36 Burst results for "Christie"

Fresh update on "christie" discussed on Life Transformation Radio

Life Transformation Radio

00:57 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "christie" discussed on Life Transformation Radio

"All right. So how did this song Come about? How did you create worst bad decision, you know a great great question. You know, I'm one of those things where so many anecdotes and so many periods of my life, you know being a photographer focusing in glamour. Obviously, you need a lot of very attractive females and males and so I'm surprised some of the more attractive people in this world are also the most insecure people in this world and I've seen so many relationships abusive relationships and I'm not talking about physical you don't verbal, you know, playing with people's emotions and so many relationships that have settled they have settled for something less than what their worst. And that's the message. I'm trying to connect people take a step back. That's why I pretend I'm your conscience in this song telling you don't do it. This is not for you. You know, it's not for you take a step back walk away and those are actually Lines from the song when you hear it trust Mera you're going to love it. It's I put my heart and soul into it just like I put anything else but it's on the same caliber. Like I said, I've got some killer people killer players off on the on the record and it's very influenced by you know, that old classic Aerosmith Elton John Billy Joel, you know, the big powerhouses of yesteryears. So it's definitely going to resonate with the commercial Radio Room. Oh man, that's awesome. I'll tell you a quick story about Billy Joel concert. So long time ago. I was an usher at the sports arena in San Diego, California, and I thought I was late. So I was on the radio back. Then I was late. I got stuck in traffic. I just couldn't get out and I was late and there was one job left. And I remember the guy Auto and he's like, he's like dude you're late again. I'm going to get you the crappiest job for being late. I'm like, okay, I'm your best doctor and he goes, oh, you're going to hate this job. You're going to stand in one place. And all you going to do is stare and make sure that no one sits in these seats and I'm like, okay. Well, all right, so we waited so I wasn't even with the regular team so Billy Joel and Billy Joel fan if you remember I had beautiful Christie Brinkley in his life at a time and I stood Yes, I stood at the front of the stage on the floor right in front of these chairs that were marked and there was no one there and all it was doing was telling no one that could sit there. And then right as the concert was about to start. This incredibly beautiful woman walks down right next to me and sits down and my job was to stare at Christie Brinkley all night. It was just unbelievable. She was so sweet. I talked to her for a little bit and it was just so great. She just sat there by herself at one time. She had a girlfriend Joiner and it was just one of my most amazing. Uh, it was just a great time. It was just so sure loved it. I don't know. I heard the.

San Diego, California Elton John Christie Brinkley Billy Joel ONE One Job One Place One Time Aerosmith Relationships Joiner
How to Generate Loyal and Committed Clients with Cristy Nickel

Healthcare Business Secrets

02:13 min | 2 d ago

How to Generate Loyal and Committed Clients with Cristy Nickel

"The working with christy nikko. Christie is the president and ceo of code rid author of the code revolution number. Two will ranked boxes. Currently retired and celebrity tristesse a warning from china in elite level. Athletes is also the author of four books. I'm really excited to have her on the show. She's an evid makita salesperson and has got a kick ass business which we're gonna talk about today's episode. Welcome to the show. Kristy yes and the mohawk. Let's not forget the mohawk. Oh my god. I got a different color for change it constantly. My poor husband walks around the corner. He goes and he goes. Oh as you. And i'm like why do you think it's red now. So yes thank you for that awesome introduction. Only some some background on you. What do you do. Who do you help. And how'd you get into the space. The elevator pitch is. I created a nutrition program that enables people to lose ten percent of their body weight every month without shakes pills diet foods or exercise. So that's kind of the some of the code red lifestyle but it kind of started back when i was. I was raised in northern idaho which is in the pacific northwest and i was raised very poor. My dad was a cop and our local minister was a very small town and my mom worked for minimum wage and we just had no money but we raised on a farm and so we were very poor growing up and when it was time for me to move out of the house and go to college. Nobody in my family helped me. That was zero help. I was working. I bought my first horse at ten years old making monthly payments to my neighbor to buy this horse so i started waiting tables and i was just waiting tables and bartending trying to put myself through nursing school and i was approached by a boxing coach after he watched me in in a local boxing class. And he said how long you been. Boxing and i said forty four minutes. And he said you have a propensity for this. And i was like pow whatever and he goes. Do you wanna fight. And i thought fight. Are you kidding me like real fight. I've never even been in a fight. Never been hit. He said you could earn money. Well that's all. I needed to hear because i was so poor so i literally started fighting for my dinner. I started fighting for five hundred bucks a five. This legit federally licensed sanctioned boxing matches you know six ounce gloves Twelve rounds three minute rounds and little. Did i know. I was really good at boxing

Christy Nikko Christie Kristy Boxing China Pacific Northwest Idaho
400 homes evacuated, Rushmore closed amid South Dakota fires

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

400 homes evacuated, Rushmore closed amid South Dakota fires

"Wildfires in South Dakota have forced hundreds of people from their homes and have shut down mount Rushmore more than four hundred homes north west of Rapid City South Dakota were under evacuation with three separate fires burning in the black hills there are already reports of structures being destroyed and gusting winds were only making the situation worse governor Christie known traveled to Rapid City and call the losses tragic two fires burning near keystone forced the closure of the mount Rushmore national memorial through at least Wednesday hi Jackie Quinn

South Dakota Rapid City Mount Rushmore Governor Christie Black Hills Mount Rushmore National Memori Jackie Quinn
Bahrain Grand Prix Qualifying: Should Mercedes be Worried?

The Autosport Podcast

02:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Bahrain Grand Prix Qualifying: Should Mercedes be Worried?

"Of the weekend max stock has taken pole and it feels like we have a bachelor hands. What did you think of the stephens. Performance arianna was fantastic today. It really really was. I mean like. I said a few nights ago recorded our hand i've represented. I was always very pessimistic. Is very wary of the potential from his eighties to to come back out of nowhere and stunned the formula one field and maintain its advantage from the previous seasons. But yeah i mean what. What a great drive from vistaprint. The there was a slight a slight down a slight negative aspect to it. It did make a mistake in key. One damaged his car and put not seemingly not enough christie reckons that it costs about one tenth for seconds in terms of each latte did after going over the cubs and damaging his floor. I'm an by By over three tenths of a second so you know he could have been even further ahead. Bob that just shows you how good that packages and and how well see bishop in eastern. It was just a fantastic fantastic drive in and again. Sergio perez out in key to in the other red blue. I mean obviously is a new car concept for him so he's gonna take a little while but it really does again show work good job. Verstappen does yeah definitely but mercedes did look better than what we've seen previously. They seemed like they had improved. Low bet but ozzy said max zappa me was only four. Tenths ahead of lewis. Hamilton and various hamilton. Did say after. He gave everything he had so i not finding hot one qualifying session and we have a very long season ahead. Thought should mercedes be worried. Yeah i think they should be. And i think that that's already so reflected in in the comments that they're making i think by taito wolf. You will boldly more bluntly per lewis hamilton. Coming out and saying well. These changes to the floor. Rose have been done to slow us down. I mean how much straightaway in the press

Max Stock Arianna Sergio Perez Stephens Verstappen Christie Max Zappa Cubs BOB Ozzy Hamilton Lewis Taito Wolf Lewis Hamilton
Banksy painting raises $23 million for UK health charities

The Savage Nation

00:15 sec | 2 weeks ago

Banksy painting raises $23 million for UK health charities

"Ah Banksy painting honoring Britain's health workers amid the pandemic is sold for a record $23 Million of Christie's auction house painting shows a boy playing with a toy nurse as a superhero. Seeds from the sale will be used to fund UK health organizations and

Britain Christie UK
Banksy painting raises $23 million for UK health charities

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Banksy painting raises $23 million for UK health charities

"A Banksy painting honoring Britain's health workers in the pandemic the soul full of a cold twenty three point two million dollars Oceania Christie's says the proceeds from the sale will be used to fund health organizations and charities across Britain the work by the mysterious street artist Banksy titled game changer first appeared on the wall at Southampton General Hospital in may the black and white picture depicts a young boy sitting on the floor playing with another super hero toy as Batman and spider man toy figures lie in a wastepaper basket next to him Banksy had left a note thanking the hospital Christie's says the reproduction of the picture will stay at the hospital the patients visitors and staff Charles the last month London

Oceania Christie Britain Southampton General Hospital Banksy Christie Charles London
Noem Rejects South Dakota's Transgender Sports Ban

