen that you have to have a bipartisan resolution. One to The idea that oh you know the biden administration you know has to raise the debt ceiling pay for. It's it's social engineering of the american economy. Well that's just behest because what this what raising the debt ceiling is to pay back pay for the bills that were already created meaning in this case the eight trillion dollars that the trump administration spent over it for years. So if you have a public that is not engaged in the in the facts around what this is and what it isn't it makes it easier for a political operation To play out where you just so confusion and make it seem like this is a problem created by the other guy That that is actually extremely helpful to think up. Because i think we typically think christine. I'm even thinking like political science. We think okay people take meaningful positions and they're trying to kind of position themselves relative to the political parties. But if it's actually better to have a fight about nothingness than we. We don't even get to the big issues absolutely melissa. I mean think about this. We spent one month two months talking about critical race theory out of nowhere instead of talking about the hundreds of thousands of americans who've died because of copa and the ineptitude of republican leadership so the republican party has mastered this bayton switch That democrats oftentimes follow along and play along with But we have to understand that it. It's really them creating these nothing burgers for the public to argue about and think about Without a real conversation about what exactly is going on and so as we know. The stakes are so high. The republican party has really invested in a lot of confusion to make sure that they're never held accountable for live their policy positions because when we look at public opinion we see that the country is going in a direction that consistently moves farther and farther away from the washington. Dc republican elites know. What people really do understand though is is jobs and friday job. Numbers came out the pretty disappointing economy. One hundred ninety four thousand new jobs in september that way down from three hundred sixty six thousand august and more than a million in july. I'm wondering Christina if if there's only sort of so long that the democrats or republicans can have a nothing burger because people will notice in december if they don't have enough money to buy holiday gifts and pay those student loans. Absolutely emmy melissa you you know. Unite as political scientists know that people go to the polls based on their economic circumstances. That's what they vote about. You know lots of folks are like. Oh lat. Next populations vote based on immigration. Absolutely not vote just like everyone else pocketbook issues and do you have enough money for you and your family to move forward and i think the the larger issue with the democratic party has always been even with their successes. they're not great at articulating to the american public. What they have done how they have rescued the american public from horrid a republican policies that have almost pushed just often economic cliff in so even if americans don't have as much money as say they want or need or had a few years past Demo the democratic party needs to explain to the american public. what exactly it is. They're doing to make sure that there's a foundation being laid so people can actually have jobs moving forward if they don't have them right now. So michael i'm interested as we thinking about this like big questions here around The material circumstances of ordinary americans were thinking about these. You know sort of d. c. fights that nobody even knows what the fights are about and i gotta say i absolutely thought that at the end of the trump term that we were going to see an all out battle for the soul of the republican party that this was like the moment when we were gonna see witch. Republican party was gonna come into ascendance and whether it was going to be one that was really kind of on these issues Or one that was going to take you know. Questions like for example critical race theory to talk about. Is that battle happening. And i just don't see it. Because i might not be seeing it or is is it seated because i see the fight happening in the democratic party..

biden administration michael steele christina greer confusion fordham university republican party nyu senate christina maryland Washington nyc michael melissa chris Michael copa Mike christine
"christina greer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:36 min | 7 months ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"We've heard this week that, um, you know, so I mean, there's a bunch of places The New York Times the chief among them who's saying that Kamala Harris has been given jobs that are much too difficult that It was an op ed that was written by a political scientist at Fordham University called Christina Greer. And the headline was Dear Camilla Harris. It's a trap, and it was. It was basically saying that that she should be getting easier gigs that if you really want to set Kamala Harris up to be a successor, don't give her impossible tasks are jobs that our troops to challenging. Do you get the sense that The vice president's staff is resentful in any way of the jobs that President Biden has given her. I think I wouldn't say that they're resentful, but they are definitely doesn't not go unnoticed, and I think defenders of both Harris and Biden would say, Well, it's a sign of how much he trusts her that he gives her these assignments that are tough and that are important to the country. Um, like the border, which is you don't want to have an out of control border you don't want to have that become a big talking point among Democrats are among Republicans and so I think they feel like they're up to the task, but it's also a small operation. So there is, you know, one domestic policy adviser. Maybe. You know he had second. Yes, staffers under him, But this is not the This is smaller than, uh, you know, this is kind of the size of a Senate office or congressional office, and so Although you she moved up in title, uh, she did not gain this huge degree of staffers at the national Security counts much bigger example. Now in your piece for politico. We're speaking with Daniel Lippman. You emphasized that there are very few people who work with her that have worked for worked with her for any length of time. She's She's kind of developed a reputation for this actually of having very high staff turnover and very few loyalists around her. What do we know about that? Yeah. So in the California G's office, she had a certain set of AIDS that do not really necessarily go with her to her Senate office and the Senate offices didn't go her go with her to the presidential campaign. In the presidential campaign. Failed presidential campaign did not go with her to the VP s office, in large part, and so she just has, you know A. This is a very sharp contracts to Biden, where Uh, he, uh, places a high degree of importance on loyalty and on having people he's worked with for decades, and that is shown in terms of people he's brought to his White House..

Daniel Lippman Kamala Harris Harris Christina Greer Democrats Republicans this week Camilla Harris Senate Fordham University both President second one The New York Times White House California G Biden VP decades
"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:26 min | 7 months ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And Whoa! Christina Greer great lines While I mean I I constantly talk about the frequency in which Adams communicates with his supporters, and by that, I mean the decibels in which they hear what he is saying. And I think far too many people get caught up with how he's saying things and not what he's saying. And so as someone who's been a public servant for 20 something years Still presents himself as the underdog. He's essentially saying these these young cats to communicate in this kind of inner circle on social media don't really know what's on the ground and as you could hear with memes and a men's. There are a lot of people who agree with him on that into the social media versus Social Security. He's making a age distinction. But I think he's also making a class and racial distinction somewhat subversively, and I think that's what's going to be fascinating for the next four years. Where I do think that some members of the press are ill equipped to fully understand racing class, uh in some of the outer boroughs of New York City, where Eric Adams has a real stronghold in a real fundamental understanding of New York, and a lot of liberal New Yorkers for the past 20 years have had a very permanent seat at the table. When it comes to de Blasio and even Bloomberg, we saw how Bloomberg clean streets and snow removal and how he cater to particular folks. And Eric Adams is saying I'm not Gonna push you out of the table, but it's very clear that I don't owe you anything And you might not be my priority. And I think that's going to be a real awakening for a lot of New Yorkers who are accustomed to having a mayor. Uh Look at them and their needs as a priority. Talk more about that. How do you see the age thing? Because the age thing is clear. We saw it in the Maris poll. A couple of weeks ago, Adams was winning by far among voters over 45 Maya Wiley was winning among voters under 45. So you could say there's a more progressive, less progressive split by age right there and so and Eric Adams says Social Media doesn't determine winners of mayor elections people on Social Security do Um, you know, that's literally true. But what's the race and class intersection with that that you were just referring to? Well, I think a lot of the Adams voters aren't necessarily on Twitter and instagram following along. I think some of them are out of the workforce either because they've been pushed out of the workforce or they're retired. So they're on, you know, relatively fixed incomes, and he's essentially saying I see you. I recognize that Jordan, New York looks very different than the one that De Blasio and Bloomberg have set up for New Yorkers that are of a particular class. And this this isn't even dealing with Covid. Um And so for older black voters and white voters and immigrant voters, um It appears that he has been speaking to them in a consistent basis, not just during this election season. I mean, in many ways, Garcia and Wiley has kind of come on the scene and introduce themselves in new and exciting and dynamic ways. Which explains why younger voters by and large have been galvanized by their campaigns. But I think Eric Adams campaign seems to represent people who have been in In the electoral process have been faithful in the electoral process, but haven't necessarily gotten.

Eric Adams Garcia New York City De Blasio Wiley Christina Greer Maya Wiley Covid Adams New York Twitter instagram de Blasio under 45 20 something years couple of weeks ago over 45 New Yorkers next four past 20 years
"christina greer" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on KGO 810

"Call 877 26 Bible. That's 877 26 Bible, 877 26 Bible. Freshman Georgia Republican Congress woman Marjorie Taylor Greene is a woman without a whole lot of work after Majority Democrats last week stripped her of her committee assignments over her support of Q and on conspiracy theories. Fordham University political science professor Christina Greer says the GOP has allowed green to become out of control. Republicans have ignored it. In many ways, they've aided and abetted it, and now they've bred this dragon that they don't know what to do with former Trump administration members. Sarah is, Ger says Such extreme views aren't unique to the Republicans. Publicans tried to do with Ellen Omar. And now Democrats are trying to do with Marjorie Taylor Greene and we have seen these freshmen congressmen come in, not hire legislative staff. They're just hiring communications staff so that they can continue to get attention and move further and further to the extreme. It's terrible for our country. It's terrible for our politics. Both is Girl and Greer appearing on ABC s this week broadcast Massachusetts teacher gave a lesson and being a real life hero. Fourth grader Theresa Rozario of Brockton, Massachusetts, was at home in his in class when she smelled smoke told my teacher that there was a fire mouse teacher Bessie Doyle says she heard the fire alarm going off ended class and directed Teresa. Whose home I said, Get out! Get out of the house. You need to get out of the house. Doyle, then call the fire department and told them where to go. You need Han.

