17 Burst results for "Christie Evans"

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:40 min | Last week

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"We need a strong democratic European federation with a stronger parliament as it is just now. We need the European army. So we have a lot to do for the next year. So where is your bad today? With yet another war raging on its soil has a commonly closer to the ideal of international fraternity, advocated by Gunther of collegiate. Dieter schlenker. As an archivist and as a director, particularly of the historical archives of the European Union, obviously the European integration, it's not a linear process. We have seen so many different crises either internally or externally, certainly there are always periods when the unity is stronger, very often, unfortunately, under threats, but it's always difficult to achieve and the very quickly there is the tendency to say me first instead of solidarity, principle on which the European Union is founded. For Monaco in Vienna, I'm Alexei korolev. Thank you very much, Alexei. And that's all for this edition of the briefing. It was produced by harissa James, our research war Simpson bogo and our studio manager was Christie Evans. The briefing is back tomorrow at the same time midday here in London, 7 a.m. in Washington, D.C., but the Monaco daily will be here with much more news and analysis already as 1800 London time today that at 10 a.m. in San Francisco midnight if you happen to be in Bangkok, I am Marcos hippie, goodbye, and thanks for listening..

democratic European federation European army Dieter schlenker European Union Gunther Alexei korolev harissa James Simpson bogo Christie Evans Alexei Monaco Vienna Monaco daily London D.C. Washington San Francisco Bangkok
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:47 min | 3 months ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"On today's program, think of any major band or musician over the last few decades and almost all of them can trace their roots back to playing their first gigs in a small pub or club. It's where they cut their teeth, throwing out their sound and winning their first audiences. Arguably, it was these venues that suffered the most during the pandemic as what modest incomes they did have were wiped out. Well, this week, the spotlight shines right back on them. And joining me now from Huddersfield is sybil bell. The founder of independent venue week, good morning sibyl. Good morning and how are you? Very well. Thank you. And delighted to hear about independent venue week. What's it all about? It's really a chance to shine a spotlight and celebrate the people and the venues all around the country that really give artists and crew their first chance to be to build a career in the music industry. These spaces take all the risks with bands that perhaps people haven't really heard of, providing a really vital, vitally important service to their community in terms of bringing arts and culture. So it's a really great chance to give a stage to the people that give stages to the artists. Indeed, just explain to us just how important places like these are when it comes to bringing new voices and new sounds to the world. Well, they're absolutely are because if you look at if you look if you work backwards and look at artists that are headlining, stadiums or arenas or even festivals. Any artist worth their salt has started out in a grassroots music venue. It's so important to learn your craft somewhere safe, where the venue owners and operators understand that. They understand that they're not always going to get packed venues as bands just start out. They understand that the artists are going to make mistakes. It's like everything in life making mistakes is really important. It's just about how you do it and how you deal with those mistakes and how you build on it. And these grassroots music venues are such a vital part of that. And it's not just about the artist that's on stage. It's also about people wanting to work behind the scenes, the crew, the tour managers. And it really is a melting pot of trial and error, exciting music and really learning your craft. And for communities all around the country, those communities that do have venues, there is some way for people to go to discover new music that's not on a screen that's not on television or your phone. And it's just a really great chance. It's almost like real life social media before we had social media. This is what people did. They went out. They went to a venue and it's much more than just about the music you see what people are wearing, you look at the artwork on the walls. You immerse yourself in a local subculture really. And without that, I don't really really understand how we would continue to be able to have a thriving music industry. Tell us a little bit about how hard you've been hit with the pandemic. Or rather, let's focus on the recovery because at the moment we still have tours and gigs being canceled at the last minute because I will run the band has got COVID or that the capacity is only ever half full. I mean, how much help do independent venues need at the moment? Well, it's been the toughest periods of pretty much everybody as well. It's in the toughest period for them. But I think what COVID really did demonstrate is how much of the creative industries and music especially is built around freelancers and people on project cycles. A lot of people that work in venues are freelance, or they're part time, they have other jobs. A lot of art is most artists, if not all artists, and they first start out, have other jobs. And when you can't play or perform or work in a venue, that's an income stream taken away straight away from you. And the venues themselves very often are buildings that are least not many people own there, they knew some do but make most don't. And depending on who your landlord is, you know, you face the last 18 18 to 24 months in very precarious position. And arts cancel England and DCMS really did pull all the stops out to provide support. But I think in this latest round of ongoing restrictions where things haven't been very clear cut, it's been much harder for venues to keep going because some shows that were due to happening spring 2020 are on their fourth reschedule if you can imagine. So people are working incredibly hard behind the scenes to try and find places for these artists to play in dates for them to play and then that time coming round and somebody in that either in the artist's group or the crew or the venue has got COVID and things have to be curtailed. So it's been particularly tricky. I think for us with independent and unique this year, we really felt that we might be able to have some in person shows last year we were completely decimated and had to turn everything digital, which was very much against the ethos of IBW we've created IW so that people will get out of their screens and back into venues and back out in public. So it was tough last year, but I think what we're seeing this year is slightly more optimism NHS has done an incredible job with the vaccination rollout and there is a measured sense of positivity and certainty coming back gradually now. And I think a lot of people are using the week itself. We're hearing from our venues and artists and promoters that people want this to be the week that they really come back out in for. Bill, thank you so much for joining us. That's all we have time for today's program. Thanks for our producers MSL, Charlie filmer caught in Sophie monahan combs, our studio manager was Christie Evans. After the headlines more music on the way, the briefing is live at midday here in London. The global list is back at the same time tomorrow, but for now from me, Emma Nelson goodbye. Thank you for listening and have a great week..