Philadelphia's Morning Answer

02:22 min | 2 weeks ago

Noem Rejects South Dakota's Transgender Sports Ban

"Last night with Tucker One more time. Just briefly. A bill crafted by the South Dakota legislature banning biological males from competing and girls athletics or women's athletics. K through college, essentially Bill basically says, if you're a woman in a college in South Dakota, If you're a girl in K through 12 sports in South Dakota, we will not allow biological males to compete period. Christie nomination, initially said she was excited to sign this bill. Then ultimately, she ended up backtracking, she backtracked. Allegedly Because the NC double a said, if you do this We will basically Not recognized women's collegiate athletics in South Dakota. And some other business interests like Amazon and the Chamber of Commerce. Said You're going to give us, Fitz. You're going to give us heartburn. We're gonna lose a lot of business. Lot of professional. You know, our collegiate Sports and contracts and things like that will be broken with South Dakota. If you do this So Tucker header on yesterday to explain herself. Why was she initially excited to sign this bill? And then she backtracked because of pressure from big business with this was his opening question. And here's how she started. Well, That's not true, Tucker and thank you for inviting me to be on the show Tonight. I could sign the bill the way that it is today. On then also, But it wouldn't solve the problem and that's the real issue as I looked at the bill and examined it and have been discussing with legal scholars for many months and how to protect women's sports This bill would only allow the NC double a to bully South Dakota, and it would actually prevent women from being able to prove to participate in collegiate sports. So what I've done is I've asked the Legislature through a style every form. I'm sort of just for our viewers. I'm so sorry, Bill. Just back up for what's right for our viewers who haven't followed. This is closely how would this bill prevent women from playing in South Dakota? If you would Because what it would do is it would prolong the books that would allow the NCH to take punitive action against our state, and we're a small state Tucker. We've had to fight hard to get any tournaments to come to South Dakota. When they took punitive action against us, we would have to litigate and legal scholars that I have been consulting with. For

South Dakota Athletics South Dakota Legislature Tucker NC Christie Fitz Bill Chamber Of Commerce Amazon Legislature NCH
A JPEG Sells for $70 Million, Creating a New Era of Digital Art Auctions

Business Wars Daily

03:51 min | 2 weeks ago

A JPEG Sells for $70 Million, Creating a New Era of Digital Art Auctions

"From wondering. I'm david brown in this business. Wars daily on this tuesday march twenty third. If you're an art collector with a spare seventy million lying around a rembrandt says on may be out of your reach. But you just might be able to score yourself. A lesser van gogh picasso or like someone last week. You own your own people digital montage. Oh you've never heard of people that's okay. He's not one of those guys. They teach art history class. Which makes it all the more remarkable one of his electronic art pieces just sold at auction at christie's for nearly seventy million dollars even though it only exists in pixels is the third highest price ever commanded by a living artist. According to the new york times people is a digital artist from south carolina. Whose given name. Is mike thirteen years. He's created a drawing every day. He started with pen and paper but now creates art. Digitally the record breaking piece titled everyday's the five thousand days is a composite of the first five thousand days of that project. This was also the first time christie's sold a piece of digital only artwork. It was purchased with the cryptocurrency ether. Another first for christie's something tells me you won't be the last either. So you're probably wondering why in the world someone would pay seventy million dollars for a pack a reproducible. Virtual file right. Something you can't touch or even hang on your wall. yeah. I know. That's what i was wondering. Turns out every day is is in just another pretty j. peg. It's what's called a non fungible token or nfc and if you're thinking is so tell me why that matters. Well you're going to need to stick with me for a moment. On this one in tease us blockchain technology for authentication. Now this blockchain is the same sort of thing that you find in bitcoin right. It captures information and shares it with a network of computers and once shared. There's a digital ledger. That records the data across thousands of computers. Making it impossible to manipulate or so goes the theory. So when you buy an nf it's quote minted to you. Meaning an ownership record is created across thousands of computers around the world. You own the original one of a kind file. I know it may seem complicated on the surface but it really is pretty straightforward essentially techie. Way of making a digital file one of a kind like a physical object even if others tried to make a copy. It's taking a photo of a famous painting. It's not worth what the original is worth. Entities allow users to own bits of video songs or images. Their popularity actually began years ago with a game. Called crypto kitties where people could buy in trade animated cats after attracting top venture. Capital firm says investors some crypto. Kitty sold well into the six figures. Lately they've turned into a blazing hot sector in art and collectibles. Sports stars like lebron. James and rob gronkowski have even gotten in on the action selling. Nfc video clips. In digital trading cards people has been at the forefront of this craze in february a short video clip he created sold for nearly seven million dollars in one weekend in december he made more than three million dollars selling his t's bad for a guy who calls some of his own work crap according to the times not to be outdone. Sotheby's has gotten in on the act last

Van Gogh Picasso Mike Thirteen Christie David Brown The New York Times South Carolina NFC Rob Gronkowski Kitty Lebron James Sotheby
What the Heck are NFTs? Let's Ask Beeple.

Sway

04:11 min | 3 weeks ago

What the Heck are NFTs? Let's Ask Beeple.

"Mike welcome or should i call you. People your can just call me. Mike was weird. Call me don't you dare call me my dungeon from high school with swish e issue. So let's not get into these things which makes a lot more sense but explain people. It's like a fuzzy. Like you walk looking thing. I'd get over there okay. Reach it adds a toy from the eighties. Kinda like beeps and makes a sound. they're not that popular. If you look at just go people toy and you can see what they look like again. This is something. I named myself like years ago. Why as. I did not expect to be answering this question. Twenty years later right. Because is an artist. Moment of artistic reverie or what in my more solid like when you cover. It's is it beeps and so it like when you change the light it beeps. And so there's a sort of interplay between light and sound and the i work that i did looks nothing like the work you see. Now and it was really very like abstract audiovisual tightly sinked audio and video. So that's why i did it. So that that interplay between light and south. I say so you happen to like this toy was it who gave it to so our family actually gave it to my grandma and then and this was an toya head like growing up right. We gave it to her. When i was like ten or so and then somehow i just took it back right like five years later or ten years later and that was that it wasn't light bright or something like that. That would have been a different name for you. So mike winkle. But i'm gonna call you thank you very much. I appreciate it so way before this auction. You're creating digital art and showcasing places like instagram and twitter. That's where you started sharing. This is a project you started. I think it was may two thousand seven. Were you created and post new digital art. Work every day Talk about this effort and why you wanted to do this. Yes so when. I started this out The first one was made. I two thousand seven. I wanted to get better at drawing. And i'd sauna an illustrator out of the uk named tom. Judd who did like a sketch -oday in his sketchbook And he did it for about a year in like. I think i thought that was a cool way. To sort of like you know incrementally improved. And so i started doing a drawing every day And like posting it online again this just on my website and literally. Nobody was seeing it besides my mom and light three friends And so. I did that for like a year and If you look at the christie's actually you can see all of those drawings. In the upper left hand corner there are all sort of like they're in the lower right hand corner is the last of the like five thousand day And so after a year. I learned a lot. It had pushed me to sort of like try a of new techniques and so after that i was like well what if i use that same thing to teach myself a three d program which i didn't know and when i say three d program it's similar to what they make like pixar movies. Yes spain the art telling these software so the software basically has it's it's like a three d world where you can place any sort of objects or build any sort of objects and then you have lights virtual lights that you place and and play some around the people and then you have a virtual camera and you basically shoot a picture of the the people. The way i work now is really almost like i have a huge giant collection of three d models. There's marketplaces where you can buy. There's thousands upon thousands you type in bike. Here's know eight hundred bikes which by deal on and so you can just buy these models and then you can use them and stuff and so i can with one. Click pull those into the scene and then i can sort of pose them. Put them wherever i want. Scale the mob scale them down. It's almost like playing with toys. I've got the biggest bass toy collection. I could break them apart and put you know a new head on a new body on new arms on whatever and then sort of set up these scenes and take a picture of it. And you don't want to compare it to clip art but it is doing a collage online corrective some but in a three d format. Yeah it's like that because again. I'm taking these assets that you know. I had not built sort of putting them together in sort of a bunch of different

Mike Winkle Mike Oday Toya Instagram Judd Christie Twitter TOM Pixar UK Spain
A brief guide to NFTs

