17 Burst results for "Christie Wilson Cairns"

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"Right with with the wars? Brodie L. I've seen them like the star. Wars landed Disney. But I mean that's it. This is maybe this is sliced bread. Maybe this is right Dan. Derek. Then we'll see how you feel about this so it is official TYCO. Whitey is headed to a galaxy. Far Far Away he is GonNa go right. Indirect a brand New Star Wars movie for Disney. He's gave me the first person of color to direct the Star Wars movie and he'll be writing a script with a Christie Wilson Cairns She was nominated for an Oscar for her work on nineteen seventeen. I think some probably most people are familiar with. He got his start with offbeat comedies. Like what we do in the shadows and then he moved to the big leagues. It'd Thor Ragnarok and got nominated for Multiple Oscars for writing directing and appearing in Joe Joe Rabbit he got to road tests star wars jobs. He directed the season. One Finale of the man laureate and then there are some rumors that he was going to get something like this and now on May the fourth those were confirmed that he is working on his own star wars movie that apparently is going to be completely independent of anything. That's happened in the Star Wars Universe before I noticed place into. Is it a new Canon or is it a standalone rogue one? It'll be like it'll be a standalone but it won't have any connection to the previous movies is just going to basically take place within that same universe but won't be one by any SKYWALKER darth vader or anything like that is listening. I I like I really like him. This filmmaker I think he joe rabbit and and Thor Ragnarok were brilliant. I can't speak to the man delorean because I've opened the Disney plus APP a couple times and every time. I'm like there is nothing for me here except for America's funniest home videos which put a bunch of old ones on old school. Tom.

Joe Joe Rabbit Disney Whitey joe rabbit Derek Brodie L. Christie Wilson Cairns Oscars TYCO Dan America official Tom Oscar
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on Double Toasted

"That's it. That's an unhinged sesame street Nicholas Cage Appear Sesame Street ELMO. Abc News now hoping one of our fucking greatest unsung treasures of acting. And I hope we all remember how amazing that guy is. Yeah man now. This is going to be great people. I'm looking forward to it. This this this is going to end with Nicholas cage holding up a Tiger. Hit a seven wearing that tiger skin. He becomes the tiger. He GonNa fucking tiger king thinking right here. Robert this is this is seriously. I can't I mean especially maybe because we're bereft of news and stuff like that for the most part but this is the most exciting thing to break during the corona. I think And I just can't wait for shape. Because when is it going to go into production? Those are all those questions. I think it's going to be a little time before we see it but I can't wait man I can't either man I can't either let me move you over to next day if you can see that computer work in real time so far so good on his last legs but it ain't dead babies what it said. Cammie up. Let me go man what we got next man cool. Hey Man it's Star Wars Day. May the fourth be with you. Cory which is harder and harder to say for me by the way just because my enthusiasm for those films. It's kind of dissipated. But but the people that Lucasfilm's they decided to give everyone a collective pick me up. I know this is old news by now but today they came out and they confirmed that. Take a light is going to be given the helm of a New Star Wars Film Non Skywalker Saga and also going to be a CO writing it with a Christie Wilson Cairns. I believe her name is. She Co wrote One thousand nine hundred nineteen when I heard that. Those two teamed up together at thought. Okay now this. Is this kind of Star Wars News and I'm looking forward to until they fuck it up. We'll be also bringing in. I think really amazing singular visions. And I think the cool thing about TYCO's we've seen him do a small stuff and then we've seen him go into a big tent pole like thor and I know it has its aiders but I've really loved Ragnarok and I he. Reinvented that and brought such levity. Such a distinct stamp on it and then and then just within the universe you know I think the coolest thing is that he's already kind of played within the Star Wars Universe we had the man to Laurean and whatnot right. So let me let me. Just ask you and we can. We can take it any direction you want to. Yeah the appetite. Maybe a little you know shattered because of return of Skywalker last Jeddah and all that stuff but do you think that this is going to bring all that excitement back for star wars. Well first of all you brought it up until you bring it up you gotta give me time to show the People. Maybe how can? How can anybody who tell me? Give me a list given me. Names numbers addresses of.

Nicholas cage Abc News Christie Wilson Cairns Skywalker thor Cammie Cory Lucasfilm Jeddah Robert TYCO Laurean
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on KOMO

"Fourth Star Wars day you've got some Star Wars news for us yes of course and you know we we should we should have expected that we would get some big Star Wars news on this unofficial or official Star Wars holiday the big news is actually just a confirmation of something that we had heard back in January is that how you feel what you T. is going to be directing and writing a Star Wars film of course he's the guy behind Joe Joe rabbit which this year won the screenplay for Best Adapted the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay and he's done some big movies before including the last four movie Ragnarok which was very well received he is a fantastic writer of very funny guys got a great outlook on things and film instead of months and so he's going to be doing a Star Wars movie he's co writing it it's written also by a Christie Wilson cairns was nominated this year for an Oscar for writing nineteen seventeen doesn't really big star power there and some talented people writing a new Star Wars movie when we're going to see it we have no idea what it's going to be about we have no idea who's gonna start no idea there but some exciting news for the Star Wars universe and he's no stranger to it too because didn't he have some directing experience with Mandalorian he'd be he directed the season finale of the Mandalorians if you're watching that on Disney plus your fan of that particular TV was a part of that world as well so he does know the Star Wars world I trust his vision I like his vision Georgia rather was one of my favorite films of the year and while it's not exactly a Star Wars type movie it showed a lot of imagination and a lot of humor and I hope we find that in this film that he's gonna be writing ABC's Jason Nathanson thanks Jason.

Oscar writer Christie Wilson cairns Disney Georgia ABC official Joe Joe Mandalorian Jason Nathanson
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on KOMO

"The fourth Star Wars day you've got some Star Wars news for us yes of course and you know we we should we should have expected that we would get some big Star Wars news on this unofficial or official Star Wars holiday and the big news is actually just a confirmation of something that we had heard back in January is that hi there were T. T. is going to be directing and writing a Star Wars film of course he's the guy behind Joe Joe rabbit which this year won the screenplay for Best Adapted the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay and he's done some big movies before including the last four movie Ragnarok which was very well received he is a fantastic writer a very funny guys got a great outlook on things and film and cinema so he's going to be doing a Star Wars movie he's co writing it it's written also by a Christie Wilson cairns was nominated this year for an Oscar for writing nineteen seventeen doesn't really big star power there and some talented people writing a new Star Wars movie when we're going to see it we have no idea what it's going to be about we have no idea who it's gonna start no idea there but some exciting news for the Star Wars universe and he's no stranger to it too because didn't he have some directing experience with Mandalorian he'd be he directed the season finale of the Mandalorians if you're watching that on Disney plus your fan of that particular TV was a part of that world as well so he does know the Star Wars world I trust his vision I like his vision Georgia rather was one of my favorite films of the year and while it's not exactly a Star Wars type movie it showed a lot of imagination and a lot of humor and I hope we find that in this film that he's gonna be writing ABC's Jason Nathanson thanks Jason komo news and your call will propel interest money update value stream.

Oscar writer Christie Wilson cairns Disney Georgia ABC official Joe Joe Mandalorian Jason Nathanson Jason komo
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"That's there's the pattern that works Christie. I do the running by doing download. The APP Aiguo in in like thinking. I can't run and then I run into my block. Oh can I go. Why is this so hard and then I go back to my house? I do the bullshit research. Sometimes I'll spend a whole depicting name in my favorites. You know that weeks for the worst one in the most enduring one is I clean my house but I clean my house and then I go. What would it be like? If I rearranged everything in my what would it be like if I turned on my boots through the pages in the Spain's and so I was set and do insane and things and people will come to my house and be like what is wrong with you and I'm like I'm I'm in the first active this new script and it'll be fine but I just need to help me move this French folks. I'm cutting in really quick to remind you that issue. Forty one of backstory magazine comes out later this week. It's our Oscar. Her issue filled with plenty of articles featuring this year's Oscar nominees including some of the folks on this panel. Who are answering different questions from what we talked about today? Of course before the Oscar issue she comes out. Our current issue is our nineteen seventeen issue of backstory magazine. which you could find over at backstory dot net? That's right issue. Forty has not one but four stories about nineteen seventeen eighteen which includes interviews with the film's co-stars Dean. Charles Chapman and George Mackay also editor Lee Smith Plus ca writer Christie Wilson Cairns. The icing on the cake is that you you could not only read the entire nineteen seventeen screenplay but also thirty other scripts from the award season including many of the scripts featured on this panel and backstory magazine..

backstory magazine Christie Wilson Cairns Oscar Spain Charles Chapman Dean Lee Smith George Mackay editor writer
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Yes but the brightest just a piece of meat in a sense this something. That happens pens. That's transcendent I'm trying to find a moment of that. I think it approaches. Sometimes we create something that we feel something something from what we create that gets US close. I think to A sense of transcending the material and if we go there can stay in that in that space transparency. Maybe that's maybe that's where we wind up. Yep Of course we don't know because it's probably the same place we were when we before we were born so has worked for you. Become a means toward working toward transcendent partially it used to be But there are other issues. Now I mean there are different there's certain things that family which have become much closer and Very very different and and I'm sure that's all very personal so it isn't ask you about your best. You try your best need you know But yeah you learn different a different Approach to life so I wanNA thank you not only for your movies but for the move is introduced me to. You've restored a lot of movies. Oh yes you like years ago you were issuing reassuring a bunch of movies on DVD one of them. I'm especially grateful for US Johnny Guitar. which is one of my favorite favorite films now and It's such a great western. It transcends the Western form yes it does yes so I always think of you as like a great filmmaker and also oh great film teacher so thank you for both thank you thank you Martin. Scorsese's new film. The Irishman is nominated for ten Oscars Oscars including best actor and best director. After we take a short break. Justin Chang will review the film nineteen seventeen a World War one movie which is also so nominated for ten Oscars this is fresh air support for. NPR comes from whyy presenting the pulse. PODCAST that takes you on adventures into unexpected corners of health and science plastic in the guts of deep sea creatures crying after anesthesia building. Your own Internet. Each episode is full of fascinating stories and big ideas the pulse available. Where you get your podcasts or a whyy dot org? Hi It's Terry Gross inviting you to check out our new online archive collecting forty years of fresh air interviews and reviews. You can hear my interviews with people like David David Bowie of Franklin Johnny Cash. John Updike Tony Morrison searched for names. You're interested in make a playlist for yourself or friends at fresh air. Archive Live Dot Org. That's fresh air archive dot org after winning the Golden Globes for best motion picture drama and best director. The new war moving nineteen in seventeen opened wide this past weekend to a strong box office and on Monday it received ten Oscar. Nominations said over two days during World War One one. The movie follows to English. Soldiers trying to stop an impending attack and save the lives of their comrades film critic. Justin Chang has this review. Nineteen seventeen has been widely praised as a mind boggling technical achievement. It certainly is though. I'm less convinced that it's a great movie. Inspired inspired by his grandfather's experiences as a soldier in World War One the writer Director Sam Mendes has made a heroin combat picture. By way of suspenseful beat the clock thriller about two British soldiers on a dangerous mission in northern France in April nineteen seventeen and he has shot the movie in what looks like one long continuous tenuous take with no visible edits except for one dramatic cut to black midway through this visual gimmick. Call it the one take wonder has along. Hollywood history. Alfred Hitchcock famously used it in his nineteen forty eight thriller rope and in recent years. Advances in digital technology have made it easier. For filmmakers offers to simulate the illusion in movies like Birdman you can understand why Mendez chose the technique for nineteen seventeen. He and his co writer. Christie Wilson Cairns Telescreen pared-down story in something close to real time. He wants to erase the distance between you and his characters to make you feel as though you're right there with them in the trenches and on the battlefield. The soldiers are both in their twenties dean. Charles Chapman Plays Blake and George Mackay Plays Scofield. Their mission is to travel across miles of bombed out French terrain to deliver an urgent message to a nearby British battalion. Warning them that what looks like a German enemy. Retreat is in fact a deadly trap raising the stakes. Even further Blake's brother is a member of that battalion and he and sixteen hundred other men will almost surely perish if the attack proceeds blake and Scofield received their orders from general played by Colin Firth. He's one of several well-known English actors actors including Benedict Cumberbatch Mark. Strong and Andrew Scott famously known as the hot priests from fleabag who will pop up along. The young man's journey to offer a few Ri- words words of counsel for the most part Blake and Scofield are desperately alone upon leaving the trenches. They soon find themselves in a no man's land that looks apocalyptic tickets desolation. The camera never blinking as it follows alongside them in one especially tense scene. They stumble upon an abandoned German bunker. Where an explosion? Explosion Occurs Temporarily Blinding Scofield and forcing him to rely on Blake to guide him through the darkness. You do jake stay often thought somebody soft after joking they just jump into.

