14 Burst results for "Christie Parker"

"christie parker" Discussed on Hauntingly Yours: A Podcast for the Paranormal

Hauntingly Yours: A Podcast for the Paranormal

08:37 min | 7 months ago

"christie parker" Discussed on Hauntingly Yours: A Podcast for the Paranormal

"Hauntingly yours. I'm your host, D.C. o'rourke. And I'm here to regale you with yet another haunted tale that I have pulled from the darkened archives of the world. I just wanted to give a quick shout out to Donnie and Christie Parker, spirit guides paranormal for our last episode, where we got together to chat about Fleetwood church in brandy station, Virginia. Thank you so much guys for that. Much love. The spirits of brandy station of event, we mentioned in that episode was nothing short of awesome. And all that attended had a great time. You're truly being one of them. Since the event, I was actually invited to join the ranks of spirit guides. Team as spirit guides paranormal that is, as a paranormal investigator and I gladly accepted the invitation. I'm honored to be working with such a well respected team in the field. I also have my own team, shadow walker is paranormal that I will continue to work with as well that I started back in January of this year. Now, back to our adventure, shall we? What tale do I have for you guys? Why don't you gather around in your ears? For this episode, I decided to go digging and perusing through the files of none other than Ed and Lorraine Warren. I mean some inspiration and I thought, what better place to look, right? I dug through all this stuff. And you know, I came across annabelle and the non and all these wonderful things that we've seen in Hollywood movies from the conjuring universe and I said, I want to go for something more obscure, you know, forget amityville for getting annabelle what Ed Lorraine investigate that no one really knows about that much. And I found one thing in particular that really stuck out I guess you could say, but in order to tell that story, one we go back in time because this story is none other than the south end werewolf. And it begins in Essex, England with mister Bill Ramsey. Now, mister Bill Ramsey, what can you say? He was a normal person. At first, born in 1943, in the small town of south end, the located just within Essex. The first 8 years of his life were quiet and normal. He was a normal boy with normal hobbies, playing outside was his favorite pastime, and he would spend hours running around where he would let his vivid imagination be free. When Bill turned 9, his life as he knew it took a strange turn for the worse. One day he found himself playing in the garden behind his house when he began to fuel very peculiar. A chilling wind swept across his body, which seeped into his bones. The sun hung high in the sky and smiled down on him favorably. The warmth of that smile caressed his skin sweetly. This felt very off to him. It was out of place. His body began to sweat, but it just seemed to freeze the moment it attempted to roll away from him. Then to make matters worse, poor Bill was overtaken by a horrible stench that filled him with severe nausea to the point where he wanted to vomit. Later on he would stay, have you ever walked into a meat locker right after you've been outside on a hot day? That's what this was like. What's even more strange than the physical symptoms that he presented were the psychological manifestations that had came along for the ride. Whatever this experience was, he was a sure, but it wanted to change him. His mind was filled with the carnal urge to get down on all fours and run for the ocean as fast as he could go. All the while in his mind conjured up images of wolves of all shapes and sizes. Something was amiss. The imaginative 9 year old boy that he knew slipped into a trance that altered all that is very world had become the child's parents picked up on the odd behavior right away. Ramsay's mother did everything that she possibly could to help her son break free from this trance that he was in, but nothing seemed to be effective. Honestly, it seemed like it made matters worse the more she tried. The images of wars disappeared from his thoughts and were replaced by feelings of extreme rage. This seriously scared its folks. The adrenaline pumping through his veins as a result of the rage gave him what looked like Supernatural strength. Strength that a 9 year old boy should not be able to possess. He ran to the back garden and tore fence posts straight from the ground and swung them in the air like giant clubs. No matter how hard his parents tried to take control of the situation, it just didn't matter. Bill Ramsay's grip was just out of this world. They didn't wish to leave their son in such a vulnerable state while he had this frightening episode, but they felt helpless. Especially when Bill ripped metal wire from the fence and placed it in his mouth. His parents stared on horrified as a gnawed on his theories. The furiously and growled like a rabbit animal by this point, they thought it best to lock themselves inside the house and wait it out. Safety first. After all, sometimes later Bill finally calmed down and his parents allowed him access to the house again. Oh, they're sweet son. What had taken a hold of him like that? His face and mouth were torn and scratched to pieces from where he had gnawed on the fence. They tended to his wounds like the good parents that they were, of course. When they'll ask what exactly had happened both mother and father replied, we will never speak of this again. Bill pushed the incident to the bag of his mind and tried his best to loop on what life he never spoke of the matter to anyone before he knew it 15 years of his life had flashed right before his eyes. He had gone from being a child to a man, he met a beautiful woman. He got married. Down the road, they would end up having three beautiful children together. From all that, we know, Bill was an excellent father. He spoiled his children here. He enjoyed a prosperous career as a Carpenter and he took pride in his work. I think it's safe to say that our friend Bill Ramsey, well, he led a conventional life for many years. Not too long after his marriage had begun to blossom nightmares would plague him on a regular basis. In these nightmares he always chased after his wife like a predator after its prey. At the end of every one of these his wife would always turn back to look at him with a horrified expression on her face. The stress of it would kick him awake every single time. And his body would be drenched in a cold sweat with his mind full of dread. There was only a few times where he swore he could even hear what sound it like a wild animal in the room afterwards, and it panted incessantly. In the end, he surmised the sounds of nothing to be afraid of as they were coming from his own vocal cords. The nightmare is finally stopped. Two years later. It was 1967.

mister Bill Ramsey Christie Parker Fleetwood church annabelle Lorraine Warren Ed Lorraine brandy station Bill Essex rourke Donnie D.C. Bill Ramsay walker Virginia Ed Hollywood nausea Ramsay England
"christie parker" Discussed on Hauntingly Yours: A Podcast for the Paranormal

Hauntingly Yours: A Podcast for the Paranormal

05:19 min | 9 months ago

"christie parker" Discussed on Hauntingly Yours: A Podcast for the Paranormal

"Christie parker spirit guides paranormal as into fleetwood church. All right guy so. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Have you been doing good. They're very busy. Yeah i i bet you are. And i can only imagine why and what's up. Thanks for having us. Oh yeah yeah my pleasure. of course. i'm flattered that she agreed to come on now This episodes obviously going to be centered around fleetwood church so pretend that i know absolutely nothing at all about it and give me a little bit of the history and kinda the the origins of the place. Okay i mean sorry this real. The place dates back as far as finding comfort county records to eighteen fifty. We're not sure what was their other. Spirits allowed us to to know each a church built. Eighteen eighty established eighteen. Eighty one decommissioned. I think in the one thousand nine hundred seventy s turn into an antique steward of the nelson. The hundred it hasn't today is china restore back to his original form. Interesting thing about the foundation. Though st steve at who owns it his found civil war bullets in the foundation. There is also a sketch in the library of congress. dated eighteen sixty four. I believe that was done by one of the soldiers who was fighting in that area. And there's a lot of civil war history that will get to and it shows a building where the church would be. But you can only see the corner of it so it's just Painted tantalizing clue of what might have been there a Interesting be curious to know what exactly that was Another church or something entirely different spheres tells was a home somehow may have gone on fire of were still digging for answers and that would explain. Okay there is such a web of information that it's hard to lay it out in in a way that makes sense so bear with us a little bit All a brand new station has a really rich history starting before this of a war on the area that is now twenty. Nine was generally the area of the old carolina road that was used by east coast. Native americans that would travel north and south. So and also the meta pony indians Monkeys what else cherokees a.

fleetwood church Christie parker st steve nelson china congress carolina east coast
"christie parker" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:52 min | 1 year ago