Talking Tech

06:05 min | 3 weeks ago

A brief guide to NFTs

"May have heard news recently about the auction house christie's announcing that an artist by the name of people sold a piece of artwork for more than sixty nine million dollars big price tag. The hurt the third highest price for living artists. Here's the thing though. This piece of artwork isn't actually a physical work of art that you would hang in your home it's all digital it's only digital. The work was sold through what is called an nfc. it is growing technology. That is being used a lot recently. You've probably heard the term. Nf teased quite a bit in the news recently. Some examples of this of the nba has a new collectible service called nba. Top shot where you basically are collecting highlights from nba games. So for example you might see a dunk. That lebron james makes in a game you can go to this site and you can bid on that highlight and quote owned the highlight and that is how the service works We've also seen some other people really get involved in it as well Kansas city chiefs quarterback pat mahomes launched his own digital art gallery using these tesla ceo elon. Musk recently sold a tweet of his as an nfc which seems absolutely bizarre but it gets to the big question for some of the listeners out there potentially what isn't nfc. We're going to try to break it down a little bit here. We have a lot more of this available on tech dot usa. Today dot com. So we're gonna try to give you a cliffs note version of this but to explain it simply as simply as you can for something as complicated as this. Nfc stands for non fungible token so the way it works is if you're looking at something that's fungible. It is something that's easily interchangeable. Think about money for example if we each have a twenty dollar bill we can exchange twenty dollar bills and the values the same and it really doesn't make a difference with an nfc or a non fungible token each of them are unique. Each of them are different. So i might have an nf t and you might have in an f. T. we can't trade them value for value for each other because the values of different because they're unique they're different in a variety of ways. So that's what makes them non fungible so basically what it is is because it's digital. It's not a physical thing you have. It is basically a piece of data that that you own something. So in the case of the bidder at christie's auction he owns a piece of artwork in the case of someone who saw a really cool james harden layup or pass. They owned that clip online on nba. Top shot And we've seen some other weird applications for this technology to But the way it works is it's all done using blockchain technology now for the listeners that are saying to themselves. okay wait blockchain. i don't know what you're talking about here. so blockchain works like this. It is basically. It's kind of like a cloud storage database and what it does is it tracks transactions of items or assets. Let's take something like bitcoin. For example which is a currency that. I'm sure you've heard of quite a bit Something that a lot of people used to buy things online. So you have. Bitcoin and bitcoin is built on blockchain. So what happens is when you have this blockchain technology it is tracking every time someone is using. Bitcoin keeps track of wind. Bitcoin is transferred from one person to the other for a purchase. And that's essentially what it's built on so if you look at all. The history of bitcoin has an open blockchain. It's essentially an open database where you can review the history of all the transactions that have been done through blockchain. Now you don't see people's names or ideas or anything like that but it has a regular tracking of where this bitcoin is going and so that's kind of entities are instead of a bitcoin. It's this and f. T. and it's the same principle where it using this blockchain technology it's tracking every time this nfc's ownership is transferred. And you have a ledger and accounting of every which way this has been sold or resold and so on and so forth. You know you obviously can do this with bitcoin and economically. Do this with stuff like a tweet or an artwork or in the case of a article. New york post. Someone did it with the sound of their own farts. Which again if someone's willing to buy that sure that's great but there you go. That's that's how far we've gotten with all this experts. I've talked to have said that. One of the big benefits to this is the security Because these blockchain's arc run by one central company or one central administrator there on peer to peer networks which means they're spread out across lots of computers. So there's really no one place these are stored and so because they're spread out. It's much harder for someone to say. Go in an altar records that are recorded on a blockchain. So that's one of the big things and there's a lot of talk to from experts that this might be the wave of the future one expert. I talked to recently had said that you know one possibility. Is there used to track land titles and deeds so for example instead of dealing with those mountains of paperwork that you have to deal with. When you're buying a house or selling a house or things like that you would do it all using this blockchain technology and it would be done on the computer. And it'd be much simpler wireless paper while signatures and that. That is a very fascinating us. Obviously we're very far away from a lot of this stuff. All the stuff right now feels very strange in new. And there's really a lot of hype around it. So that's why we're seeing weird stuff like people selling their own individual tweet as an nf t- It makes everything on the internet. Feel like it's a commodity Whether that lasts again. It's too early to say. I think you know. Obviously there's a lot of hype around this and it's definitely worth watching because you know i if this all you know goes as it seems like experts have suggested i mean this could really changed the way we do things in terms of buying and selling and dealing with all those Types of this on the internet So we'll see where all this technology

NFC NBA Pat Mahomes Christie Bitcoin Blockchain Lebron James Musk Tesla James Harden Chiefs Kansas City USA New York Post
Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

FT Politics

08:50 min | 3 weeks ago

Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

"When johnson talks about the uk's world-beating response to covid nineteen vaccine pogrom passes muster. It's been an unqualified success or one of the reasons. His conservative party are so far ahead in the polls over twenty five million brits have received their job so fall but the government unexpectedly announced show fall in the number of vaccines delivered in april juice. Supply issues and the debate has a geopolitical angle. To given the you struggling with its own vaccine rollout slovan the line. The european commission president on the block might even consider export controls. All options are on the table. We are in the crisis of the century. And i'm not ruling out any anything for now because we have to make sure that europeans are vaccinated as soon as possible so sarah. Let's begin with the overall state of the uk's vaccine pogrom based on what was set out in december. It's pretty much all going to plan fairly high levels of takeover ninety four percent i believe and the government is insisting that all over fifty will have had their first job by the middle of april. So what's the problem. Well a week ago we would have said. This was indeed the most Astonishingly amyloid success and a sign of vessel. Buoyant moved around it. Was that the with some very clear briefing to a couple of the saturday newspapers suggesting that we were actually going to move to the over forty's much sooner than expected so it was a bit of a jolt to find out on wednesday that in fact. Nhs people involved in the program had been told that they must hold booking any new appointments throughout april because the been a sudden very significant reduction in the supplies available so that really has put the first serious dent in the narrative which right from december the eight. I think it was the day. That william shakespeare became one of the first two vaccine as now suddenly. The government is in the unaccustomed position of having to explain what's happening and explain why some of the public expectations that they'd raised so hard may not be met to be fair to the government. They still absolutely insisting they're on track with the two big dates that they've set for this program that all over fifty should be vaccinated by the middle of april. And all adult britons. Who wants a job will have had it at the end of july. But there's no question that it's been a difficult political management problem for them this week and very much not the position that they'd hoped to be in the club. Let's have a look at why this might be happening and seven. I spent a lot of this week speaking to people. Whitehall trying to figure out exactly what was going on behind the scenes with matt. Hancock gave us a of clarity in the house of commons and the government is pinning own production issues. The first one is this batch of one point seven million jobs that we sent back for testing and the second thing is the supply from the soham institute of india which again the governor's put down to supply issues but others are saying that actions being blocked by modi's government from shipping out to the uk. Exactly it is pretty opaque what's happening. There are two elements. Here that can hold up. Supplies one is the genuinely technical difficulties in producing a complex biological process. I mean it's not straightforward zanu vaccine and a lot of the manufacturing sites haven't made this sort of marin a vaccine before it scale factor. You could say none of them have because this is the first one. That's the fiso won. The astra zeneca at novartis vaccine is also level to a complicated process. So there are technical supply issues and then there at the political ones. You alluded to and i don't know whether the serum institute of india supply has been blocked for political reasons because india was having rather a good downturn in covert cases. But that's turning up again. Unfortunately and there are feelings. That indian government wanted to have it at home. This is so. I think if we look at the context of this a lot of it is actually not that much of a serious problem that we were crunching the numbers this week and april is a significant moment in the vaccine program for the uk. Because yes they were vaccinated all over fifty which according to people like christie chief medical officer of england which uses ninety nine percents of deaths on messages the pressure on the nhc s. But eneko you have to install the second jobs. Really the po- gum began to scale up towards the end of january and eleven week window. The nhl is set between the first and second doses. That really kicks in april and but hancock said this week that really still going to be delivering about fourteen million jobs throughout april which is low though. It's been in march but it's still a pretty high number so it's probably good to keep it in context with feels really what's gone wrong. Here is expectations that the rogue briefing about forty s really feels like delivers come off the bush tourism bush. Johnson's tried to restrain for much of twenty twenty. One yes and i think some. Nhs officials were less than delighted about that huge raising expectations last weekend. In a way. I think this was always going to be a difficult point for the program. It was absolutely predictable that at the point at which second doses to scale up there was going to be a deep in first doses. So it's perhaps unfortunate that there wasn't more subtle public preparation. You're absolutely right international standards even in april. We're still going to be doing more. Vaccinations than many of our counterparts. So it's particularly unfortunate wasn't better preparation. Because i think in the minds of a lot of britain's the will now be a sense of this program isn't doing well it's stumbled. It didn't have to be this way that it could have been very differently presented. And after all as i said the government is still on track to meet those two deadlines that it says now clive. We need to put this in the context of europe as well and we heard from s. the von d'alene at the top. That and you still really struggling with its vaccine vo loud but the most baffling things. She's seen this week. Is the story about the astra zeneca job and how effective or side effects. That may have in this concern. Over blood clots we heard from the ama from the nhra in the uk from the world health organization. All saying there are no concerns about blood. Clots and ashes annika vaccine yet at didn't stop lawson countries from halting giving out the doses. It's a very complicated picture on side effects. At least the spotlight turned away from efficacy. Before countries in continental europe were worrying that the astrazeneca vaccine wouldn't work well enough to older people. I think the efficacy questions have more or less be answered now. The spotlight is on whether they're adverse side effects and a few of those have been discovered there. These two different sorts of blood disorders do with abnormal clotting thrombosis that have been detected in people who just been vaccinated in norway in germany elsewhere on continental europe. The numbers are tiny. I would say fewer than twenty around the continent. Investigation is still continuing. There's no proven link with the vaccine. But a lot of vaccine knowledge ists the might be a link. But that is no reason to stop the vaccination program when it's saving tens of thousands of lives probably and people have said that just by halting for a few days the astrazeneca vaccination and continental europe. This week until the european medicines agency said it was okay that would have cost lives. It loves cost lives directly because people weren't getting vaccinated and it also probably unfortunately of cost lives indirectly because all the publicity about ad side effects will just undermined confidence in the vaccine