Marjorie Taylor Greene Republicans Christina Greer Bessie Doyle Ellen Omar Massachusetts Theresa Rozario Fordham University Brockton GOP Trump Sarah professor Georgia ABC Teresa
"christina greer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In January. 4th are now extended for an indeterminate amount of time. That's due to low ICU capacity and efforts to stop the spread of covert 19 cases include the new variant recently found in Southern California. Oh, that brings us to the Oh, that brings us to the Oh, I'm Callie Crossley in for 10. Xena Vega. You're listening to the take away tomorrow marks the final day of Kwanza, the annual weeklong celebration honoring African and African American culture. And like most holidays, Kwanzaa looks a lot different in 2020 because of the covert 19 pandemic, which has disproportionately impacted black people in the US between that and the months of protests against systemic racism and police brutality. It's been a traumatic year for Black Americans, one that's made Kwanza and what it stands for, especially resident here to discuss that and more is Christina Greer, associate professor of political science at Fordham University and author of the book, Black Ethnics, Race, Immigration and the Pursuit of the American Dream. Messina. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me back. Also with us is Karen Queen nor Abdulmalik, teaching artists, director of the Folk Life Center at Perkins, Center for the Arts and an international story teller known as Queen Nor We know her. How? Barry Gunny, who by by Johnny That's right for those of us who was never celebrated queen, or what is Kwanza and what does it celebrate? Kwanza is a harvest holiday for African Americans and people of African descent in the greater diaspora. It began in 1966 on was founded by Mao, Lana Karonga. I say it's a harvest holiday because all year long we plant our seeds. Our seeds of good It might not be the seas. When my mom Alana traveled to Africa, he looked at the harvest holidays, how they would plant and work the land. And then they would have a celebration at the end sometimes will be 10 Days, 14 days. 21 days and he said, We don't have the opportunity to have a celebration of harvest celebration. And so Kwanza was in gendered so that we could celebrate the good that we have planted in our community using seven principles all year long. It's cultural, not religious, right? Absolutely. It is a cultural holiday. It is not a religious holiday. However, it is spiritual because as Africans and people of African descent we do not separate the spirit from the deal in this of our lives, but it is not religious and or acquainted. Or connected to any religion. Christina why was Kwanza created how much of it was connected to the social unrest of the late 19 sixties? Well, we have to remember that you know, the black power movement of the 19 sixties and seventies. Created in many ways a similar parallel situation that we're witnessing today, where black communities needed to come together to feel unified to feel like they needed to define themselves and speak for themselves to build and maintain their own organizations for their own protection and advancement. And we find ourselves in 2020 sadly needing to do those same things because of the lack of real substantive racial progress that has been made in this country and certain institutions, and so when we think about the seven principles of unity and self determination In collective work and responsibility and cooperative economics. You know, as we think about issues like de funding the police and how do we build and maintain our own stores and shops and businesses and work together and use money and resources and keep those in our communities or purpose or creativity? We've seen the beautiful creativity coming out of Pain and anguish, which leads us into the final day, which is what it's all about in faith, you know, and how we push our hearts forward for a better society for a better family, for better community and to better ourselves, And I think that's why to have faith, which is Imani on January. 1st is such a powerful way. Tonto celebration of Kwanza so back then they catch on right away. Or did it take a few decades to become more widely recognized? Kristina? Well, I mean, I don't know how many African Americans in the United States celebrate Kwanza. I did not grow up celebrating Kwanzaa and I have to be honest. This is the first year that I really every year I look over the principles and, you know, reflect on them briefly, But I will say that this is the first year that I really read a lot more. And each morning reflected on which of the principles of the day what they meant to me and actually had discussions with different friends and colleagues about that. I think you know, interestingly enough, we saw how Juneteenth caught on this year. After the tragic death of George Floyd. And so many corporations and companies and businesses around the country were thinking of real ways to celebrate and recognize Juneteenth. I haven't necessarily seen it in the same ways this year, but I am curious to see Moving forward if a new generation of black Americans and black people in America will see this holiday is something of a reminder, especially after the hectic Christmas holidays when people are allowed to be back with their families again. To think about these really seven important principles. So Queen of the seven Principles including Umoja Unity, Nia Purpose, Kamba creativity, which is today's principle, which Kwanza principal resonate with you this year in particular, Are they any that stand out? Always could you chug live self determination. That's one that's always high on my list. That's because we have to name myself define ourselves, and I'm really think about language Ng this year. And as people are talking about anti racism in this people are talking about right. My supremacy. Labeling is very, very important. How we looked at that and how we what we define and call ourselves as even when you're going to write for Grant and the communities are marginalized or underserved, that we could flip that language. And change that language..

Kwanza Christina Greer Callie Crossley United States Kwanzaa Xena Vega Southern California Karen Queen Barry Gunny Messina Fordham University George Floyd Alana Imani
"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Rooftop films dot com. From W. N. Y. C in New York. This is America. Are we ready tonight? Obviously. Are we ready to count the votes? I'm Brian Lehrer from W. C with Christina Greer, politics editor for the Gree Oh, and political science professor at Fordham University. We'll give you results when we have them. I guess the only thing that's being projected so far is Vermont for by then, and Kentucky, which closed at six o'clock, at least in part. For Trump again. You know, everybody knows Kentucky is going to go for Trump and For months going to go for Biden unless there's really a shocker. What? We're waiting for his early returns from Georgia, which closed at seven o'clock, big potential swing states, but only 2% of the vote has been counted there so far, so we're not gonna waste your time with the results among the 2%. We'll also be looking at Florida this our most of Florida closed at seven o'clock, North Carolina and Ohio close at 7 30. Just a few minutes from now we have three caller questions on the table. If you're voting today, rather than voted early, why did you wait till today? With so many options available this year? If you changed parties for your presidential.

Trump Kentucky Florida Gree Oh Brian Lehrer Christina Greer Fordham University New York America Biden Vermont W. N. Y. C Georgia professor editor North Carolina Ohio
"christina greer" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Most people have heard the word gerrymandering once or twice probably during a presidential election. . What exactly is gerrymandering essentially, , it's the process of giving one political party and advantage over another political party. . By Redrawn district lines. . It's like Democrats trying to gain advantage over Republicans or Republicans. Trying . to gain an advantage over Democrats you see each party wants to gain as many districts as possible. . So they can do things like control the state budget or set themselves up to win even more districts in the future. . So to understand how this process began and how it continues today, , we must go back to eighteen twelve in Massachusetts Albridge Jerry the governor of Massachusetts supported and signed a bill to allow redistricting that is redrawing the boundaries that separate districts the catch, , the new lines favor Jerry's political party, , the democratic Republican Party which no longer exists. . You see Jerry wanted his party to win as many states Senate seats as possible the more members of your party who vote the more likely you are to. . Win Election the new lines were drawn to include loads of areas that would help governor Jerry in the future there were so strange looking that someone said, , the new districts look like a salamander the Boston Gazette at Jerry's name to the word Salamander and Walla Gerrymandering, , the process of dividing up and redrawing districts to give your political party and advantage. . So how exactly does someone go about protecting their own political party and actually Gerrymandering district? ? There are two successful practices packing a district and cracking district. . Packing is the process of drawing district lines and packing in your opponents cattle into his few districts. . As possible if more districts equals more votes, , the fewer the district's there are the fewer votes the opposition party will get. . Packing then decreases the opponents voter strengthened influence. . Cracking, , is the opposite taking one district and cracking it into several pieces. . This is usually done in districts where your opponent has many supporters. . Cracking spreads these supporters out among many districts denying your opponent, , a lot of votes. . When, , you have a large number of people who generally vote for one type of Party, , those folks are known as the voting block cracking as a way to break that all up. . So. . When would a party choose to pack their opponents districts rather than crack them? ? Well, , that really depends on what the party needs to dilute your opponents voters. . You could pack them into one district and lead the surrounding districts with voters of your own party or if you and your partner in power. When . it's time to redraw district lines, , you could redraw districts and crack up a powerful district and spread your opponents voters out across several neighboring districts. . So Governor Jerry and twelve to gain advantage for his party and redrew district lines in his state and such a crazy way. . We have a whole new word and way of thinking about how political parties can gain advantages over their opponents. . Politicians think of creative ways to draw districts years. . So the next time an election comes around and politicians asked people to vote be sure to look up the shape of your district and the district's that surrounded. .