Blake Scofield Justin Chang director Oscar writer British battalion Terry Gross David David Bowie Alfred Hitchcock France Director Sam Mendes Johnny Guitar. John Updike Benedict Cumberbatch Scorsese NPR Christie Wilson Cairns Telescr Franklin Johnny Cash
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Filmcast

The Filmcast

14:05 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Filmcast

"And your time gentlemen must be something bigger channels here. You have a brother in the second battalion. If they're walking into a trap the oldest ought to deliver a message calling off tomorrow morning's attack if you fail and it will be a massacre which is just across the that is the German frontline. If we're not clever for about this. No one will get to your brother. How will that was from the trailer of Sam? Mendes is one thousand nine hundred nineteen. I'm going to read the plots to be too young British soldiers during the first World War are given an impossible mission deliver a message deep in enemy territory that will stop sixteen hundred men and one of the soldiers brothers from walking straight into a deadly trap. This movie is directed by someone is written by Sam Mendes and Christie Wilson Cairns Christie Wilson Cairns has written for TV before. I believe this is her first film and missing from that description and missing from a lot of movies marketing quite impressively oppressively. I'd say is the fact that everything in this movie takes place as though it is one long continuous shot right. It looks like it looks for the most part part one long continuous show and we'll talk a little bit about what the effect of that is. But I just want to say from a marketing perspective. I admire or the fact that I think I watched all the trailers. I don't think that was mentioned in any of the trailers. No because I think would've felt cheap and tacky attacking sensationalistic to mention that given the subject nature of the movie right because this is an theoretically war movie people's lives are at stake. AAC With this message is being delivered. Can you imagine watching a trailer that shows like the the sort of gravity of war and then like the text flashes on screen. And it's it's all done in one vong shot. It just would remember the trailers from Russian archives. I seem to think they did that. Just but Russian art is like very the different. Yeah it's not nearly this kind of subject matter and like you know people aren't dying left and right horrifying deaths but I agree that was part of the marketing for us Ark for sure yeah. I think we've come. We've come a long way from Russia such a long way. Oh Man Russian art center's you don't know was like Almost like a documentary style. Look through the Russian Hermitage museum out of saying And when that movie came out it was meant meant to look like one long shot. It came in two thousand two at the time the technology to one longshot was like I had to have like a special rig on the camera to make it work and it was like ground breaking that the NBA existed and was done in one longshot and now it's like like the level of complexity is exponentially higher in nineteen seventeen than it is in in Russia dark movie that came out around seventeen years ago so it is. It is really when you when you step back and think about it. Like technology has come such a long way. All that said. I'm sorry go ahead was just say it's extraordinary because I'd I heard that there's actually not a single take the longest take in the movie is three and a half minutes just extraordinary. Because they're certainly moments where I saw edits I there's another point but not that not that frequently. Yeah I agree. Maybe it's better. They didn't advertise it. Because it's like well it's not quite not quite what right like this little so many little cuts here digital they digital through the magic of CG Indiana stitching. They're able to combine many of the takes 'til like one long shot but okay all that said Yeah What did you think we talked a little bit about the movie already during their top ten episodes but Davinder? Would you think overall the movie. And then I want to go to Jeff and then get despoilers so I rushed out the morning of our top ten last year to to see this movie just to squeeze it in there. It didn't quite make my way into my top ten but I really enjoyed enjoyed. It is a stunning technical achievement. It is tremendous work from Sam Mendez and Roger. Deakins it is. It's been four years since Specter and the the stain of that movie. I still feel I still feel burned by that damn movie and like how much. I was really rooting for two. Because I you know I really genuinely loved loved sky fall and despite its flaws like I like what's I meant is was doing with it. Inspector was like well. Here's the style here is none of the script This movie in many ways. It feels like an evolution of the opening sequence or specter which was like a long continuous thing which was very stylish in had absolutely nothing to do with the rest of the movie movie. That was something Yeah I douglas movie just like as a complete experience it is a wonderful thing to sit and watch the theater with great sound It is surprisingly emotional. Like I do feel like they do a good job of Centering what the story is who these characters are that we're following and and the journeys that they're that they're going on like there there's room for some really nice intimate storytelling among the big bombast. I will say overall they're like As as a one take movie which is technically isn't It just looks like it is I I'm still more wild by the like audacity and Difficulty of making Victoria comparative. This one which is you're that was really really literally just doing it. And and not not stitching together. Everything's really and like you know going at a really low budget. So I'm I'm former impressed by movie. Lake Victoria but this is certainly astounding This just feels like a movie you have to see in the theater too because just the level of artistry is just there for some of the set-pieces in a Lotta the action and so much of the cinematography. Yeah there's there's a sequence that is lit up entirely night flares by yeah flares in the dead of night in is just like wind up being the whole like an sequence of sky fall of AH gorgeous shot of like the House on fire It just feels like salmon design. Roger Deakins kind of just one upping themselves entirely. It's a gorgeous movie. I hope more people see it in a vic theater. I hope to see the Max. Yeah Jefferson Kanowa. What did you think of nineteen seventeen? Well they've I guess you could say what I thought of. Nineteen nineteen seventeen is best summed up the form of a limerick excellent. You know I liked it a lot. It earned my year end. Top spot heartfelt and mind blowing. My love is still going like one. Continuous Shot Nice nicely done. We get the Olympic for nineteen. Seventy people should be thinking the heavens that they were treated to to limericks about nine not just yeah and I'm I'm probably going to repeat a lot of the things I said in that episode about about the movie because we hadn't talked about it yet I I mean it. It absolutely blew me away this movie and a a- As I said then it it not only earned my top spot for twenty nineteen. I think it would be a movie that I would put on the best of the decade list. It is is is what I wanted from dunkirk. It's what I want from most war movies where I feel Catharsis I feel empathy. The I feel a connection with the characters I moved I'm thrilled. I am in awe of the spectacle the size the scale of war all of these things on a story level that it does so well. We'll talk about more in spoilers The movie works as a movie The movie I'm drawn. I love these guys as I said in our top ten episode it just feels to me more like Lord of the rings than it does was a warm of you. It's an adventure. Were stepping out with these two characters and we're traveling with them and it really is a movie about moving from place to place and that sense of what's going to be around the next bend. What crazy adventure? What what heroin experience are we going to survive with? These characters characters is exactly the kinds of movies that I I love. As well. So on a story level the performances are exquisite. I thought the two young actors around whom the the story is centered How I didn't know before the movie? Both of them are on my radar now as actors to watch watch because both of them deliver incredible performances in I think inexperienced that is unlike what most actors have to deal with. These longer takes these very technical. I'm assuming very technical requirements in order to make this thing work So as a the film I was moved as a film I loved the the story. I mean it is a war movie about trying to stop war a lot of ways. It's about you know trying to prevent a battle rather than win a battle which I found to be inspiring and beautiful but also there's that other layer of the technical side which just added completely to me. It didn't distract it. Didn't feel like a gimmick it felt like a beautifully totally additive element that really highlighted that journey we are we are with them moving from place to place it never we never get a break. There's there's never anything removed. There's never a time jump. There's never a cut from one place to another place even within the location. I'm never jumping around the room as the The Observer. I'm moving seamlessly through this experience with these characters and that to me made it feel more like a journey made it feel more Dramatic that they have to traverse this place. They have to move through some horrible horrible horrible things and the just the experience of seeing how that is accomplished the hundreds and hundreds of extras stress. I mean shots where you're just moving through a trench trench. Yeah there's just people on all sides that you know the the the are are there but to be props but to be set pieces but the movie does not spare any moment of really making you feel like this is a endeavor that took thousands of people that involve the lives of thousands of people and that scale done with this level of Artistry Artistry with this cinematography it is a it feels intimate and personal and grand and epic all the same time man. I love love this movie. It it feels like an achievement. It feels like a triumph and it is also feels like a very intimate small tail that feels personal and and effected me on a very emotional level. I was weeping at the end. It is a beautiful movie. I love it yeah. I think it's great to who I want to talk about. Spoilers of the guys but I'll just say two things about the movie before we get into that one of them is that I agree with you all. I think. Think the fact that it's done to look mostly like one. Continuous shot really does help the movie. I think that it. It does several things to your experience movie one thing is that for the most part. This movie takes place in real time right and so you know. They have to travel travel from this point to this point you know they only have a certain amount of time to do it and you know that like every second that elapses as you're sitting there in the theater is a second lapsing in the in the time line of the film and that's a very I think that's actually part of the marketing is like the enemy is time right like that. Like the fact that it's real time means that you you're feeling the ticking clock. You're feeling urgency of their mission. And the second thing that it does it. Is You know that like essentially the camera stays with these characters For A AH I'll say basically like it stays with them for as much as a movie as you think is possible and leave it at that right and as a result of that because you are with them you know it's it's almost the cameras almost like a third character ghost like the follows characters around and because it's swung round. You know that if they get an jam they are not like. You are not getting out of that Jim unless they get out of it as as well right whatever situation. They're in this camera is going to be there for it. Pretty much is kind of kind of the agreement that you you have with with his camera. As you're following them through all these steps and that really for me personally ratchet up the tension quite a bit all that said. None of that would mean anything. If there wasn't an emotional core to the story. Yeah and I think I think there really is it really. Is these two characters lance corporal. Blake and lance-corporal Scofield. Who Will you know? One of them has a brother. WHO's in this other division? They're trying to deliver a message each to and you know it's kind of cliche that it's like hey it's a family member and you're trying to save the family member. I mean. Think of one of the Great War Movie Saving Private Ryan Ryan. That message is pretty like the thrust is pretty similar. They're literally trying to save private Ryan. It's the title trying to.

