35 Burst results for "Christiane"

"christiane" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:04 min | 2 weeks ago

"christiane" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Will pass. And just experiencing that we can do that and we don't need to do anything with it. Can be very powerful. Let me ask before we go about another emotion that you write about, which is resentment and you talk about how we can use our meditation practice to vector toward forgiveness. Can you say a few words about that? Yes. So forgiveness is a really hard one. And forgiveness doesn't happen overnight. Forgiveness is not something that we decide to say, yeah, that makes sense to forgive that person or that situation or myself. But the thing is that anger will turn into bitterness. If we over time can't let go of it, and that's just like a yucky feeling honestly. And forgiveness practice can help. I mean, Jack kornfield, he has taught a lot, and I'm actually using his meditation as a foundation because I find that it's the most helpful step by step way, and he talks about his forgiving his father, his abusive father, over years, of doing a practice daily, just a little bit and starting out really with coming back to what we mentioned earlier, the intention, because we have agency over our intention. We can't decide to forgive, or we can't decide to be compassionate or we can't decide to love. But what we do is we can set the intention and then we can keep inviting these qualities in over and over and over and trust basic neuroscience that whatever we do repeatedly that will change us. So what are the steps for forgiveness, meditation? Just starting out by is there a situation that you want to kind of work on? And then depending on, is it something that you have done? Is that something that somebody has done to you? Or is it something that you have done to yourself? So what is it actually that you want to forgive? And then using compassion practice to say, I'm not that person anymore. Maybe I made a mistake there. I moved on, and then just like with the loving kindness of the meta practice, we can use particular phrases, is basically out of my own ignorance, out of my own fear, out of my own being stuck. I made this mistake. And then just really repeating that and feeling into the pain of not being free here. If it's in a relationship with another person that we're still holding kind of the other person, I've learned a lot, and I suspect a lot of people will have learned a lot too. But is there something that we really should have covered here that I failed to bring us to? No, I think we've touched a lot of things, and I would really want people to not feel that because they have pain that they can not have joy and meaningful life at the same time because we can really fall into this idea because I have this. I can not be or feel a particular way. And that is something really I think the most important message is of course I wish for your pain to go away. Of course, you keep searching for a solution, but even if the pain doesn't go away. It doesn't mean you can't have a really beautiful and meaningful life. Before we go, can you just remind everybody of the name of the book and any other resources you have on the Internet or elsewhere that people might want to avail themselves of? So the book is called outsmart your pain. And I've resources on my website and also classes where I teach about pain and a lot of guided meditations and retreats that I'm teaching and my website is just my name. So Cristiano wolf dot com. Cristiano, thanks very much for coming on. Thank you so much for having me. That was a pleasure. Thank you. Thanks again to doctor Christiana wolf. Thank you as well to everybody who works so hard on this show. 10% happier is produced by Justine David DJ Kashmir Gabrielle zuckerman and Lauren Smith, our senior producer is Marissa schneiderman, Kimi regler, is our managing producer and our executive producer is Jen point, scoring and mixing by Peter bonaventure of ultraviolet audio. We'll see you all on Friday for a bonus meditation. Hey, I'm gonna make a little ask here. If you like our show and you want to support the work we're doing, there are some quick and very easy things you can do to help us out. First, please leave us a 5 star rating and review. Those are really helpful. There's a reason why podcast hosts ask for them all the time. Second, please fill out a short survey over at wondery dot com slash survey these surveys really help us up our game. It's incredibly useful for us to hear directly from you the listener. So if you have time, please fill that out. And speaking of wondery because we've had some questions about

Jack kornfield Cristiano wolf Christiana wolf Justine David Gabrielle zuckerman Lauren Smith Marissa schneiderman Kimi regler Jen point Peter bonaventure Cristiano Kashmir
"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

01:43 min | 5 months ago

"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"For constantly.