Governor Jerry Republican Party Ted Jerry Hugh Stanley Christina grier Boston Gazette Massachusetts Senate partner redrew
Gerrymandering: How drawing jagged lines can impact an election

TED Talks Daily

03:11 min | 1 year ago

Gerrymandering: How drawing jagged lines can impact an election

"Most people have heard the word gerrymandering once or twice probably during a presidential election. What exactly is gerrymandering essentially, it's the process of giving one political party and advantage over another political party. By Redrawn district lines. It's like Democrats trying to gain advantage over Republicans or Republicans. Trying to gain an advantage over Democrats you see each party wants to gain as many districts as possible. So they can do things like control the state budget or set themselves up to win even more districts in the future. So to understand how this process began and how it continues today, we must go back to eighteen twelve in Massachusetts Albridge Jerry the governor of Massachusetts supported and signed a bill to allow redistricting that is redrawing the boundaries that separate districts the catch, the new lines favor Jerry's political party, the democratic Republican Party which no longer exists. You see Jerry wanted his party to win as many states Senate seats as possible the more members of your party who vote the more likely you are to. Win Election the new lines were drawn to include loads of areas that would help governor Jerry in the future there were so strange looking that someone said, the new districts look like a salamander the Boston Gazette at Jerry's name to the word Salamander and Walla Gerrymandering, the process of dividing up and redrawing districts to give your political party and advantage. So how exactly does someone go about protecting their own political party and actually Gerrymandering district? There are two successful practices packing a district and cracking district. Packing is the process of drawing district lines and packing in your opponents cattle into his few districts. As possible if more districts equals more votes, the fewer the district's there are the fewer votes the opposition party will get. Packing then decreases the opponents voter strengthened influence. Cracking, is the opposite taking one district and cracking it into several pieces. This is usually done in districts where your opponent has many supporters. Cracking spreads these supporters out among many districts denying your opponent, a lot of votes. When, you have a large number of people who generally vote for one type of Party, those folks are known as the voting block cracking as a way to break that all up. So. When would a party choose to pack their opponents districts rather than crack them? Well, that really depends on what the party needs to dilute your opponents voters. You could pack them into one district and lead the surrounding districts with voters of your own party or if you and your partner in power. When it's time to redraw district lines, you could redraw districts and crack up a powerful district and spread your opponents voters out across several neighboring districts. So Governor Jerry and twelve to gain advantage for his party and redrew district lines in his state and such a crazy way. We have a whole new word and way of thinking about how political parties can gain advantages over their opponents. Politicians think of creative ways to draw districts years. So the next time an election comes around and politicians asked people to vote be sure to look up the shape of your district and the district's that surrounded.

Governor Jerry Republican Party Jerry Boston Gazette Massachusetts Senate Redrew Partner
"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's a national call in to connect with your neighbors and people from around the country this hour on the question. Is there a liberal and a conservative way to fight a pandemic. I'm Christina Greer, political science professor at Fordham University in the United States today officially hit the grim milestone of 200,000 images. Hide virus pandemic is not over back to second wave of lockdowns is now underway in countries where it faded and came back as they reopened, including the UK, Spain. Israel in India, all to different degrees. So the question for Americans now is who would be the better president for keeping us safe from the virus and from the economic, social and educational devastation? That shutdowns Khun bring what should the balance be? And who is better to strike it? Joe Biden or Donald Trump, also who get vaccine development, right and hold developed the rapid and at home tests that might free us to return to normal even faster than a vaccine. And listeners. This is a national call in so you're invited to join in and tell us if you're a Democrat, a Republican or independent, is there a liberal or conservative way to fight a pandemic? Is there a democratic or Republican way You're invited to call in at 844745 Talk. That's 8447458255. This nurse. What role do you want for the federal government in ending phase one not over and keeping face to at bay. What do you want the president to do next, and in the year ahead, even the pandemic has become something of a partisan issue right in our polarized country. So we invite your comments and your questions. Is there a liberal or conservative way to fight? A pandemic is one better than the other. Well, what's the ideal mix? What do you want to say? Or what do you want to ask? 644 Absolute ate for four. 745 talk. That's 8447458255844745 talk. And we will have three guests this hour, one more associated with conservative institutions, then one more associated with liberal ones and then a journalist to tie it all together. So with us first is a bit Roy, president of the Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity in Austin, Texas. And policy editor for Forbes magazine was also a health care policy adviser to Mitt Romney's 2012 Republican presidential campaign Object. Thanks for joining us and Welcome to America, Are we ready? Hey, it's a pleasure to be with you. How are you? Great. Thank you, Alex. So let's jump right in. So is there a liberal or conservative way to fight this pandemic? Well, I was really Ah, bit amused. I'd say listening to your the way you you laid out the segment because what's interesting to me and what I observe, is that The Conservatives from a dictionary definition standpoint, the people who are averse to risk the people who are cautious. The people who are perhaps more dogmatic and unwilling to think about contrarian points of view. Those are the people who in general are advocating a very restrictive approach to covert 19 where we lock down the economy, and we we we basically think about Avoiding the risk of the virus at the expense of all of the things, putting that as the highest priority and the liberals, the small L liberals again from the dictionary definition point of view. Are the ones who are open to different points of view, competing interpretations of the evidence that we find people who are much more oriented towards balancing the trade offs between restrictions, closures of schools, restrictions of businesses along with the risks of the virus. Fell over. When you say balancing the trade off. Does that mean accepting a certain number of additional deaths? For a certain number of additional O R. Let's say less economic pain. Well, Brian, I think that ah, you your premises False because you're assuming that there is no cost tow lives from massive economic restrictions and the and the closure of schools. In fact, There's a considerable amount of academic research that shows that prolonged economic shutdowns do decrease. Life expectancy do increase deaths of various types. Death from Mental health challenges, deaths of despair, death from not being able to seek health care of a non cove it nature. There are all sorts of of elements of health and health care that our Damaged by lockdowns, and that has to be taken into account along with the economic and equality costs completely, and I think that was the framing. Where's the balance in these complex choices, But We know now that as of today, officially 200,000 Americans have died from the virus. Would you argue that anything proportional to that? Has taken place in terms of American deaths from the degree of lock down that we've had it could have. Well, this is AH, is a really important question. Right? So what we if we look around? We look at New York City where you are, Brian. There was a lock down right schools are still closed. And yet New York has had a New York City in particular has at a higher proportion of deaths. Ah per capita than any other part of the country. California has not had the same problems that New York has had. But if you compare, say California, Texas, which have had pretty similar Courses of in terms of deaths. Mortality hospitalizations cases, California has chosen a more aggressive or restrictive approached lockdowns. Texas has been a bit more pragmatic. But the results have been pretty similar. Right, So it's not clear. There's this kind of this dogma out there that locked down save lives, at least in certain quarters. And if you actually look at the evidence of how lockdowns have performed We don't actually see that correlation. But half lockdowns. Cost lives have isn't the New York experience that it came in from Europe before anybody realized that was happening?.