Sam Mendes Roger Deakins Russia Ryan Ryan Christie Wilson Cairns Specter Sam NBA Russian Hermitage museum Artistry Artistry Lake Victoria vic theater Davinder Sam Mendez Olympic Jeff heroin
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on KPCC

"What you can offer them welcome back to the frame I'm John horn over the past weekend the World War one drama nineteen seventeen was a big hit at the box office then yesterday morning the movie directed by Sam Mendes landed ten Oscar nominations including Best Picture and best original screenplay the film script was co written by Mendez and Christie Wilson cairns the two had collaborated before but this is their first project to be produced nineteen seventeen plays out as a single take there are no obvious cuts are at odds and because the camera is never ahead of the action what's new to the soldiers on the battlefield feels like it's new to the audience at the very same time when Mendez called cairns to pitch his idea for nineteen seventeen she didn't hesitate to say yes he had this one image I am in his mind and it was based on his grandfather it was this seventeen year old boy carrying a message through no man's land lost in the fog you orders to get to the second question you would one mile southeast of the town of cost deliver this to come to mackenzie it is a direct order to cool off tomorrow morning's attack if you don't it will be a massacre we will lose two battalions sixteen hundred manual brother among them do you think you can get there to talk yes and then the last thing you said not because by the way still gonna be one show I am I have any hung up after you drop that bomb on me because he likes to you know do things in pairs and so on the questions received for our first set their meeting I guess I I have read that right after he got off the phone you Google the one shot failings yeah which probably doesn't get you very far because they're not really no there's not very many and I was actually I was looking for their strips because you know scripture templates you know so I was I was looking for the the the formula that one shot movies we take like how I look on the page so I am I had to I had to just be like okay right there's there's nowhere to to steal from like enough to make up as you go along when you have the device of a single take or what looks to be a single take it changes the perspective of the audience the audience in some ways is discovering things ask the characters because the camera is never in front of the characters what does that mean in terms of storytelling in terms of the reality that you are creating for the characters in the audience and how far or how far you can't push that reality it was very difficult to to put it very simply it's super hard I am and like you see it so when you're working in reality everyone who setting and not cinema understands reality that that one show is how do we actually all live our lives we live in one continues unbroken T. editing is sort of an artifice in film and and so what we were trying to strip all of that week as a writer Sam Sam and I had to sit down and sort of be like well how far can you push this hope how much before it's too much how can of lake dark and twisted and and desperate can you make the audience before they start to look away because this image as soon as anyone looks we've lost them the audience might look away if it's too graphic if it's too violent if it's too if it's too graphic is to file if it's just too much you know the way I was when I was writing this I had a sort of in my mind I had a little kind of like an ECG monitor of the audience's heart rate and I was like okay no we've we've pushed up so far for so long people are going to start to fatigue with actions who knows you have to drop the bike down and make it back into a character please do this.

John horn
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

10:28 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Frame

"Welcome back to the frame. I'm John Horn over the past weekend. The World War One drama nineteen seventeen. Seventeen was a big hit at the box office then yesterday morning. The movie directed by Sam Mendes lended ten Oscar nominations including best picture and best original screenplay. The film script was co written by Mendez and Christie Wilson earns. The two had collaborated before but this is their first project to be produced. Nine hundred seventeen plays out as a single take. There are no obvious. Cut Sir edits and because the camera is never ahead of the action. What's new to the soldiers cultures on the battlefield? Feels like it's new to the audience at the very same time when Mendez called Cairns to pitch his idea for nineteen seventeen she didn't hesitate into say yes he had this one image I am in his mind and it was based on his grandfather. It was this seventeen year old boy carrying a message through new man's land lost in the fog. Your orders are to get to the second. Of course he would one mile southeast of the town of the coast. Deliver this Tacona. Mackenzie it is a direct correct order to call off tomorrow mornings. If you don't it will be a mask. We will lose two battalions sixteen hundred men your brother among them. You think you can get in time this. And then the last thing he said the call was owned by the way. It's all going to be one short. I am and he hung up after he dropped. That bone me Because he likes to do things in person the questions received for our first set down meeting. I guess I I have read that right after he got off the phone when you googled one shot films which probably doesn't get you very far because they're not really no. There's not very many and I was actually. I was looking for scraps because you know scripture Tim please you know so I was. I was looking for the formula that when short movies we'd take like Look on the page so I am I had to. I had to just be like okay. There's there's nowhere to to steal from. You'RE GONNA have to make up as you go along when you have the device of a single take or what looks to be a single take. It changes the perspective of the audience. The audience in some ways is discovering things asked the characters because the camera is never in front of the characters what does does that mean in terms of storytelling in terms of the reality that you're creating for the characters in the audience and how far or how far are you can't push that reality. It was very difficult to put it very simply. It's super heart. I am like you say it. So when you're working in in reality everyone who setting in that cinema understand reality that one show is how we actually all live our lives. We live in one continues. Unbroken teak editing sort of an artifice and film. And so what we're trying to do is strip all that way as a writer Sam Sam and I had to sit down and sort of billable so far. Can we push this home much before. It's too much which I can have like dark and twisted and desperate. Can you make the audience before they start to away because it's an as soon as anyone looks away. You've lost them. Thank you. The audience might look away. It's too graphic of. It's too violent of his. If it's too graphic too violent if it's just too much you know the way I was when I was writing this I had sort in my mind. I had a whole can of like M. E. C. G. Monitor of the audiences Hartley and I was like okay. Now we've we've pushed up so far for so long. People are going to start to fatigue. Quick actions who knows you have to drop it down and make it back into a character plea. Did you hear that story about. We'll see how long is not in the mood. Keep is on the top of the Ridge. They told you shrapnel what what was it. Well you know. He's goes ahead right and he was moaning about the as a writer can of usually your. You're you're so focused is creating a good story. That's a blueprint especially screen. There's a blueprint to make an excellent Gomes. That's your job and with this. There is all these extra extra burdens extra caveat. Okay because there's going to be a traditional edit there's not that phenom rerate in the sense you had to endure in the script so it becomes really tricky a key to sort of manage expectations ahead of time. Because you're doing it for Phantom audience in your head we're talking with Christie Wilson Cairns the CO screenwriter of the movie nineteen seventeen eighteen. So you have kind of the mathematical challenge of how this movie is going to be shot by Roger Deakins but you have a narrative problem too and that is how is this story going a play out emotionally. And how do you try to figure that out as you're writing because if the audience doesn't care about these characters no matter what the technology or the shots look like. They're not going to be in the story. Oh Yeah I mean you can have the best can of Lake Cinematography in the world. And I'm slice. I think we do. But if you don't have one or two characters who you root for. Then what's the point and I think that's the case with everything you know if if you don't have someone that you love someone in the if you represents if you or your brother or your father or your son then what's the point you know. Go Go Watch your documentary if you just want to learn about the war if you just want to see staggering film techniques which music videos. Because they're usually cutting edge for that but for us. I mean the whole point of this story from the very beginning with to to make a film that felt like one hundred hundred and ten minutes in someone else's life that fail transport of an immersive. And you could only do that with two characters that you love and you hope they survive. I WANNA ask about research. I want to start by talking about physical locations when you were walking around battlefields from were one. What was the physical impression that you took took away in? How did that shape the movie that you wrote? I mean my research in France was obsolete. How doing I've been to France? Several teams Guna had gone with my school had gone with my grandparents. I am too to the first world. War Battlefields and I can remember the impression that being younger thinking that soldiers were were big. Men were adults were grew in people who made a conscious decision to go and fight and die for their country and not last time. When I was there which was when I was writing the script so a year and a half ago I I was struck by the fact that you know what there's a mile of rude in just outside Lille and there's five sandwiches packed full of young men and I find myself all of these sandwiches and I was older than every boy buried there and I'm thirty two? I don't feel particularly old but at thirty two. If I was a man at that time I would have probably either. There'd been dead or been leading men into battle. I'm to me that really hit home. The coast of human life of young human life am not to that. was something something that really went into the script. Because Xijiang you know bleak in an Scofield George Dean are so young and they look very young. And it's it's quite staggering. Getting to think of these young men having to live through the unimaginable horror. I was in London over the holidays and I took my boys who are Big World War One and World War Two fans is to the Imperial War Museum and they have an exhibit about World War One. That's incredible and on the top floor. There's an exhibit about heroism and the personal stories that you encountered in doing your research because I think you did some research inch. Imperial War Museum spent a lot time there. Even though you're telling a fictional story what parts of the true life tales that you took away from your research that are incorporated into the story. What we were trying to do was tell a story that felt completely real and so we were going through? All these different archives amfar signed accounts. We were soldiers diaries. Because we were looking for sort sort of these moments that Phil Filming but also felt very human quite profound one of the ones affected me. Most is The milk so in nineteen fourteen. Actually you can you can at the Imperial War Museum. You can listen to the veteran himself and his own words telling the story because it was recorded Jordan in the seventies. I believe I'm he talks about the nineteen fourteen retreat the British exertion force were on the run. He stole milk from a farm arm and he was a performer himself and he was wracked with guilt at this theft. He wasn't a thief and he he thought he'd taken food out of the MOS of innocent people of people that were you know fearing for their lives and a couple of days later he found himself a sailor during a bombardment and it was him an a young woman in a baby in the baby be was starving and the baby needed milk and he had it in his canteen. He'd stolen delete a day earlier. I am an for the first time in in the whole war he. He felt like he had served his purpose. He'd be never a reason to not was really Kenneth Shocking and profound to me in that went straight into Scofield's character. Just the idea feeling feeling lost feeling lost feeling overwhelmed and then there's just one woman where you're like. Oh I've done I've done a good thing. Sam Mendes has talked about the stories his grandfather told influencing him. was there any family story of yours that affected you or that you brought to this film. My grandfather was to wasn't born until nineteen twenty nine to go t- never had to fight in the first World War but am he was profoundly affected by the where he grew up in quite abject poverty and Glasgow last school. I am been born ten years after the conflict. The the marks of that generation of Los men were still very much in his life. It was a huge part of him and he'd lost first cousins and uncles in the war until he was really shaken by and I think for him even though he wasn't highly educated he really believed that we had. How did you T to history that we as civilization should learn from the mistakes of our past and hopefully avoid repeating them constantly and then also we as people should should understand fantasy so that we can we can be better men and women and he really kind of pushed out on me is when I was younger? The value of learning the importance importance of education. And so my love for the war my kind of my interest in that the first and second row will really come from Hemingway which was secondary. So it's not he never fall on the battlefield. He was profoundly affected along with the whole generation of people. Christie Wilson Cairns is the CO screenwriter of nineteen seventeen Christie. Thanks so much for come on the show thank you so much for such a pleasure.