"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

04:43 min | 5 months ago

"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"This summer I want to go to Melbourne camp accomplish. My Friends say we can swim, play sports, craft, ride horses, and have new adventures every day. Mel would camp accomplish is for kids ages 5 to 18 with and without disabilities, with ten weeks of day camp and overnight camp options to choose from. It's all located in southern Maryland with paddle boats, ropes courses, and outdoor stage, and tons of space to run around and have fun. Sign me up at Mel would dot org slash camp. What question would you most like answered? Oh, many, I'm glad you didn't say what question would you look most like to ask? Right now I'd like to ask Vladimir Putin, why? What is your problem, mate? Why are you trying to bully a country that's done nothing to you? So what question would I most like answered? Look, you know, I think most people would like to know what happens on the other side. You know, is it worth it being good and moral and loving and happy and doing all those things here? That's interesting. Is there a payoff? I don't really care because I like my life anyway. So I don't really care if there's a payoff or not. I like how you framed that. It's not what happens when we die. It's listen. Did I really have to be good? All the time. In order to get access to heaven. This is the Catholic in me. That's the cash they gave me. But you know what I would love to know honestly because I have this image that everybody who's gone before me or my Friends, my family, my lovely dog. Everybody who's gone before me. They're up there, having a nice time. You know, they're also enjoying. And I'd like to go up and have a really nice time. And I hope that exists. I hope that exists, you know? Do you think that if you knew that was what was going to happen? Do you think you would live your life differently? No, I wouldn't live it differently. All bets are off. I tell you what? No, no. There's certain things I wish I had done more boldly and maybe taking a few more risks here and there on more personal issues. But overall, I'm good. I'm good. I got two more questions before you send me on my way packing. Yeah. I would like to know whether democracy and truth will survive. And I'd like to know whether we will ever live on another planet in another atmosphere in another environment. Wow. I wonder if democracy will exist on another planet. Well, we can create it. I wonder if we did get to another planet. Would we take all the same constructs of law and society with us, or would we make amendments that could continue to be amended? Socially. I wonder. Well, I hope we would perfect something that we started here on earth because we are in that moment, by the way. We're not just fantasizing you and I right now. Democracy and under threat by the very nations which perfected it or tried to. Well, they just were in being reminded that it is an experiment. It is this experiment. And how about truths? What if there's no truth? That's the worst. That is literally the most terrifying thing. So I would like to know, will truth survive? And on that happy note, Minnie. And on that bombshell, thank you. So much. Well, thank you for having me. I'm not sure an answer to one of my questions has ever cut quite so close to the bone as christiane's answer of what questions she would most like answered, being whether truth and democracy will survive. It's been a hard two weeks to watch what's happening in our world and I would like to say and I wish I could say it to christiane right here and right now that the strange byproduct of what Putin has done is to actually unite the world, which I know he didn't intend, but nonetheless, Barr quite literally a couple of countries. That is what he has done and perhaps that's how truth and democracy will survive because we will unite. You can watch Christian's one hour late night public affairs series and then pour on CNN international and amen porn co on your local PBS station. Many questions is hosted and written by me Minnie Driver. Supervising producer, Aaron Kaufman, producer, Morgan levoy, research assistant Marissa Brown, original music, Surrey baby, by many driver. Additional music by Aaron Kaufman. Executive produced by me, Minnie Driver. Special thanks to Jim nikolay. We'll Pearson, Addison O'Day. Lisa castella and anik oppenheim at WK PR. De la pescador, Kate driver and Jason Weinberg, and.

Melbourne camp Mel Vladimir Putin Maryland christiane Minnie Aaron Kaufman Putin Barr Minnie Driver Morgan levoy Marissa Brown CNN PBS Jim nikolay Surrey Lisa castella anik oppenheim Pearson Addison
"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:27 min | 5 months ago