UK Government Soham Institute Of India Astra Zeneca Serum Institute Of India Eneko European Commission William Shakespeare Whitehall Johnson Modi House Of Commons Sarah Hancock Novartis NHC Bush Matt
An NFT-backed jpeg sold for $69.3 million at a Christie's auction

This Week in Tech

03:28 min | Last month

An NFT-backed jpeg sold for $69.3 million at a Christie's auction

"This week at christie's which is the big Auction site for for art. A creator of art named people sold one of his japex digital creation for sixty. Nine million dollars Is it dollars. Or is it crypto. Well it's worth sixty nine million. Whatever it is it is the. He's the third largest price paid for living artists. People is up there now with jeff collins and david. Hockney sixty nine nine to be fair. Nine point three million dollars went to christie's which immediately i'm sure turned the theory him into american cold hard cash sixty million of it was a bid by an anonymous bidder using a pseudonym although we think we now know who it is and i'll explain that in just a second sixty million dollars what did you get for the sixty million. Did you get something you can hang on your wall. No did you get did you get. What did you get you got. You didn't even get the j. peg. You can have the j. peggy at address which would give you this. J peg which by the way consists of five thousand images that people has taken he. Does it daily art image. Over the last Well since two thousand seven whatever that is fourteen years so it's ki- it's kind of the collected works of people but you don't even really get anything except a toke a thing that says you own it it it can be infinitely reproduced. You can print it. Anybody can print up but you own it only you can own it. And that's a. That's a affirmed on the blockchain. Sixty million dollars. Now the guy who bought it uses the name medic cova. But amy caster who i. I don't know from adam but wrote in the blog and i convinced me. That in fact is a crypto entrepreneurs. Been on the scene. For about seven years named vig. Nash some dorasan and furthermore amy caster kind of explained for the first time to me. What's really going on here. So it wasn't Medico vans own ethereal that he spent in effect he created a another crypto bundle called b twenty bought the painting with that and is selling shares. Bits fractional portions of the people artwork to other people in other words. Step three prophet fifty nine. He owns fifty nine percent of be dot twenty. Motta's who else owns it. Be people owns a two percent stake so in effect people bought his own painting or part of his own painting. I'm not that there's any conflict of interest there or is there. But really i think if there is if in your mind there is some question and i'll ask you guys now to comment but if they're in your mind some question about what the hell is. How could how could jay peg be worth sixty nine point three million dollars. And why would somebody a medico van. Spend that kind of money on jay peg. It now becomes clear. He's gonna make money on it

Jeff Collins Christie Amy Caster Hockney Dorasan Peggy David VIG Medico Nash Adam Motta Jay Peg
A Beeple Artwork Just Sold for $69M

The Breakdown with NLW

05:47 min | Last month

A Beeple Artwork Just Sold for $69M

"Sound. You hear the sound of people's heads absolutely exploding a few times in previous episodes. I've mentioned the people auction going. On at christie's this is the first time the famous auction house has auctioned off a completely digital good. They had previously included an f. T. versions of some physical items that were up for auction but this was the first time it was just an nf tea while the final bids are in and the price paid for people's the first five thousand days was sixty nine million three hundred and forty six thousand two hundred fifty dollars first of all the folks over on wall street. Bets are in utter disbelief that the price wasn't sixty nine million. Four hundred twenty thousand and sixty nine dollars. Second of all crypto. Twitter is absolutely frigging losing their minds. This is a crescendo. Perhaps the first of many but definitely the first of the nfc mennea sweeping the world. I've given the background before but in short. Nfc's are non fungible tokens non fungible means that rather than every token being like every other token in other words each. Bitcoin is like each other bitcoin. They're mutually interchangeable. Each other is equivalent to each other. Tether these are cryptographic. Unique tokens that uniqueness lens them well to the actual owning quote unquote of the original quote unquote of creative work. Like a piece of art and of have been a part of the crypto space. For years i mean remember crypto kitties but over the last few months and especially the last few weeks they have had a major breakout. There have been two really important categories within that the first is actually in the sports collectible slash trading cards space last year. The team that brought you crypto katie's launched nba top shots in conjunction with the nba. These are effectively a new type of trading card featuring efficiently. Licensed video highlights. Now i was watching this and things started reasonably but they have really picked up over the last couple months last month. Nba top shot process. More than two hundred fifty million dollars in sales from one hundred thousand buyers more than that admitted a whole new group of wales a wall street journal article today was called the whales of nba. Top shot made a fortune buying lebron highlights. They were the early to the hottest. Nf market and their collections are now worth millions of dollars. They take a look at people. Like michael levy a thirty one year old financial analyst. Who spent one hundred seventy five thousand dollars over six months whose collection is now worth twenty million plus or andy chore. Leeann a twenty seven year. Old dev who back in his younger days traded pokemon bought sneakers but then more recently bought. Thirty eight hundred. Nba top shot moments. That are now worth a collective fifteen million. I think it's really important to point this side of the market out because in many ways it is a completely different. Demographic than the crypto punks art type people and frankly the people interested in people at least on an artistic level. But i also think it's worth noting that collectibles in general are going crazy. Golden auctions is a huge trading house for cards memorabilia. It sarah on march seventh. Golden tweeted prior to two thousand twenty. There only ten cards that ever sold for one million dollars plus in history last night we sold five cards for a million dollars. Plus clearly there is something going on in these sports card collectible market as well and on a smaller level i track a small index of magic the gathering card prices just to keep track of what older cars in that space are doing and it's up four hundred and fourteen percent in the last year. This is going to be relevant for discussion in a little bit about what's really underlying what's happening in an f. Teas but for now. Let's get back to the art. There has been a ton of focus. Here i people were gobsmacked by the price of crypto punks which are selling for thousand sometimes even tens of thousands hash masks or more of the same but all in all these things felt pretty well contained within the crypto space they were insider games insider speculation and insider collectors over the last few weeks that shifted we saw people sell on nifty gateway for more than six million. We had musicians jumping in just in blau who performs as three lau sold a set of thirty three. Nfc's for over eleven million dollars. Grimes may just under six million dollars. Kings of leon released an album last week with full. Ft's we've seen more sports stars jump in with gronk releasing a bunch of nf teas and then we've had brand seemingly determined to ruin the party for everyone like taco bell who released a set of tease last week as well. Of course alongside the hype. The backlash has increased as well. I mentioned on yesterday's show that there is a huge group. Were now fighting on environmental grounds. Just to give you a sample of some of those tweets per the biggest thing. The nfc sh tells us that we have an extremely short amount of time to destroy the capitalist system before it scorches all live from the earth in of a three percent rate of return. Here's another one the. Nfc thing has drawn a line in the sand between the artists who are annoying for evil minting enough tease and artists who are annoying for good cyber bullying people minting. Nfc's until dimensions mentions are so exhausting. They stop like we're all annoying but it's how we use our powers finally. Let's do one more tweeting things here and there but my stance on teases final. It's horrible for the environment and a very critical time in the climate crisis. Therefore if you participate in it. I will judge you freely in gladly and no longer support you so i tweeted this out yesterday and got a huge number of responses of people who have seen similar things and keep in mind. These aren't like random accounts or at least these tweets are getting hundreds of likes responses. And re tweet so. It seems clear that there is this counter lash happening even as we speak all in all the point. Is that even before today. Things in this space. We're getting pretty heated. But then the people auction closed

NBA NFC Andy Chore Old Dev Bitcoin Christie Michael Levy Leeann Katie Wall Street Journal Twitter Wales
Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

Tolbert, Krueger and Brooks

00:37 sec | Last month

Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

"Learn about NF tease. The price tag for some digital artwork is starting to rival classic paintings from Picasso and Monet. Mike Winkelmann. He's better known as people created a montage of 5000 days of digital art and then put it up for auction at Christie's. It's sold for a record $69 million unique Blockchain based digital image is part of the non fungible Token world or end empties are still being shunned by many in the art world as a speculative fat, But the eight figure price tag for the people Certainly caught the naysayers. Attention.