Christie Wilson Cairns Imperial War Museum Sam Mendes writer Mendez CO screenwriter France John Horn Christie Wilson Oscar Roger Deakins Sam Sam Tacona Mackenzie Lille Lake Cinematography Tim Gomes Phantom
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Frame

"It from the broadcast center at KPCC. This is the frame. I'm John Horn. Here's what we've got today. What would an alternate history history of this year's Oscars look like well for starters? It's more black than white. And when Director Sam Mendes called Screenwriter Christie Wilson Cairns to collaborate on one thousand nine hundred seventeen be finished by telling her and important twist and in the last thing he said. Michael was by the way it's going to be one show which which makes it's my dream job incredibly difficult. I knew we have any hung up after he dropped that bomb on me and a passionate performance artist takes her concern for the environment onto the stage. It's the frame. We'll be right back. We now know who was nominated for this year's Academy Awards and who wasn't there were no women pick for the directing Oscar and only one person of color. Harriet Stars Cynthia. Rio was among the twenty acting nominees. He's but what if like Hollywood does in a few movies. There was an alternate history to the Oscars. Franklin Leonard wrote about his imagined Academy Award nominations for the Washington Post. He's the creator of the blacklist an annual compilation of much admired but unpredicted movie scripts Franklin. Welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me the back. So we're not so sad. Your column is almost funny. It could have been a satirical piece from the onion. What motivated it? Well here's here's the interesting thing right like it. It didn't necessarily need to even be ready satire if anything you know. The article was written as a as a list of all of the people could reasonably have been nominated in place of those who got nominated and I think that there are additional people. That aren't even mentioned in the article. who also could have gotten reasonably? We nominated and no one would have batted an eye except for the fact that it would have been unusual that all the nominees people of color that all of the directing on these women which you know is so far from our reality only because history would suggest that all the nominees should be white and all the directors should be met. Well let's talk about that right. Because there was a lot of great artistic accomplishment from people who weren't nominated I think about hustlers from Lorraine Skafar you on the star Jennifer Lopez Lulu Wong the director of the Farewell Greta Gerwig who made little women performances by Alfie Woodard and clemency Aquafina and farewell the entire cast a parasite right nominated for best picture. None of the actors were so. What's the disconnect in your mind between the great work and the recognition or lack of recognition of that? Great Work Work. I mean the short answer is racism and sexism in the intersection between the two. I think that there is a fundamental lack of appreciation for the work of women directors and the work of Actors of Color. I mean I. I saw it in on my twitter timeline. And yesterday people saying Oh Jennifer for Lopez wasn't really acting playing herself you know and I think there's an assumption that you know the actors in parasite or somehow that's just who they are. They're not actually performing. If you've been in a room with a with Song King Ho you know that that was a heck of a performance. So I think that the assumptions and the appreciation and the value that we give to these performances into these directing Sort of accomplishments is diminished. Because of. WHO's doing it? Someone told me you know. Why are you trying to inject politics politics into these decisions? And it's not that I'm trying to inject politics into it is the politics are already in it. I'd like to see them removed or at least an acknowledgement the extent to which the politics there. We're talking with blacklist Creator Franklin Leonard About this year's Oscar nominations earlier this morning a read a piece in the Guardian about how award. Nominations granted people of Color especially women are often for subservient roles like slaves nannies maids. And that's movies like twelve years a slave that help babble even Roma g think there's some truth in that for the few women and women of color who are recognized they play a certain kinds of part and not another kind of role Yeah I think it's pretty arguable. You look at the list of women of color that have been nominated in London You know I suppose. In theory those nomination is progress because She's not playing a slave. The entire time in actually is playing a freedom fighter rescue slaves but no I look I think that there is again and there are some by a large percentage of certain demographics of American culture and really sort of Western culture culture about what role is appropriate for women specifically women of Color. They are far more comfortable with women in those roles than they are. If you stray too far afield and I suspect Jennifer Lopez playing a stripper gets one over on the men that she is supposed to be dancing for left left. Some significant percentage of members who the Kademi uncomfortable since actors are by far the biggest block of Academy voters. Why do the Oscar? Nominations differ from the screen actors guild. which nominated Jamie Foxx from just mercy the Peter Neon go from us and Jennifer Lopez from hustlers I suspect it's age. I I again this. I'm I'm not an expert on this. You can probably correct me if I'm wrong. But the threshold to join SAG is a lot lower in terms of career accomplishment than the threshold to join the academy and therefore it sort of seems inevitable that the academy voters are probably at least the mean significantly older than your average Sag goater and given the changes that have happened in the industry particularly over the last twenty years. I suspect that has something to do with the different nominations. The academy to a certain extent stint can only recognize movies that get made even if Oscar voters still ignored a lot of great work from underrepresented filmmakers and actors. Now you've worked as a creative executive. I can Hollywood so from where you sat on that side of the table. What needs to change in the kinds of movies that are made and who gets to make them so the academy voters voters at least can pick from a wider pool of eligible performances? Films having the same changes that needs to be made in any hiring environment where there's endemic matthias you know. We need to hire a labor force. That's more representative of the culture. As a whole we need to empower them to tell the stories. If they're most excited about telling we you need to make sure they have the resources to tell those stories well And then I think that combined with the changing demographics of the academy membership. I think you'd see a real shift over time in what gets awarded. I think it's really important to remember that you know the reason this conversation sort of pivots around the academy as bad as the time. I'm during the year when the industry is the most visible to the world and I think that it's the time when you know they're they're they're the most outside pressure can be exerted and it's it's the clearest opportunity community to make these cases right that no women were nominated for best director. It's a lot easier to understand that than it is to understand that ninety percent of the movies that are directed a studios are directed by men by so. I think that that's why this conversation happens around this time of year but the real issue and the one that matters is who Who tells the stories of our time? Do they have the resources to tell them. And do they have the autonomy to tell them as they see fit. So let me ask you this last question. We know that the academy I suspect is probably a little mortified. That only one person of color was nominated in the acting races and that no women were many directors. Is it going to be same as it always was the year from now two years from now. How quickly are we not going to be having this conversation? You know I think that the end of the day we're doing with small data sets and you know the IT. It takes a long time to make movies put movies into the marketplace and then run them through the award season so you know even if everything changed as of today we probably wouldn't be looking at a major change until twenty twenty two and as we all know Those changes tend to be even more glacial than the industry. So it's hard to say you know hopefully within this decade Lord knows. I'm going to do everything to make sure it happens faster. Franklin Leonard is the creator of the blacklist. His piece in the Washington Post is called the twenty twenty Oscar Oscar. Nominations didn't have to look like this. Franklin thanks so much for coming back on the show. Thanks for having.

Oscar Franklin Leonard director Jennifer Lopez Oscar Oscar Academy Awards Washington Post Hollywood John Horn Jennifer Lopez Lulu Wong Sam Mendes twitter Michael Harriet Stars Cynthia London SAG Jamie Foxx Rio Greta Gerwig Christie Wilson Cairns
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Frame

"It's the time of year on the frame weekend where we track. What's happening and Hollywood's almost endless award season this this week? Three of the industry's top. Guilds announce their nominations and on Monday. We'll learn WHO's up for an Academy Award every guilt. The writers producers the directors has nominated the world war one drama nineteen seventeen directed by Sam. Mendes film is co written by him and Christie Wilson. Karen's when men is called up Cairns to pitch the idea for his film she was all in. He had this one image in his mind. It was based on his grandfather. Was this Seventeen year old boy carrying macy's through new man's land lost in the fog. Your orders unto get to the second question would one mile southeast of the town of Acoust- I deliver this to Kinda Mackenzie. It is a direct order to call off tomorrow morning's attack if you don't we'll be a massacre we will lose it's two battalions sixteen hundred men your brother among them. Do you think you can get there in time. This and then the last thing he said in that caused by the way. It's GONNA it'd be one show. I am and he hung up after he dropped that bomb on me because he likes to. You know do things in Paerson. The questions received for our first set down meeting getting I guess I I. I have read that right after he got off the phone. You googled one shot. Joe Probably doesn't get you very far because there really listen though. There's not very many. I was actually. I was looking for their scripts because you scripture tim please so I was. I was looking for the the the formula that one short movies. We take like look on the page so I am I had to. I had to just be like okay right. There's there's newer to to steal from A. You'RE GONNA have to make up as you go along long when you have the device of a single take or what looks to be a single take. It changes the perspective of the audience. The audience in some ways is discovering things asked the characters actors because the camera is never in front of the characters what does that mean in terms of storytelling in terms of the reality that you are creating for the characters there's in the audience and how far or how far you can't push that reality very difficult to put it very simply. It's super hard. I am an like you say it. So when you're working in reality everyone who setting in that cinema understand reality that one show is how we actually all live of our lives. We love it in one continues. Unbroken teak editing sort of an artifice and film and so what we were trying to do with strep all of that way as a writer Sam and I had to sit down and sort of relate. We'll hope far can recruit. Hey how much before. It's too much I can have like dark and twisted and desperate. Can you meet the audience before they start to look away because this in his anyone looks away. You've lost them million. The the audience might look away if it's too graphic of it's too violent if it's if it's too graphic too violent if it's just too much you know the way I was was when I was writing this I had sort of in my mind I had a little old can of Lake M. E. C. G. Monitor of the audiences heart rate. And I was like okay. No we've pushed up so far for so along. People are going to start to fatigue with actions who know you have to drop it down and make it back into a character play. Did you hear that story about how he is not in the mood. Keep your eyes on the trees. Top of the Ridge. They told you shrapnel well no. He's Gaza hairdresser. You have to as a writer can have usually usually. You're you're you're so focus is creating a good story. That's a blueprint especially screener this a blueprint to make an excellent foam us. That's your job. In with this there is all lease extra. Burdens caveat see relate. Okay because there's going to be a traditional aid. There's not that final rewrite in the sense you had to do it in the script. We're talking with Christie Wilson Awesome Cairns the CO screenwriter of the movie nineteen seventeen so you have kind of the mathematical challenge of how this movie is going to be shot by Roger Deacons but you have a narrative problem too and that is houses story gonNA play out emotionally. And how do you try to figure that out as you're writing because if the audience doesn't care about these characters no matter what the technology or the shots look like. They're not going to be in the story. Oh Yeah I mean you can have the based can of Lake Cinematography in the world. And I'm slightly I so I think we do. But if you don't have one or two characters who you root for then what's the point and I. I think that's the case with everything you know. If you don't have someone when you love someone in the represents you or your brother or your father or your son then you know what's the point you go and watch a documentary if you just want to learn about the war of you just want to see staggering techniques which music videos. Because they're usually the cutting edge for that but for us. I mean the whole point of this story from the very beginning was to to make film that. Felt like one hundred ten minutes in someone else's life that fail transports different immersive. And you could only do that with two characters in love and you hope they survive. Christie Wilson Cairns is the CO screenwriter of nine thousand nine hundred Seventeen Christie. Thanks so much for coming on the show. Thank you so much for having avenue such a pleasure. Nineteen seventeen is in theaters now coming up on the frame weekend. Priscilla Alonzo went from learning English by watching ATV to creating and starring in her own Sitcom which didn't exactly go as planned. Stay with US and welcome back to the frame weekend. I'm John Horn. When Cristello Alonzo became the first Latino to create and star in a broadcast TV Sitcom in two thousand fourteen? It was a landmark of but Chris Stella as the show was called was canceled cancelled after just a year. She writes about that in her book. Music to my years a mix tape memoir of growing up and standing up late last year after going on a comedy tour called affordable. Care Act Alonzo tape this conversation with me at KPCC where she also performed some standup. My first language is Spanish. My mom never learned to speak English so I had to learn English by watching. TV shows like the price is right and why people you must be plink goes not a real word. I had no idea. I love that word. I used to say it all the time. I feel blink today but it is. It's not real so I had to watch ATV and I would imitate what I heard on. TV So in my family. I'm the only one that doesn't have a super thick Mexican accent. My oldest brother. He was born in Mexico and he's got not like a stereotypical accent. This guy sounds like like Taco. You know what I mean. He's like a sister. You WanNa go get something to eat. Well we could do that or would you like to see what's behind door number three. Come on you know when you were watching watching TV listening to music and then when you go off to high school. was there a time when you started realizing that what you could share as performer made people laugh. I actually found out that I could entertain people with my mom. My mom was an undocumented woman from Mexico who spent I would say about twenty years of her life trying to get her resident alien card and I always say the name of it because I want people to know what it's called the resident alien cart art coming from a background like that. If you're not familiar with it you really don't understand what it entails to be undocumented here my mom never never got to see your family again and I would see my mom very sad at times and as a kid I never wanted her to be sad so I started making her laugh whenever I saw her face and it was this connection that I had but started with my mom. That actually allowed me to always try right to find the person but look the saddest or that had the roughest time and tried to entertain them because that was all I could afford to give which was.