"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Or experience most altered your life? I would say I have to say the Iranian revolution of 1979 because that completely was the division between my childhood and my adolescence and my adulthood. And in a way, overnight, I grew up and I grew a conscience and I grew a political awareness and I grew an ambition and I grew maturity and I just went from a very happy go lucky childhood, not knowing a huge amount about democracy and dictatorship and all of those kinds of things and freedom and not really understanding what they meant in the big picture. To only wanting to go and talk about that stuff and bear witness and report and tell those kinds of stories around the world. Two people who may not be able to go and see for themselves. And that for me was the most fundamental turning point in my life. Yeah. Well, were you living in Iran at the time, and did you move? Yes, so my education spanned Iran, the UK, and after the revolution I went to the U.S., my university, and I started CNN in the United States. But I had sort of got an involuntary gap year, mini. I had failed to get good enough grades in my what you would call high school here at a levels to go to medical school. I feel you. Yeah, I feel myself right now or whatever. But you know what? I am so pleased because in the end it's one of those failing to accomplish what you think you should have done that led me to this profession and to this life because it's not just a professional. It's my life. And so I'm very grateful for that. But I spent the whole year of the revolution. So from January 1978 to January 1979, watching this happen in my homeland and in my neighborhood and suddenly everything I was right was wrong. The people who I had grown up believing in were now the people who I should be condemning. I couldn't leave my house without there being soldiers and guns aimed at doing martial law. You heard the Ayatollah Khomeini's imported smuggled in cassette tapes, put on the loudspeakers from the mosques nearby. I mean, chilling stuff. It was chilling and you just didn't know where it was going to end up. Well, now we know, right? I mean, the Iranian revolution shaped and changed the whole world. Would you say that was the first time that you were really aware of the division of ideology? There is another way of thinking that is being applied in this place that is so familiar that I thought thought one way. That's such an interesting way of putting it. And I would say yes, but I had known, obviously, because we are living through the Cold War, and Iran was right in that place where the United States liked Iran as an ally because it was faced off against the communists and this and that. So in other words, everything that was happening politically at that time, particularly where I was living, was east versus west, communist versus the United States. Communism was everybody grew up in my generation anyway, knowing that is the first big ideological issue. And then it was the Iranian revolution. I will say interestingly, and I can not exactly remember, I probably could go back and figure it out. I can't remember whether it was just before the Iranian revolution or just after. But my parents, my mother, particularly, had Palestinian friends in Iran. They were Catholic, and she was Catholic, and she met them at church. And they had been refugees. They had been turfed out after the 48 war. And they had found that their way to various places. And ended up in Iran. He was a pharmacist and I can't remember what she was. Phenomenal people. Foot nominal people. And from him, I remember him taking me on a visit to a museum and telling me the story of Palestine. And that was possibly my first real conversation about history divides and what happens when one side wins one side loses and when there's never justice and when this wound continues to be open. And so that was also a very early lesson. But then of course, then I go to Bosnia and I witnessed genocide in Europe for the first time since the Second World War. So that was right in my face. I mean, I could have read about Anne Frank and I read the book, but I didn't see it and understand it until I saw it and understood it and reported on it and was called to make a judgment. And my judgment was that I would not be neutral in the face of outrageous violations of humanitarian law. I would not be neutral. I would not be an accessory to genocide as a journalist by being neutral. I insisted on telling the truth and it made me very unpopular in a lot of quarters. I remember it being apparently so controversial to take a position, but I didn't have enough political acuity to really think about that. But I do now, and it's astonishing to me that taking a position on genocide that you would have been called partisan for that. It's absurd now. It is absurd. Absolutely, but remember the victims were Muslims. They were European Muslims and the aggressors were European Christians. It was very, very tough. It's a very particular context that you then go out into the world to do what you do. And I think that's astonishing that you survived that, not just physically, but mentally, and I know you've said that so many people didn't. Well, to bring it back to what you've been asking me, I survived because of love and happiness and joy and knowing how to see it and how to recognize it and wanting it. Give your child the keys to life with an education that builds curiosity and a lifelong love of learning at guidepost montessori. Guidepost montessori offers individual programs that foster confidence, independence, and enable your child to reach their full potential. Enrolling children from ten weeks old all the way through high school. Guideposts small class sizes allow their dedicated teachers to focus on your child's physical, social, emotional, and academic growth. Your child's education is the most important investment you will ever make in their lives. It's time to find your guidepost. Visit a school near you to see firsthand why guidepost montessori is the best choice for your child. To learn more, visit guidepost, montessori dot com. That's guidepost montessori dot com. Hey, what's up with Emily? And everyone knows how important music is in my life. Probably the only thing I put above that is my health. And that is why I live by advantage of health. Music is always changing. Why has it our healthcare model changed in a century? Well, now it has with Liv, live into healthcare practice that provides complete women's health and wellness. It's all in one place, from primary care to mental health, so important. And gynecology to obstetrics live understands these are all connected and important to you. With live, you'll have a care team that works together with you to personalize a wellness plan around your distinct knees and goals. They're innovative care model puts you at the center, making it so easy to start out healthy and stay that way. So how does live work? Leave is a membership based practice in the heart of D.C. that prioritizes your experience. On top of top notch patient care members also get access to care coordination, same day prescription delivery, exclusive events, and so much more. Plus, they accept all major insurance, so like me, change the way you act, play, and live. Learn more and become a member by searching for live by advantage that's L IV by..