sybil bell Huddersfield England NHS Charlie filmer Sophie monahan combs Christie Evans Bill Emma Nelson London
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:36 min | 7 months ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Was founded in the 1950s and played a pivotal role in covering the biggest stories in Lebanese politics and society. Well, a little earlier, I spoke to Tom Fletcher, who served as the UK's ambassador to Lebanon between 2011 and 2015. Tom also wrote a number of columns for the paper during his time in Beirut. I began by asking him about the significance of the newspaper's closure. Well, I think it's a huge shame that it's closing down. It was a source for many of us every morning of our updates on what was going on in Lebanon. And beyond. And so it's a shame in a way partly because of the impact on that new space and the gap that will leave for decent English language newspaper in the Levant. But also it will leave a huge gap in terms of the development of future journalists. Many, many of those working in the media across the Middle East passed through the dirty star at some point. And so that's a real loss. You know, on the ground now in Lebanon, it's such a difficult time for many people. Just talk to us about what this paper has been able to do for local populations and people passing through as you say, in years past, you know, obviously through wars and strife and everything that's happened in Lebanon across the country. Well, when you think about the sorts of stories that will have been on the front pages of the daily star over the years, I mean it really is huge amounts of history compressed into just a few decades. And I say that. I suppose as a protagonist, it was often in those stories at various moments, but also, as I guess, also a former columnist for the deadly star. I think I must have written 9 ten 1112 editorials columns that's at various points during my time as ambassador when we wanted to reach that audience on the issues that mattered to us. So I think it's always heartbreaking when a newspaper closes because of that sense of a shared story of having been with us on that journey. And because I suppose, as well of the cohesion that a newspaper like that brings to a community that so badly needs it. You know, the country is no stranger to seeing its media outlets close big newspapers have closed in Lebanon before. What does this mean for the local population and having access to something like that, which might be a little bit more outward looking and as you say, has many different people writing for it? Well, of course, when there are wider issues around access to a free media access to the news and of course, in the background, that context and monocle, you're living it, I guess, as well. Around, how do you adapt the media to a digital environment? And the daily star was very much part of that landscape. I suppose people will find other channels. They'll find other ways of getting their news. But I really feel sad for the journalists who might lose that audience now and for the readers who lose that journalism. And you know, what happens to all of those brilliant journalists of the future that won't now have the opportunity to cut their teeth at the daily star in that way? How worrying is this for the country and for Beirut specifically if people are looking for sources of news and other places which perhaps aren't as credible or those are online social media sites, how concerned are you about that? I think that would be a worry in an age of so much fake news so much propaganda. So at a time when so much of the news is so nakedly partisan that has to be a setback. But I think there's also a broader setback here for Lebanon, which is that this just contributes to a sense of depression and of decline at the moment. So it's that broader hit to morale. The country is going through, which is terrible to watch. Just lastly, Tom obviously, as you say, many people have passed through the city, have written for the newspaper. Beirut has been a city where a lot of foreign correspondents have been based of course in years past. Is there a knock on effect from seeing a paper like this close and how people view the city and perhaps wanting to be based there? I hope not. I mean, for better or worse, you know, Lebanon is the place to base from when you're covering the tumultuous kind of roller coaster ride that the region is going through. So I don't know whether it will have that impact. You know, on one level, it would be wonderful for Lebanon of Lebanon, stop generating so much news for a while. But I don't think this is the means of doing that that any of us would have wanted to see. There was Tom Fletcher who served as the UK's ambassador to Lebanon between 2011 and 2015. And that's all for today's edition of the briefing produced by Rhys James, a researcher, Lillian force it. Our studio manager was Christie Evans. I'm Daniel bech. Thank you so much for listening and goodbye..