Mike Winkelmann Monet Picasso Christie
Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

WSJ What's News

03:23 min | Last month

Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

"A digital artwork has set a new record at christie's selling for sixty nine point. Three million dollars that's higher than bids for artwork by frida kahlo and salvador dali. Our ceylan off says the collage by artist. People also set a record for the non fungible token market. She'll explain simply put an. Nf nafta is just this digital token that conveys ownership. so you can think of f. as digital collectibles the idea is that you have this asset online and there is only one owner of it and because of that that gives it some level of scarcity it gives it some value where it gets more technical is the fact that that authenticity is guaranteed through information conveyed on blockchain which is the same technology that underlies bitcoin. It's just saying here. Is these specific. Asset here's data. it was created. Here is the name of the work of art in this case. And here's all of that information preserved so that you can actually track who owns this digital asset because assets online. You know if you have an image you can share it. You can make an. Mimi can do all sorts of things with it and there really hasn't historically been one owner and this lets you do that.

Frida Kahlo Salvador Dali Christie Blockchain Nafta Mimi
Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

Pat Thurston

00:43 sec | Last month

Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

"Tease. The price tag for some digital artwork is starting to rival classic paintings from Picasso and Monet. Mike Winkelmann. He's better known as people created a montage of 5000 days of digital art and then put it up for auction at Christie's. It's sold for a record $69 million unique Blockchain based digital image is part of the non fungible Token World, or N F. T s are still being shunned by many in the art world as a speculative fat butt. Eight figure price tag for the people has certainly caught the naysayers. ATTENTION By Mark Nieto. This report sponsored by Exit inaccuracy matters. Get a $5 rebate by trading up any non contact

Mike Winkelmann Monet Picasso Christie Mark Nieto
The gold rush of digital media shaking everything up

The 3:59

03:28 min | Last month

The gold rush of digital media shaking everything up

"Broader chang and this is your daily charge. What does shed light on. This mysterious world is our crackle reporter rich. Never welcome rich anything's so let's get right into it. What the heck are nf. Teas that is a good question. And it's a complicated answer but nfc stands for non jewel token in their bisley. They work like a bar code and they're meant to authenticate pieces of digital Like a file or a or a or a video or a or a movie At what it does is basically it designates one version as the authentic version and everything else is just copy right. He gives you the examples of some high profile. Tease of some of the wilder. Ones have gone for lots of money. Sure so right now. There's this auction at the british auction. House christie's is doing ended today and the bidding last time i looked at thirteen million. And it's for a piece of art by by rs named people So that's kind of one at the crazy extreme end of it There were those one clip of lebron james of walking shot that went for like a hundred thousand dollars jack dorsey of twitter is auctioning off the first tweet And i think that one is at at more than two million right now home what. Let's let me kind of break. It down because i think this is where i'm having difficulty wrapping my head around. You mentioned the lebron james to drill clip. Which can easily be shared the tweet by elon. Musk that can be screened. Shot at or can be shared the the the christie's auction that that piece of our it's not physical. It's a digital piece of art. Which again can be copied and shared. Why would someone pay this much money for. I guess what is what is technically though authentic version of this digital asset but ultimately is still a digital asset that you can copy and share right right. So that's that's where it gets really really complicated because the people the people are work. You know that's me. That's in our story like the pictures in our story right and i didn't hate thirteen million dollars but it you know it basically comes down to perception and that's really why this is kind of a fascinating topic because at the heart of it it it. It's we're talking about ownership online and what that means And and so you. I was talking to one one. Berkeley professor for For the story. That i did and his his take was. You know. it's it's about bragging rights but it's also about more than that know like like you. You've got these these pieces of art. That are are prolific online right. Everybody seen i'm like like a meme And if one person owns that you can take credit for for owning this That people love but also you know it. it could also be kind of something deeper than that I liken it to a painting right if you it. It makes sense that you'd want to buy like an original basquiat versus printed and the reason might be because you you might feel closer to the artist if you were to own the quote unquote authentic version of the same go for for an

House Christie Lebron James NFC Jack Dorsey Elon Christie Twitter Berkeley
The mental health impacts of the pandemic one year later

The World

04:15 min | Last month

The mental health impacts of the pandemic one year later

"To be with you today. Tomorrow. It'll be one year that World Health Organization director Ted Rose get Racists made the official declaration pandemic. Is not a word to use lightly or carelessly for 12 months. We've been living with the word pandemic, and it's reality more than 2.6 million people dead and 117 million infected because of the Corona virus. Planet continues to battle the acute phase of the pandemic and what get braces recently called mass trauma. As we hear from the world's Alana Gordon. Psychologists say the trauma will have impacts for years to come. Christie Douglas, He's a paradox. Collectively, we're experiencing this very much together in this moment. However, we are also doing so when we are all socially isolated in distance, collectively together and yet collectively, totally alone. Dangler is a clinical psychologist and global health researcher at Harvard. She says. The pandemic has even disrupted how we mourn. People grieve very differently. Everyone grieves so differently. Some people grieve very publicly. Some people grieve very privately. Sometimes we do a little bit of both. It's a mixed process, so there's really no one right way to do it. Douglas says rituals are essential to be able to begin to acknowledge the reality of the losses. Ah, lot of that has gone virtual this year. She says it's too soon to understand the impacts. But she is worried digitally connecting doesn't replace in person connections. Reef alone is very painful and were not meant to grieve alone, and we're forced now to grieve alone. Oftentimes in isolation. It's a lot. There's the losses from the pandemic and then other losses were grieving was interrupted by the pandemic itself. In the U. S. Black, Latino and other vulnerable communities are already carrying a bigger weight of these losses. This is happening against the backdrop of compound it stressors. So we're sort of in a perfect storm. We worry for downstream, clinically impairing conditions. And what I really worry about is the impact on the most vulnerable among us All. This means the impact of the pandemic and the collective trauma could last for years. Wh o. Emergency operations manager Mike Ryan recently stressed that this sense of loss can't be anyone Individuals burden to carry mental health systems are maxed out. I think there's a point Where it just becomes unethical to continue to call something out as an issue but not actually focus on solutions. Solutions for joy. means re imagine the whole system for addressing bereavement, making it more holistic. She's director of ever more a nonprofit that focuses on improving conditions for families, You know, brief siblings, right higher risk of premature death, dropping out of high school or teen pregnancy. Brief Children experience higher rates of depression. There's a lack of understanding that the systems around the families you can facilitate Helpful, coping, functional, coping or make coping all that more difficult and complicated. Mulherin says. Policies can make a difference like employment and housing protections. Benefit transfers. Psychosocial supports things that just aren't a guarantee right now. Christie Dangler at Harvard is deeply worried, too. She also says it's important to remember when you're into this pandemic that humans are resilient, acknowledging the loss and stress is the first step. And yet, she says, there also might be another paradox. In this moment, perhaps a more optimistic one. It's almost psychologically impossible to truly process and absorb. This without hindsight, without some distance, Douglas says, many maybe feeling none to the magnitude of losses in this moment, and some instances that can actually help it can provide a buffer. It can help us get through a very demanding time. And then when we have the space, we might go back and start the process. But in the meantime, she really hopes that these overdue collective conversations about grief and loss Lead to long term support for everyone who's grieving for the world.