"christie parker" Discussed on KCRW

"We know that it will send through New Year's No, probably put me out of business. Forever. Public health officials implemented the restriction Wednesday night after spike in Corona virus cases. Nicky Barnes is general manager of the lobster in Santa Monica. He told KBC that it's a very stressful time for the industry before we get into the Christmas season. It's tough. It's tough to have to do this to our employees all over again. County says the closures are necessary due to the increased risk from aiding like congregating with people from outside your household will not wearing masks. They're urging people to support restaurants in the meantime, by ordering food for take out and delivery. And for a third straight day back, Black lives matter. Protestors demonstrated outside L. America L. A Mayor Eric Garcetti is official residence on Thanksgiving Day and they're vowing to be back today. They're calling on president like Joe Biden not to appoint Garcetti to a Cabinet post Black lives matter has been critical. The mayor for what they say is failing to solve the city's housing crisis and failing to find housing for homeless people, among other things. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations and from little passports, offering hands on activity kids to keep kids engaged and expand their minds designed to help kids explore the world. And unpack the mysteries of science more at little passports dot com. It's a 35. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm David Greene. Joe Biden is wasting no time getting ready for the White House. The president elect is preparing to announce more key staff positions after the holiday weekend. His transition aides now have clearance to work with members of the outgoing administration. Donald Trump, the departing president, still claims he won the election. But during this week, his actions and even some of his words Have been more in line with the reality that he lost. And we have NPR political correspondent Asthma college with us this morning. Hi, Asma. Hi there. Okay. So Biden has already unveiled its foreign policy. National security teams. What is he turning to this week? Well. The big news of this week was that the General Services Administration told Joe Biden's team that that it could officially begin the transition process. So what this means is that he will likely begin to have his first in person National Security briefings next week. Hey, will likely begin receiving the president's daily brief on Monday. And, you know, typically, the incoming president would receive classified intelligence briefings. Just so that they have a sense of you know what they're stepping into into the White House. But by didn't had not been receiving these classified briefings because of the delays in the transition process, you know, in terms of other key appointments we already know thanks to my colleague, Frank or Dona is is reporting that Biden is planning to nominate Janet Yellen as his Treasury secretary. She, of course, has plenty of experience navigating tough economic environment. We'll get a fuller picture of the other people on Biden's economic team, and I'm really interested to see this in part, David because it's coming at a critical moment when millions of people are set to lose unemployment benefits at the end of the year, and there's this ongoing debate about additional covert relief. Yeah, a lot of important debate over that issue, obviously important so many Americans. So the president elect didn't make any public appearances over Thanksgiving itself, right? But he in the future First lady did put out an op ed. I mean, what message are they trying to convey now? They're really trying to focus on collective sacrifices that people are making and the importance of acknowledging that this is all happening against such a deadly pandemic. You know, they wrote in this op ed, and they also called Frontline workers, fire fighters and nurses yesterday to thank them and recognition for people having this pared down Thanksgiving. It was a message akin to the one that he delivered on Wednesday afternoon. He gave this Thanksgiving address to the nation and I will say it felt like a rather jarring contrast when we seen and heard from the president lately. You know where the president I think has sounded somewhat divisive and frankly kind of petty. At times. Biden is trying to sound presidential delivering this message of reconciliation, unity and resolve. In the face of a pandemic, with record numbers of cases and increasing numbers of death. 260,000 Americans in county It's divided US. Anger this Set us against one No, the country's gonna wary of the fight. We need to remember. We're war with the virus. Not with one another, not with each other. You know, David, he talks about how hard it is for families to forego traditional Thanksgiving celebrations, but that it's what's needed in this moment. Well, then, we also did hear from President Trump talking reporters for the first time since the election sounds like what not a concession but may be getting closer to accepting reality. That's right. You know, for the first time President Trump explicitly did say that he will leave the White House if the electoral college votes for Joe Biden. Certainly will. Certainly I will. And you know that. But I think that there will be a lot of things happening between now in the 20th of January. A lot of things. And you know, he didn't say what those lot of things were. But I will say that he continues to push these baseless allegations of voter fraud. There really is no root for him to overturn the election results. So at this point, you know, it feels largely like rhetoric at nothing that's going to actually be able to change the outcome. All right. NPR's Asma Khalid. Asma, Thank you so much. You're welcome. President elect Joe Biden wants to make civil rights a top priority in his administration advocates who follow the Justice Department say there is a lot of repair work to be done. Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson. A few months after Donald Trump became president, he delivered remarks about law enforcement that set the tone for civil rights. Former Justice Department prosecutor Christie Parker remembers. I said, Please don't be too nice. Like when you guys put somebody in the car and you're protecting their head. You know the way you put their hand off. Like Don't hit their head and they've just killed somebody Don't hit their head. I said you could take the hand away, okay? He essentially told them Go ahead and use excessive force. Don't be too nice to the people you arrest. Parker says That speech marked a major turnaround where I think we see Real fall down by this administration, in a purposeful one is in prosecutions of police officers who do their work, you know, out on the streets, it's not just cases against individual cops who break the law. Veterans of the Justice Department say there's been a retreat on another front. Investigating entire police departments for patterns or practices of discrimination. Jonathan Smith used to run that unit at the DOJ has been 70 investigations that were brought in 25 of those were brought during the Obama administration and one was brought during the Trump Administration. That's 25 in the Obama years, one under Trump Smith says states like Illinois, Colorado and Minnesota have tried to step in to police the police, but it's very different than the kind of resource is an authority that comes from the United States Department of Justice and I don't think it's a substitute. Trump's first attorney general, Jeff Sessions, viewed state and local law enforcement as partners. He said Federal investigations would demoralize police. In one of his last acts in office sessions issued a memo removing a key tool from civil rights enforcers. His memo made it nearly impossible to use court enforced consent decrees to help oversee police forces. We need to go up to ran the civil rights division in the Obama years. That memo should be withdrawn Day One of this new administration, Gupta says. The country is in a different place now when it comes to police oversight. I think there is no question that George Floyd's murderer Minneapolis this summer really forced a crucial reckoning around race in public safety, Biden says there has to be accountability, and he wants to bring police and civil rights groups into the White House next year to talk about the issues. Civil rights advocates say the election has highlighted another big action item Doing Morte to protect voters. Lisa Tyler Barrett is director of policy at the end of the legal Defense and Educational Fund. She wants to see lawmakers pass a new voting rights law named after the late congressman John Lewis. But she says the new Justice Department can act even without Congress. So the civil rights division has previously played a very active role in enforcing voting rights by bringing cases under Section two of the Voting Rights Act. The law allows justice and others to sue states over discriminatory practices..

Joe Biden president Donald Trump White House Justice Department David Greene NPR NPR News Obama Black Nicky Barnes General Services Administratio Christie Parker
"christie parker" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"christie parker" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm David Greene. Joe Biden is wasting no time getting ready for the White House. The president elect is preparing to announce more key staff positions after the holiday weekend. His transition aides now have clearance to work with members of the outgoing administration. Donald Trump, the departing president, still claims he won the election. But during this week, his actions and even some of his words have been more in line with the reality that he lost. And we have NPR political correspondent Asthma College with us this morning. Hi, Asma. Hi there. Okay. So Biden has already unveiled its foreign policy, national security teams. What is he turning to this week? The big news of this week was that the General Services Administration told Joe Biden's team that that it could officially begin the transition process. So what this means is that he will likely begin to have his first in person National Security briefings next week. Hey, will likely begin receiving the president's daily brief on Monday. And, you know, typically, the incoming president would receive classified intelligence briefings. Just so that they have a sense of you know what they're stepping into into the White House. But Biden had not been receiving these classified briefings because of the delays in the transition process, You know, in terms of other key appointments we already know thanks to my colleague, Frank or Dona is is reporting that Biden is planning to nominate Janet Yellen as his Treasury secretary. She, of course, has plenty of experience navigating tough economic environment. We'll get a fuller picture of the other people on Biden's economic team, and I'm really interested to see this in part, David because it's coming at a critical moment when millions of people are set to lose unemployment benefits at the end of the year, and there's this ongoing debate about additional covert relief. Yeah, a lot of important debate over that issue, obviously important so many Americans. So the president elect didn't make any public appearances over Thanksgiving itself, right? But he in the future First lady did put out an op ed. I mean, what message are they trying to convey now? They're really trying to focus on collective sacrifices that people are making and the importance of acknowledging that this is all happening against such a deadly pandemic. You know, they wrote in this op ed, and they also called Frontline workers, fire fighters and nurses yesterday to thank them and recognition for people having this pared down Thanksgiving. It was a message akin to the one that he delivered on Wednesday afternoon. He gave this Thanksgiving address to the nation and I will say it felt like a rather jarring contrast when we seen and heard from the president lately. You know where the president I think has sounded somewhat divisive and frankly kind of petty. At times. Biden is trying to sound presidential delivering this message of reconciliation, unity and resolve. In the face of a pandemic, with record numbers of cases and increasing numbers of death. 260,000 Americans in county Divided US. Angered US. Set us against one No, the country's growing weary of the fight. We need to remember. We're war with the virus. Not with one another, not with each other. You know, David, he talks about how hard it is for families to forego traditional Thanksgiving celebrations, but that it's what's needed in this moment. Well, then we also did hear from President Trump. I mean talking reporters for the first time since the election sounds like what not a concession but may be getting closer to accepting reality. That's right. You know, for the first time President Trump explicitly did say that he will leave the White House if the electoral college votes for Joe Biden. Certainly will. Certainly I will. And you know that. But I think that there will be a lot of things happening between now in the 20th of January. A lot of things. And you know, he didn't say what those lot of things were. But I will say that he continues to push these baseless allegations of voter fraud. There really is no root for him to overturn the election results. So at this point, you know, it feels largely like rhetoric at nothing that's good to actually be able to change the outcome. All right. NPR's Asma Khalid. Asma, Thank you so much. You're welcome. Right? President Elect Joe Biden wants to make civil rights a top priority in his administration advocates who follow the Justice Department say there is a lot of repair work. To be done. Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson. A few months after Donald Trump became president, he delivered remarks about law enforcement that set the tone for civil rights. Former Justice Department prosecutor Christie Parker remembers. I said, Please don't be too nice. Like when you guys put somebody in the car and you're protecting their head. You know the way you put their hand off. Like Don't hit their head and they've just killed somebody Don't hit their head. I said you could take the hand away, okay? He essentially told them Go ahead and use excessive force. Don't be too nice to the people you arrest. Parker says That speech marked a major turnaround where I think we see Real fall down by this administration, in a purposeful one is in prosecutions of police officers who do their work, you know, out on the streets, it's not just cases against individual cops who break the law. Veterans of the Justice Department say there's been a retreat on another front. Investigating entire police departments for patterns or practices of discrimination. Jonathan Smith used to run that unit at the DOJ has been 70 investigations that were brought And 25 of those were brought during the Obama administration and one was brought during the Trump administration. That's 25 in the Obama.