Iran United States Ayatollah Khomeini CNN Anne Frank UK Bosnia Palestine Europe Liv Emily D.C.
"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

05:39 min | 5 months ago

"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"He could have come up with. It was pretty amazing. It was right. I remember exactly where it was. It was 2002. We were at the king David hotel in Jerusalem, and I had a satellite cell phone link to him, as I was broadcasting live, and it was at a time when the then government of Ariel Sharon decided to go back into the West Bank, they tore down his headquarters, and it was in response to some Palestinian suicide bombings inside Israel. And it was after 9 11, so you remember the state of affairs then was very, very tense. And Arafat, he was really being pushed into a corner. And I asked him something like, do you take responsibility for? And I named the suicide bombing location. And he just went ballistic, but I mean, ballistic. I'm here in a prison. They've got me surrounded. I am general Arafat to you know who shut up, he said to me, you literally shut up. He was so angry. And meantime, I know the camera's on me, right? So I'm live with the camera on me. And I am going red from the bottom of my feet to the top of my head, and I'm thinking the whole world is watching me being torn to shreds by Yasser Arafat on live television. And then he hung up, and I'm like, okay, well, I said, I comment what I said, but some things, you know, that's live television folks. And then, of course, all the producers love the artist break TV. It's great. And I'm like, okay, but that was me being humiliated. But anyway, I got over it. That was Yasser Arafat. Me. The thing is, I remember how calm you remained in the face of that rage. And you do it so acutely in your professional life. You have done that. But it's really interesting to hear that in your personal life. It's like more challenging. It's slightly more charging. I'm a bit better than I was. But yeah, I just force myself to stay cool and to not change my expression too much. Clinton did it to me as well in a live two way from Sarajevo. I asked him a question that got under his skin. And he went, he said, there have been no constant flip flops, madam, he maddened me in front of the world. And then my face just went beat red, but I'm not sure that you could actually recognize that over the satellite. So I had an advantage, right? I was thousands of miles away, blushing and freaking out, but staying cool and not changing my expression. And then the funny thing was, actually, every time I went anywhere after that, all these people who I would go and interview prime ministers and army chiefs and this and that madam, they would greet me with every time I went in. So it was a bit of a joke for a while. I think it's really interesting to get to experience the best version of our response to stress and conflict and you can quite literally see you on television or on YouTube or whatever, doing that thing. But taking it out of that place and applying it into our lives. I'm fascinated by why we can do it in some areas of our lives, but it's more challenging in others. And you do it in the place that you would think would be more challenging. It's a really interesting practice, but it just kind of seems to reiterate to me that life is all practice. It is. And then you've got as one of my producers used to say you got to know when to hold them and when to fold them. In other words, know who you're dealing with and when you're dealing with, so you react a certain way at a certain time and different ways at different times. You don't want to bring all that cool under fire into your private life. You want to be more vulnerable, more open, more reactive, more and more, you know, more. But it's quite a paradigm to exist in to be able to move from an extraordinary place of conflict in the world back into a home life and children and husband and those are amazing polls to navigate. And again, I agree with you and so many of my colleagues have not been able to navigate that and have suffered very, very deeply from not being able to navigate and you know so many people in many different professions obviously find that difficult and it is challenging. And it does take lots of work. I would simply say again that I do believe the foundation that I was given as a child has helped me in every which way, every which way. I come back from these terrible times in the field or great times as well. I mean, and I reunite with my family. You know, family lunches, family dinners, Friends, all of that's what keeps me human and keeps me alive and keeps me loving, keeps me happy, keeps me friendly because I stay alive. I don't close myself off. You know, the classic stories, right? I don't know your grandfather's your grandparents or whoever in World War II, let's say. My father, my father, flew in World War II. And he probably never told you, right? He probably didn't talk. Never. They never talked. And I understand it to an extent. And I don't talk war stories much. But I do talk. And I do if somebody one on one, somebody wants to know about this, wants to know about that. I'll talk. But I do otherwise talk and open myself because you can try to bury it, carry on, make a new live, support their families, and try to forget it. But truth is you can never forget. And there's always PTSD. Did you know in the Second World War they called and it was in the First World War II, they called PTSD LOS, which was lack of moral fiber. That makes me want to cry. It's awful. That was the acronym, which is why I think men didn't talk about it. Women didn't talk about it. That's really tragic. And how about shell shock and all of that? And how about they treated the World War I conscientious objectors as cowards and mentally deranged? I mean, it's just tragic tragic..