Lebanon Tom Fletcher Beirut Tom Middle East UK depression Rhys James Lillian force Christie Evans Daniel bech
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:25 min | 7 months ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Smooth, fast track only for those from an initial approved 46 countries or 45 countries in Hong Kong. That at the last minute was expanded to 60 or 63, I think countries and territories. So of course, people who have been dying to sort of rush back for an island holiday and really making plans, I suppose for Christmas, all rushed the website, put their applications in, and it promptly crashed. It kept crashing. People around the world have had error messages constantly over 24 hours. And you only have to look at the Twitter fee or other social media and save the angst of people who have been trying repeatedly to uploading their application. So it's all good in theory and I'm sure these wrinkles will be ironed out. But it is a hell of a wrinkle to kick off with. They do really need this return to tourism though, don't they? Well, desperately, yeah. I mean, let's just remember that in 2019, this country had 40 million visitors. I think so far, this year to the 9 months today, it has had a precisely about a 100,000. That's a drop of about 99.9%. I mean, if devastating, you know, hotels and restaurants have closed, et cetera. But as has the evidence, I don't think China is doing itself any favors in this kind of piecemeal and hurried approach and let's just add that before this weeks or months of prevarication and stop start fast forward, go backward. So again, if I may talk about the alcohol band situation, we've all been told and people were very excited last Friday to be told that the government had decided finally to lift the ban on inhale sales of alcohol, which is, again, added to the decimation of the restaurant and bar industry in Thailand for a good part of the last year and a half, really. And only to find that it's not as simple as that restaurant to want to start serving alcohol. The only found out at the last minute that they have to go through it an extremely onerous process to get approval and accreditation to be able to serve alcohol that requires a lot of documents and photographs to be submitted. Again, every restaurant rushed the website on Monday and it crashed. And the same thing happened. A lot of frustrated restaurant tours and bar owners unable to get their applications in. And even when they do, it turns out that an unforeseen rule is that if you can serve alcohol, you have to stop at 9 p.m.. So apparently, why does being told they'll have to take the drink away at 9 o'clock? So you better not order a grand bottle of vintage wine at ten to 9 because you might be able to switch it. Literally they will come and grab your glass from you. Well, that's more or less been being said by some officials. But again, like everything in Thailand, I think, you know, the headline rules are not necessarily played out in the implementation. So it does remain to be seen. But, you know, let's just get to first base. It really is, I think a lot of people are kind of at the end of their tether, particularly these small businesses, restaurants, medium sized hotels. And this is the last thing they need. So I think people are complying and trying to get these approval through and the client as our travelers around the world. And on a nighttime anytime we're reading some of the tweets, you know, somebody was saying they tried 6 times and gave up and it took them all day. But I think people will persist and apparently the success rate has been about 20 to 25% in the initial 23,000 nearly 23,000 people overseas applied for this Thailand pass and 25% of the successful. It can only get better. Grant Robinson, thank you so much for joining us on monocle 24. That's all that we have for today's program. Thank you to our producers, Daniel veitch, pedros and Charlie Phil mccort are researchers Sophie monahans and lilian fawcett and our studio manager Christie Evans. After the headlines more music on the way, the briefings live at midday in London, and the global bliss is back at the same time tomorrow, but for now from me, Emma Nelson,.

Thailand Hong Kong Twitter China government Grant Robinson Daniel veitch pedros Charlie Phil mccort Sophie monahans lilian fawcett Christie Evans London Emma Nelson
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:19 min | 7 months ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Grow it for their personal use. So trade is not allowed, you can't grow cannabis for a friend and pass it on to them for free. So it's very much just for consumption inside your home. But Luxembourg's government sees this as a first step towards legalizing recreational cannabis, which is what they promised in the coalition agreement. In 2018, but we're still far away from that, because sales are not allowed. It's only allowed in these specific conditions. But yet, Luxembourg is the first country in Europe to take this step. It's often a little bit confusing, because other countries are tolerating the possession of cannabis taxes. Famously, the Netherlands, but yet Luxembourg is the first nation to allow the growth and the use at home. In most beg the question, how big a thing is cannabis and Luxembourg. I mean, it's not necessarily hit the headlines globally until now. Well, according to our justice minister, some Thompson, it is a big problem in the country. It's the most used drug and it makes up a huge part of the illegal market. So by legalizing the growth at home, the government hopes to keep users away from the black market, which we know is called very problematic issues around production, trafficking, dealing. So by legalizing it, we're hoping to turn our back on this black market. But also, if users can grow their own, they can have a high quality product. So yeah, we can consume a product that is safe to use. So all in all, the plan, the government's plan is to have a state regulated production chain, both of seeds and of plants were still far away from that, but this is a first step towards that. Finally, we have but a few seconds to discuss this, but is this likely to be something that paves the way for change across the European Union? I can imagine that it might it might lead to change across the European Union. I mean, there are already nations as I've already said the Netherlands have criminalized the possession, Portugal as well, the Czech Republic. Luxembourg isn't the first in that respect, but it's taking it to another level. But yet I have to say that there's still a lot of that there are a lot of negative reactions in the country. People aren't quite sure it seems a bit like a half measure. We have kind of legalizing it, but not really, so those who are in favor of it in the first place aren't happy because it's not fully legalized, those who are against it aren't happy either, because they are worried that now it's going to lead to a boom in the use of drugs or cannabis. And they are thank you so much for joining us on the program. That's all we have time thanks to our producers Daniel Bates and Charlie Phil McCourt, research of tofu monaghan combs and studio manager Christie Evans with editing assistance from norah hole. For now from me, Emma Nelson goodbye, thank you very much for listening and have a great week..