Joe Biden president President Trump White House David Greene NPR News NPR Justice Department Steve Inskeep General Services Administratio Christie Parker US Asma Khalid Obama Obama administration Janet Yellen Asthma College
"christie parker" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:40 min | 1 year ago

"christie parker" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Target has black Friday deals all November. Actually, sales began as far back as October in some cases, so a lot of people have already started their holiday shopping and don't intend to stop. OK, so we should really think of it is black Fridays or blacks and many days like that. Sales holiday. Oh, okay. This is mainly happening online for safety reasons, I assume By far the vast majority do say they plan to shop online on their phone screens. Because a big thing that happened this year we got a lot of people becoming online converts for the first time, especially thinking things like Grocery, health and beauty products stuff that we used to have to see first. Well, here's the vector, India who tracks online shopping at Adobe Digital insights about 30 when percent of consumers reporting that they rarely shopped online or had never shopped online before, and the covert pandemic was essentially a forcing function. And what do you think about physical stores Every year, the International Council of Shopping Centers does a shopper survey and this year even this group is reporting a big drop in the number of people who say they plan to physically go shopping. But in that survey, almost two thirds of respondents said they did plan to go shop at a physical store. It's a lot of people And so stores are adjusting. You know, they're requiring masks. They're counting customers again to limit crowds, and they're drawing attention to the cleaning measures. Which this is like, unglamorous thing that stores usually like, distract from. Well, Now you've got sanitizers front and center, However, people shop What are they shopping for? Classic stuff. Clothes, Get guard stores, electronics, smart TVs, home speakers, that sort of thing for years. We watch this shift toward experiences rather than things. Well this year we're back to things you know, until we can start jumping back into Massages or classes or whatnot. And especially, I'm talking things for the home where we're spending all this time. Now more holiday decorations to deck out the houses, books and crafts to occupy time. My favorite hot seller for the covert time is apparently air friars are big for, you know all that comfort food. So many families are still struggling financially. We hear about that every day, they still seem to say they want to feel special. They want to celebrate, the national regular retail Federation predicts. On average happens, they're going to spend almost $1000 gift food, decorations and other holiday things. Which is only a little bit less than last year, when the economy looked extremely different, Helene it's always a pleasure talking with you. Thanks. Thank you. NPR's Alina's Taliek. President elect Joe Biden wants to make civil rights a top priority in his administration advocates who follow the Justice Department say there is a lot of repair work to be done. Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson. A few months after Donald Trump became president, he delivered remarks about law enforcement that set the tone for civil rights. Former Justice Department prosecutor Christie Parker remembers. I said, Please don't be too nice. Like when you guys put somebody in the car and you're protecting their head. You know the way you put their hand off. Like Don't hit their head and they've just killed somebody Don't hit their head. I said you could take the hand away, okay? He essentially told them Go ahead and use excessive force. Don't be too nice to the people you arrest. Parker says That speech marked a major turnaround where I think we see Real fall down by this administration, in a purposeful one is in prosecutions of police officers who do their work, you know, out on the streets, it's not just cases against individual cops who break the law. Veterans of the Justice Department say there's been a retreat on another front. Investigating entire police departments for patterns or practices of discrimination. Jonathan Smith used to run that unit at the DOJ has been 70 investigations that were brought and 25 of those were brought during the Obama administration and one was brought during the Trump administration. That's 25 the Obama years one under Trump. Smith says states like Illinois, Colorado and Minnesota have tried to step in to police the police, but it's very different than the kind of resource is an authority that comes from the United States Department of Justice, and I don't think it's a substitute. Trump's first attorney general, Jeff Sessions, viewed state and local law enforcement as partners. He said Federal investigations would demoralize police in one of his last acts in office. Sessions issued a memo removing a key tool from civil rights enforcers. His memo made it nearly impossible to use court enforced consent decrees to help oversee police forces. We need to go up to Ram the civil rights division in the Obama years. That memo should be withdrawn Day One of this new administration, Gupta says. The country is in a different place now when it comes to police oversight. I think there is no question that George Floyd's murderer Minneapolis this summer really forced a crucial reckoning around race in public safety, Biden says there has to be accountability, and he wants to bring police and civil rights groups into the White House next year to talk about the issues. Civil rights advocates say the election has highlighted another big action item Doing Morte to protect voters. Lisa Tyler Barrett is director of policy at the end of the legal Defense and Educational fund. She wants to see lawmakers pass a new voting rights law named after the late congressman John Lewis. But she says the new Justice Department can act even without Congress. So the civil rights division has previously played a very active role in enforcing voting rights by bringing cases under Section two of the Voting Rights Act. The law allows justice and others to sue states over discriminatory practices. That's a step the Obama DOJ took. On. Lee had to be reversed under President Trump Tyler Barrett says expectations for the new team are high. We are hopeful to have the civil rights division restored to its intended purpose. After all, she says. Congress created the division more than 60 years ago to protect the most vulnerable communities. Carrie Johnson. NPR NEWS Washington.

Justice Department Obama Donald Trump Carrie Johnson NPR President Trump Tyler Barrett International Council of Shopp Christie Parker Joe Biden United States Department of Ju Congress Obama administration Trump
"christie parker" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"christie parker" Discussed on KCRW