president New York City Texas Brian California Fordham University Khun Israel Christina Greer UK Joe Biden United States Mitt Romney Spain India New York Forbes magazine professor Donald Trump Europe
"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But when the time when it came to it, she also was willing to sort of gently be an attack dog. Against Trump's opponent, Joe Biden. So let's have a listen. Last time Joe's boss was Obama this time, it would be Pelosi, Sanders and the squad. Their vision for America is socialism, and we know that socialism has failed everywhere. They want to tell Americans how to live what to think. Right. So you heard that Professor Christina Greer. Very measured tones, but a pretty stark message about Joe Biden. What do you make of it? Right. Well, I think it goes to the campaign really struggling on how to target attacks to Joe Biden. You know the issue within the Democratic Party is that Joe Biden isn't too the left enough. Right or hasn't been in the past the issue for Democrats that he's nothing like a socialist right. So he actually learning to work with the squad on Nancy Pelosi and the Bernie Sanders Wing of the party. But that is not Joe Biden face. And so I think that they're trying to paint a picture of Joe Biden that is Why don't you just write anything? I think many Democrats would even say that, but I think it's fascinating the way the Republican Party uses people of color to absolve themselves of the racial injustices. That means That are so Blake. I mean, you know, we have What's going on across the country, Not just Kenosha, Wisconsin, but, um The backdrop of racial unrest this summer alone should be enough for the party to recognize and understand it. So to have a person of color get up there and say this country isn't racist. Will we literally have 404 101 years of receipts that yes, yes, Indeed, it has been, and still is. And even though she says it's not racist, she rented it to stories of discrimination that she and her family faith which we know just a very, very small fraction of A type of racism that not just black people experiencing country but Latinos, Asian Americans who are definitely experiencing it now, Mr Krone virus, so WeII did here a number of references to the China virus that I thought that was thought that was noteworthy and interesting, and I'll be listening to see whether it continues to be called the China virus as the convention continue it Right, And that's deliberate and we know that in certain places across the United States, it's definitely made Asian Americans unsafe. People have just essentially gone back to save the 19 twenties, when we have the Chinese exclusion Act. No. You know that This is a party that is very white, Uh, much older. I think the Democrats was show trying to showcase their not just geographic, racial, ethnic diversity, but their ideological diversity as well. I think the Republicans are critics struggling with what their ideological diversity is, because in order to be a Republican right now, you have to be and you know, a devotee of Donald Trump. There is very little room. For ideological diversity in there, they're increasingly smaller tent. This is why we're seeing so many former Republican coming out and supporting Joe Biden because they actually saying I'm putting country over a man not just party putting country over an individual who has taken over the party. So I think the youth of Nikki Haley and her ability to be used consistently by not just the party. But Donald Trump specifically says a lot about your blood condition. But what she's willing to say to ignore the realities of what American race and racism have bench and consistently still are. We have time for one more phone calls, So let's go to Charles in Harlem. Charles, What was your reaction to what you heard last night? Oh, thank you for taking my call. It was just an overall observation of the internal Soto incoherence of of the message, even on its own terms for the For the Republican the overarching seen write an example That's Professor picked up one was that Ah, you know, Nikki Haley began with a blanket statement that America is not racist. Then she spent the next few minutes talking about how she overcame racism. And then Tim Scott. His whole talk was about how he overcome racism. So is you use a racist or not? The vouchers for for schools that they You keep promoting, you know vouchers for public school school choice. Within vouchers for housing. You know, like Section eight housing they were opposed to in the suburbs. So which is it? Are you for personal choice or not? I just It's you know, similar vein, and I noticed a lot of I noticed a lot of talk about how great the economy had been like right up until the pandemic as well and and even that sort of revealed a little bit of a muddle about what they want to say. What I like. Is the economy. Good. Is it bad? And how should we feel about that? Personal choice. If you're for personal choice, and people should get vouchers and they should be able to live where the land and you that vouchers and let them live. If you're gonna have vouchers for public school, then why can't you have vouchers for the housing? They want one. They don't want others, So it just seemed sort of confusing to me as well. That's all that was just my only observation. Charles. Thanks for your call. Christina Greer. Last thoughts last 30 seconds we have here. What are you gonna be washing for? In the next three nights of the Republican convention? Well, I am going to be watching to see if Melania Trump plagiarizing Michelle Obama's speech. I obviously will be watching for that. I want to see how often the president talks and whether or not he could stay on script and expressed some sort of compassion. For the victims of the Corona virus that happened under his watch. In some sort of acknowledgement of that on, I'm going to see if he has any surprises that we love surprises as a TV. Reality show star. All right. I've been talking with Christina Greer, a Fordham University political scientist and host of the podcast Y. Do I have that right? That right, Okay. And listeners a quick programming note. Alison Stewart and all of It will be back next week. In the meantime, stay with me for politics. We will take a quick break right now.

Joe Biden Melania Trump Professor Christina Greer Republican Party Charles Nikki Haley Democratic Party Nancy Pelosi America Bernie Sanders Wing Kenosha Obama Alison Stewart Wisconsin Blake Mr Krone Fordham University China United States Tim Scott
"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the 2020 Democratic National Convention has begun. As you've been hearing this morning, the first ever virtual convention kicked off last night. There was no pact convention hall hardly any applause. But there were one liners, unusual backdrops, occasionally some odd camera angles and overall creative attempts. To get voters virtually excited and focused on one main idea vote for Joe Biden because he's running against President Trump. Donald Trump is the wrong president for our country. He has had more than enough time to prove that he can do the job, but he is clearly in over his head. He cannot meet this moment, Nero fiddled while Rome burned. Trump gulfs. His actions fan this pandemic, resulting in over 170,000 deaths. My dad was a healthy 65 year old. His Onley preexisting condition was trusting Donald Trump, and for that he paid with his life. Those first two familiar voices in that montage where the headliners of Good night those of us in the East Coast who stayed up late heard Senator Bernie Sanders and then Michelle Obama, who gave a masterclass on public speaking without an audience. The third voice we just played was a less well known speaker. Kristen or Kisa, whose father died of Cove it after attending a karaoke bar in Arizona shortly after their shelter in place order was lifted in May. She said her father made the mistake of trusting Trump. And it cost him his life. She was there to remind us that it's not just left leaning politicians saying that Trump isn't the right president for America Right now, it's regular people who lost their dad to covert who thinks so too. So overall, How did the de mes do on this first night? Cheers or jeers or whatever else from the political media? And what about from your own circles? What do your friends and families saying about the evening? Fordham University professor and political commentator Christina Greer, who is also host of the fake podcast joins me now, and let's hear your impressions and favorite and least favorite moments from last night are number is 646. 4357280. That's 6464357280. And we have Professor Greer on the line right now, Professor. Welcome back. Thank you loved to be here, So I've gotta ask you first. You know, politics, you've watched political speeches and conventions and political rhetoric for years. Did you have a Wow, moment from last night, something that made you sit up straight from the couch or wherever you might have been watching. You know me quite well. I mean, this is this is such an odd time right? Because that obviously our first convention where it's being held over Zoom and Skype and social distance where you don't have the same energy. You don't have all the people coming together from 50 states. Obviously, Michelle Obama perfectly lead out, not just the problem, but what I thought was a powerful about her speech was that she laid out the solution how voters should take their balance and hand deliver them if they can. How they should start to register for absentee ballots right now. She could do it today because the threat of the president, lying cheating and stealing is so large. So I thought that was incredibly powerful. Obviously Joe Biden and Amtrak, I think what's been missing from this administration for so many voters is a lack of compassion and empathy. From not just president, but his entire administration to know that there's a possibility to elect someone who understands pain and suffering and wants to listen to other families. American families better are going through a really tough time. Not just economically but due to Kobe. And then lastly, what was really powerful was obviously Cristina who you mentioned the young woman who lost her father to prove it. She essentially represents A portion of 170,000 people and families who have been lost who you know, lost their lives because of it, and some, you know, have lost loved ones, and they still support the president because they don't believe that it's really even though they're struggling with law. Many people are recognizing that their families and communities are really suffering and grieving, largely because of the inept policies and preparation from the president. This administration and And I thought that her thought Bull. Plead to the American people, saying that the only pre existing condition or father had was listening to the president and we see it happened to him. It happened hurricane and sadly happened to thousands of other people in this country who believe the president when he said it wasn't a big deal or that You know, it would just go away miraculously. You know, Conventions often include regular people, but that was a powerful regular person moment. I mean, obviously, we're living in extraordinary times. But that really was mean sending battle that'll stay with people. I think that that might be one of those moments that all that'll last out of this. Her indeed. And I think you know what's interesting is the choice of having case it. I mean, I speak to my students and former students quite a bit. And, you know, I think that there is I think some people are too mind. Some of the more progressive leaning Democrats they'd love seeing Bernie about. Bernie was great talking about his friend and colleague Joe Biden and trying to get his hopes of supporters on board. I think some people who are more moderate touch right, leaning on See John Kasich is Wow, This is a man who doesn't agree with Democrats on a lot. But he can agree with Bernie Sanders and the rest of the Democrats to say that Joe Biden is the man for this moment and the president's on the wrong track, but I will say for some of my students and former students They didn't like, and they don't like this inclusion of Republicans speaking on behalf of Democrats, and so it'll be interesting to see how that falls out in the subsequent weeks, and also that gives Republicans Time to prepare encounter on DH put together their attacks for their convention next week in their virtual space. I want to play a brief clip from Michelle Obama and get get a reaction from you in case folks didn't hear her entire speech. Here's one other clip from Michelle Obama. Donald Trump is the wrong president. For our country. He has had more than enough time to prove that he can do the job, but he is clearly in over his head. He cannot meet this moment. He simply cannot be who we need him to be for us. It is what it is. Professor. Why was this such an arresting speech? I mean, was it the fact that she said his name once and only once, was it the fact that she spit his words back to him that it is what it is, which is the phrase he used to describe. To react to the number of deaths or do the cove. It wasn't her delivery. What was it? I think all of the above. I mean, as the kids would say, you know, it was a bargain of all burns because she used his own phraseology against him. He used that in such a callous manner. She slowed it down and Put it up in the mirror to the American people and also to Donald Trump. But we know that you know the reason why Michelle Obama's such a powerful counter to the president is because we've seen Donald Trump really struggle with smart, strong women. We've seen him really struggle with Smart. African Americans period. So Michelle Obama encompasses both. I mean, she has a level of of grace and dignity and intellect that eyes unparalleled especially when compared to the president..

President Trump president Michelle Obama Joe Biden Senator Bernie Sanders Professor Nero Professor Greer Fordham University Rome Arizona John Kasich East Coast Christina Greer professor Cristina America
"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And movement as something that's nationalistic. I am someone who shares to Macon ancestry with Kamala. My grandfather's You're making my grandmother from another Caribbean island and then the other half of my family is African American. I love all those side with every ounce. Of my being, and I appreciate that extinct cultural lineage experiences that all of those sides have. And so the reckoning In terms of specificity that a lot of us they're asking for. And recognizing a game that's being played in terms of identity. It people politicians, the media, etcetera. Cloaking themselves. They're cooking others in the identity and lineage of African Americans. Nous and then trying to create a narrative of triumph that is very much grounded in that lineage is something that we're becoming quite aware of, and that were rejecting and that we're also interrogating. And so I think it's important to have this conversation in a glass of this segment. And I think it's important at some point for w. N. Y C to have a segment with the founders of a DDOS movement, perhaps some people from a Tus chapter in New York To discuss the objective nuances that are at play here because it's being stored around that only creating more frustration. Um and and it's going to end up back back. It sounds like a great idea for a segment that we should dio on. Christina Greer, where do you want to jump into that? I think that last caller said quite a bit. So let me just parked out some of that. And I think that what I talk about in black ethnic event for people like Camel hair and people who have Black immigrant. Uh, heritage, your parents. It's a both, and they could be both immigrants. Both, you know Jamaicans and also feel very deep rooted in a black American experience because of how they live their daily lives. I think.