Luxembourg the Netherlands European Union government Thompson Europe Czech Republic Portugal Daniel Bates Charlie Phil McCourt monaghan combs Christie Evans norah hole Emma Nelson
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:08 min | 7 months ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Machine, which is apparently on full view of the diners. We have a modern composting machine in our dining room that visits and guests can see while eating. His name is Lowry. And he's a modern composting machine that can break up to 80 kilos of by waste in 24 hours, let's say in an average. Working with micro bacteria heat and air to break down the bio waste into a dry fertilizer. That we returned back to the farms when it's ready. A little bit close. According to Sun Yat, there are many invisible factors that affect a restaurant sustainability. We look for locality as much as possible as well because I think when we're talking about ways we are like any plastic box we can imagine food thrown to the wind, but I think that sometimes we forget like all the invisible waste like CO2 produced by transportation, water needed to measure the world, et cetera et cetera. When we're choosing the first one is the ingredient is good. Obviously, the second one is how close you can find it. Is it a more expensive path? Carlos and dicus explains. Well, there's a few angles that you can look at it. The first one is that if you believe in science, you believe that the future needs to be sustainable. So preparing yourself for the future is an investment, not an expense. And the second angle that you can look at it, it's actually the core thing that we're doing, it's minimizing waste. And by minimizing waste, you are utilizing everything that you're bringing into the restroom. So actually, your angle is actually maximizing a resources, which is the most industrial thing that you can hear. So it is a very particular angle. But then, of course, comes the thing. Do you want to value the producers? Do you want this producers to have a good life also and to be able to be farmers for urinations to come? Because if you do, you also need to pay them a fair amount for their product. So you might lose something in terms that you pay more for your product because you care about the people that deliver your products. But I think you make that back by having superior quality product by delivering something to customers. It's better. And also by investing in the future for your business by minimizing also everything that comes into the restaurant. According to Luka balak, sustainability alone is not enough to attract customers to dine in a restaurant. This null has learned after a few hiccups along the way. The perception changed from the beginning we tried to be more political and presented more and be there. But then one a thing of the hospitality business that we realized is that we look more at the moment towards the customers and the customers needs and maybe sometimes it can be overwhelming and take the main aspect of the restaurant of enjoying the dinner with your Friends and food and environment needs to play a bigger. That was Schiff, a collis enriquez of Helsinki restaurant nullah, proud bearers of a Michelin green star for sustainability. Without government helping us, this is a fight we can't win, he says. He was talking to our Helsinki correspondent petry bertz off. That's all for this week's special episode of the foreign desk explainer. Listen out for more of these additions, produced by me Michael booth, in association with the Nordic council of ministers. It was edited by Christie Evans at Monaco 24 in London. Thanks for listening and goodbye..

Sun Yat dicus Lowry Luka balak Carlos collis enriquez Helsinki petry bertz Schiff Michael booth Nordic council of ministers Christie Evans Monaco London
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:51 min | 8 months ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"It depends entirely which countries are involved in latin america. Countries would throw tantrums and recall ambassadors dot every day of the week but it was frequently enough. That didn't really resonate. Nobody just waited quality till the tantrum had subsided and the best came back. What the french just done with join your ambassador from the united states for constellations. That is heavy a close ally behaving like that. The french are making very strong point just on that thought. Though of the making strong point there is the question of again. When this is undertaken who were they making the point to do they assume that these registers with the general public i mean they can probably seem quite rightly it registers with the media that taken interest in these things or is this mealy away of scoring points between government. I'm not sure scoring points. They are generally trying to register deep dismay. With whom certainly with the french public in french culture in general protocol tends to be rather strict perhaps than in southern anglo-saxon countries and the significance of withdrawing ambassador will be widely public understood. Also of course making the point to the americans. I wouldn't want to say how clearly the white house understands what is being said to it. The state department certainly will having a close ally withdraw ambassador that will cause a system onto official. Right through the corridors. Fucking bottom john everard. Thank you as always for joining us here on the foreign desk. That's it for this. Episode of the foreign desk will be back next week and look out for foreign desk. Explain it available. Every wednesday. the foreign desk was produced by christie evans. Christie also produces the foreign desk. Explain for me. Andrew mullahs thanks very much for listening until next time goodbye..

latin america united states john everard white house christie evans Christie Andrew
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:33 min | 9 months ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"He to four have to do without the whimsical. Stylings of idrac mizzle azadi a belarusian comedian resident in the russian capital now packing his bags supervision of which by hatchet faced stooges infer hats greatcoats clutching kalashnikovs. Could not be confirmed as this monologue. Went to air misdemeanors lazarre de made a joke which failed to amuse someone at russia's ministry of the interior which has now gone the hapless japes to off in thunderously forbidding terms which will now be translated by monaco's russian duggan desk chief and producer of this monologue christie evans mirrors liza day mid expressions and site hatred and emnity towards persons of russian nationality. Humiliating a human dignity in this regard. His presence on the territory of the russian federation was recognized as threatening public order the rights and the jets the interests of others everyone's a critic but we further loan but such is russia's hypersensitivity to the slightest slight that even the neighbors are having to tiptoe in a manner of speaking we learned that as one drives towards greg himself in the deep north of norway. Come on christy. Let's some howling blizzard. Wind and pull the bay is whatever. The road runs alongside a creek.