"And having to shut that down. It's just devastating Sydney Prices co owner of the Noble Bird in Long Beach, she told KBC that this week's decision by the L. A County Board of Supervisors will have an immediate impact. On her employees during the holiday season. Having to tell us some of our teammates, we won't have hours for them, or we simply don't know what the future holds, is crushing. Made a sharp rise in Corona virus infections that divided L. A County Board of Supervisors voted 3 to 2 this week to adopt a recommendation by health officials to halt on site dining for three weeks. The judge also turned away an effort by an industry trade group to suspend the order, Health officials say In person dining is risky because restaurant patrons remove their masks and often spend extended amounts of time with people from outside their household. The restaurant owners say they're being singled out. They say there's no evidence linking their operations to rise in case numbers. Mark Ridley Thomas received a warm send off from his colleagues during his final meeting. As a member of the L. A County Board of Supervisors. Ridley Thomas is termed out after serving for a dozen years on the board, but he isn't going far. He was just elected to a seat on the L. A City council representing Crenshaw, Mid city and Korea Town Supervisor Ridley Thomas, the second district And Los Angeles County as a whole. Stronger because of your service that supervisor Katherine Bargor, who prays Ridley Thomas for his work on behalf of unhealthy people and those with mental illness. The soups announced this week that the Plaza entryway at the L. A Natural History museum is being renamed in honor of Ridley Thomas. Here's supervisor Sheila Cule. It is really appropriate that every Young and old person walking through that entryway. I will say to themselves. Oh, yes. Mark Ridley Thomas. What a wonderful man or Martin really timeless. I wonder who that was. I'm going to Google him and learn a lot about all that you have done. Ridley Thomas has served as an elected official for almost three decades on the L, A City Council and the state Legislature and the Board of Supervisors Because this will be his second stint on the City Council. He's limited to a single four year term. Support for NPR comes from C three c three dot Ai software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence and enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Maurizi three dot ai And from Tia A. Who believes their clients. Passion will never run out. Nor will t I A s commitment to not only get clients to retirement, but through it. Tia dot org's slash never run out. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Many businesses did not make it to this black Friday. Maybe you've seen them shuttered in your neighborhood. But those that have endured until now, maybe in position for a big holiday shopping season, though it is definitely not safe to push your way into a crowded store just about anything. Can be delivered to your door. If it's a gift. Hopefully that is done discreetly. NPR retail correspondent Lena's Eliot is covering the story for us. Good morning. Good morning. What do retailers expect? Big picture across the board. All surveys there, suggesting the majority of Americans plan to shop in store or online this week or next and forecast suggest we're actually in for a record setting holiday shopping season. Just to address. I always get this question about black Friday is a dead and every year I come here and if you like a declared dead and then get a bunch of annoyed messages from people who love it, and I just want to say it's just no longer that obsession with this one single day of the year. You may have heard these ads weeks ago. This year. Wal Mart turned black Friday into deals for days starting Saturday, November 7 This'd year Target has Black Friday deals all November. Actually, sales began as far back as October in some cases, so a lot of people have already started their holiday shopping and don't intend to stop. OK, so we should really think of it is black Fridays or blacks and many days sales holiday. OK, this is mainly happening online for safety reasons, I assume By far the vast majority do say they plan to shop online on their phone screens. Because a big thing that happened this year we got a lot of people becoming online converts for the first time, especially thinking things like Grocery, health and beauty products stuff that we used to have to see first. Well, here's Vivek India, who tracks online shopping at Adobe Digital insights about 31% of consumers reporting that they rarely shopped online or had never shopped online before, and the covert pandemic was essentially a forcing function. And when you think about physical stores every year, the International Council of Shopping Centers does a shopper survey and this year even this group is reporting a big drop in the number of people who say they plan to physically go shopping. But in that survey, almost two thirds of respondents said they did plan to go shop at a physical store. It's a lot of people And so stores are adjusting. You know, they're requiring masks. They're counting customers again to limit crowds, and they're drawing attention to the cleaning measures. Which this is like, unglamorous thing that stores usually like to distract from. Well, Now you've got sanitizers front and center, However, people shop What are they shopping for? Classic stuff. Clothes, Get guard stores, electronic smart TVs, home speakers, that sort of thing for years. We watch this shift toward experiences rather than things. Well this year we're back to things you know, until we can start jumping back into Massages or classes or whatnot. And especially, I'm talking things for the home where we're spending all this time. Now more holiday decorations to deck out the houses, books and crafts to occupy time. My favorite hot seller for the covert time is apparently air friars are big for all that comfort food. So many families are still struggling financially. We hear about that every day, they still seem to say they want to feel special. They want to celebrate, the national regular retail Federation predicts. On average happens, they're going to spend almost $1000 on gift food, decorations and other holiday things. Which is only a little bit less than last year, when the economy looked extremely different, Helene it's always a pleasure talking with you. Thanks. Thank you. NPR's Alina's Taliek. President elect Joe Biden wants to make civil rights a top priority in his administration advocates who follow the Justice Department say there is a lot of repair work to be done. Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson. A few months after Donald Trump became president, he delivered remarks about law enforcement that set the tone for civil rights. Former Justice Department prosecutor Christie Parker remembers. I said, Please don't be too nice. Like when you guys put somebody in the car and you're protecting their head. You know the way you put the hand off. Like Don't hit their head and they've just killed somebody Don't hit their head. I said you could take the hand away, okay? He essentially told them Go ahead and use excessive force. Don't be too nice to the people you arrest. Parker says That speech marked a major turnaround where I think we see Real fall down by this administration, in a purposeful one is in prosecutions of police officers who do their work, you know, out on the streets, it's not just cases against individual cops who break the law. Veterans of the Justice Department say there's been a retreat on another front. Investigating entire police departments for patterns or practices of discrimination. Jonathan Smith used to run that unit at the DOJ has been 70 investigations that were brought and 25 of those were brought during the Obama administration and one was brought during the Trump administration. That's 25 the Obama years one under Trump..

Ridley Thomas Mark Ridley Thomas L. A County Board of Superviso NPR News NPR Justice Department Supervisor Ridley Thomas County Board of Supervisors Christie Parker International Council of Shopp supervisor Long Beach Steve Inskeep Google Obama David Greene Sydney Prices co
"christie parker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"christie parker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David Greene. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Many businesses did not make it to this black Friday. Maybe you've seen them shuttered in your neighborhood. But those that have endured until now, maybe in position for a big holiday shopping season, though it is definitely not safe to push your way into a crowded store just about anything. Can be delivered to your door. If it's a gift. Hopefully that is done discreetly. NPR retail correspondent Lena's Eliot is covering the story for us. Good morning. Good morning. What do retailers expect? Big picture across the board. All surveys there, suggesting the majority of Americans plan to shop in store or online this week or next and forecast suggest we're actually in for a record setting holiday shopping season. Just to address. I always get this question about black Friday is a dead and every year I come here and if you like a declared dead and then get a bunch of annoyed messages from people who love it, and I just want to say it's just no longer that obsession with this one single day of the year. You may have heard these ads weeks ago. This year. Wal Mart turned black Friday into deals for days starting Saturday, November 7th. This'd year Target has Black Friday deals all November. Actually, sales began as far back as October in some cases, so a lot of people have already started their holiday shopping and don't intend to stop. OK, so we should really think of it is black Fridays or blacks and many days Friday sales holiday. OK, this is mainly happening online for safety reasons, I assume By far the vast majority do say they plan to shop online on their phone screens. Because a big thing that happened this year we got a lot of people becoming online converts for the first time, especially thinking things like Grocery, health and beauty products stuff that we used to have to see first. Well, here's Vivek India, who tracks online shopping at Adobe Digital insights about 31% of consumers reporting that they rarely shopped online or had never shopped online before, and the covert pandemic was essentially a forcing function. And when you think about physical stores every year, the International Council of Shopping Centers does a shopper survey and this year even this group is reporting a big drop in the number of people who say they plan to physically go shopping. But in that survey, almost two thirds of respondents said they did plan to go shop at a physical store. It's a lot of people And so stores are adjusting. You know, they're requiring masks. They're counting customers again to limit crowds, and they're drawing attention to the cleaning measures. Which this is like, unglamorous thing that stores usually like to distract from. Well, Now you've got sanitizers front and center, However, people shop What are they shopping for? Classic stuff. Clothes, Get guard stores, electronics, smart TVs, home speakers, that sort of thing for years. We watch this shift toward experiences rather than things. Well this year we're back to things you know, until we can start jumping back into Massages or classes or whatnot. And especially, I'm talking things for the home where we're spending all this time. Now more holiday decorations to deck out the houses, books and crafts to occupy time. My favorite hot seller for the covert time is apparently air friars are big for, you know all that comfort food. So many families are still struggling financially. We hear about that every day, they still seem to say they want to feel special. They want to celebrate, the National Wrestling Retail Federation predicts. On average happens, they're going to spend almost $1000 on gift food, decorations and other holiday things. Which is only a little bit less than last year, when the economy looked extremely different, Helene it's always a pleasure talking with you. Thanks. Thank you. NPR's Alina's Taliek. President elect Joe Biden wants to make civil rights a top priority, and his administration advocates who follow the Justice Department say there is a lot of repair work to be done. Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson. A few months after Donald Trump became president, he delivered remarks about law enforcement that set the tone for civil rights. Former Justice Department prosecutor Christie Parker remembers. I said, Please don't be too nice. Like when you guys put somebody in the car and you're protecting their head. You know the way you put the hand off. Like Don't hit their head and they've just killed somebody Don't hit their head. I said you could take the hand away, okay? He essentially told them Go ahead and use excessive force. Don't be too nice to the people you arrest. Parker says That speech marked a major turnaround where I think we see A real fall down by this administration, in a purposeful one is in prosecutions of police officers who do their work, you know, out on the streets, it's not just cases against individual cops who break the law. Veterans of the Justice Department say there's been a retreat on another front. Investigating entire police departments for patterns or practices of discrimination. Jonathan Smith used to run that unit at the DOJ has been 70 investigations that were brought and 25 of those were brought during the Obama administration and one was brought during the Trump administration. That's 25 the Obama years one under Trump. Smith says states like Illinois, Colorado and Minnesota have tried to step in to police the police, but it's very different than the kind of resource is an authority that country, the United States Department of Justice and I don't think it's a substitute. Trump's first attorney general, Jeff Sessions, viewed state and local law enforcement as partners. He said Federal investigations would demoralize police in one of his last acts in office. Sessions issued a memo removing a key tool from civil rights enforcers. His memo made it nearly impossible to use court enforced consent decrees to help oversee police forces. Benita Gupta ran the civil rights division in the Obama years. That memo should be withdrawn Day One of this new administration, Gupta says. The country is in a different place now when it comes to police oversight. I think there is no question that George Floyd's murderer Minneapolis this summer really forced a crucial reckoning around race in public safety, Biden says there has to.