Caribbean island Kamala Christina Greer New York
"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Secret Service agents working to protect vice president. Pence had to remain quarantined in Arizona after testing positive there even as the president continue to minimise the risk from the virus into success of speeches. It was a weekend when Broadway actor Nick Cordero of Bronx Tale and Waitress fame, among other plays, died of the virus at age 41 the NYPD says chief of transportation died of it, too. It was a weekend when reportedly a few 100 people continue to occupy City Hall after the budget passed last week, with cuts to the NYPD and many other things that protesters saw as bookkeeping tricks, at least as it pertained to the police. It was a weekend of 45 shootings in New York City, which makes 63 in the last week, compared to 26 in the same week. Last year. There was a weekend when the Washington Redskins and Cleveland Indians announced they're considering changing their names. It was a weekend when the New York City beaches were open for swimming with lifeguards back on duty. Today is the day that Phase three reopening takes place in New York City, including nail salons and tattoo parlors. With certain precautions, but indoor dining as you probably heard, has been postponed because of the spikes in 16 other states. Governor Cuomo says anyone coming to New York from those states should quarantine for two weeks. But nobody is sure how he can enforce that New Jersey Next re opening phase kicks in on Wednesday that will include summer camps and outdoor graduations with proper precautions. With me now. Doctor. Christina Greer, Fordham University Political science professor, author of the book Black Ethnics and Co host of the Podcast F A Q And My C Hi, Christina. Welcome back to WNYC help you had Arrest for weekend. Yes, I did hide, Brian. What do you make? First of all of the post New York City budget. Politics who's happy and who's not. After reading the fine print of this document, which came out Wednesday, too much consternation. Yeah, well doesn't seem like many people are happy. I think the concern is, you know, as we think, critically and imaginatively about de funding the NYPD They're to be in direct relation in incorrect causation. About some of the violence we're seeing over the past weekend on DH. The efforts to decrease some of the of scene budget of the NYPD has enjoyed for quite some time. How is the male mayor if he's been out publicly at all dealing with the spike in shootings? At a policy level. Well, I think you're right. This is the frustrated treating Factor in that, you know, I break up Mayor de Blasio tenure into four sections. You know, First year first term, we saw Universal pre K. We saw him center pushing forward of progressive agenda. First term second half kind of quiet instead of resting on his laurels. And then the second term first half, you know, everywhere, but New York Precedent. And so now we have the mayor back in the city dealing with, you know, rabbit unemployment. What seems to be, you know, summer spikes in violence, which many people were concerned. Sorry about. Obviously, there is a correlation between high unemployment and high violent islands. But the sad part is of the mayor doesn't seem to have a buy in from the citizens of New York or credibility amongst his colleagues and City Council because he's been relatively disinterested. Seemingly disinterested for about four years. So I think when a policy level it makes it much more difficult, because because we already have whispers about who's going to start running in 2021 so I think people are starting to form allegiances and alliances. Planning on a future of New York without marriage, Blasio and we know that his relationship with the press has been tense to be polite about it on his patient's level with articulating a vision has been little to none, especially recently. And so it's hard to get policy past when It seems as though on the one hand he's distracted. On the other hand, he's pretty annoyed when asked specific questions about moving forward. New length spike in shootings likely to the spike and unemployment. I think some of the media are linking it to the defund the police movement. Causing the police to back off feeling like they're not like they're not wanted there, not respected. Why should they be aggressive out there to prevent shootings? How do you weave that whole tapestry together? Yeah. I don't subscribe to that argument. And we've seen several times with the police have slowed down to, you know, try and prove a point. And instead of, you know, get under the mayor, skin and we didn't see spikes in violence we saw. You know, we have so many police officers who actually are not necessary for policing. We could use a host of other individuals who don't have Guns and bullets to actually do their jobs. So I don't think we need armed individuals to.

New York City NYPD Mayor de Blasio City Hall vice president Governor Cuomo Nick Cordero Pence Christina Greer Arizona WNYC Washington Redskins Cleveland Indians City Council Brian Fordham University Political s professor
"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And bike bridges spanning the city's rivers and harbors tune in for the story a ninety three point nine FM may make twenty or ask your smart speaker to play W. NYC it is seventy nine degrees now chance of showers and thunderstorms after midnight and tomorrow it's eight o'clock this is WNYC FM HD and A. M. New York it's the New York primary night call on W. NYC good evening everyone I'm Brian Lehrer in a year like none other new Yorkers have been sending in absentee ballots in record numbers and yes going to the polls in person to to nominate members of Congress and some very interesting and important races also the queens borough president special election and a number of other things as well including the democratic presidential primary and let me say that for nomination that's already been clinched it seems like everyone I know has been calling me up to share their inner angst about whether to vote for Biden or Bernie or Warren or somebody else anyway we will open up the phones in our give your caller questions in just a minute let me first introduce my partners for this hour W. in my see politics in city hall reporter Brigid Bergin has been following most of the key races and Dr Christina Greer Fordham political science professor author of the book black ethnics and co host of the podcast FAQ NYC hi Bridget hi Christina happy Friday hi Brian hi doctor Greer hi Bridget M. listeners we'll take calls in three blocks this hour at least I'm gonna try to squeeze that much and we'll keep a pretty fast pace call in number one call us now if you did vote in the presidential primary who did you vote for why did you bother if Biden's already clinched it and tell us what you're voting experience was like whether you voted in person or voted absentee six four six four.