Yasser Arafat general Arafat king David hotel Ariel Sharon Arafat West Bank Jerusalem Sarajevo madam Israel Clinton YouTube PTSD LOS
"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

07:42 min | 5 months ago

"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Hope you enjoy this one. My first question is, can you tell me where and when you were happiest? So I've thought about it a lot. And I don't think there's ever for anybody one particular place or space or time. I remember it in three steps, really. I had, I would say, indisputably, one of the happiest childhoods that I can even imagine. And, you know, I've spoken to a lot of friends and asked them and just osmosis and conversation as you go on, you know, you understand how people have lived their lives and what has made a difference and has shaped them. And I don't think I've ever heard anybody say what I feel, which is that I am the luckiest person in the world. You know, I grew up in Iran of an English father and a Persian father. My mom Catholic, my father, Muslim, you know, it was a patriarchal and a non democratic. It was a monarchy when I grew up there. So it had all those things that could have made it very stressful and difficult and hard and et cetera. And instead of just such I don't even mean freedom to roam and to range and to do all sorts of just read them in my mind in my heart and my friendships and with that freedom came this most incredible amount of happiness and when you're young, you don't really realize that that's what it is. You know, afterwards you get asked, these questions. But when you're young and when you're a kid, I just remember everything being fun, whether it was playing with my friends, you know, in their houses or ah, is this whether it was playing sardines, you know what that is? Hide and seek sardines. Everybody crams into one. That was really fun. Whether it was in somebody's garden and running around playing hide and seek. And especially riding horses that was my sport, I was 5 years old when my mom and my dad literally put me on the back of a very large balls, not a pony, not a kid's game. And me and my best friend and my sister. That's what we did. That was our sport, not hockey or lacrosse or whatever. And that was really a source of happiness, because you were sharing that happiness with each other. Your mothers were sitting in the corner chit chatting and not being helicopter parents, but you knew that they were there, so that was nice. The writing instructor was this phenomenal Iranian guy who would be in in the Iranian military in the cavalry. So he was a brilliant old military man from the cavalry. And he was really compassionate and fantastic. He loved us kids, and we were girls, by the way. Remember, this is a really girls being taught. How to be happy, how to be brave. And he just, you know, didn't let us swim out if we fail if we had an accident or whatever, you know, make sure he dusted us off. But almost by the scruff of your neck, you'd be picked up and put back on the horse. And that developed a bond of love a bond of courage, a bond of connection with another living thing from a very early age and an understanding of how you have to react and treat other living things, whether they're animals or whether it's nature, whether it's people. And it was just happiness. It was just a phenomenally happy childhood. First of all, I'm so glad that you had a wonderful childhood. Do you think that that wonderful beginning girded you or gave you something that you were going to be able to use in all of the places of conflict that you would wind up that all of the bloodshed and all of the disparity that you would live in for so many years of your life? Do you think that it gave you a base to be able to do that? I really do think so I never really thought about it or dissected it, but I do believe in retrospect that that is actually what happened that I grew up with phenomenal parents who gave me unconditional love and support. Never overly demanding in terms of I want you to be a doctor or a banker or a dish or that. We had to be moral. We had to tell the truth. We had to be kind. We had to have all those values. But we were good enough as we