Justice Department Donald Trump Obama Joe Biden Steve Inskeep International Council of Shopp Christie Parker Jonathan Smith David Greene NPR Benita Gupta president Wal Mart United States Department of Ju George Floyd
"christie parker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"christie parker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene. And I'm Steve Inskeep. Many businesses did not make it to this black Friday. Maybe you've seen them shuttered in your neighborhood. But those that have endured until now, maybe in position for a big holiday shopping season, though it is definitely not safe to push your way into a crowded store just about anything. Can be delivered to your door. If it's a gift. Hopefully that is done discreetly. NPR retail correspondent Lena's Eliot is covering the story for us. Good morning. Good morning. What do retailers expect? Big picture across the board. All surveys there, suggesting the majority of Americans plan to shop in store or online this week or next and forecast suggest we're actually in for a record setting holiday shopping season. Just to address. I always get this question about black Friday is a dead and every year I come here and if you like a declared dead and then get a bunch of annoyed messages from people who love it, and I just want to say it's just no longer that obsession with this one single day of the year. You may have heard these ads weeks ago. This year. Wal Mart turned black Friday into deals for days starting Saturday, November 7 This'd year Target has Black Friday deals all November. Actually, sales began as far back as October in some cases, so a lot of people have already started their holiday shopping and don't intend to stop. OK, so we should really think of it is black Fridays or blacks and many days sales holiday. OK, this is mainly happening online for safety reasons, I assume By far the vast majority do say they plan to shop online on their phone screens. Because a big thing that happened this year we got a lot of people becoming online converts for the first time, especially thinking things like Grocery, health and beauty products stuff that we used to have to see first. Well, here's Vivek India, who tracks online shopping at Adobe Digital insights about 31% of consumers reporting that they rarely shopped online or have never shopped online before, and the covert pandemic was essentially a forcing function. And what do you think about physical stores Every year, the International Council of Shopping Centers does a shopper survey and this year even this group is reporting a big drop in the number of people who say they plan to physically go shopping. But in that survey, almost two thirds of respondents said they did plan to go shop at a physical store. It's a lot of people And so stores are adjusting. You know, they're requiring masks. They're counting customers again to limit crowds, and they're drawing attention to the cleaning measures. Which this is like, unglamorous thing that stores usually like to distract from. Well, Now you've got sanitizers front and center, However, people shop What are they shopping for? Classic stuff. Clothes, Get guard stores, electronics, smart TVs, home speakers, that sort of thing for years. We watch this shift toward experiences rather than things. Well this year we're back to things you know, until we can start jumping back into Massages or classes or whatnot. And especially, I'm talking things for the home where we're spending all this time. Now more holiday decorations to deck out the houses, books and crafts to occupy time. My favorite hot seller for the covert time is apparently air friars are big for, you know all that comfort food. So many families are still struggling financially. We hear about that every day, they still seem to say they want to feel special. They want to celebrate, the national regular retail Federation predicts. On average happens, they're going to spend almost $1000 on gift food, decorations and other holiday things. Which is only a little bit less than last year, when the economy looked extremely different, Helene it's always a pleasure talking with you. Thanks. Thank you. NPR's Alina Cellular. President elect Joe Biden wants to make civil rights a top priority in his administration advocates who follow the Justice Department say there is a lot of repair work to be done. Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson. A few months after Donald Trump became president, he delivered remarks about law enforcement that set the tone for civil rights. Former Justice Department prosecutor Christie Parker remembers. I said, Please don't be too nice. Like when you guys put somebody in the car and you're protecting their head. You know the way you put their hand off. Like Don't hit their head and they've just killed somebody Don't hit their head. I said you could take the hand away, okay? He essentially told them Go ahead and use excessive force. Don't be too nice to the people you arrest. Parker says That speech marked a major turnaround where I think we see Real fall down by this administration, in a purposeful one is in prosecutions of police officers who do their work, you know, out on the streets, it's not just cases against individual cops who break the law. Veterans of the Justice Department say there's been a retreat on another front. Investigating entire police departments for patterns or practices of discrimination. Jonathan Smith used to run that unit at the DOJ has been 70 investigations that were brought and 25 of those were brought during the Obama administration and one was brought during the Trump Administration. That's 25 in the Obama years, one under Trump Smith says states like Illinois, Colorado and Minnesota have tried to step in to police the police, but it's very different than the kind of resource is an authority that comes from the United States Department of Justice. And I don't think it's a substitute. Trump's first attorney general, Jeff Sessions viewed state and local law enforcement as partners. He said federal investigations would demoralize police..