A. M. New York Bridget M. doctor Greer professor Dr Christina Greer reporter Warren Bernie president NYC Brigid Bergin Biden Congress Brian Lehrer New York
"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:00 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm with professor Christina Greer from Fordham University and we are taking calls from black listeners specifically tonight asking you what is justice to you and we're asking you how are you showing up for each other in this moment and before we take a few more calls I want to go to another W. in my see and gotten this reporter who is out in the street tonight Jake often hurts Jake welcome to the W. in my see here and here I thought where where are you right now and what do you say I'm in Mott haven I didn't about probably three hundred officers because they blocked off the area where they thought he I believe are continuing to create a large group of protesters who I was with a couple of minutes ago we had we have been marching down we're a one forty third before we were marching south and at one point they are a large group of cops on bicycles and heavy armor showed up interrogated that the narrow street that we were walking down and it happened pretty quickly people I don't think realize what was happening but as there was a little bit of bottleneck in the group a couple hundred people were kind of approaching the barricade of fight cops basically out the crux clock struck eight PM another group of cops came from behind with the cons out and started pushing people and it was it was a really scary and claustrophobic scene in there and I don't know that it's been freed up yet I think I think they might still be there they're not wanting to anywhere near it but there were there were some really brutal arrest there was pepper spray I heard I heard that a pregnant woman got number three people were screaming horrified legal observers with the national lawyers guild were handcuffed and detained I don't know where they are right now it was really very can I ask the the same thing I ask when and we look at the kitchen items on earlier we're hearing that when we see those of us who are at the protests now the the police department the mayor saying that well you know when you see these videos circulating online they're out of context there is there there are things that are prompting the kinds of reactions that you're describing Jake so how can you is that the case is what how would you know now the mayor's wrong where is wrong about this and I assumed for multiple nights and this is like that was the most obvious but it happened before note these are this is the whole protest flight group of F. T. P. they were involved in the subway protest where there was like a dental exam and make their you know not the daytime park slope crowd by any means but they are it's just people that there was not even time for anything to get rowdy work it just left like a pretty up with the demonstration they were walking for about ten or fifteen minutes and and then this happened and it was unprovoked is what it is and are you seeing any elected officials or any other political folks out who are negotiating in these in these tense moments yeah your money Williams our public advocate was out last night our office I have not seen any of this one I have you the NYPD chief of department Terence Monahan he ordered the arrest of Sheila Jones she's an organizer with profitability he he was at the front he wasn't in the the Katelyn well I was I saw a video that out but yes Terence Monahan recently took a knee with protesters since that was the fact that I watch well thank you Jake please take care of yourself out there and thank you for being out there to witness it for us thank check out the hearts from Gothamist you can continue to follow his and our other reporters reports from the streets at Gothamist dot com and sundry center in queens welcome to WNYC okay hi how are you well you know I I okay great please set your screen that you know justice would be legislative actions such as police stations with high rates of discrimination discriminatory behavior it during arrest they would lose funding etcetera but you know you talked about how we're taking care of each other in the community and and and I have friends in the check in I have friends that we call the to the morning we check in because this is dramatic and I find that our nation and we sold under estimate the trauma that we all experience you know you got kids that come from households where the parents I have some type of severe crisis in short coming and then they start to act out in school in rather than addressing that the kid is been ex posed to a dramatic situation they label them bad the truth might get in trouble you go to juvie now he has a record and he can't get a job and then the only recourse he has is to sell drugs to make money X. it it just goes on and on but it all stems from poor mental health in that it has never been addressed in so our do you know B. M. black in in in America is trademarked no matter where we go and what we do you walk into a store you get five when I was leaving home depot the other day a white one left in front of me with something that was picked up at the curb they don't give you a receipt so he lets her go by but he stopped me and has to really add that I'd take a close look at what I'm doing you know so everything we do is dramatic we don't get respect for even our accomplishments that I looked at how you know when they noticed that there was more common in the black community and in in New York rather than trying to reach out to the entire black community said we're going to do testing in the project I'm a homeowner I live alone in queens and have a house I'm not in the project I still couldn't get testing so don't treat us don't lump us together suggested to me would be to treat this as a protected group a protected group we need to go back to quotas if you mistreat us then we're gonna take your finding I need to be a Cup Abby group comes here in repros over and tried to push either I'm not that visible black person we're so easily by default discount it because you can see S. we can't hide we can't take off our skin and pretend we're something else will just change our last name SO pope says by default eliminate the competition and say the black and bad let's get rid of that first we need to be treated like a protected group they need to respect that were traumatized we will go against our will we didn't do crap to you will be get treated the worst since Sandra thank you for that that since Sanders says again we get we get back to dollars and cents and and and a I think a call for mental health also Christina there there's there's those there's those questions but I want it I want to back up to so when I asked both Jake and and Quinn about elected officials out in the streets in the course of these protests that you know have you noticed this absence of of people who we vote for in the middle of this and and how do you feel about that is an appropriate thing for me to focus on I just keep saying where are where are the elected officials other than the public advocate in the middle of the standoffs what part of the passion with you on the street that you know so many people who are marching feel as though they've been failed on on every level of government local state and federal and they are you know in cities across the country what has my name written headline there you know made sure that the push funding towards it the police department as opposed to many organizations are environmental funding I think you know we also have to recognize that there the relationship between protocol that the lack of pocket is really key because in a lot of folks they will you know why are they marching they're not gonna get anything and a lot of people are marching don't necessarily believe in electoral politics they don't see their elected officials out marching they don't think that they're important or do anything we have to understand that black people in the country have never gotten anything without protest politics and we we know that you know sometimes we have to build coalitions and take to the streets because that's how policy gets change that that would be one of the few ways that elected officials see if even elected officials who were elected officials of color or black more specifically so I think that you know as if we have elections not just on November third but I definitely think that this is a wake up call for a lot of local elected official in New York who you know are are up for reelection in November of next year or are looking to get promoted to a different position in the city sometime in twenty twenty one whether or not they're gonna have a contentious primary or not and I think that they're going to have to change their rhetoric with all that you know represented angle I was caught on a hot Mike saying that he wouldn't even you know get the protest if you didn't have a primary challenger these are the people that we really need to pay attention to make sure that they are are you quickly find themselves unemployed because we have the power to actually elect people that represent that you want to listen to your ideas and there are too many people who have the talent where you know if you're exactly then I think you should run for university political scientist Christina Greer thank you for writing.

Christina Greer Fordham University professor
"christina greer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:46 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Night of civil unrest across the country even after president trump threatened to send in federal troops of mayors and governors could get their arms around it welcome L. political scientist Christina Greer she's associate professor put aside at Fordham also the author of the book black ethnics race immigration and the American dream thank you so much professor for being back with us give us your perspective on a broader sense about where this civil unrest falls on a spectrum but again I think we're definitely reached a boiling point if we look at the major cities and smaller cities across the nation most people of my generation have never seen anything on on this scale but we have to ask ourselves what is the root cause and you know that it's not just about George Floyd I doubt if they're making a quality it's about a segment of the citizenry living under constant fear and police violence it's about where the inequality it's about forty million Americans filed for unemployment and we know more I'm not having any job prospects it's not a failure of the federal government to deal with the global pandemic and people feeling the pain and the anguish over hundred thousand American dead and knowing that the president and members of his party are you going to do anything to save or access Americans that don't look a certain way or live in particular places and so I think the the piece that lots of people want to half **** and want to return to quite frankly isn't possible until folks understand the extent to which justice has not been fair exactly for the progress I think we need to be very careful about the various elements of because they still get mashed together we have the police issue which is clearly an issue nobody would deny that having seen the video we got a real problem this country it's not limited Minneapolis but we also have as you say the broader question of inequality inequality of income of wealth of educational opportunity of health care which we saw really come to the forefront with this pandemic as it was such a disproportionate effect on African Americans as well as on Hispanics I must say input as we see these protests what should they be protesting for if I can ask it that way what is it we could do concretely what policy measures can we take to start to address this so I just want to I just wanting to know what did I do video Saturday that many many people deny that video thanks thank you nothing wrong with that video and there's always the question of what we probably did something before the police officer had been yelling his neck I've gotten locked and messages from unsavory individuals who are very happy they do then it's one less black person in this country there we can't say that no one disagrees that video there's a real divide it to whether or not that excessive use of force that led to the death of George Ford excessive use of force that led to the death of Eric garner or excessive use of force that led to the death of Brianna Taylor with an EMT badly there are a lot of people who think that that means of course is justified in in some ways a glorified because they don't think that black Americans belong in this country and that they should ever have the full rights as citizens and so when you're asking what the protest for I mean I as a political scientist Brendan believes that protest politics and electoral politics have to go hand in hand you don't get stuck with it changes in policy usually in the country into people take to the streets and show our elected leaders just to help set up they are and once the policy comes into question all the time and their homework which at the push it even further as we talked about what happened in the sixties you know many of those uprisings and rebellions and protests you know the end result was the civil rights act of nineteen sixty four the voting rights act of sixty five the Immigration Act of sixty five the housing act we we had those two in conjunction protests and electoral change and I think a lot of folks want to see change not just at the federal level the application the executive in in in in power it's an eclectic understanding of what's being executive should be but a lot of people want a sense of his consent to change on their local and state level than that there's nothing to do with partisanship there people who were really disappointed in democratic mayors on how these advocate accused police departments and and assisted in providing them with hyper paramilitary gear that out that will be used against their own president so I think that we want to see policy changes as to how communities interact with police helplessly trains to be members of the community and help educators attorney and how healthcare professionals are trained how allocations of resources are distributed I think back the real end result of these protests and unfortunately quiet kneeling on the sidelines of the football field didn't yield results for certain individuals lots of people have no weakening but many did not refuse to see what quite mailing would do and so now we're we've moved beyond quite kneeling and it's it's making people's lives very uncomfortable and they want it to go away but I think the pain of so many of the protesters and it won't go away until you recognize the lack of justice and equality in the country professor I certainly take your point and agree with it that into moxie the only way you get final change is through the ballot box through politics at the same time when was the last time any administration either Democrat or Republican at the national level made a real difference in the quality this country because I've seen numbers that indicate that the difference in nineteen forty five nineteen eighty and nineteen eighty the card current time is dramatic in the growth of inequality since nineteen eighty and that continued through democratic and Republican administrations yeah I think that that and that's what I'm saying some of this anguish actually has nothing to do with partisanship much of it does with the Donald Trump and his white nationalist rhetoric but much of it is that you're seeing people feel like no matter who's in power things are changing now I think we we can you know be a little more specific explicit and we can feed policies that have happened under democratic presidents the public and president and see how this played out for many communities but we also know that you know there's some generational wealth conversations that we have to still attract that fact who's in power so I mean the fact that the GI bill was not shooting it properly the fact that at the army food concessions that excluded black women and we're still seeing the generational back the fact that the two thousand eight housing crisis you know the victory of the little bit of black wealth in in circles within communities also I think that it needs to be a much broader partisan conversation but on the day to day we can also see about that there are real distinctions between the two parties when it comes to whether it's job creation whether it's criminal justice whether it's environmental policy which we know disproportionately affect black in that next community would put an undue burden on their health care prices and communities that don't really have hospital and resources which then further in history their family wealth or lack there of so it's not only the direct one to one sometimes we have to sixteen the by products and the other back at how that plays out in community banking equity continues to grow okay thank you so much because it's always a pleasure to have you with us that is associate professor Christina Greer political sciences investor from Fordham University coming up here research seems to be growing around on the entire world we were talking about that next this is bound to borrow or television and on N. J. I. T. New Jersey institute of technology makes innovation happens and J. I. T. faculty mentor Kristoff Camacho when he was a student helping him co founder start up and patented device that uses drone technology for reforestation and to collect valuable data for land management I found the pair trees back in two thousand sixteen taken what I learned from my research and try to see in my green it's a start our technologies to really enhance land management operation so we work very closely with land management companies so we have a traumatic forms precision reforestation.