Christie Wilson Cairns Christie Wilson Sam writer Priscilla Alonzo Mexico Academy Award Seventeen Christie macy Mendes Hollywood Karen Kinda Mackenzie US Lake Cinematography Paerson Roger Deacons Joe Gaza
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"My script and then that can snowball day I think you just keep sending it to people be relentless the Senate have everyone read. Have people aren't just you know this. You exact dream of reading it but like you know your friends Gardner have read it and keep working on it and I think what you really need to be as writers lucky and I can't tell you how to be lucky but I can tell you if you keep working at it one day the an opportunity to open up and you feel lucky because you'll be like I've got the script and it's ten drafts in and I knew I've absolutely nailed it and I'm GonNa give it to this guy so that would be my advice to you. The device USA right there in the good question any resources that you draw inspiration from in prepare you for the next story. I mean I read a little scripts I've already every script going going I like to see you all people are doing. I do definitely I am. I also read the Law of Literature. I am an I think you writers is like James Salter and stuff like that like writers writers are amazing to read because you can see how they scrape characters who they describe rooms and stuff like that and and I would urge you to steal from them. Because they're they're great in the current issue backstory magazine. I think we published about twenty five scripts. You Sir right there. Did you have any family. Connections the First World War that you dedicated your writing to I am I. I have distant great uncles aunts but actually my grandfather who was born in nineteen twenty nine. Who never fought in the war? Obviously I am. He was profoundly affected by drought. And Glasgow. I'm you know in the early thirties. There were still a generation of men messing. There was rampant poverty. The the ship building was kind of run so bad at that point women were working in the shipyards. Were just not enough men and he grew up in real object poverty and he had a real belief in education. Even though he wasn't highly educated he would go to the library. He would read himself. I am I think he left school at fourteen. We had like nor traditional education. But he really really believe that if you can learn history if you as a society but also use an individual inertia you can be better people and he passed that one to me he had such a love. AWW can affect your history of of understanding the wars in particular how they came about and so in a we has kind of respect for history became mine. He would read me bedtime stories about the war which obviously profoundly made me off and made me write this. I am that that to me. Was My family connection. Another one from the audience. Member question is is in regards to. How do you create characters? You line up a big backstory for them about where they're coming from who they are before you start writing thing or is this something that you discover fluidly while writing and rewriting. I think a lot about them before I start writing. I mean for school field. I I knew that he he would have been a poet so I read all the war poets until like I couldn't tell you where he grew up because that wasn't important to me I could tell you how he would react to something or or or what can of lane verse would make him cry to me. That was more interesting than he. He was born in what be because that would never have appeared in the script. It doesn't matter to me. So that was the kind of thing and then for bleak I knew he was young. He was green. I knew that he wants to be a hero. I thought he would read the lone ranger because they can note the time they were a big books of the Taymor through man would read stuff like that and think. Oh this is horribly. Could react to stop. This is this is the kind of heat who he dreams of being. I am and then when I'm writing characters addict. This is going to serve the scene. But I'm everyone in the script. I'm trying to understand the logic of higher though behave and so I think I would. I be even the scenario because I think ultimately really what you're trying to do is you're trying to make people that the audience understand and you can only do that. If the behaved the way people behave so I might either. Ob meal with someone. I knew and this this is how the this is how they react under stress this too at this I do it and so I think with actors in mind rate with people in mind. Does that make sense. That totally makes sense and the other thing that you do is you wrote a very character. Driven piece and the silences allow us to discover character through action and through meditative moments. which I thought was is really cool as well? Still Take it away. We'll look I absolutely love your movie. I'm so glad you came here tonight. I can't wait to see what you do next congrats and your wgn nomination give it up again for Christie. Thank you so thank you for listening to me. and that's the Qa went down special. Thanks again Takuo writer Christie Wilson Cans for coming down and being so generous with their time and chatting about her debut feature film nine thousand nine hundred seventeen also. Don't forget to check out the massive nineteen seventeen issue of backstory magazine. It features four great cover stories that include nineteen seventeen stars Dean Charles Chapman and George Mackay Plus Editor Lee Smith Plus co-writer co-writer Christie Wilson Cairns. who gets into some different topics in the ones covered in this podcast and heck you could even read the entire screenplay for nineteen seventeen plus a bunch of other other awards season scripts and backstory as? Well there's a lot of stuff you to explore an issue forty so I hope you'll check out the table of contents backstory dot net to see all the other great stuff that's inside and while you're there.

backstory magazine USA Senate Christie Wilson James Salter wgn Gardner Glasgow Law of Literature Christie Christie Wilson Cairns. Taymor Dean Charles Chapman writer George Mackay Editor Lee Smith
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"So sign up. And I'll see you at at the movies but now without any further ado. Let's jump right onto the stage at our sold out screening at the Los Angeles Film School Right After introduced screenwriter Christie Wilson Cairns to chat about her debut feature film nineteen. Seventeen it all right well so it's always good to start with breaking end stories and I I always. I always liked to do that. Add and I just wanted to know if this is true you you were possibly involved at one point with TV show Taggart yes correct. Yeah Yeah Ah I see involved. I was fourteen years old and I kept turning up on their say so I also that I was a nuisance to tagger. I believe is the technical legal term stalker soccer. Yes I stopped I stopped the TV show tanker the production of the TV show tiger. No I grew up in Glasgow and I loved film. I love TV. I was sort of obsessed obsessed with it but I had no idea got maids and then one day I walked by a film set and they were like and it looked like a you know what. She's like a bunch of trailers. It doesn't look like cool and glamorous whereas like what's that the only oh we're filming taggart and I was like can I watch and they just let me. I am much to their sort of liter. Regret because I turned up everyday day that summer. Hold the and then the next hold in the next one and the next one and then eventually they started peeing me because I think legally they had to were you were you. Did you have the film bug before you walked on their set by coincidence or I was I was always obsessed with movies but like out safes in like a weird kind of like I would watch the Matrix in pretend to be new not cool like oh I think I'll work in film and localism where you're saying that's not cool because I've done that so many times I've been told it's is not Kuhlman. Don't listen well so you also went to the Royal Conservatory of Scotland. As we sit here though Los Angeles film school what was something that was really piece of wisdom that was imparted to you. That stayed with you ever since what was what was kind of something to sum up your film school experience. I mean I went to film school. 'cause as I was like I want to learn highway to make films and actually the most important thing I learned at film school was why to me. I am and what films to meek and so a lot of my sort of aviation foam school was being forced to watch films that were out my comfort zone like films that I wouldn't have picked up in global video. I am because I'm not old example. Well I mean I would never have watched reeser hit all time favorites like it would never have been something that would appeal. healty young me I would have been crying. Baby no I am. If you took eraserhead for the baby in this film we really could have had a hell of a scene all right sorry going. You don't like my baby. We'll talk about all I know is not raiser head but I worked hard on that seat. It was good it was thank you thank you I am but yeah it was. It pushed me out of my comfort zone as a viewer. And then that informed me of my my film literature essentially involves your brain in different lean and by watching you know foreign films other films films outside Your Comfort Zone. Old Films. New Films Weird films bad films I think is very useful and that was a huge part of my education and not just. Hey this is a white bounce. I never get a camera but I knew white balances white balance is very important She'll so that's good so it exposed you to two levels of cinema and storytelling that you weren't previously familiar with which is which is something that is great that film schools can do. Yeah I think also the other thing which I loved it with home school and it. It wasn't just the Rose Coach Academy it was also the Nafta's where I did my masters afterwards was you were a bunch of people who loved film together for the first time. I wasn't the weird foam there. There was we were all weird Phil nerds and it's really lovely to be in that and and I have you know friendships and collaborators from film school. I still work with today. I am and like sometimes. You're the first people to Alpha just finished. The script is three. And my deadlines to DIS. Will you read it. Because I can trust their opinion. When did you start in the screenwriting path? Half that at what point did you realize that. Yes you know how to white balance. But you're not going to be a camera person but screenwriting appeal. You wasn't never gonNA be. Roger Deacons the greatest best. I mean he's quite good as an easy you know. It's pretty amazing. He's future that land us. Yeah I think so. I had an amazing screenwriting shooter and I never I never really when I was on tiger and they not ozone a few TV. She was a young child. Who was insurance risk? When I when when I would do that you know the script disappeared you I would? I never saw rates or so. I was with every department except the rating department because the were some mystical creatures that were fire off and so it never really a cartoon that that was a real job that someone sat down and was like this is what we're going to shoot. I am and then so I had an incredible shooter call Richard Smith who works here on 'em he was like. Oh I'm going to ask you to write a short story this weekend. It can be anything weird or the better can be could be something wherever ever Combined Monday with something just anthon two pages and I was like and I kinda thought it was like I was GonNa take the pestle out but with it because I was like. I'm just GONNA do some weird. And I wrote the studio to Guinea pigs plotting and assassination of their owner. 'cause I was pretty sure guinea pigs at the time. Were trying to kill me. I am and and so I wrote and I and I and I remember sitting into rating like Oh. I can't believe I have to do an. ACM film skill. I should be making stuff and then like two hours just just disappeared and I had had something and I was like holy crap. That was so much fun and I handed it into him and he was like. Oh you're good at this. Give me five more every week. He was like I won tain ideas. I want a short short film. I want this. I want that and he was very relentless in just making you rate and actually that's the only way to become a writer sister right lords and it can be crap at the beginning all whizzes and to keep going through it over and over exactly very shortly after you graduated film score just kind of giving people a baseline who your before we get to the film You wrote the script author and in two thousand. Fourteen wound up on the blacklist which opened a lot of doors for you. Give us the pitch on a because to my knowledge it is still not been made. Hopefully he'll not been one day. Give us give us the pitch. So I'm a big signs near an iphone does sewn dicky's like radiation. Some people might know this. But it has a half-life it disappears appears in the room and so I had this idea imagine a machine that could turn up every so that was ever in a room and so the story of ether as we use these machines to solve martyrs and you have to lesson two someone's murder over and over again to solve it becomes a very intimate relationship rather than he you turn off. CSI Miami and there's a whole date girl on the floor. You ought to listen to the whole gig girl girl dying I am and so it was just like a different we have getting into police procedural and it was quite weird quirky and has a lot of flaws as a script because it was the first thing I ever wrote and I was new. I am Evola for that script because it got me my job and penny dreadful and it got me like meetings Salmon Dr Noski. I know these like unbelievably fonsi directors. You John Logan of petty dreadful noticed either and you got a meeting with him. And you wound up in the writer's room on season three. Tell us just what was is your biggest lesson of being thrown into the fire on your first actual paid gig which is a dream for riders but could also be a health gape onto itself. You know I was really lucky. Lucky it was a very small writer's room it was it. Was Jon Morgan. It was Andrew Drakkar. WHO's an incredible theater writer? They know enemies and TV writer and meet with just the three of us and I think that sort of the ideal scenario regime. Because we weren't I didn't have to stop anyone to get an episode like we were all going to get an episode in the end actually Andrea. I route two. I am each because we just kind of go the gist of it but John was an incredible mentor. Like a really really giving very open and so he made it okay to feel and I think when you're trying to sort of do something different when you're trying to bring them we'll do something out your comfort knowing that it's okay to feel as is so important because how can you take risks. How can you how can you go for patches or mad and weird and different if your story that you're GonNa get Rian Lindell if you feel and so that to me? That was the most important lesson. Jason is actually give yourself a break. Give yourself permission to not right. The greatest for straffed ever knew into Martin. Because you're not gonNA and then you also wrote for the penny dreadful comics. Thanks for a while comic fan before that or was that yeah wear their sorry. I I could see anything you want to. It's just I tunes spotify the big fucking nerds course. I like what was it like writing for different medium like that was a while to get it because I I mean I had read Tacoma who am I always read can of late last night or Moser stuff like that and I. I wasn't really into kind of like Batman or or or Superman. I always served Kim slightly from the state and so do with penny dreadful trying to tail. We the first comics. Where actually the backstory that? You'd never seen before season one and two weeks we'd known a bunch of soy from join but it was that you're trying to make up stuff so you're like fighting pieces into a jigsaw puzzle. I am but it's in a way I think screenwriting should be very visual. I think your job as a writer of film or TV is an inherently visual medium. And if you can't read visually you need to reconsider your job or really work at it. I am and so to me rank only title. Ix was kind of very can to that it was off to the side slightly because you have to tell it in a different way but it's the same sort of muscles. There's there's are beautiful hand painted cover by the way of backstory magazine. Right there yes yes it's digital so you can have as many replicas you want to the boys and then I'm I'm very generous. All these issues I've procured justly printed out and hanging on your wall but so obviously you're in there. We also interviewed the two stars of the film and Lee Smith Your editor and we'll we'll talk about his job later. The hardest for this one shot movie that supposedly doesn't have at its but we fill them you guys know but Su- salmon is was a producer on penny dreadful and you and him as you told me for. The cover story tried to work together on two different projects that fell apart for two different reasons and finally the third time was a charm in which he called you up one day and realized rather than going after someone else's intellectual intellectual property he had an idea of his own to get from there. I guess I'm in my pajamas writing because writing is inherently glamorous. That's the uniform. And the the official uniform dissipate in the picture for you and I'm probably am eating junk starburst or something incredibly healthy one of my five day for sure and then in my phone rings and Sam Mendes named scrolls across it so I answered in frustration. Because it's Mendes answer him on the first ring and I was like a high and he was like okay. I have this idea..