Justice Department NPR News Donald Trump NPR Christie Parker International Council of Shopp Steve Inskeep David Greene president Trump Administration Wal Mart Jonathan Smith Obama Obama administration United States Department of Ju Vivek India
"christie parker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"christie parker" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm David Greene. Joe Biden is wasting no time getting ready for the White House. The president elect is preparing to announce more key staff positions after the holiday weekend. His transition aides now have clearance to work with members of the outgoing administration. Donald Trump, the departing president, still claims he won the election. But during this week, his actions and even some of his words Have been more in line with the reality that he lost. And we have NPR political correspondent. Asthma college with us this morning. Hi, Asma. Hi there. Okay. So Biden has already unveiled its foreign policy. National security teams. What? What is he turning to this week? Well. The big news of this week was that the General Services Administration told Joe Biden's team that that it could officially begin the transition process. So what this means is that he will likely begin to have his first in person National Security briefings next week. Hey, will likely begin receiving the president's daily brief on Monday. And, you know, typically, the incoming administration of the incoming president would receive classified intelligence briefings. Just so that they have a sense of you know what they're stepping into into the White House. But by didn't had not been receiving these classified briefings because of the delays in the transition process, you know, in terms of other key appointments we already know thanks to my colleague, Frank or Dona is is reporting that Biden is planning to nominate Janet Yellen as his Treasury secretary. She, of course, has plenty of experience navigating tough economic environment. But we'll get a fuller picture of the other people on Biden's economic team, and I'm really interested to see this in part, David because it's coming at a critical moment when you know millions of people are set to lose unemployment benefits at the end of the year, and there's this ongoing debate about additional covert relief. Yeah, a lot of important debate over over that issue, obviously important to so many Americans. So the president elect didn't make any public appearances over Thanksgiving itself, right? But he in the future First lady did put out an op ed. I mean, what message are they? Trying to convey now. They're really trying to focus on collective sacrifices that people are making and the importance of acknowledging that this is all happening against such a deadly pandemic. You know, they wrote in this op ed, and they also called Frontline workers, fire fighters and nurses yesterday to thank them to emphasize this idea of gratitude and recognition for people having this pared down Thanksgiving. It was a message akin to the one that he delivered on Wednesday afternoon. He gave this Thanksgiving address to the nation and I will say it felt like a rather jarring contrast what we've seen and heard from the president lately, you know where the president I think has sounded somewhat divisive and frankly kind of petty. At times. Biden is trying to sound presidential delivering this message of reconciliation, unity and resolve. In the face of a pandemic, with record numbers of cases and increasing numbers of death. 260,000 Americans in county Divided US. Anger this Set us against one No, the country's gone where you'd fight. We need to remember. We're war with the virus. Not with one another, not with each other. You know, David, he talked about how hard it is for families to forego traditional Thanksgiving celebrations, but that it's what's needed in this moment. Well, then we also did hear from President Trump. I mean, talking reporters for the first time since the elections sounds like what not a concession but may be getting closer to accepting reality. That's right. You know, for the first time President Trump explicitly did say that he will leave the White House if the electoral college votes for Joe Biden. Certainly will. Certainly I will. And you know that. But I think that there will be a lot of things happening between now in the 20th of January. A lot of things. And you know, he didn't say what those lot of things were. But I will say that he continues to push his legal team continues to push these baseless allegations of voter fraud. There really is no root for him to overturn the election results. So at this point, you know, it feels largely like rhetoric at nothing that's going to actually be able to change the outcome. All right. NPR's Asma followed asthma. Thank you so much. You're welcome. Right now, In terms of what President elect Biden is going to focus on once he is in office, he's made it pretty clear that protecting civil rights is gonna be a big priority, and civil rights activists say he has some work to do. Resident. Trump set the tone early in his administration. When he relayed this message to law enforcement. I said, Please don't be too nice. Like when you guys put somebody in the car and you're protecting their head. You know the way you put the hand off. Like Don't hit their head and they've just killed somebody Don't hit their head. I said you could take the hand away, okay? The president also limited options for police oversight. Let's bring in NPR's Carrie Johnson to look ahead with us to abide administration and talk about Donald Trump's legacy when it comes to civil rights. Good morning, Carrie. Good morning, David. I know you've been talking to people in the justice community, asking them about what this president's legacy is, as we look back of the last four years. I put that question to Christie Parker, a former Justice Department prosecutor. Here's how she responded. Where I think we see a real fall down by this administration, in a purposeful one is in prosecutions of police officers who do their work out on the streets. Sources are telling me it's not just cases against individual cops who break the law. Justice Department veterans say there's been a retreat on another front that's investigating entire police departments for patterns or practice of discrimination. Jonathan Smith used to run that unit at DOJ. Here's what he told me. There's been 70 investigations that were brought and 25 of those were brought during the Obama administration and one was brought during the Trump administration. Just to underscore 25 in the Obama years, one under Trump. Yeah, well, Well, I mean, largely if we look at this, what was it mostly a change in tone when it comes to policing America, or there are their actual policies that are now in place from President Trump that we're not there before. Actual policies. David Trump's first attorney general Jeff Sessions, you'd state and local law enforcement as partners. He said Federal investigations would just demoralized police and in one of his last acts in office sessions issued a memo removing a key tool from civil rights enforcers. That memo made it nearly impossible to use court enforced consent decrees to help oversee the police. Benita Gupta ran civil rights in the Obama years, and she says that memo should be withdrawn on day one of the Biden administration. This country, she says, is a very different place as far as police oversight now. I think there is no question that George Floyd's murderer Minneapolis this summer really forced a crucial reckoning around race in public safety. Okay, So what Some are calling a crucial reckoning Moment. Carrie. So what? How different will things be under a President Biden, Biden says there has to be some accountability. He wants to bring police and civil rights groups into the White House next year to talk about the issues in civil rights advocates tell me the election has highlighted another big action item that's doing more to protect voters. And double. The Legal Defense and Educational Fund says the Justice Department could actually bring more cases as it did in the Obama years to protect voters against discriminatory policing and changes. But that, of course, was reversed under President Trump. You know, the civil rights division was created to protect vulnerable communities in civil rights activists say it needs to get back on that mission under President elect Joe Biden. NPR's Carrie Johnson. Carrie, Thanks as always, my pleasure. Well, if you look.

president Joe Biden President Trump White House David Greene Carrie Johnson NPR NPR News Obama Biden administration General Services Administratio Steve Inskeep Justice Department Asthma Trump Obama administration Legal Defense and Educational
"christie parker" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:25 min | 2 years ago

"christie parker" Discussed on KGO 810

"Home simply say Alexa Lee KGO eight ten once again here's John Rothman okay you know that in going through this we leave out a lot of news but I've got to do this very quickly all wait I've got a one of the winners of the ticket or for Charlie is Jane Mayer from Menlo Park change congratulations and we'll give away another pair of which only check at the tickets on Thursday and then we'll do a double dose on Friday because I'm not here tomorrow because of cal basketball hello I got an email with tongue in cheek they were canceled L. basketball because array the answer is no okay so I want to just let you know that to the president did suffer a bloated day a federal judge in taxes blocked the trump administration from using billions of dollars in Pentagon funds for the construction of the border wall judge David Brioni I think that's how you spell is proud to be our I owe any S. real I'm not sure anyway he was a Clinton nominee just so you know that but he ruled today that the administration cannot use military construction funds to build additional barriers on the southern border twenty to know that it's it's a point of great debate and discussion and in the ruling the judge said the president's emergency proclamation was a blatant attempt to grab power from Congress today's order affirms that the president is not a king and that our courts are willing to check him when he overstepped his bounds very interesting about with those of the words by way of Christie Parker council for protector microcytic and the judge by the way of a firm this and the lawsuit just so you know it was bought by el Paso county taxes and border network for human rights their argument the president of the United States overstepped his authority a when he issued a national emergency declaration to gain access to additional funds for the border wall despite receiving of one point three seven five billion from Congress but let me let me just be clear on this that part of the argument that will take place in the impeachment process has to do with the president overstepping his authority now the only thing that can be raised in the trial are the articles of impeachment all right let's get to your calls let's go to Dave calling from Cupertino Dave welcome to KGO it John on thanks does your hearing other call and I want to just say so increase about inspector general but I'm not a little tall I always but like it Chavez said something when he said do me a favor if he had said could you help our exports to Ukraine or let our naval ships out some more Clark calls you know all of us as Americans would say Hey he's he's acting on behalf of all of us but but when he says you know look at Joe Biden he's he's acting out yeah storm cell so that that's what is if you read the first article that's what the first article says and it mentions the bidens by name pure and simple yeah and and then on the inspector general Michael for which she I die on my commute home from work clear not I listen to us on Hannity and so the last year or perhaps more she's been pounding the table on how this IG report was going to you know show what a witch hunt this was eccentric center and and in that process she would say Michael Horowitz is a stand up guy very credible he can get to the bottom of this excel or a and now that the reports come out and has said you know there's no political bias no improper motives I eat you know anytime you talk to a a trump supporter most alarm do listen to Sean Hannity and and and socks ET you know I would suggest asking Hey it's the last year at least in saying this guy is going to deliver the goods and and it and that is a very credible and you know trucks were the guy you know explain that to me because it seems to me you know you can't have a two way isn't but yeah I I I realize they're trying to move the goalposts again by saying okay it's the term report now it's not the whole no no you're right I tell you I I listen to John bachelor and I listen to Sean Hannity on my way home I alternate because there's a commercial break between the two and I can tell you up I listen to Hannity and I listen to John bachelor to learn the other side every time John batch for has Devin newness on every time Sean Hannity defends the president I learned the other arguments now none of those arguments have convinced me but I listen to them because that way when people call here I'm able to be familiar with what the arguments are on the other side and I think it's critical that's why when the Republicans issued their report but a hundred page report all up on this whole question I read that report I was able to talk about it intelligently and then the Democrats issue there are three hundred and some odd page report I want to point counterpoint and I think that's what's important yeah I read the the Republican report and you know this use the word trump has a deep seated you know why history about destruction thing in your train and I I noticed that in here's a camera that he talked to the Yalta economic summit yes and then eight I think this September two thousand sixteen and the as far as I could tell the newspaper are you never brought up corruption and he just went on about how great a country you train is so I I found you know I'm like use it too many of those listings in that report very you know Sir contrived and hard to hard to well you know I'm willing to read it to understand it now what's going to happen in the Senate trial is we're going to hear clear arguments and that's what I hope and when I say and when I talk to rob my friend rob from Richmond earlier who would like a narrow trial that's where he and I differ I agree with the president let it all come out and as far as the bidens are concerned if the bidens did something wrong what the justice department indict them I don't want all this is this nonsense of going back and forth I want to know the truth and I think knowing the truth it'll make the trial much more interesting if the partisan trial well if the Republicans on reflex simply defend the president and the Democrats simply attacked the president we're not gonna learn very much and and no minds will really be changed and that would be too bad yeah all right thank you Michael emails a John your print one of your previous callers gave a pro trump argument simply by stating the policies arguments were invalid due to bias let me plead with your listeners to judge the message and not disregard the argument simply because of the messenger such is an ad hominem attack just simply disregard any statements because one is a Democrat or Republican is foolish reasoning Michael you're right it is foolish reasoning four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten when we come back from the break I will take as many of you as can be fit him so I'm John Rothman four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten and by the way what did you think of a federal judge ruling the use of billions of dollars in Pentagon funds to build border walls to be wrong I think the judges right four one five eight zero eight zero eight ten John Rothman right here on.