idrac mizzle azadi lazarre de christie evans russia monaco liza jets greg norway christy
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:32 min | 9 months ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Four have to do without the whimsical. Stylings of idrac mizzle izadi a belarusian comedian resident in the russian capital. Now packing his legs supervision of which by hatchet faced stooges infer hats and coats clutching kalashnikovs. Could not be confirmed as this monologue. Went to f- misdemeanors lazare de made a joke which failed to amuse someone at russia's ministry of the interior which has now gone the hapless japes to off in funder asleep forbidding terms which will now be translated by monaco's russian duggan desk chief and producer of this monologue christie evans it mirrors liza mid expressions incite hatred and emnity towards persons of russian nationality. Humiliating a human dignity in this regard. His presence on the territory of the russian federation was recognized threatening public order the rights and the interests of others everyone's a critic but we further learn but such is russia's hypersensitivity to the slightest slight that even the neighbors are having to tiptoe in manner of speaking we learned that as one drives towards greg zied cells in the deep north of norway. Come on christy. Let's have some howling blizzard wind. And paul the bears or whatever. The road runs alongside.

idrac mizzle izadi lazare de christie evans russian federation monaco liza greg zied norway christy bears paul
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

03:16 min | 9 months ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Does have a lot on his hands and it does need financial. Help us absolutely no question about it. Ruin a good spot to finish. This discussion seems to be to bring it back to your story as a microcosm for what millions of afghans will be thinking about this week as in. What are they going to do now. And what is their future relationship with a country going to be like. Where is your thinking. Got to on when you go back whether you would like to go back and what you think you'll be able to do when and if you can upsetting to me in people's monitors one is matter of personal safety whether they'll be safe On that's a question that is going to depend on people's experiences. I have personal safety fields right. Now that's why. I would not choose to go back right now until the promise of amnesty actually proved to be credible. The other people have undermined is what does future hold is going to be. A country would like to live in his country. I would like to have children in. Is the country where i will get an education. I have a student sort of saying. Will i be able to continue it by depletion or not. Is this country. What i'm going to be able to prosper. Or is implore country because it is sanctioned. It is a proud because it depends on a lot of money. Coming in from outside. Aid has huge trade deficit at its finances. True an aid and a little bit remittance of other offensive million. So i'm going be able to actually feed my family have a meaningful amtra slide. Honest and people have to make choices for themselves. I think a lot of people are waiting with boats interesting. What i choose to do a will wait here until i see the promise of amnesty. If the promised amnesty prove credible if they prove credible. I'm going back on doing what i can to persuade Incentivize whatever government is in place. Actually respect the basic rights of every human being on which is to educate themselves under children participate in public life regardless of gender ethnicity or whatever it may be and just make personal choices about how to live their lives. I think a lot of is just a matter of what state should be doing. And what people should get to have their opinion about anything they want. But don't get to impose those big violence population and they should just create a space where people can make personal choices. We can debate as to where the station intervene but there should be a narrow face. The problem i think he might open at is that they want to impose the choices are making under retired population. They did last time. I hope this time they've learned and they will create a room for people to be expressing themselves differently. I mean somebody would like to cover more one Records that's fundamental issue. Trying to advocate for more choices for people and the state to not use violence post any kind of single narrow set of choices under population. Jerky norfolk haroon rahimi. Thank you both very much for joining us on the foreign desk. That's it for this episode of the foreign desk. We'll be back next week and look out for the foreign desk explainer available every wednesday. The foreign desk was produced by nfl and christie evans. Christie also produces the foreign desk. Explain it for me under mullah. Thank you very much for listening until next time goodbye..

haroon rahimi christie evans Christie nfl mullah
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:56 min | 10 months ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Finally on today's program. Think of a country jam packed with culture heritage history and landmarks. And you may well think of italy. It has as we all know. The highest number of unesco world heritage sites of any other nation until now because that's accolades has just been claimed by another country and that country is china or rodney. Harrison is professor of heritage studies at university college in. Good morning. rodney good morning. Tell us what happened. Yes so this It looks as if china will overtake italy as having the largest number of World heritage sites the meeting of the world heritage convention is taking place right now in china And the word convention was adopted in nineteen seventy-two at a general conference of the united nations. But the roots of this idea of an international convention to provide protection for cultural natural heritage goes back much further to the period between the two world wars and it really took off as an idea during the two quite important safeguarding campaigns that were run by the united nations in the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties the first of them to do with the relocation of every simple temples during the construction of s one high dam in the late fifties and nineteen sixties and then the flooding venice in nineteen sixty six both of which drew very significant international attention to the vulnerability of cultural heritage so this convention was established in nineteen seventy two created this entity this world heritage list and a series of mechanisms by which sites could be considered for inscription on the list and signatories to the convention or states parties as known in the terminology of the list they have to agree to establish and maintain a national register of cultural and natural heritage sites and importantly attentive list for consideration for world heritage listing. What's sorry i interrupted you terribly rude. That what what's pushed china up to the top of the list. Yes so There is sort of question. Why china but In in a way one would ask why not so. The kind of original list was very focused on anglo european science and China only became a signet tree or a states party in nineteen five in its first heritage sites. Were into onto the world heritage list in nineteen eighty seven There's now a thousand sites in one hundred ninety countries or countries all over the world and obviously china is a very big country topic of the nascent. Which is set to overtake but the answer is actually more to do with politics and power and this sort of process of world. heritage listing is a kind of in in some ways it's a very open process. So if if one had the patience one could live stream the whole of the public parts of the meeting over the coming days and what the discussions but in many ways also about Sort of politicking and power and influence and for china the the past and this sort of idea of great chinese civilization really underpins its international economic and foreign policy in in a very significant way so Recently it's announced it's announced this huge initiative called the belton road initiative at massive international infrastructure development program across seventy different countries. It's it's sort of saint a piece of its economic policy. But it makes reference to this idea of the silkroad this network of ancient land and sea trading routes which connected china with both east and west so heritage is really fundamental to china's vision of itself as an international political and economic superpower. And the idea of the greatness of chinese historical civilization provides really sort of strong grounding. not only for. It's a foreign policy. But also for the way it treats its own ethnic minorities for example and its ability to kind of control and sort of dictate cultural policy Internally as well rodney harrison. Thank you so much for joining us on the line. That was rodney harrison professor of heritage studies at university college in london. That's all we have for today's program. Many thanks to our producers. Reese james page rentals alexis self daniel beach and charlie film studio manager christie evans with editing. Assistance from chris blackwell off to the headlines as more music on the way. The briefing is live at midday here in.