writer Los Angeles Film School Taggart Glasgow Sam Mendes Los Angeles Christie Wilson Cairns Royal Conservatory of Scotland Roger Deacons Richard Smith backstory magazine John Logan ACM Rian Lindell Kuhlman reeser Rose Coach Academy Phil
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

11:14 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"One movie And in collaboration with the deeks the the best DP in the Business Roger Deacons This has made a film that takes place or seems to take place in one. Continuous shot as it follows. The fortunes of two British soldiers were tasked with the mission in world. War One to get a message across enemy lines that may save. Sixteen hundred lives It it is a pulse pounding. toe-tapping singing extravagant. No is not one of those. Okay but steph pulse pounding right okay on stars as I said Dean Charles Chapman George Mackay who has been in the podcast. Before years ago. We've had orion him back in nineteen seventeen in fact I took podcasts. And lay are fantastic and it. Listen if you really you want to know more about nine hundred seventeen sport or special for that movie is going to be out next week as well. With director cement as an writer Christie Wilson Cairns and invite also are star wars skywalker final sport especially with the five of us five of US sitting around the table and talking about the movie that loss to be very very soon an indeed. Do My LURGI. The water special is not yet up but it will be up hopefully by the time you listen to this right there you go. Here's Dean Charles Chapman and George Mackay talking to infer Ian Freer. Enjoy George teen to the empire. PODCAST unglued thank you. The movie hits. What movie premiered this week think? What kind of reaction to begin to is really fucking intense? Fuck Yeah yes I don't know but we have not read so much nicer for the book. We'll get the gist of. It has been good yes master as well a lot. We've been doing a lot of screenings and we turn off. That have just watched the film so yes see and they're so shocked emotional faces and get compliments is it means we've you know we've talked someone some some out so it's it's nice to say it's a really nice thing about it in the somebody said Blake is the hall of the film things. Cartesian harbor film. Scofield is the sole film. Did you fast. It's really lovely. How would you describe their relationship hot and so yeah I mean I see? That's so completely different people. They come from completely different backgrounds buffing that's what Mike some so you know. COMICALLY UGH liquid connick jr every nice to watch and they saw you know bounce off each other. You know. Scott feels a bit defensive and doesn't share too much whereas Blake concept token. The dog about mom buys brother about food in. He's he's one of them but That that sort. You know two opposites jell together so of 'cause well yeah Joe Slovo Scofield. Yes as being set. I think he's He's a quiet man and like you know I think he's probably quiet in general but especially suggested that he's gone through Gone three boys probably a bit more experienced as soldier has been through some some hardships and and his way of dealing with it. I think he's I think he fears that if he if he unravels if he breaks he won't be able to put himself back together so he's just got to hold himself is is and he kind of walk. That tight rope and it's his time spent with Blake that kind of teaches them to to open up a bit. Yeah so you've got these Very kind of intense cars as an intense a situation which is compounded. By the fact you're doing all in one shot when when did you find out about if it was a it was that dinner and I both have three auditions like with other tight with Nina Nina. Goldie cost it then had a reading with Sam and then the third one they narrowed together and it was the second meeting. He was the one with Sam where he explained blamed this. So we're going to be one one shot and the concept of making what that would mean for us being involved and that was the first time I heard they know it was. It was the same time and that was actually the first time may May George as well as the audition you know. It was the second edition where he told me. Yeah he told me on the second. Auditions Shinzo is just me in a room and it didn't actually sink in until I walked out of the audition room and have the salt ritual and ring my mom up so wish h house of you know when he looked away when he looked at me. And you know this. And he said he's going to be in one. Continuous tight was all the facts. And then it sort of hit me and then I started to question. How the fuck did you have any conception of what I mean? I mean yeah. He explained it very well but obviously I didn't have a clue what it would look like. You know nothing that's been done as a WHOA. WHOA film that's done in one? You think about the explosions or the you now. The different you know rigs and south's GonNa it was. It was very exciting. Yeah I guess Al that. Is this club extensive. Six month Reynoso Peres US right. What was the was the value of that view? Don't in like in general as a life experience in a work experience. It was just having a much more three dimensional and understanding of of making a film and role within everyone else's role and just that team work Catholic. Just being because oftentimes trying to be so focused on what you're doing you forget that it's a constant hand off always all the more so with the spur. The haven't awareness now of every other department which I didn't have before right and and the they will work together then they're not separate entities which which come together to make up kind of you know various points I would. They said they were working together. All of the time you know the the the the camera operators were were like a character within the see normally it was like a constant dance and that the movement that we are moving in was facilitated by the set which was built by the art department. How we move to with from the costume department? The the kind of the story the way we possibly different landscapes also told by the makeup department and the different hair down to the different mud that they used like just give me a much more three dimensional appreciation of of the making process. And didn't he have you rehearsing in the middle of fields in question. That's right yeah pretty much from the get guy I mean for instance. The first the first week of reassumes was pretty much. We'll open failed in Salisbury. Nothing but grass just may silent JOE JR fuss scripts ups in Iran so woken and token the same. You know because this the set needed to be built around you know how long the same would need to be the same needed to be how long the set needed to be But yeah you know every day for six months we wear in the the web in colour. And there's so much soccer backpack really their toe straps around you saw the shoulders. They've got different patches in different compartments on it and we would wear that to get used to the white and you know where think needed to be. Yeah and when when you come to me. It's difficult question but when you come tissue what you remember as being the most difficult intense Guy George. I think I don't know every day was its own. I think the probably the most difficult was the first week because we've been rehearsing for for six months beforehand and as we knew the story kind of inside inside and out we knew the movement. We felt like we finish your houses on the Friday and start filming on the Monday. So kinda didn't feel any different other than the sorts of relentless nature era. We just did again and again and again and again and again and again and again because you know we were we suddenly all of a sudden we were we were putting down. What would be eh the final piece you know? That's like at the end of the day. That's five minutes of the film added is the final film and so we were afforded the luxury of being being able to you. Know if we didn't get it on the first day we would just come back again on the second and we wouldn't go home. It's none of that thing of last year. I think we've got one. That's about good enough and we can save it in the edit. So yes six o'clock up next. Let's go home. No no no we do this. We've got this location for four days. We will do all day for four days until it gets if we need to and just that was kind of inspiring but intimidating is tough. That was tough guys. I mean never. was there an easy day. That's for sure I remember one sequence given so much away those A bit in no-man's-land we've Scarf Ildem Bleich and Odd shin-splints during the whole process of filming and then conditions editions. Th you know. We're we're living in very realistic. You know the modest always explain it lot walking on us as a as a show in the film where the camera so allows downs. Sounds was black and scarf. Fields Faye Faye just slipping everywhere. But that's not acting fast. Genuine the ostrich Toronto. And that was shin-splints call. That was painful for you. You can't complain doing that because we had so much easier. Compared to the men actually fought in that war. You know a lot reality checks will be made when you had family in the ordinary. Yeah my Mock right. GRANDFA- great-grandfather He's nine with David Henry his An audio book called the Western Austin Front theories which is snippets of Dori entries of the soldiers and mock right Granddad. starry was in a and I'll read that he talks a little bit. How he for in the cavalry and he got shot when he was in no man's land and paralyzed and he survived out in no man's nine for four days China Crow back to the other side? any Wasif savarth the wall and he worked in the first poppy factory that opened in Richmond and said he died and Operate that pretty much every day to get into that add spice of I've been a solid job by having that connection really did might be closer to to play in a soldier in the war. That's amazing topper. The I guess in Actors in theater you're used to just repeating repeating repeating but in film. That's a rarity. Isn't it that you would do that. That kind of level of doing again and again and again yes so this. This was definitely a crossover. Like I guess in a way is it. Wasn't we just kind of. There's a kind of pragmatism that comes with having done a fair to the and I think that Sam recognized the Samsung so much amazing using data that it's just a thing of Yeah Yup. We're kind of like everyone's there if the cameraman didn't film it you kind of go. Why so if you're not gonNA act it you'd go? Why like Sousse of ties? That I mean it wasn't this kind of cut and dry as that but but yeah there's there's this the practical nature of you've just got to have in mind that the folks seeing it. They've they've never seen it before they're seeing it for the first time so you just gotTa keep that in mind and that was a one night stand would kind of give us now and again with would be like just remember. You've never seen this before. You've got the the words in the movements new muscle memory but this is the first time you've seen this landscape and you don't know what's down there. You don't know what might be there so just keep looking keep looking around. Keep tension your body's ladies and is more pressure on a film like this when you got was August take for example. I think it was nine minutes when he had the longest was nine. Minutes You know in the last you WanNa do is cock you up but you know things did go wrong mistakes happen And there are actually mistakes..