Alexa Lee KGO John Rothman
"christie parker" Discussed on The Documentary Life

The Documentary Life

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"christie parker" Discussed on The Documentary Life

"Three life a show that sets out to inspire and inform you on how to best live and lead your own documentary life. I'm your host Christie Parkers and this this is episode number one hundred nineteen and it is brought to you by Barong films proud creators of documentary film the Documentary Life Podcast and the documentary the Academy our industry changing a-to-z documentary filmmaking program that will transform you into the documentary filmmaker that you've always wanted to be find out more worth the documentary life dot Com Slash Academy over the past five weeks. I've been head down in in completely immersed in the edit of our current doc film. It's probably the most amount of consecutive days that to this point I've been able to dedicate to strictly editing on the film. Of course I've had two episodes of the podcast and all the comes with that but other than this. It's been all about editing editing editing. Which of course makes me even happier? That will be welcoming veteran. UK Film and TV editor Patty Bird back to the program we get to our industry conversation segment Sigmund. I'm an editor by trade and so I'm always eager to have a bit of conversation on the topic. In fact I thought as a precursor to our conversation with Patty Ready. I thought that I might take a moment and share some of my own editing tips with you you see recently. I've been getting some emails asking for a segment on best practices his for starting on an edit. And you know what I totally get that the beginning of edit is always the most daunting part you're essentially taking sometimes times over a hundred hours of footage. The first feature doc I ever edited was over two hundred forty hours footage. And you're tempting to distill this down to a sixty sixty minute program for TV or ninety minutes for a feature doc even on journey to Katmandu which was only thirty. Five minute film. I had to go through thirty. Plus plus hours of footage so having a few tips on getting started on the editor of your doc seemed like a good idea for today's show so with that let's get started on on five tips to start editing. Your dock number one set up. Your infrastructure is soon as possible the infrastructure of your you're edit begins in the infrastructure of your drive firstly. Make sure you have a drive. That has only dedicated to your film that means no other worker occur films or anything else goes on that drive the drive. Is your film in fact you should probably name your drive..

"christie parker" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"christie parker" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Use of Pentagon funding for a border wall one month after the Supreme Court ruled in trump's favor a judge heard arguments today in el Paso Texas over a lawsuit filed by the local county government then an immigrant advocacy group the border network for human rights US district judge David Brioni didn't immediately rule on a request for a preliminary injunction Christie Parker a lawyer for the legal route protect democracy project says the lawsuit makes broader arguments than the case presented to the US Supreme Court the justice department argues trump's declaration of a national emergency to fund of the Wall cannot be reviewed by any judge crews in Arizona and New Mexico are currently building sections of barriers the body of a forty one year old Iraqi man who died in Baghdad after being deported from the U. S. for committing multiple crimes is being returned to the Detroit area for burial democratic representative and eleven of Michigan announced today Jimmy alto's body was in transit was expected to arrive tomorrow I'll download who came to the U. S. as an infant and lived in the Detroit area his most of his life was deported in June Levin says Aldo's would had diabetes as well as schizophrenia and other mental health issues he spoke no Arabic and had no family in a rock when he was deported a private funeral is planned for next week Levin says that child the in community foundation is covering the cost of repatriating al does body he was among hundreds of Iraqi nationals who arrested during enforcement deportation orders you are.

New Mexico Jimmy alto Detroit Levin diabetes Aldo Michigan representative Baghdad Pentagon Arizona US Supreme Court Christie Parker David Brioni el Paso Texas trump Supreme Court
"christie parker" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:20 min | 3 years ago

"christie parker" Discussed on KCRW

"We decided to hold a walkout to protests riots, you so four-star patrician in cases of harassment and discrimination, which they recently filed litigation. But this is also meant as the beginning of the conversation. Not the end we gave them a time line and said, hey, you better make a change on that by may sixteenth or we're going to come back again. That's right, games employees. Jeff Monaghan speaking with case W, hundreds of workers at the video game company here in Santa Monica staged a walkout yesterday to protest the company's policy on force arbitration. We're gonna talk about that coming up. I though more than six hundred more than six hundred former federal prosecutors signed a statement stating that Donald Trump would have been charged with obstruction. If he weren't the president of the United States, they say that the actions described in the Muller reports satisfy all the elements for an obstruction charge the prosecutor served under both Republican and democratic administrations. Joining us now is one of the people who signed that letter Christie Parker, she's at protected democracy. And nonpartisan nonprofit that published the statement and she's a prosecutor in the department of Justice nearly twenty years under four administrations Republican. Democratic alike. Hi there. Hello. All right. What is the purpose of the statement? The purpose of this statement is to make it clear to the public on behalf of the group of federal prosecutors who have collectively hundreds of years of experience investigating and prosecuting in charging obstruction of Justice allegation that the conduct alleged in the Muller report does make out conduct that would be chargeable and indictable as obstruction of Justice. Okay. Well, let's I just wanna play a little tape of of William bar explaining why he did not pursue an obstruction charge. He basically said Trump ultimately took no action that deprived Robert Muller of documents or witnesses that he needed to finish his investigation. And here he is at the Senate hearing last week speaking with Senator Dianne Feinstein, you still have a situation where a president essentially tries to change. The lawyers account in order to prevent further criticism of himself. Well, that's not a crime. So you can in this situation instruct someone to lie. Nobody has to well to be obstruction of Justice. The lie has to be tied to impairing the evidence in particular proceeding. Okay. So he's saying basically, no evidence was impaired. And there was not an underlying crime. You disagree? I would I would say to that is that attorney general just fundamentally this understands the statutes that govern obstruction of Justice, the subject of an obstruction investigation does not have to actually have committed an underlying crime in order to be chargeable. First of all and the Senate also does not have to actually be successful in preventing the communication of evidence or destroying evidence or persuading another evidence, not another witness not to testify obstruction happens and his chargeable crime merely when a person attempts to do to do those things in connection with a pending investigation. So what do you think Robert Muller? Why didn't he state it very clearly in the four hundred forty some odd page. Ages that this was a crime and that this was obstruction of Justice. I think it would be very interesting to hear from Robert Mueller himself to hear him. Explain exactly what he was thinking. Why he did what he did. But I think it is apparent from the report and from the constraints that special counsel Mueller with operating under that he was proceeding from the premise that he was not going to be permitted to indict sitting president. And the reason for that is there's a department of Justice policy that has existed for a long time that prohibits indicting a sitting president. So the way he went about reviewing the aided was someone who didn't have what every other prosecutor has which is the ability at the end of the day to charge. The case if the case is chargeable. So what he did? Instead was lay out the evidence in a very clear way in connection to the elements of various, obstruction of Justice statutes. And really leave a roadmap for other readers. And here, I think the key reader. He had in mind was congress would does have the ability to do something about the president's at -struction to leave a roadmap for Denver to make the ultimate conclusion about what to do. Right. And at least on the house side that seems to be where the Democrats are headed. They're not letting this go, even though Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is saying it's over it's finished. So what do you think is going to happen next to just today? We have this tug of war over Don Mcgann handing over documents subpoenaed by the Democrats, former White House counsel, also one of the most if not the most numerous sighted person in the mullahs report when it comes to this obstruction charge or obstruction allegation. There was all of this tug of war over handing of these documents Mcgann finally saying, no, I can't do that. I'm not gonna do that. Do you think that the White House? Is correct in not handing over these documents that they are subject to executive privilege. No, I go, and I believe the White House is waived executive privilege over virtually every aspect of the mole report in there, certainly should be no executive privilege over conduct that amount to the commission of a crime by the president of the United States. And while I don't know exactly what will happen next what I hope will happen next. And and certainly one of the things that I was hopeful of when I is a former prosecutor signed displeasure is that congress will take it upon themselves to call in the witnesses that special counsel molar interviewed for the purpose of constructing his report, and that they will interview those witnesses so the public can here. And so the public can understand exactly what happened here and exactly why he attorney general is wrong. And why it does indeed constitute obstruction of Justice? So do you expect Don Mcgann to? Testify publicly or at least behind closed doors in front of the committee. Well, if I were a member of the house of representatives, I would certainly seek to have him come in and testify. I do expect it there is going to be a very lengthy battle over whether or not he will actually be permitted to do. So that might involve going to court, but I I certainly hope that that the public will have the opportunity to hear from the former White House counsel because he's obviously a very key figure in the behavior that the president of the United States engaged in that any other American would be charged with a crime for engaging in and do, you know, William bar? Have you worked with him at all professionally? I do not I do not personally know, it's your bar. Certainly is a long time employee of the department of Justice is a longtime civil servant. I knew who he was. But I never met him myself. And he had as far as I understand a pretty good reputation. What do you think of him now? I think he did have a reputation as many other public servants appointees to the department of Justice have had as an 'institutionalised as someone who understood the nature of the institution and the nature of the position that an attorney general was supposed to occupy my opinion of him. Now is unfortunately, governed by the way that he has behaved in this most crucial and important situation. He's been charged with dealing with which is handling the turning over of the Muller report to the public. He has not engaged in that as to my mind, the American people's lawyer as the Justice Department's chief official and what he has done instead of attempt to act as a Representative of an even an attorney for the president of the United States states, which is quite simply not. Not the role of the attorney general of the United States Christie Parker council at protect democracy and a former federal prosecutor one of the signatories to that letter six hundred plus federal prosecutors signing that letter saying the president obstructed Justice. Thank.