china rodney italy united nations university college unesco Harrison China rodney harrison Reese james daniel beach charlie film christie evans alexis london chris blackwell
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"Marino. Is America particularly susceptible to this? He's that way they've got this idea from because I'm I'm just thinking in terms of the United Kingdom and the stray Leo the idea. I mean, I'm not saying it doesn't happen. But it's never really caught on to the same extent. There haven't been sort of dynasties of Kennedy's or bushes or Clintons or or or the equivalent well in other countries. You mean? What is it about the United States specifically that seems to crave rule boy family? Why why why do they like the Royal family so much whenever they go over there? I don't know. I think it's because they don't they don't necessarily have one of their own. You know, it's a good question about back to your name. You know, your legal name in the states is first name middle initial and surname. You have to have that middle initial in there if you use that's that's your legal name, so strange, though, it may be that's that's that's the laws that were. But. The most popular newsworthy items around the world tend to be the younger royals. It's not just this country. In fact, it's more in the United States in Germany and so forth. Look at look at Hello magazine in six languages. Are there any political names o or domestic nines in particular that imbue you with confidence? Roosevelt. I mean, the the there there aren't that many? Oh. No. I mean there aren't there there. I tend to be another part of the American character is suspicion of dynasties. And we have this very sort of split personality about them. We we love them. We hate them. We we are drawn to them. But we also reject them. I think there's there's a as I said there's a whole separate conversation about that. I tend to think that an essential element of the Republican Democratic character of the US is that you know, we change our government. There's a two-term limit. You had you know, FDR violated that norm. And when he was when he after he died, they changed the constitution to make sure no one would ever do it again. And you know, it doesn't explicitly prevent people from the same family from running. But I think there's a sense sort of resistance to that the Kennedys had several generations. Well, they had one president. And do we have time to? Term limited out selves that does bring us to the end of today's show, Kathleen Burke and Jacob power killers. Thank you for joining us up Dory. House. The show was produced by Guston much lottery research by for non DOE Augusta Pacheco enroll re good Rick STDM manage it was Christie Evans music next one thousand nine hundred it's monocle on design. This more on the day's main stories on the daily twenty two hundred Midori house for tons at the same time tomorrow eighteen hundred London I'm Andrew mullet. Thank you for listening..

United States Marino. United Kingdom Kathleen Burke Hello magazine Kennedy America Leo Kennedys Midori Andrew mullet Roosevelt Guston Augusta Pacheco president Germany Christie Evans Rick STDM
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"And after maroon five said, yes, they came under tremendous pressure publicly to turn it down. They didn't turn it down, and they delivered this completely forgettable performance that does seem to be engineered to just not caused attention to anything or anyone of note. I mean, some African American artists did, of course, perform. Notably. We've maroon five and Gladys Knight sang the national anthem beforehand to say nothing obese leave the many many African American players who actually took part in the game. Mary is there a is the basically a problem the NFL is avoiding addressing here. I mean as as Peter correctly points out there is Colin Kaepernick has been forced into retirement because of a political stance that he quite reasonably took. Nobody I have radio heard from thinks there is any good footballing reason why he's not currently a starting quarterback. Ha have we actually kind of forgotten how how how scandals and monstrous this is? Well, I certainly had forgotten or at least you because few months ago, this was all at the top of news everywhere. And now somehow it's not so only just sort of floated back with the Super Bowl, but it's sort of like to return something slightly more frivolous. Which is in some ways. It almost seems as though our positions are being reversed because the the UK sports in the UK national sports never used to have all this sort of show biz razzmatazz around them the most that you got was must band during the during the Cup final half time. Now, you have opera renditions of the mutiny of the national anthem all those things and that is straight borrowing from from the United States. Pleader, basically does bring us to the end of today show up marriage, isky? NPD goodman. Thank you for joining us at Midori house. The show was produced by Augustine match. Larry research by financial Augusta per Sheku, Android. Good. Rick STDM manager was Christie Evans this music, next nineteen hundreds and monocle culture show. This more on the day's main stories on the daily at twenty two hundred all be back with Madari house. Same time tomorrow eighteen hundred London time, I'm Andrew Mullah. Thank you for listening..