Blake Sam Joe Slovo Scofield Dean Charles Chapman George Ma George Mackay US Guy George Goldie Nina Nina soccer Christie Wilson Cairns Samsung Dean Charles Chapman connick director Reynoso Peres Mike Faye Faye Shinzo Toronto
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Thank and the fact that they've been leaked by his own Butler Was it was a huge scandal So it it. It's interesting interesting but it wasn't worth taking a detour on rate their user in the Middle Gino by no means no but chiefly we took in. When when I pitched the Netflix? I took in two photographs. One eventing Hopkinson wanted Jonathan Pryce and and I told them the story these three young very young woman very talented Very bright listen to the story and and they said they said yes. We'll make the film and we'LL GIVE I. I said how much would you give me. And they said whatever it costs and And I remember thinking. Do Your parents know that you're doing this and and But then they said Oh these so you have Anthony Hopkins and Jonathan Pryce and visit Walnut. No not exactly. But I'm sure they're going to want to do it and financial had worked with Tony Hopkins on a movie before and Jonathan Looks Amazingly like Pope Francis. Jonathan hates anyone saying that that because he thinks he looks like Brad Pitt but But he he does and and he. He loved Fernando's work on city of gone One of Jonathan's favorite movies amazing. Yeah so they They were the first phone calls and both said yes. which rarely happens when you were at that net flicks flick's pitch that you're talking about? Were you showing them the stage play or the finished screenplay no I was just talking and talking them through the story okay. Yeah and so. Was it commissioned from that point so so when you went to script you had like go deal Yeah we don't live at that point. No they had the stage play and We we had financial and We had the two photographs to promising young actors and And I told them the story of this movie and they said we'll make that film. That's that's fantastic. We we have time for. I think one last question right there user. He was serious about two great images one of the graffiti in the beginning and then in the end of him in the fog dog when he's in exile. Where those on the page that way or was that something Fernando found the? That's what financial found we shot in in some of the barriers in Argentina. Agentina which are gang run and took a huge amount of negotiation to shoot in those locations. The people in the of the people who live in those various they they. I actually thought Jonathan Pryce was the real pope and Then they will bowing their heads to him when he will pass and stuff and those Graffiti is is stuff that they found in those locations as for On the high pompous when he's walking in the wilderness us. We had the idea of him walking in the wilderness because it sort of Biblical But it was a bright sunny day and just before they started shooting eh from nowhere can these heavy mists and really just divinely lucky and And they shoot shoot shoot. And they weren't last Austin than say they have this in his doctorate his soul moment he walks through these heavy myths and stuff. It's stunning it was. It was incredible footage. What are you what are you working on next? I know that there's a Yoko Ono John Lennon project and a BG's project possibly where are you on those two the titles yet You I know that they're both set up once with the Jesus with paramount Being produced at least by Steven Spielberg and The John Lennon Yoko sit up universal and John Mark Ballet Dude Dallas buyers club. Very much yes yes Yeah he's he's he's down to direct So hoping to shoot that next year and I'm doing a musical on Broadway of Neil Diamond Neil sweet caroline diamond. Wow so I go from here to get into workshop on that So we're hoping to bring that to Broadway is other non musical things kicking around that. You're working on. Yeah I'm doing the adaptation of three identical strangers which was Stunning documentary which My agent Coleman said would you be interested and I said look Chinese another job like a hole in the head And he's just check it out. What's the Steve? I was so blown away. By this documentary about three identical twins who reunited and and find triplets yet and they re triplets in and then they find that they're all pot of really nefarious study pretty and IT GETS Super Creepy I. It was a great movie. Yeah that's settled with With Sidney Kimmel entertainment and film four in the okay okay. Wow I can't wait for that. We'll look this is two. Popes was a fantastic movie and did a lot of heavy lifting with your research to make a movie we that has good arguments good views from both conservative and progressive viewpoints showing that we actually can work together when we want to so. Oh Kudos to you give it up again for Anthony on a job. Well done every bank. And that's how they went down special. Thanks again to screenwriter Anthony. McCartan for being being so generous with his time and chatting about his latest film. The two popes also don't forget to check out the massive nineteen seventeen issue of backstory magazine. That's right issue. Forty has not one but four stories about one thousand nine hundred seventeen which included interviews with the film's co-stars Dean. Charles Chapman and George Mackay also also editor Lee Smith and Co writer Christie Wilson Cairns. Plus you could even read the entire nine thousand nine hundred seventeen script and a bunch of other awards season scripts as well in in fact you could also read the to pope screenplay in issue forty along with an interview with Anthony. The gets into different topics than this podcast. There's a lot of.

Jonathan Pryce Anthony Hopkins Fernando Netflix Middle Gino Yoko Ono John Lennon Butler Hopkinson Neil Diamond Neil Sidney Kimmel backstory magazine Argentina Brad Pitt Dean Austin John Lennon Yoko Coleman Steven Spielberg Christie Wilson Cairns Pope Francis
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Qwipster Film Review Podcast

The Qwipster Film Review Podcast

09:12 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Qwipster Film Review Podcast

"That's getting a lot of critical acclaim. In fact it just won the Golden Globe for the best picture in the dramatic category. It is called one thousand nine hundred seventeen and it is a war movie with some thriller and Adventure elements to it. It's an already. Eighty film does have violence some disturbing images and language. The run time is an hour and fifteen minutes. George Mackay Dean Charles. Chapman are primarily. The stars with with small roles really extended Cameos for Colin. Firth Mark Strong Benedict Cumberbatch Andrew Scott and Richard Madden. The director is Sam Mendez. Who also who writes the screenplay along with Christie Wilson Cairns nineteen seventeen takes place in northern France? It's amid the Great War as we call it today. World War One lance-corporals Blake and Scofield are two British. Soldiers commanded to carry orders from their general into no-man's-land in them beyond into the German occupied enemy lines. The mission critical orders are for a battalion of sixteen hundred British soldiers including Blake's brother to stand down from their planned raid the next morning against the Germans who are actually setting them up for a massive ambush they go through trenches through decimated towns bombed out structures there traversing manner of dangerous terrain cautiously but very expeditiously in order to save the lives of their fellow soldiers. Now stunning camerawork I think is among the top highlights of nineteen seventeen. You have director and Co Writer. Sam Mendez working for the fourth time with the legendary cinematographer. Roger Your deacons to gather a Deacon Mendez deliver this immersive war experience across a wide variety of challenging trains and the Hook here is that it looks the entire film. Looks as if it was done all in one take. It's actually several takes. That are seamlessly stitched together. By the Tech Wizards who are using. The latest technology. Really does has look very seamless. In fact I only noticed one time where it cuts away from the action for a moment. But that's right smack DAB in the middle of the film so Kudos to them for being able to pull this off Mendes did dabble with that technique a little bit for a lengthy one take sequence during the eight minute opening to his second James Bond Flick Specter. The thing. That's interesting here is that they're using a camera outdoors primarily to do this one takes special. There wasn't really a a chance for the usual. Filmmaking staples like lighting or you know the off camera crew because the camera really does three hundred and sixty degrees around here so you are not supposed to see any people who are working on it. In fact the director had to watch it on a monitor remotely off site matching shots were required while they I had to wait for similar. Natural lighting conditions to occur to keep things very consistent. They waited patiently for windows of opportunity when the clouds would block the sunlight. They were looking for gray skies. Throughout the entire picture for Mendez. This film proves to be a Labor of love. The script twohey co wrote with the Longtime Penny dreadful writer Christie Wilson Cairns based on stories that Mendez's elderly grandfather had told him about his days as a soldier. During World War One and Mendez heard these stories when he was very young and nineteen seventeen marks first screenplay credit for the director Mendez also provided a supplemental script in addition to his traditional script. And that script was full of Schematics of the locales that this is going to take place maps of the area very detailed diagrams of the buildings and other structures truce and the US this because they were building the sets very specifically so that the camera and its operators and the grips could traverse in and out without being obtrusive and this mobile crew through how to maneuver the three hundred and sixty degrees in and out without any indication that they are there or even how they did it. These comics were essential to have in mind so they could figure out where to stop for dialogue or debris through for a nail biting action sequence when it called for the decision to do nineteen seventeen. In one take was from Mendez. He wrote the movie with deacons in mind especially in the manner that the cinematographer works with a lot of story boarding and he likes to break down every element that he's going to shoot beforehand Mendez. Felt it would be necessary for the story to get into the trenches for most of it and to do it in real time in that one take technique would definitely get us into that mode however Mendez also wanted the story and its characters to be at the forefront instead of having to obsess over this technique so if audiences experienced a film only looking at the single take elements elements of the cinematography. He would consider that a failure of wanting to do it. This way Mendez wants people to experience the film without seeming like there is a camera there at all the key is to make audiences forget that it exists. And that's why he wants to go this way. If you're in the audience you should be in the moment. You're not supposed to be trying to decipher if you're they're using a steady camera crane or zipping on wire through the scenes if you're thinking about that in your mind then you're not really engaged now. Some younger viewers the way that the action tends to follow one one or two men walking or running or jumping across a variety of landscapes is probably going to be reminiscent to you of the immersive nature video games. There is a very video game aesthetic to who the film it gets you into the action in a manner that also plays like other types of films you don't see in the war Shandra. Ten Action Thriller CLAUSTROPHOBIC. Horror movie it sometimes. All of those things seem to come up at once. This is a pretty rare film. It is both epic and it's utterly intimate throughout because we're seeing the scope nope on the screen that Great Cinematography that captures the landscape. But we're also following one or two people as they traverse that now although the film is is immersive and it does have the requisite intention. The one take premise. I will say does hamper. Its effectiveness on occasion. If this were a film that was shot with conventional editing. I think thank the editors would have taken out several of the sequences that take more time than they're worth to keep a narrative flow for instance. There's the scene where one of the soldiers ends up on the back of a truck and we get extended extended dialogue sequences with other men that are in the back of the truck with them. It doesn't quite push for the story and it goes on for quite some time before the truck ends up getting stuck in a bit of mud which is kind of a brilliant sequence for a one take movie. The technical aspects of the scene are jaw-dropping but audiences. Are I think more likely to be riveted in gene. How they did this sequence in one take more so than they might feel the tension of the moment so as a result? I think that if you're doing this you're going to likely bounce back and forth between being involved in the movie for its story and also admiring the way it is presented from a more distant vantage point and that tends to mute the emotional elements of the story. Hey that is trying to achieve nine. Thousand Seventeen also delivers an understated antiwar message underneath the realistic recreation of life in the trenches is hell will war is hell as they say it does take you into some of the worst aspects of that however I think as the story must also keep moving the thematic elements of the peace. They're not really S. fleshed out to deliver big powerhouse messages other than to observe how terrible the conditions must have been for the soldiers on the frontlines Mendez does in the film with a dedication into his grandfather. Who told them these war stories? So that's kind of a potent reminder as you walk out of the theater too. You're comfortable life yet again that there were real life men who experienced experienced such horrors in the theater of war and they didn't just do it for a couple of hours ninety seventeen I say is a riveting and a unique way to pull off a full scale war four movie and it does it in a way that the experience I think is essential to take it in in the movie theater. Because you're not going to be distracted by looking at your phone or talking to your neighbor neighborhoods not really a place to adequately pas the film anyway because it's all done in one take action is always moving. It's very much a cinematic experience more so then I would say it's good storytelling but I do think that as an example of the continuing power of motion pictures once that you see in the movie theaters. It's a solid reminder reminder of the importance of a visionary filmmaker like Mendez and in getting all of those aspects right in technical sense so very much a cinematic in a matic experience above all else in your unique in that way and very highly recommended for that so three and a half stars out of four is what I'm giving nine thousand nine hundred seventeen three and a half stars on my scale means that I do think that this is a good film and definitely worth going out of your way to see if this all sounds of appeal to you. If you're a Sinophile I definitely recommend at least catching this in the theater. While you can in order to get that experience that you probably can't get watch it on the smaller screen so very much recommended did at three and a half stars. Thank you everyone for listening. I hope that you enjoyed this review. If you see nineteen seventeen and you have your own thoughts on this and you want to impart them to me in my contact information in my website. That's equipped stir dot net Q.. WIP As the e R Dot net. You can find links to my twitter. Feed facebook page instagram. All of those are adequate ways of getting in touch with me until next time. Thanks so much for listening. Please enjoy your tongue. Anytime he at Luby's..