president Justice Department Robert Muller United States prosecutor attorney Senate department of Justice Don Mcgann Donald Trump Robert Mueller Christie Parker White House special counsel congress harassment Santa Monica
"christie parker" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:55 min | 3 years ago

"christie parker" Discussed on KCRW

"Case W, hundreds of workers at the video game company here in Santa Monica staged a walkout yesterday to protest the company's policy on force arbitration. We're gonna talk about that coming up. I more than six hundred more than six hundred former federal prosecutors signed a statement stating that Donald Trump would have been charged with obstruction. If he weren't the president of the United States, they say that the actions described in the report satisfy all the elements for an obstruction charge prosecutor served under both Republican and democratic administrations. Joining us now is one of the people. Who signed that letter Christie Parker? She's at protect democracy and nonpartisan nonprofit that publish the statement. And she a prosecutor in the department of Justice nearly twenty years under four administrations, Republican and democratic alike. Hi there. Hello. All right. What is the purpose of the statement? The purpose of this statement is to make it clear to the public on behalf of a group of federal prosecutors who have collectively hundreds of years of experience investigating and prosecuting and charging obstruction of Justice allegations that the conduct alleged in the molar report does make out conduct that would be chargeable and indictable as obstruction of Justice. Okay. Well, let's just wanna play a little tape of of William bar explaining why he did not pursue an obstruction charge. He basically said Trump ultimately took no action that deprived Robert Muller of documents or witnesses that he needed to finish his investigation. And here he is at the Senate hearing last week speaking with Senator Dianne Feinstein, you still have a situation where a president essentially tries to change. The lawyers account in order to prevent further criticism of himself. That's not a crime. So you can in this situation instruct someone to lie has to well to be obstruction of Justice. The lie has to be tied to impairing the evidence in particular proceeding. Okay. So he's saying basically, no evidence was impaired. And there was not an underlying crime. You disagree? I what I would say to that. Is that attorney general just fundamentally this understands the statutes that govern obstruction of Justice, the subject of obstruction investigation does not have to actually have committed an underlying crime in order to be chargeable? First of all and the subject also does not have to actually be successful in preventing the communication of evidence or destroying evidence or persuading another evidence, not another witness not to testify obstruction happens and is chargeable crime merely when a person attempts to do to do those things in connection with a pending investigation. So what do you think Robert Muller? Why didn't he state it very clearly in the four hundred forty some odd page. Ages that this was a crime and that this was obstruction of Justice. I think it would be very interesting to hear from Robert Muller himself to hear him. Explain exactly what he was thinking. Why he did what he did. But I think it is apparent from the report and from the constraints that special counsel Muller operating under that he was proceeding from the premise that he was not going to be permitted to indict sitting president. And the reason for that is there's a department of Justice policy that has existed for a long time that prohibits indicting a sitting president. So the way he went about reviewing the was someone who didn't have what every other prosecutor has which is the ability at the end of today to charge the case if the case is chargeable. So what he did? Instead was laid out the evidence in a very clear way in connection to the elements of various obstruction of Justice statutes. And really leave a roadmap for other readers. And here, I think the key reader. He had in mind was congress, which does have the ability to do something about the president's at Struk Shen to leave a roadmap for them to make the ultimate conclusion about what to do, right? At least on the house side that seems to be where the Democrats are headed. They're not letting this go, even though Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell is saying it's over it's finished. So what do you think is going to happen next to just today? We have this tug of war over Don Mcgann handing over documents appeared by the Democrats, former White House counsel, also one of the most if not the most numerous sighted person in the Muller report when it comes to this obstruction charge or obstruction allegation. There was all of this tug of war over of these documents Mcgann finally saying, no, I can't do that. I'm not gonna do that. Do you think that the White House? Is correct in not handing over these documents that they are subject to executive privilege. No, I believe the White House is waves executive privilege over virtually every aspect of the mole report, and they're certainly should be no executive privilege over conduct that amount to the commission of a crime by the president of the United States. And while I don't know exactly what will happen next what I hope will happen next. And and certainly one of the things that I was hopeful of when I as a former prosecutor signed this letter is that congress will take it upon themselves to call in the witnesses that special counsel molar interviewed for the purpose of constructing his report, and that they will interview those witnesses so that the public can here. And so the public and understand exactly what happened here. Exactly why he attorney general is wrong. And why it doesn't feed constitute obstruction of Justice? So do you expect Don Mcgann too? Testify publicly or at least behind closed doors in front of the committee. Well, if I were a member of the house of representatives, I would certainly seek to have him come in and testify, you expect it there is going to be a very lengthy battle over whether or not he will actually be permitted to do. So that might involve going to court, but I certainly hope that that the public will have the opportunity to hear from the former White House counsel because he's obviously a very key figure in the behavior that the president of the United States engaged in that any other American would be charged with a crime for engaging in and do, you know, William bar? Have you worked with him at all professionally? I do not I do not personally. No, MR bar, certainly is a long time employee of the department of Justice is a longtime civil servant. I knew he was but I never met him myself. And he had as far as I understand a pretty good reputation. What do you think of him now? I think he did have a reputation as many other public servants appointees to the department of Justice have had as an 'institutionalised as someone who understood the nature of the institution and the nature of the position that an attorney general was supposed to occupy my opinion of him. Now is unfortunately, governed by the way that he has behaved in this most crucial and important situation. He's been charged with dealing with which is handling the turning over of the Muller report to the public. He has not engaged in that as to my mind, the American people's lawyer as the Justice Department's chief official and what he has done instead attempt to act as a Representative of even an attorney for the president of United States states, which is quite simply not. Not the role of the attorney general of the United States Christie Parker council at protect democracy and a former federal prosecutor one of the signatories to that letter six hundred plus federal prosecutors signing that letter saying the president obstructed Justice. Thank.

president Robert Muller department of Justice prosecutor United States Justice Department attorney White House Don Mcgann Donald Trump Christie Parker Senate Santa Monica special counsel William bar congress