were. So that was very, very important. And that and the lessons I took from my writing in structure and from that period of my childhood. Yes, gave me that backbone and that structure to carry on without really being conscious of it. In the rest of my life, which has been, it's an extreme job that I've done, going towards zones, going to famines, going to natural disasters, you know, doing all that kind of stuff. Most people think you should run away. Well, we journalists like to say we run towards. But it takes a really important lessons and gifts from your childhood because I can tell you that so many of the colleagues that I've come across have not been able to stand it. The extreme nature, the horror, having to put yourself out there all the time, has really crippled a lot of people emotionally. And has sent them somewhat off the deep end. And I was just very fortunate that I was able to come back to my family after these terrible things into a happy environment into a connected environment into an environment where I was able to talk. I was able to think of something other than being on the road and being in the field. I could swap that darkness for the light of being away in this very happy and I keep using that word because we're talking about happiness. Happy personal environment. And that was very important for me. The other thing that was really important was growing up as the product of different ethnic groups, different nationalities, different religions, given that my parents came from two different parts of the world, allowed me to accept everybody and everything. Everything was normal. Nothing was other. So I went to all these different places and I just felt that they were just like me, you know, I never felt that I was in any way different or superior or inferior or anything like that. And that really, really helped me throughout my career because you know with this, we live now in the extreme version of partisanship and divisiveness and the other is such a not just a scary concept because it isn't, but it's used to scare people and to drum up fear and hatred and loathing. And I had the opposite. I grew up with the opposite lessons, and that really did see me through my career, because I obviously covered all these ethnic conflicts and religious conflicts and battles. Yeah, the opposite of happiness. Yeah. I mean, really, the apotheosis of happiness. And so I was really happy doing my job. And I give you a little anecdote. I was so happy being a foreign correspondent. I really thought I'd died and gone to heaven when I was made a foreign correspondent. And one day, one of the key anchors at the time presenters, who was at CNN in Atlanta, she quit to go somewhere else. And the president of the network, this most phenomenal man, Tom Johnson at the time. It was 92. And I had just managed to get myself out of headquarters and into the field and doing the job that I really wanted to do. He called me up and he said he was being incredibly whatever. Rewarding and kind to me and empowering and he asked me if I would come back to Atlanta and take the job of this anchor presenter who had just left. Her name was Catherine cryer. Honestly, I burst into tears. I was so upset. I didn't know what to do. I'm like, I know this is meant to be a great promotion, but I'm so happy here. And this is what I wanted to do, and I don't want to come back to be an anchor in Atlanta. I don't want to do it, but what if I say that, then are you going to fire me? Am I going to lose my dream job? And he couldn't have been nicer. It did take me a couple of days to get back to him and tell him that I just couldn't do it. A lot of crying went on and soul searching. And I really expected him to say, well, thanks, christiane. Well, if you can't do it, I have to get somebody else and you might as well pack your bags and leave. Absolutely the contrary. He just embraced me and he said, that's great. So I would say, after my childhood, my time in the field was the place of maximum happiness. And then right now, my son, my child is my depository.

lacrosse Iran hockey Atlanta Catherine cryer Tom Johnson CNN christiane
"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