trump Christina Greer associate professor Fordham president scientist
"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:58 min | 1 year ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Over there blowing up stuff but I'm not over here that's not my community why don't that would yeah I don't want because that's not gonna bring my brother back at all John Floyd in grief in Minneapolis yesterday with me now R. Christina Greer political science professor at Fordham University politics editor at the griot host of the podcast FAQ NYC and author of the book black ethnics race immigration and the pursuit of the American dream and Jason Johnson professor at Morgan state university political contributor at MSNBC contributor to the griot and SiriusXM as well thanks to both of you for coming on with us today good morning warning morning Brian thanks so much Christina let's start with the president did not linger too long on his photo op historically this recalls Richard Nixon running is a law and order candidate in nineteen sixty eight and winning is that what we saw last night in political context well I think it's too early to think about whether or not it will fit the pregnant November I think injecting Johnson I've got this extensively if whether or not the president will even promote a free and fair election on November third but I do think that we've seen this this rhetoric of law and order it lan order presidency and it's definitely a dog whistle to particular Americans white Americans interested in specifically to say that I I am interested in your truth and all these other people who are out here protesting in the middle of the pandemic not only don't deserve to be out here protesting that the larger context is that they don't deserve to be equal citizens in our nation I think that it's leading out quite concerning for so many people and that the president will call on the military and police forces who were acting as paramilitary Eckstine onto a fifty white nationalists and at first Jason how do you see the contradiction specifically of clearing the streets of peaceful protesters while calling himself the ally of peaceful protesters but basically in his remarks only addressing the looting and not the underlying issues of structural racism and police brutality I could not imagine a more incompetent in capable and thoroughly underwhelming person to sit in the White House everything you've done has been a contradiction everything he's done regarding the crisis has been a problem and I think the idea of of choosing a church during broad daylight to deliver a message that has nothing to do with faith I mean nothing to do with faith that everything that the president did yesterday it's sort of the example of of of twelve your flag in a room thing I think this will get I think that's what good waving a Bible remember with the individual who said two Corinthians at one point I'm pretty sure even all that familiar with university he was referring to but I think even a larger issue here that's something the doctor Greer referred to and I think it's something to think about long term is that dot has never been a president for the United America right obviously he P. one even though he got the majority of the vote but what he does now is really only trained at the small group of individuals who still believe that he's doing a good job he doesn't care about the protester doesn't care about the people in the suburbs he doesn't care about the people in the Midwest to the south he's only talking to his white nationalist base and very very strong Republicans who will see the idea of the president speaking in front of a church as being a side of of faith and security for everybody else he's he's not a comforter he's a tormentor listeners our phones yesterday were only for people who went out to protest yourselves over the weekend today we will open it for people who were out protesting and anyone else to where do we go from here in your opinion listeners how does real change come to the United States after the uprising in the streets or anything else you'd like to say or ask Christina Greer Jason Johnson six four six four three five seventy to eighty six four six four three five seventy to eighty or you can tweet a comment or question at Brian Lehrer but again the phone number six four six four three five seventy to eighty Christina the Terence Floyd clip on reminded of Rodney king can we all get along after the uprising in his name after the cops who beat him or quit it in court can you compare the two I think that there's a similar threads in the undercurrent of foundation I mean I I think George Bush brother did not want the destruction being done in his late brother's name but I think that family thing they make clear that they understand some of the anguish and far too awful of focusing on that property damage and not there then as to why people feel the need to boil over and express themselves in this way in the movie Dr king when he breaks down what a lie it really means for a lot of people it's not even about the material good if it's about that feeling that white Americans have a freedom that many people in the country have never experienced any capacity and their food they look extreme manifestation of that I I think that you know yes Google have to physically rebuild nation after the several nights the I would call the my pride in some people want to use the word diet but I think the larger question of how do we rebuild this nation from a moral and spiritual intellectual capacity and that's the question that far too many Americans don't want to attract it's easier to talk about building and what's happening every evening yes it is scary and it's dangerous but still being black in America and it has been for four hundred and one year Jason this impossible to disentangle anarchists mostly white from what I read with their own agendas or whoever is bringing hammers and bowling balls and whatever to these protests from rage over the issues that explodes into violence in the last week so people don't conflate everything as much yes yeah bring you cannot this is example I've been using for a couple days now it's like you can't say that everybody who leaves the party of the drunk driver right yes some people are gonna leave a party not gonna drive drunk and are going to cause damage but what other people the party they got two birds they walk home they have a designated driver you know just because some bad people behave poorly in an event doesn't mean that basically classified everybody there it's abundantly clear that the most people were going out there protesting they've got fine they've got master they're saying whatever it is they want to say you do have Asian provocateur and I think what's important right at the conceptualized right this isn't new if you had agent provocateurs in the sixties and seventies it was quite helpful there were people who infiltrated organizations purely for the purpose of of trying to prevent those organizations as being dangerous to the media the rest of the country I thought in Ferguson six years ago so when we hear stories when I talk to my friends and colleagues were in Minneapolis Tuesday yes after the curfew the vast majority of the protesters and demonstrators go home and then you have white nationalist in probably marching through the streets there was a report this morning from NBC talking about the fact that you had white nationals organizations pretending creating fake Twitter accounts claiming that they were antifa thing that they were going to attack white neighborhoods yes we can disentangle the men and women who are out there every day saying Hey look we need to do something about the police we need to do something about how the bility and the numerous and sundry people who are out there trying to basically serve off of this movement to sow chaos and whatever agenda they have it's just a matter of using the right language and recognizing who's really speaking and who's causing trouble just like phone call Michael in Brooklyn you're on W. NYC hi Michael thanks for calling in do you have Michael Michael in Brooklyn Michael once Michael twice let's try I mean in Fairfield you're on W. NYC hello I mean hello at least Facebook Connecticut my daughter Isabelle and I went yesterday wife spoke with you on that a post okay speaking I was speaking with the police officers that went around and I believe the election to be that one of the things that happened in the west what to each department with that at some point they had a black police officer however it whenever there was a clause and he responded to the community the the household the people of the cruise will call the police department to verify that the gentleman with the police officer to where it got so bad that he ended up leaving the passport police department and the things are happening over the time of a black in a predominantly white community are you know I see stuff stuff happens with me and my child and all of that you talk about what's happening to policing in the lease we also need to focus on the home and parents I a few things happen the parents H. I. C. thirteen comments being made against the other children kids and things like that it's just all a bit judging on yes the police are a problem but it's stacked in the hole it starts with who is raising beef the police are going to work and what are we doing at home I don't think most people most people think Westport is pretty difficult to imagine a black police officer would have justified by he is at the pool each time you go through a quote it's frankly disgusting unfair that's what I wanted to say so when young people go out there please talk to your parents as well it's really not right for those things to be happening Christina thank you I mean I mean thank you very much and Christine thinking about the very end of it means comments there young people when you go out please educate your parents as well supposed to be the other way around traditionally parents educate their children and you know the proper ways to view the world maybe these days it needs to go the other way yeah I mean we kind of have a general argument people use the generational argument you know my parents were certain way but you know keep going that way just because they're younger than that obviously naturally because we have generational US chattel slavery so clearly bad racist ideas don't just die out with one generation it definitely taught we can look at that the protesters in Charlottesville and we saw that age demographic I think also you know with them very frustrating for a lot of black Americans and people of color in this nation if you know far too many people said well I don't have for Hillary Clinton but everyone in my family my father my mother my uncles my aunts my grandparents all voted for trump when you gonna do and that what that education actually have to start at home it's not enough just to pack your back yourself on the back thank you voted one particular way you have you know a friend of color you know you've you've been to a March the heavy lifting has to be done by individuals in their own families many people are going to listen to you know a black woman on the radio they're going to listen to their child and so when we think about we have substantive change that must happen with the democracy to continue it really does need to be with white Americans doing the heavy lifting and it will hardly work and heart complications in their own home David in Inglewood you're on W. NYC hi David thank you for calling yeah hi I will make two quick comments and then I'll make my laugh comment I'll be very quick first of all you talked about unfair election not but yet you will never go against Democrats I mean Cuomo canceled the New York primary not a Peabody you maybe thirty seconds second of all you never have any Republican Jeff on this program is locked up in a public relations campaign every day for the for the Democrats you've never heard of anyone from the trump administration on I mean I think you.