Deacon Mendez director Christie Wilson Cairns George Mackay Dean Charles Chapman Colin facebook twitter US France Blake Firth Mark Strong Benedict Cum Mendes Roger Luby Richard Madden writer
"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

10:05 min | 1 year ago

"christie wilson cairns" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"We've hopefully got flower moon coming up with killers of the thousands of the foul mood with Scorsese teaming again with with De Niro and this with Leo as well so that'll be another. Oh the maximum scorsese film. But I really think this is the last time you will probably see Scorsese and Deniro and patchy and kites L. All working together. uh-huh magical thing. I needed more kyle for my money. Basically a cameo over the years it is essentially is it's one of the it's one of the One on the perils of telling the story in the way that the talent is that people flit in and out of the narrative and maybe you could have amalgamated. Maybe amalgamated more people. And you know maybe the Bobby Kennedy character being in two zero two of the characters become one character that sort of thing. There is a word I'm looking for specifically big. Remember this. I thought yeah I thought it was terrific I think Deniro is the best. He's been in a long time which is really interesting. Because I think he's actively awful and joker the just woefully woefully miscast. But he's he's great in the Irishman. You can see why he he fought to get made. It was his idea to make it in the first place. And while I lament the passing of the Winter Franken machine which is a great don winslow on oval that will that he was gonna make whiskers eighty and they were basically three prepping the winter frankie machine and then he went over at this book who she listens and they did that instead. The one thing. I think that that may be council against the Irishman Worthy enough is the aging effects. So it's it's an aeroplane a sixty five year old man at various just as of us live so he's a sixty five thirty five year old man who sixty five then. He's a forty five year old man. He's also sixty five hundred sixty five. The makeup effects means in his seventies and eighties are great you to put the stuff just didn't work for me. Maybe should have talked to. The Guy was gray I am I I think that the conversation around it maybe. It was unfortunate in distracted from the substance. The film of the terrible two three early scenes were not good with the aging. But I will say because we're fair and balanced that also the DA. Michael Douglas and endgame is appalling. and not up to the standards of Lewis Movies so sorted out pointing to people Blanco. You're going back to L. as soon as you get onto them and tell them to sort of al I I mean I didn't love the argument. Didn't make my top ten because movies are just not my thing and it couldn't overcome that but I do love where ended up as a story and as a sort of a theme I mean I think Silence more my scorsese bag and I actually think Wolf Wall Street is more my scorsese bag than this but But it was a stunning thing to watch but I saw it has become talk about it because only just came out and even those based on historical fact took that something happens to someone and the noise. That person makes that moment has stayed with me for since the thing that I think. You're talking about that entire entire sequence for me a knot in my stomach is still yet to entice. I have no idea what either of you talking about. It's tremendous thing Ben that may be gastro-enteritis. Addison usually get yourself checked out hoover not on who is not volunteer of the year. Blanco you've already said Apollo Eleven. I have already said Apollo Eleven. Can I mentioned other things on my list. Maybe endgame isn't top of my list. I also very much enjoyed which I believe. I think I'm correct in saying that. It was a last year America this year here. Can you ever forgive me. I can't forgive you. Yes Melissa McCarthy who argued film fantastic and It it can be brutal at times. But it's also hilarious at times not grant and and Melissa McCarthy together are hilarious. It's incredibly Saad in places but I think I thought it was wonderful. I absolutely loved it. Fabulous didn't make my list but I want to give a shout out something. We haven't I mentioned which is the Souvenir Hawks film which I thought was tremendous men's really really fascinating character study But my list of the Air I had I have the top four that would I would honestly be happy with any order. You Care to put them. I'm GONNA guess them. Okay joker bright. Burn twenty-one bridges juice the kitchen uncanny none of those troubled by this to tell you just say what you just said wrong No so the the order I put them in when I had to send over my list was Holmes and Watson Number Four. Little women's number three feels street could talk number number two Avenger Dan game. Yes that's right. I said number two and number one book smart but only you could put those in any order and I'd be happy Larry all right I will put ventures in game and number one on your list. How do you feel about that as for me? I really liked a little movie. I like to call once upon time in Hollywood is tremendous beaten talk about the last shot. Movie movie is just so good What else is on my list We've pretty much mentioned everything that I I really really loved mentioned vice which dropped in the beginning of this is a mindless top ten talent but yes I loved voice. I thought that was very very good other than that. Most of the similar films are in Washington. Books it's number two for me and then game is the cinematic and indeed non cinematic highlights of twenty nine. We are inevitable. I'm not sure we've said enough about marriage story but I just want to again mentioned marriage Murray story best finish off of their moment of the year. Oh Boy Well I'm in actually. It's it's not my moment of the earth. That's obviously the one we're going to talk about in a minute but But for example Adam driver singing being alive in marriage story is pretty up there. It's staying alive Helen. We've talked uh-huh maries. Beautiful Film is about the dissolution of marriage. I literally went for ice cream before this film. Because I'm like this is going to be the really depressing arcing evening. I'M GONNA sugar up to try and get through this. It's going to be awful incredibly funny in the first half an incredibly sad as the marriage really you know the breakdown really kind of gets underway an ultimately. I found it weirdly life-affirming in a way that I can't quite explain but I find it really life affirming and Kinda love affirming and just strangely optimistic so I just think it's a stunning stunning film. And nearly as good as a NOMEX MRS film little woman you go there. You go indeed if we're going super granular on moments not just portals. But the moment white cap has million and he is the run the jump that was an uppercut under the chain where he just like absolutely conches. Thanos with me on your is that was the specific moment. Maybe like nearly involuntarily leap out of my chair but otherwise I've mentioned it before the astral projection scene and not sleep. I think it's incredible the final sequence of once upon a time in Hollywood's it's been a great year for big moments. I have one. That's probably Kamov Song if you have not seen ready or not yet and it is the discovery the what was feared is is something that should be feared and it's a lovely. The prize is a lovely surprise. And it's extremely out there out there a little shift Yucca. Yeah that's Nice Jimbo It is it is portals all the way for me. Pat That is that is that said there were moments in the pharmacies. Okay threatens particularly in the episode the long night the absolutely gave me chills a charge of the rocky with flaming Erickson all the little flames retire. podcast tool this on the pilot. TV review this. We're GONNA come on your review the year podcasts on on pilots. Talk about endgame. How does that sound or might just blue bloods portion able banner year for Blue Bloods People? They solve some crimes and they ate some roasts is still alive. Sadly uh-huh also. If you've been watching watchmen. It's been a banner year for blue. People blue penises. Oh golly DOT and if you've been watching adventures endgame has been about a year for banner. So well done him. He's Finally resolved his problems. yes my favorite moment of the year Was I was taking quickly. But also it was sorry Alec Ignore Football boy. Do I know these words that you're saying because I'm saying corner taking quick but yes portals which as I said on the podcast before isn't just the greatest greatest moment of the year systematically isn't just greatest moment of my life isn't just greatest moment of your lives but as a grass moment in human history I think got straight on your left the other moments that I like this year. I love the I don't care and Captain Marvel that just blew me away. But nothing compares to Portal's income pays like those are the lyrics all right prince was so head of his time wasn't really all right. Well now that we you have done that we have reviewed year I would give this year four stars out of five. Everyone concur. We're good. We're happy with that. All right well. Is it for our review of the year. Twenty nineteen Regular podcast is out every Friday except of course now because we take a break. We're back in January tenth an Mbacke very very soon after that with our first supporters of twenty twenty which is nineteen seventeen very confusing but first border special of nineteen seventeen. We'll be twenty. Twenty net will be with director. Sam Mendes and writer Christie Christie Wilson Cairns. So that's GonNa be very interesting indeed and we'll do that in one take. Does that sound. Yeah right yeah yeah now after all the dollar should I say cut that out cut. That'd been out. I.

Scorsese Melissa McCarthy Hollywood Deniro Bobby Kennedy Pat That De Niro don winslow twenty twenty kyle Blanco Sam Mendes Washington America Christie Christie Wilson Cairn Saad Ben Addison Michael Douglas