02:51 min | 5 months ago

"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Oh, hang on here frozen. What? Hello. Hello, hello. Hello. Oh, there we go. You're back. Sorry, Minnie, I just don't worry. It's life stuff. We've got tape off. Clearance, clearance on the Internet. That's great. Yay. Thank you so much for doing this. I really, really appreciate it. You're welcome. Hello, I'm Minnie Driver. Welcome to the many questions season two. I've always loved priests questionnaire. It was originally a 19th century parlor game where players would ask each other 35 questions aimed at revealing the other players true nature. It's just the scientific method, really. In asking different people the same set of questions, you can make observations about which truths appear to be universal. I love this discipline. And it made me wonder, what if these questions were just the jumping off point? What greater depths would be revealed if I asked these questions as conversations starters with thought leaders and trailblazers across all these different disciplines. So I adapted Proust questionnaire and I wrote my own 7 questions that I personally think are pertinent to a person's story. They are. When and where were you happiest? What is the quality you like least about yourself? What relationship real or fictionalised defines love for you? What question would you most like answered? What person place or experience has shaped you the most? What would be your last meal? And can you tell me something in your life that's grown out of a personal disaster? And I've gathered a group of really remarkable people, ones that I am honored and humbled to have had the chance to engage with. You may not hear their answers to all 7 of these questions. We've whittled it down to which questions felt closest to their experience or the most surprising or created the most fertile ground to connect. My guest today on mini questions is journalist christiane amanpour. I try not to be intimidated by the ideas I might have about the extraordinary people I interview on the show. But knowing I was going to be speaking to one of the great interviewers of the 21st century definitely gave me pause. I mean, yes to Arafat hung up on her and Bill Clinton, well, he snapped like a cornered teenager. Christian has won every major television journalism award, interviewed every single geopolitical player of the last 25 years. And her journalism made such an impact during the war in the former Yugoslavia that she was made an honorary citizen of Sarajevo. It's really important to say that this conversation was recorded before Russia started a war by invading Ukraine. The world looks very different today than it did three weeks ago, but I think the observations christiane makes about conflict are eerily poignant..

Minnie Driver Minnie Arafat hung christiane amanpour Bill Clinton Yugoslavia Sarajevo Russia Ukraine christiane
"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

01:36 min | 5 months ago

"christiane" Discussed on Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver

"Only if metro by T mobile, you can upgrade to 5G and get more. More choices with the largest selection of three 5G phones, like the Samsung galaxy a 13 5G and more 5G coverage on the T mobile network. Only at metro. Most affordable versus major prepaid brands with eligible port ID and plan plus tax 5G not available in some areas if congested users greater than 35 gigabytes per month may do this reduced speeds and metro customers may notice reduced speeds versus T mobile due to prioritization, video at 480p. A quick scroll of sacks dot com is your guide to shopping the best spring fashion. You'll find curated shops that make getting dressed every day, easy. Browse effortless bohemian dresses from free people and Zimmerman, and trending spring denim styles from frame and good American. Plus, the latest party ready bags from saint Laurent and Valentino. Their new arrivals weekly from the top designers you love and new emerging names on sacks dot com. You can shop for everything you need for spring now and pay later with klarna. Plus, you'll also get free shipping and free returns every day. On sacks dot com. Spring is around the corner and we're thinking about our health and wellness. What do fiber magnesium and niacin have in common? They're found in peanuts. When it comes to eating peanuts,.

"christiane" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"christiane" Discussed on What It Takes

"Emotional yasser arafat. We have austin has being a woman in this field. You're often with presidents and bassett and diplomats. And you're often the only soldiers because you've been more zones. How has it helped or not helped. So i always say is a little bit twee in a little. Bit of a catchphrase. Now it's just like being a man except better you can get into so many places where men can't for instance particularly in the post nine eleven world right whereas all being about islamic fundamentalism and this and that and various cultural realities that we had to try to penetrate to understand. What's going on. And i have actually being allowed to get to to get past to punch through that. What what would on the surface be and is misogyny complete disregard for women's rights or their right to even exist and get into for instance the homestead get into people's homes and workplaces and hospitals and wherever necessary to tell the stories of the civilians. And that's really been my what i've done. Mostly yes. i have a program now. In which i interview world leaders and important people in this that i believe my career. If i'm going to be proud of it is that. I told spent most of my career telling the story of ordinary people and that to me is what the news is. Because they're the ones who who live with the effects of what world leaders decide.