Ted Rose Alana Gordon Christie Douglas Dangler World Health Organization Harvard Douglas Mike Ryan Mulherin U. Christie Dangler Depression
South Dakota gov. to sign ban on transgender girls from female sports

Democracy Now! Audio

00:31 sec | Last month

South Dakota gov. to sign ban on transgender girls from female sports

"South dakota's republican governor christie. Gnomes said monday. She's excited to sign a bill. Barring transgender women and girls from competing in high school and college sports mississippi republican governor tate reeves has promised to sign similar legislation in mississippi south. Dakota's aco you chapter responded quote the danger this legislation creates is real. The potential harm to south dakota is significant and the stakes for transgender students. Are high kids are

Tate Reeves Gnomes South Dakota Christie Mississippi Dakota
"christie" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

04:56 min | Last month

"christie" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Like paul mccartney. Selene dionne taylor swift and usher and the list is not stop there. It's total who's who of the music industry. In addition she's often hired by atlantic records. Sony music the oh two arena in london. And she's been the house photographer at the royal albert hall. Talk about a coup gig. We encourage you to check out our website at christie goodwin dot com to get a sense of what she does but first we'd like to welcome christy to join. John annoy at denatured pond cast. Hello welcome thank you for having me. Welcome to the show. We've been looking at your work and and and it's really amazing You have certain situations going on that. A very unique. We've spoken to people who photograph musicians in concerts in the past but looking at your work. You have a little niche going on there in a certain signature. Look and other things going on that just really really wonderful. And we we plan on talking about in the next hour so I guess my first question is how you've been getting by because concerts are not happening these days. I know you know. Twenty twenty was supposed to be a brilliant year for me. I was fully booked. the holiest through and then from one day to another everything got counseled ans-. It's weird because i've been always been on this treadmill for almost fifteen years. Never daring to say no dude job. A scared device say no there will be job coming anymore and i was on this treadmill and all of the sudden that treadmill stopped and i sort of when that quiet and it was a good thing and i had to stop by think. I was very close to burn out so in that perspective. It was good to that good. Hey little bit league my wounds but you know after two months i got bored. Because that's what creative people have constant still so I haven't been shooting any music. But i've been doing all the things that have kept myself busy..

paul mccartney christy london John Selene dionne first question Sony music Twenty twenty almost fifteen years one day first two months two royal albert hall taylor atlantic next hour christie goodwin dot com arena
"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

01:46 min | 4 months ago

"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

"That sounds nice doesn't it in that context. I don't think it's really that surprising after all that people have been buying all of the second hand agatha christie novels that they can get the hands-on nor that richard osmond's thursday murder club. A book heavily influenced by the queen of crime is one of the best selling novels of the year. It's not escapist fiction in the conventional sense but it is a kind of escape to immerse. You're exhausted strung out. Brain the order and method of a well-structured. Who done it. A good plot will start out by presenting many different plausible solutions to the mystery and then gradually with them away until only one remains in a year full of spiralling hypotheticals. I've sat found myself wishing.

richard osmond agatha christie
"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

05:41 min | 4 months ago

"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

"Desperate for books assumes we reopens often tangle lifted. we had the biggest explosion of trades. I've had it was busier than it's ever beam and there was one shelf in particular that people were frequenting the one thing that i did nice. This was a massive surge in sales of x christie. novels an christie's always a good seller. But since time. I haven't been able to buy enough. Agatha christie's to keep up with demand has been really seminal and is not people coming in buying one two levels is it will come in and buying ten of this team but i think agatha christie seems to have appealed to the lockdown mentality and i don't quite short alston vote guidance lifted i had again by books from high snaps lockerbie and thankfully there is just not every agatha christie novel ever written so that is two days off to lockdowns lifted. I saw that pressman monk shows and the polo. When's within i would say we. This is one of the main ways that shown gets hold of the second hand books that he stocks in his shop. Firehouse clearances lords to me. The best deals are deals. Fat somebody as resizing save it west. Somebody's died and the highest has to be sold and the collection brooks library asked to go and they rid of loss. So yeah. that's that's how i get hold of myself and i suppose it's probably a one every ten days one day every ten days collector has have to clear burks shown does a lot of these melancholy trips to clear out books and there were certain trends that he's picked up in the years that you've been doing it. There are things that use flying in almost every has clearance. And i've christie's of them is just because she was so enormously popular in her. Diane has never really gone. I think she's if you look at the tb dreamtime stations on her books always been incessant since since she died so eleven. Time deny christie. Because i just know and sell them almost instantly and in scotland. There's always walter scott's waverley novels to accept shown isn't quite pleased to see those because they're impossible to sell apparently so what was it that sent people dashing into shawn's bookshop pursued lockdown lifted. Desperate to by agatha christie novels by the dozen. Well he has a couple of theories soon compulsively because they're very readable very shorts genuine and all come to kind of neat resolution at venues and at a time when liberty quite knows or knew what we were going to be down or the resolution was dance. Bnb still during. This is something quite satisfying about.

agatha christie christie brooks library alston burks Diane tb walter scott scotland shawn
"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

04:26 min | 4 months ago

"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

"Like a lot of people. I've really struggled with reading this year whereas once the woods just to flow off the page and straight into my bray now a connection is broken somewhere. I've been distracted and anxious. Picking up books that i think will suit my mood and then putting them down again after a few dozen beijing is because they don't immediately fix me this slowdown in my reading. Has bothered me a good deal. Another item on the list of things. That i worry about but co control. There are a few books that i have still been able to get properly stuck into and almost all of them are you done it. There's something uniquely comforting. I think about the rhythms and patterns of a classic detective story from the nineteen eighteen to nineteen thirty nine period. And those are the ones that i've gravitated towards in two thousand and twenty and i'm not alone in this book. Sellers have noticed. Even more agatha christie's flying off the shelves than usual and several of the most popular new crime novels published this. I'll ones in which the influence of classic crime fiction is very apparent the beloved conventions of golden age detective fiction were formed in the wake of global traumas namely the first world war on the flu pandemic that followed it in that sense although this extraordinary year brought so many new strange experiences are comfort. Reading habits are actually part of a very old tradition of convalescence by a crime fiction. You look forward to curling up on the sofa. This christmas with your favourite to done it and feeling a little better for awhile. It's worth understanding. How stories about murder and violence became so associated with alexei shen and recovery in this episode. I'm exploring how crime became cozy. Welcome to sheet on it. I'm caroline crampton..

beijing agatha christie flu alexei shen caroline crampton
"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

04:33 min | 4 months ago

"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

"At least i always notice the fact that when she does have american characters they tend to have really outlandish elaborate name like their first name is something super weird like not super weird just like kind of you know grandiose-sounding and often has a van in front of it so it will be like cyrus van helsing or just. The names are just often ridiculous and they're nine times out of ten extremely rich as well. They're often the like only carolina. Have you. I mean i assume you have but you know the movie ferris bueller. Yes where he says. He's abe frommer. The sausage king of chicago. I figure every single american character in a christie novel is basically abe from the sausage king of chicago. Yes yeah you're all right. That is definitely there always described as being you know baking wheat or begin oil or something. One of them is a It was a rare christie reference to california. He was the cucumber king from california. That is excellent. yes how you are a cucumber. i have to imagine it's a little bit rare. Yes also you're right. No one of any other nationality is ever a king or well. You cannot right. Get quite a number of like russian ballerinas. Yes definitely we might be of campus. Good points about how christie doesn't do stock character. Well that's the great thing about christie though. I mean it's kind of the joy of our of our podcast. I think her leadership in general when you write as much as she did. It's sort of like the bible. The bible is really long. There's a lot to pick and choose from so if you wanna make a point or you want to approve you know a certain hypothesis or something you can cherry pick whatever you want and if you pretty much wanna make any point about christie can because there's something there in the text so if you want to find an example of character poorly drawn of course you can find that but you certainly can find many examples of the opposite as well.

cyrus van helsing abe frommer christie chicago abe california carolina
"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