Colin Kaepernick Gladys Knight Christie Evans Midori house Madari house UK NFL Andrew Mullah NPD London United States Mary Peter Augustine Pleader goodman isky
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Like, bud VAR or the old town of Qatar. So the smart thing to do I would say Tom with many places on the Adriatic is to go in the wintertime and Montenegro saying we're getting better at doing this in the last winter season we on one hundred fifteen thousand rivals that was a third more than the previous year and the weather is looking favorable for this year. We're going for it. We're going to make it happen. All best win to season ever, go. I like a bit of automatic proactive thinking, I let's talk about how this is going to manifest itself. If they've got the record breaking numbers. What's there a shortage or presumably, you know, I know how, you know, the delone family like to make things work, but of wellness centers, yoga retrea, isn't that kind of thing? No. That's the problem. I mean, so for example, those mountain Guidon in Montenegro says one of the best things about the the landscapes here. One of the best things about I mean, the clues in the name of the country Montenegro Gora black mountains. So, you know, the mountains over much of the country, Tom as so you think the winter tourism sh-, would and should be a big thing. But there's very very little in the form of infrastructure, and this mountain guide said well at the moment, it looks like something that Jack London would right about now. This is a great thing if you're up for that sort of high adventure or alternatively be helicoptered onto ski down both of which your options. But at the moment in terms of accessibility to you know, people who either aren't lunatics all rich as the proverbial. It's it's very limited. So you've got Kalish in as is the place to go, which is a pretty good place. If you not wanting to be completely nuts about your skiing. It's called decent amount of blue and red runs. It's got the infrastructure. It's gonna Sheraton hotel with a spa, Tom and. And you know, best of all I would say in the summer, and we're talking about winter in the summer coalition becomes the European sent of Tango. Wow. That's why you know about it, isn't that? God just briefly is one of those things often people rather evangelical about great places, they want more people to go. It's a boon for the economy and people who go they get benefit from beautiful scenery. Just part of you guys say, look, it's good for the economy is good for hoteliers and the like, but is there a certain Soro because exactly that wild ruggedness and it's harder to deliver the London scenery. If you've got London amounts of people there. Yeah. Have you covered? Everything was ski left, then you're not going to have that sort of quality to its any more. And this is the dilemma which places like Montenegro facing they generate so much of their income from Torres them that it's very tempting to say, right? This is all cash cow. Let's do more of it. But we've seen in places like Qatar in Montenegro and as Dubrovnik in Croatia. If you have too many people it starts to become a turnoff guy fantastic. View as always that was bulletins correspondent guide alone talking about Montenegrin tourism. And that's all we have time for on today's edition of the briefing, which was produced by Reese James on research by yelling and mainly Evans. Our studio manager was Christie Evans. We back at the same time tomorrow noon in London joined down your from adobe house in eighteen hundred but from eighteen hundreds and the rest of the team. It's goodbye..

Montenegro Tom Montenegro Gora Christie Evans London Qatar Jack London Kalish Reese James ski Dubrovnik Croatia Torres
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"European project, you you're going to be very worried by what Jonathan has said because Macron has been held up as one of the last great liberal hopes in the EU because we know they was that access with him and Angela Merkel. She of course, has been forced to stand down. She has a new success that we don't quite know how she's going to cut the mustard. But this is not good times for the president. You fact. Question is how long it will take for us to acknowledge that European politics have changed beyond recognition and that has already happened. Most people were pinning their hopes on mckown as the savior of the center. Well, they're east not much to save. If we are to believe these numbers, actually, senior pretty disastrous for McComb precisely for the reasons the Jonathan pointed out, he was very kind to Macron perhaps. But the actually these is very far from the numbers that he had and needed and would need if he remained as that sort of European beacon, not only half. He's also having problems with his some somewhat makes shave to trans-european alliance. For instance, savannah senior Spain are beginning to come closer to the Fadh right-wing vox in under Lucia in Macron or ready send a warning to them. Because remember former minister is now a mayoral candidate in of our Celona. So actually, the story here is that of the total decline of the center of central centuries politics on the one hand, the total the almost near Newton all of these appearance of the historic partisans. I public and the socialists the fronts on miss keeps a steady at ten percent. So you can see there, you know, some of the anger is is moving that direction. But of course, the real the real danger is that if you put together the too far right parties in France, you see word that anger. He's moving quickly, and these should be a warm a warning for the rest of us and stressing as well, a very very briefly marine Le Pen, she has tried to ally herself with with with the yellow vest movement. But Jonathan very very quickly before we move onto the to the final subjects. Yeah. I mean, the the the whole question was Matt coins he committed himself to macro neon reforms they're systemic structural reforms in France, those run into all kinds of difficulties partly because of the presentation, partly because of the way it was handled and so on, but he combed abandoned those without basically giving up this president which onto might well, obviously, they want him to go. Anyway, let's move on. Now. It's finally to our final funnels subjects EU trade officials. They are looked in a fight of Australia. The use of household food names nosy foods manufactures wants to put fetter palm is on empress co on their products, even though goods with those named on meeting, Greece and Italy, however, always not lost because one possible compromises to have locally produced goods labelled Australian per second. I guess Australia. Champagne fettuccine Stroup is what I can say. But look questions both view. I mean, if you all a euro skeptic, a K this really confirms every skeptics nightmare about the north was is. It's made up of meddling bureaucratic timewasters making much ado about. At the same time. I think he would probably he stand for Stilton Stilton is British. You're not supposed to talk. Mild mild ale is British and so on and if you have Australian Stilton, I think they would draw a line the opposite. Yeah. I remember way back when the French will have this great compaign on champagne. This was. To reserve that. And it basically, you know, where something comes from. It is generally accepted in the us should define how it can be called food fight and down. Under sounds like a nine thousand nine hundred song by men at work. You would be very little. To to blame a European bureaucrats there, this is actually more about the way economic live nowadays has more with copyright and information, branding and marketing than anything else in this happens. This is a global phenomenon. Okay. Then we're going to have to leave it there. So we could actually talk about food without getting into a fight. Excellent. Well, that brings us to the end of today's show Oscar Guardiola era and Jonathan Fenby gentlemen. Thank you both for joining us here at Madari house today show was produced by Carlotta Rabelo researched by fundamental Gustavo Pacheco and Martha library has studio manager was Christie Evans more music.