John Floyd Minneapolis editor R. Christina Greer professor Fordham University
"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:14 min | 3 years ago

"christina greer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In Virginia with the governor. And the Lieutenant governor with implications for the Democratic Party, and for the standards this country sets for itself with respect to racist behaviour past or present and allegations of sexual assault. Mallory no pain reporter from WVU efforts. Any public radio is with us, and Christina Greer Fordham, university political science professor and co host of the podcast FAQ NYC, one of the things that northern said at his news conference on Saturday after he denied being either in black face or in the white Klan hood in the yearbook picture he did acknowledge putting on black face as everybody knows now for a Michael Jackson dance routine that same year nineteen Eighty-four, and he said this, and I used a little bit of shoe polish to put on. Under my on, my cheeks, and the reason I used a very little bit is because I don't know if anybody's ever tried that, but you cannot get shoe polish off. So that that one was kind of a I think, you know, a sort of delayed response like he Mallory I'm curious how people in Virginia reacting to that. Because he when you listen to that clip, and listen to his words, he was talking about putting very little shoe polish on his cheeks. I guess trying to indicate well, I didn't really go full black face like was in the yearbook photo that he's denying his him. But he seems to know a lot about how to go into black face. And so, you know, that of course, raises suspicions about whether he's telling the truth about only having done it that once and that quote, minimally in the Michael Jackson instance, how's that going over down there? Well, it's interesting to me that you say that you feel like that has had sort of a delayed reaction are hasn't gotten as much play. Because it's certainly gotten plenty of play here in Virginia. One of the elements that people were responding to right away. And in the voters that I've talked to I've talked to people who supported north on campaign for north them. And and they say, look, even if he's telling the truth he that he is not in that photo. And he doesn't know how it got there. He just admitted to wearing black face at another point in his life. So so does it matter if he was in that photo, we're not so definitely it's been part of the response all along here. Then he must have known that he would be outed for that. I think he referred to somebody else knowing so presume that it would get out that he had done the Michael Jackson black-faced thing. And so he felt he needed to get out in front of that Christina are they in your opinion equivalent if he was in black face in that photo. Of course, he was in the Klan hood, you know, that's another thing too. Let let let's say he wasn't in either of them. So it wasn't in black face in that yearbook photo. But he did the Michael Jackson thing is the Michael Jackson thing is he was presenting it more. Okay. No. It's not. But I mean, let's also like why are we pretending like, he's not lying. I mean, it's your yearbook photo your name. It's your medical school yearbook photo. You never saw that photo. You'd never thought that that was a grossly inappropriate photo. You never flipped through your yearbook to see how how many other photos or just like that. I mean, we're doing these mental gymnastics to justify this governor who is blatantly lying to our phases. We know for a fact, it's clearly a culture of grown men white men who likes to put on black face there. It is. It's the eighties. Not the fifties. Not the forties. Mallory it seems to me. There's a real institutional question here, regardless of what northern did or didn't do when he was in med school in nineteen Eighty-four the. Eastern Virginia medical school released that yearbook at that time, which means it had to be vetted by some kind of editors do, you know, if they were only student editors or if anybody on the faculty also look through the yearbook and decided, yeah, this is okay to let go so the eastern Virginia Medical College actually held a press conference yesterday to try to get out in front of this a little bit. They they say that they are going to be doing an investigation of the practices, and the culture is looking through all these yearbooks. They say it was student editors, but but the man in charge of the college now says he doesn't want to blame students that it's an institutional issue. But it's certainly a question worth looking into that same yearbook reporters have gone through it now. And there are lots of instances of black face. And those are people who are doctors. Now in Virginia, a a local reporter in the southwest part of the state found one of the individuals who is. A what I think is no longer practicing, but was a plastic surgeon for a while. And he graduated from the college and he's also in that yearbook in black face. Well, I mean, and also, Brian let's also be clear. He's undergraduate yearbook has him called Koon man. I mean, which she says he has no idea. So all of a sudden if I start calling you a random nickname? You're not going to ask me. Why? Right. You're not going to ask why it's printed in your yearbook me. I don't even know if I saw something randomly on your Twitter page. I would call and say, hey, hey, Brian. You might want to look at this. It's highly inappropriate. So the fact that no one called him over all these years who looked at the yearbook and said governor or doctor this is incongruent with who you are you need to, you know, make a statement immediately. He never did that because I think is part of the culture, and he was fine with it. Mallory. That's another one that I've been wondering if journalists in Virginia were reporting out and being able to get to the bottom of northern said in the news conference on. Saturday that he was called that as a nickname Koon man by two other students who were year ahead of him. And that he knows who they are. But he doesn't know why they called him that. So presumably those people are findable. And that question is asking ball has that happened. No it hasn't. I haven't seen any reporting finding those particular two people from his undergraduate, which is military institute. There have been attempts to contact colleagues from the medical school and the Medical College. But but not that undergraduate. Michelle Huntington, you're on WNYC, Michelle. Hi, thank you so much for taking my call. I mother who's raising a young man and also a young woman and my concern in this in all of this all of these conversations is the issue of morality, and right and wrong. I think that weather no matter what when you're when you're raising children. You're teaching them. What's right, and what's wrong? And I think that when you do something wrong as a child you say, I'm sorry, and you accept the consequences. And I don't understand why this is a this is not this is lost on grown adults. But what are you saying? Respect to what these politicians should do. I think they should they should own up apologize. I was wrong. I accept whatever. Whatever whatever is going to be dolled out afterwards. I was wrong. Thank you very much. I in the case of sexual assault. If it was sexual assault. I just don't see how somebody can admit sexual assault and keep the job expect to be forgiven and just go on with your privileged public career. Do you think it's any different Christina with respect to northern who didn't seem to do that very effectively on Saturday? But if he had if he had I mean, listen, the Republicans haven't even apologized, they just keep their jobs. I mean, like, let's be clear Mitch McConnell. I mean, we have a massive picture of him in front of a confederate flag. You know, Representative king had a confederate flag on his desk. He's from Iowa, you're not even from the confederacy. We can't even get into Donald Trump in all his racism. So we know that the Republicans have a real deep-seated elected problem. But they don't apologize and they don't leave office. I think the Democrats are struggling with. You know, we've been so aggressive with saying what's wrong with the Republic. But this is the first time we have a democratic, you know, in recent memory, a sitting governor who's just saying, okay? Yeah. I said sorry. I think what the previous caller the important word that she's then Wisconsin quences north is saying, okay. The consequence was that. I was mildly inconvenienced on Saturday when I had to do this press conference. But now I just want to get back. The legislative session is in in in, you know, going on and I'm gonna get back to work. I guess what? Two of the callers have raised is. You know, if you dressed in black face in one thousand nine hundred eighty four and you have since realized why that's highly racist and offensive. Do you get to keep your career in in two thousand nineteen if if you go there forthrightly, of course, the the question is complicated. By the fact, that he really didn't go there that forthright echo there forthrightly. And so we don't have that scenario. I I, unfortunately think that we will have that scenario before we know it just because we know that racism in this country has been way more pervasive. Then most of us would like to admit. I mean, the brochure of America is what we hold onto the reality is something that's very different. And especially I mean, we always sort of knocked the south as being, you know, this the seat of racism, but we know that there's northern racism, Jim that was of a different sort, but very strong as well and even in the eighties and so because north. Was not forthright because his because he admitted that he was in that photograph on Friday, and then changed his tune presumably after speaking to someone that is also what is making it such that whatever apology. He gives seems completely not genuine and just a power grab. So that he can keep his job. And look just to add something really quickly. I've talked to voters and heard from lawmakers here in Richmond to say that they think it's possible to forgive Ralph Northam demand the individual, but certainly not the office holder, not the governor. Right. And and I could also see I mean, just speaking as white male how black people in America would just not there's already so many reasons not to trust white people, including many white liberals and Democrats as northern puts himself out the fact that he could come out in the way that he did on Saturday. And say, look, no, you know, I'm a progressive on these issues and still seem so brain dead and tone-deaf tone deaf. Tone-deaf? And then, you know, now, we have another layer, which is you have his Lieutenant governor. Who's essentially saying I think the story about my accusations of sexual assault are being put out there by the governor. I think he's trying to change the narrative. Now, we have two Democrats fighting one another, and I think the frustration that I feel in the Richmond folks that I spoke to yesterday is that it's detracting from some larger democrat versus Republican necessities. We're out of time except this just popped up on the Mallory. I don't know if you've even seen it yet. But boy, okay. Okay. So you told us before or you both did how if northern has to resign as governor. And Fairfax has do not assume the governorship because these allegations of sexual assault turn out to be true or to politically damaging that the state attorney general would be the next morning up. Are you ready for this from the Associated Press? I don't think I'm going to get a day off, Mark herring. Just flipped away from my screen. There. We go Virginia's democratic attorney general says he wore a black face at a college party in nineteen eighty. Yeah. To be continued. He continued Christine agree of Fordham, university political science professor and co host of the podcast FAQ NYC and Mallory no pain reporter for WBZ Tf Virginia public radio. Mallory back to reporting back to the capital. Okay. Thank you about. Thanks, brian. Brian Lehrer on WNYC. Stay tuned..

Virginia assault Christina Greer Fordham Michael Jackson Mallory Brian Lehrer reporter WNYC NYC Koon professor Richmond WVU Eastern Virginia medical schoo Democratic Party Twitter eastern Virginia Medical Colle Michelle Huntington Mark herring