04:16 min | 4 months ago

"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

"And i think with those kinds of you know linearly constructed thrillers. Either the story really works for you or it really. Doesn't there's not a whole lot to you know sort of sometimes in where you can least point to. Oh i really liked that clue because that was so clever or the twist didn't work for me but my on the way to you know on the way there everything but the resolution you know i was very gripping etc etc. I think it just either sometimes. It's a little bit more black and white and that's just one word. The secret of chimneys just does not work for me and i just found it to be a a miserable reading experience but not not the most miserable reading experience out of out of any christie and i wanted to ask you as well about the perspective of reading these books as americans because i think they will hit different people differently wherever they are and whoever they are bought specifically from your perspective on the other side of the atlantic how disaster the christie striky I think both of us have basically been brought up reading british novels. And so i actually that a little bit hard to even parse. Because i think that you know. I just think of evenly. Jane austen as part of my dna. Like if i'm going to think about something. I'm going to bring up reverence to ama- or you know some ability and and so christi falls under the same camp. It's just part of my dna. A and i don't know that i mean society wise. Of course there's a difference between america and the uk. But i don't think. I don't think that changes my reading at all. I don't know what do you think. I think we're definitely both anglophiles. So it's true that we we've grown up. And i think i think actually again this this kind of with your first question or at least my answer to your first question in that i think a lot of readers of christie in the us specifically our readers who tend to read a lot of literature that comes out of the uk. And i think there's a there's a there's just a danger with any sort of love from afar of potentially fetish ising or mis perceiving elements of a culture that you're not a part of but that's not christie's specific you know and again i think because christie is so widely read. Perhaps it happens for more people. Vis-a-vis christie than other authors simply. Because reading her more. But you know. I think as we've been discussing these these novels a little bit more deeply and thoroughly on the podcast. We do often have to remind ourselves that when it comes to elements of race or class. There's just a different history and a different kind of you know cultural standpoint from christie and anyone within the uk is attacking those those topics than in the us which has its own extremely specific context for race and class especially for race. It's very difficult to talk about race between from as an american about race in gen role and just to not specify well. Where is this happening. And who is involved. And what you really. If you don't get specific. I think the conversation loses a lot of its value so we often just have to remind ourselves of that and get specific you know we had. We had a joke. We were interviewing our dear friend sophie. Hannah and this was about a year ago. I guess and she had the mall of her boss book in florida and we had to explain to her. The concept of the florida man. And why florida is a problem in.

christie Jane austen uk ama christi america sophie Hannah florida
"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

03:46 min | 4 months ago

"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

"Onwards was justice steady decline but you're ranking with suggests that that's not entirely the case It's funny when i was thinking about what we were going to talk about it when when you said oh i want to. I want to ask you about what's your experience reading christie as complete s. I think the most obvious answer is that there's this narrative the sort of meta narrative built-up christie readers. That yeah she was. She was brilliant. She was pretty much a genius but then she really had a that. Started somewhere in the fifties through until the early seventies which was when she stopped writing original material. You know and then passing away in nineteen seventy six and it's just not true. I think that again asli. Our experience of the novels is subjective. But i've been struck by the fact that in every single decade there are gems of novels and stinkers of novels shall show often crank out a masterpiece followed by a clunker by masterpiece followed by clunker all relatively speaking. Of course we cherish even the clunkers within the christie cannon. But yeah and i point to good and bad novels in the twenties thirties forties fifties. And we haven't gotten to the sixties yet but you know i can say that i'm very much looking forward to the pale horse and endless night. You know those are two novels that are in the sixties that i think are just wonderful before we leave rankings. One last thing. I wanted to ask you was what's wrong with the secret chimneys. So okay funny. You should ask a funny. You should ask. Kemper hates it more than me which is funny. Because i had one of the worst experiences writing it i was like in a particularly bad work position at the time and had an awful time reading it just awful it was one of those things caroline like. And what have you know. Rather bashed my head against a wall then keep reading come for somehow in that context somehow dislikes it more than me so camp. It's well you know what the secret of chimneys for me is one of those books where the stuck in his time elements significantly. Mar the read. Because it is an extremely zena phobic anti anti semitic book and it is meant to be light hearted and frolic some and frivolous and fun. And i find that contrast to be really distasteful so i think that that's one area in which the book i'm sure worked a lot better when it was published because i i think you know the the depictions wouldn't have you know obviously wouldn't have jarred as much for a contemporary reading audience and otherwise it's the the thing that i think that also a lot of people forget when it comes to christie is that she didn't just write mystery she also wrote these thrillers right and they really are peppered throughout her career. I mean she did. She was doing thrillers. Even in the fifties we covered they came to baghdad. End destination unknown both written in the fifties and sixties. We'll have one or two as well but she wrote a lot of them in the twenty s early on and one of them is actually one of our favorites we. It's become just a running joke on our podcast that we are the biggest man. In the brown suit stands. We just can't get enough of it. We we wanna talk about it all the time. Well we love and bedding art. You know she's she's our jam. But the secret of chimneys just just doesn't work for me in the same way..

christie Kemper caroline baghdad
"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

04:51 min | 4 months ago

"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

"As she knows it and then trying to pop in these other characters and it doesn't really work honestly. It feels as though those characters are being belittled. And i think if we you know if we wanted to be you make an even stronger statement. You could even say that. There's it almost feels as though there's a little bit of of contempt in the way that they are being portrayed and. I don't think that that is intentional. At all but i do think it's because there's a bit of a superficial aspect to the way that those characters are created as opposed to the white characters in the mystery and we are constantly talking about the fact that even though some will claim that christie cardboard characters or they were just stock types and they didn't actually have any depth to them. I will deny that to my dying day. I mean i think if you read the text it's just not true in in some of novels it's true there are some that are better than others. In some of the some of our best she has characters that are just as three dimensional as characters in in any literary novel you you could pick up so she can do it it just it it. It felt as if this was an exercise and one in which she she just wasn't giving the same space in depth and breadth to the those characters and the overall experiences. Just definitely disturbing and it's ironic. Because if you think of her most well known creation one al-qaeda borrow who is belgium. He is a refugee. He is kind has mysterious past. You know we get bits and pieces of it over the course of all the novels and he's ushered in a particular way right because he and it's to his benefit at some level and to a greater degree you get it with her understanding of ageism miss marple and they're both sort of operating outside of systems because they are third and so i mean i think that if you're reading that there's some.

christie qaeda belgium al
"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

03:23 min | 4 months ago

"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

"War we would have known everybody who lived in this village because we would have known their parents and grandparents and now people just arrive and they don't bring letters of introduction from other people that we've known and who knows if anyone is who they say they. That's the that's the big one that i think most brilliant also taken at the flood as we're gonna have the flood oh jinx campaign. No i think that you really see that. But i think that when you read them chronologically you got something. Like a comparison that can be made between apparel anti-us hickory decorate talk and her viewpoint becomes so odd by agree. Doc i mean odd from our perspective and twenty twenty. I think that she was trying to be inclusive. And perhaps not doing it so but there is a notion also of the bright young things having sort of fallen apart you know. Yeah that's something else. I wanted to ask you about as well actually because i think from having done this reading through in order your very well placed to comment on christie's prejudices on tub description of prejudice and how that's changed as well and this is something that you cover on the podcast as well but it about what i think is impossible if you're going to read christie and twenty twenty and do any sort of a thorough analysis of what that experience is like not to address the sometimes jarring experience of reading christie when it comes to depictions of race class sexual orientation gender nationality religion etcetera etcetera. And for that reason. We really don't shy away from it. And when when we're ranking the books which is you know more just supposed to be a fun exercise than anything else because we do realize what a subjective sort of thing this is but when we two or ranking the books we do sometimes deduct points from books if those elements which we call stuck in its time elements mar the reading experience. And sometimes they really do. Sometimes they don't actually. It really depends on the book but you know one thing i would say is that i think the reason why those elements are often. There is that christie actually was grappling with a lot of different themes and interests beyond just the murder that she was telling so. I think you know it's important to give her credit for the fact that she was actually biting awful lot in these books and more than she is often given credit for and sometimes she quits herself better than others and then of course. There's also just the fact that it's very unusual to have written books. As long ago as she did but still but to still be as vigorously and vibrantly in print as she is and to be as widely read as she is. I think there are a ton of other authors. Who simply just aren't read. Who were writing exactly as she did in her time. And she's the one that we get to judge because we still read her book. I mean i think that if you make a point about the largest read mystery novelists say.