Jonathan Fenby Macron EU France Angela Merkel president Australia Stroup Spain Celona Newton McComb Greece Oscar Guardiola us Madari house Christie Evans Carlotta Rabelo Martha library
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"He's done an awful lot both symbolically. And in reality. I was I happened to be out in Michigan. Talking to factory owners who are dealing with the impact at tariffs. And a lot of them are being heard and every single one of them said thank you, Donald Trump at least for picking this fight. I hope you stick it out. We need to take on China. And when I asked him about things like the Muller investigation and allegations of collusion with the Russians and undermining the American election. They all said, oh, that's just. Noise. I mean, there really is this split screen America where you know, if you're on the side of the fence where you're a Trump supporter than any information that suggests that he's doing something other than championing your interest is just designed to hurt him. So just as a final vote. Then Stephen is it possible that we are looking at. He is not a ludicrous portrait of decadence, but an extremely coming bit of political signaling nowadays, even cutting. I think it's just trumping his usual tacky south. Yeah. He's caused this this crisis in the government. He's you know, that that again, you know, he seems to ignore the fact that I think it's eight hundred thousand people and not being paid at the moment. Because of what he's done because he's you know, he's behaving like a child and stemming against foot and wants money for the wall. And this is his way of thumbing his nose at people all sticking up the middle finger and saying, well, they all I can still do I can still entertain people in the White House. I'm paying for it. Does bring us to the end of today's show, Steven de and PD Goodman. Thanks both for joining us on the Dory. House. The show was produced by Walter Rabelo research by Fernando Augusta Pacheco Mafa LeBron tedium manage it was Christie Evans this music next one thousand nine hundred it's Monica on design this more on the day's main stories on the daily at twenty two hundred including possibly even the result of Brexit vote. Madari house is back at the same time tomorrow eighteen hundred London I'm Andrew mullet. Thank you for listening.

Donald Trump Stephen White House Madari house Michigan Fernando Augusta Pacheco Andrew mullet Christie Evans China Muller Walter Rabelo America PD Goodman Steven de
"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"christie evans" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Time. And during the age of Trump cable networks are really growing and ratings while the traditional network newscasts are declining and CBS the CBS evening news and the CBS morning show third in the ratings among the broadcast networks. So they really have been struggling that said CBS also has some. Really strong brand named sixty minutes is an iconic weekly new show that still has maintained its reputation. It's still kind of a gold standard. I think for sort of investigative TV news forty-eight hours is very well recognized that the program that she is currently running long standing program that that also gets good viewership and has a good strong reputation. It's interesting sixty minutes has in recent years tried to as as legacy correspondent at aged. And in some cases, passed away that brought in some flashier figures. Like Anderson Cooper for a time Oprah Winfrey to be part of that revolving door of a correspondent. So it'll be interesting to see whether she goes with that star power or whether she really doubles down on gumshoe investigative reporting. Is there any way that she can combine both given the fact that every news channel on earth is trying now to get young view is in. Absolutely, absolutely. And I think, you know, someone like Ronan Farrow, for example, who who has is young. His done amazing investigative work for the New Yorker and really elevated both his brand New Yorkers brand. I think there's an opportunity for a legacy broadcaster like CBS to by virtue of that strong reporting in getting those explosive stories to keep to stay in the game, Joan wise. Thank you very much. Indeed for joining us on the line on monocle twenty four. That's what we have time for today's edition of the monocle daily thanked surfer juices Daniel bait and Tom bowl and research is definitely need is a mainly Evans stadium manage it was Christie Evans. The globalist is hearing aid us time to Gina Gordon. Your host for that. And the daily routines at the same time to merger me that if you can fanatic for me, MLC's goodbye. Thank you very much listening.

CBS Gina Gordon Ronan Farrow Oprah Winfrey Trump Anderson Cooper Evans stadium Christie Evans Joan wise Daniel bait Tom bowl sixty minutes forty-eight hours