christie us
"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

03:15 min | 4 months ago

"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

"Found it really interesting to read her in order because there is a sort of hopeful at the beginning especially in short stories on tommy pens and even in something like the secret of chimneys and that ends up vanishing. Yes i suppose. That's right. She does characters anyway become more world weary paps inexperienced as she did herself. I think don't you think kemper. No i do. I think that in general because so many people experienced christie in this one off. Sort of a way where you know you pick up a book at random or nearly at random you you enjoy it you put it down then maybe a few months or few years later you pick up another book. You might not even be aware of where it is in the chronology. That certainly how i read christie before doing the podcast and doing it at any sort of consistent matic way i think for that reason. There's often a sort of static or even flattened nature to christie's settings or at least that's how they are perceived by a lot of readers and i think the the other major reason that happens is a lot of people experience christie. I if not foremost through the at the many many stations of her novels that exist and many of those adaptations are very purposely set in a static time period. We talk a lot about this on our podcast. But the david suchet series which you know is is quite beloved by us and so many others is set pretty much in nineteen thirty six thereabouts. The the entire series and when you read christie in as opposed to just picking up a novel here and there you really. I think gain an appreciation for how much her novels are not to set in a. You know a pretend sort of place that doesn't exist which again is a popular conception. But they're very much set in the real world and because of that her settings do change and the tone of the books changes very much from the bubbly twenties. You know that it's such a contrast those books when you're comparing the postwar but the post world war. Two books are just remarkable for how much she's really commenting on the erosion of the servant class. And you know this notion that the well ordered lifestyle in which every neighbor new every other neighbor is just gone and she leaves that into the very mysteries that she is telling. You know so brilliant. So i'm constantly struck as we're reading them in order by. Just how anchored agatha christie's books in fact are in the real world and. I think that's something that's a statement that i think would shock a lot of a lot of true fans of christie. Because if you're not reading it that way that that just may not come across. That makes a lot of sense. Yeah i definitely remember. I think it's a murder is announced. Was the one that really drake at that for me. When its own about before the.

christie kemper tommy david suchet agatha christie drake
"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

03:55 min | 4 months ago

"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

"I was a pretty early reader and so i read a lot of nancy drew and when i graduate from that i graduated to my mother's massive collection of like nineteen seventy as paperback copies of christie. And do you remember which was the first one was or was it. More of a general emotion. It was probably something quite bad to be completely honest caroline. It was probably something from the sixties periods. It was probably like an elephants can remember kind of situation yes. That's often the case. I find with people who come to our young oversee. You've got no prior information to tell you where to go and also by that point. She was so famous that those kind of the most ubiquitous books because they were printing so many of them right. Of course so of course. There were copies of them. And so. I'm sure. I'm sure it was something that or maybe Maybe halloween party. I mean there something like that was definitely one of the earliest ones and i just literally pulled them off the bookshelf. I mean there was no order in mind which makes our project especially odd given that i don't think either comper or i read them in any particular order whatsoever. So as you alluded to that catherine your project to reading everything. Christie wrote in order went to that. I come to mind. And how did you decide to embark on a. We know exactly where we were. That's the funniest thing about it. It's not just a harebrained scheme. Like i bet you. I could describe what we were eating. Don't you think yes absolutely. We were sitting in a restaurant in beverly hills. And i had been noting to kemper that i would like to start a podcast. And he didn't wanna do the topic that i had wanted. But he was very keen on the notion. Sort of based around it. Which is a gun transitional reading. What is really influential to you when you're young and for both of us and we know that it's christie and so come for basically said oh. I don't wanna do your idea but we could do kristie. I remember it a little bit differently. Actually i remember talking about the fact that i was telling catherine that she should do a podcast. Because i think that catherine has a fantastic and distinctive voice. And i remember her saying well you know maybe but i don't even know what i would do it on and then we were sort of and we had obviously developed this little side pocket part of our relationship in which we talk about agatha christie and mysteries and and that kind of grew organically from there so somewhere in in between those two origin stories and so the idea of christie was established. An where did the idea of reading her in order. Come from will start at the very beginning. It's a very good place to start show and as you've been doing it for years now. Is there a sense that you'll getting to know kristie differently than you had prior to this project. Oh yes absolutely in a lot of different ways. Yeah i mean. I find camper. We've we've talked about this. Obviously you know. There's no bigger fan of christie's autobiography than comfort on. But i would say that. I have found it. This is probably gonna sound a little bit silly but as a woman..

christie comper nancy drew catherine caroline kemper Christie beverly hills agatha christie kristie
"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

03:09 min | 4 months ago

"christie" Discussed on Shedunnit

"Welcome she done it. I'm caroline crampton. I took lot on this show about the work christie. I mean how could i not. She's the best known writer of done. It's i'm published her first book in nineteen twenty right around the beginning of the period known as the golden age of detective. Fiction that i cover on this podcast over the course of her long life. She published sixty six detective novels and numerous show story story collections. Many of which will be well known to listeners. I'm sure but although i think i've read all of her works now i've done.

caroline crampton christie
"christie" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"christie" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"When Josh Chuck we're big racists at the beginning you know it's true but just wait for twenty years from now there'll be like I can't believe we talk. Those guys were ages bastards. You know probably so. There's one other thing I want to say too. So when she lived through World War Two Agatha Christie was worried that she's going to die in the bombing blitz of Great Britain and she really wanted Hercule Poirot and Jay Marples to have a final case. So she wrote a book for each of them One is called curtain. That's poor rose from final book and the other is sleeping murder That is marples final case and In it just kind of explains what happened. My belief poor road dies. Marples just retires but when she survived World War Two. She was like well. I don't I'm not ready for these guys to be retired yet. So she kept those books and had them posthumously published and they were in the seventies and when her Hercule Poirot rose last book came out and he died The New York Times ran a front page obituary for him. The only fictional character to have that honor bestowed on them. That's crazy isn't it? Yeah and also very cool good idea to write those books early on just in case because you never know yeah besides the bombing thing. I mean she could. She could walk off a ledge or get hit by a bus or die of natural causes early. Like you never know. And then you've got this legacy cemented right pretty smart. Have you ever seen one last thing? Have you ever seen murder by death? I know I've asked you before I have that DVD sitting on my desk. Well that's amazing that you have that on your desk and you wait. Is it on your desk at work place. I was GONNA say watch tonight. But don't watch it tonight. wait until everything clears no. It's a spoof actually detective books of like Charlie chained in Agatha Christie and Sam Spade and all that that she helped you know Kinda create but it's actually like a complaint from fans of mystery mysteries it's wonderful book trimming movie Truman. Capote's in it David Niven Peter Peter Falk A lot of people James Cromwell as a younger man. James Coco is Hercule Poirot. It's his great. You'RE GONNA love him so I guess we should say that she did. I eventually Five years or three years after I met her in nineteen seventy six at the age of eighty five at her home in Oxfordshire Oxfordshire and it was natural causes. Not Poison know her. Last words were good to meet you. Chuck anything else. I do not have anything else. Well friends that is Agatha Christie. If you I know more about the Christie Start Reading Agatha Christie Books Agatha Christie like three or four times. It's time for listener main part. I'm going to call this letter from a kid because we love reading these letters from kids. Hey Guys I've been listening to your podcast for about eight months now and I'd like to say I am a huge fan This is Emmett. He's ten years old. Oh yeah love this email. My Dad is even more of a fan of you guys than me. And he told me about your podcast. I am a huge fan of the Atlanta Falcons and pretty much everything. Atlanta related including your podcast. Which is weird because I live in Iowa. I love it. It is a little weird though. Emma you're right I love how self aware this guy I think you know when you grow up in a place like Iowa now professional sports you You know you do that thing where you just pick out a team in a city. Yeah you're like the Bay city rollers you. Throw a dart at a map and go with it. That's right now I'm really worried. There's a professional team in Iowa but there is not there is no there are none right. No need to double check. I've been listening to your podcast. A ton during this corona virus outbreak. To keep me from going crazy and it's worked. My birthday is actually coming up. So I'll not be able to see my friends or even have a party. It would be totally awesome and make my year. P. Said Happy Birthday to me but I WANNA bet you won't read this on the air that Sinn..

Agatha Christie Hercule Poirot Iowa Jay Marples Josh Chuck murder James Coco Atlanta Falcons Oxfordshire Oxfordshire Britain Atlanta James Cromwell Sinn Peter Peter Falk Sam Spade The New York Times Capote Truman Charlie
"christie" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

13:54 min | 2 years ago

"christie" Discussed on Generation V

"Christie. Two.

Christie.
"christie" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"christie" Discussed on Generation V

"Christie.

Christie
"christie" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"christie" Discussed on Generation V

"Christie.

Christie
"christie" Discussed on Generation V

Generation V

09:54 min | 2 years ago

"christie" Discussed on Generation V

"He did. Successor. Christie.

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