yasser arafat bassett austin
"christiane" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"christiane" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"And then as we know right tantrums will pass and just experiencing can do that and we don't need to do anything with it can be very powerful. Let me ask before we go about another emotion that you write about which is resentment and you talk about how we can use our meditation practice to vector toward forgiveness. Can you say a few words about that. Yes so forgiveness really hard. One and forgiveness doesn't happen overnight. Forgiveness is not something that we decide to say. Yeah that makes sense to forgive that person or that situation or myself but the thing is that anger will turn into bitterness. If we overtime can't let go of it and that shows psycho yucky feeling honestly right and forgiveness. Practice can help and his. I mean jet cornfield. He has taught a lot. And i'm actually using like His meditation as a foundation. Because i find that is the most helpful step by step way and he talks about his forgiving his father his abusive father over years of doing practice daily just a little bit and starting out really was coming back to what we mentioned earlier the intention like because we have we have agency over our intention. We don't have agency we as i said. We can't decide to forgive or we can't decide to be compassionate or we can't decide to love right but what we do is we can set the intention and and we can keep inviting these qualities in over and over and over and just trust basic neuroscience right that whatever we do repeatedly that will change us. So what are the steps for forgiveness. Meditation just starting out by. Is there situation where you think you might be ready made or that you want to work on and then depending on like. Is it something that you have done. Is that something that somebody has done to you. Why is it something that you have done to yourself. So what is it actually that you wanna forgive and then using actually compassion practice to set. I'm not that person anymore. Maybe i made a mistake there. I moved on. And then you just like with loving kindness metta practice. We can use particular phrases. People can google them or they're also in. My book is basically out of my own ignorance out of my own fear out of my own. Just being stuck. I made this mistake and then just really repeating that in feeling into the pain of not being free here and not if it's in a relationship with another person that we're still holding kind of the other person i've learned a lot and i suspect a lot of people will have learned a lot to but is there something that we really should have covered here that i failed to bring us to. I think we've touched a lot of things i would. I really want. People is to not feel that because they have pain that they cannot have joy in the full and fulfilled in meaning full life at the same time. I because we can really fall into this idea. Because i have this i cannot be or feel particular way and that is something i think. The most important message is of course. I wish for your pain to go away weight. And i of course you keep searching for solutions and but even if the pin doesn't go away doesn't mean you can't have a really really beautiful and meaningful life before we go. Can you just remind everybody of the name of the book. And any other resources you have on the internet or elsewhere that people might wanna availed themselves of so the book is called outsmart your pain and every sources on my website and also fastest where teach about pain and a lot of guide at meditations and retreats that i'm teaching and my website is just my name so Christiane wolf dot com chris. Thanks very much for coming on. Thank you so much for having me. That was a pleasure thank you. Thanks again to christina. That was a great chat from my point of view. The show is made by samuel. John's dj kashmir. Kim by coma maria were. Tell jen point with audio engineering by ultraviolet audio special. Help on this episode from candice mattel khan and As always a big shout to my abc news colleagues ryan kesler and josh co hand. We'll see on wednesday for a brand new episode about secrets..

google Christiane wolf coma maria christina chris candice mattel khan kashmir samuel jen Kim John josh co ryan kesler abc news
"christiane" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"christiane" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Back pain. Chronic back pain because it's often hard to save. What is really helpful. And we know that some therapy forms of really helpful and we know that like some studies. Show that. Mindfulness is helpful for chronic pain in other studies. It doesn't really show an effect. And i think were casting the net too wide because first of all there's so many different forms of chronic pain and so if we can be more specific that is helpful but one study that i always loved so john cavity sin. Actually one of the first studies that he did with mb sr was for people with chronic pain and that was one of his intentions when you first started nba sr in nineteen seventy nine to offer something to people who really had gone through the entire western healthcare system with no really good results other than just medication or surgery and what was really interesting so they looked at. What are the pain level. Starting nba sr. And what are the pain levels ending. Nba saw and would showed was said for quite a number of people. The kind of objective pain level didn't change but the quality of life scores went up quite a bit and that touches me to just talk about that because me that is such an important way to express how the teaching squawk honestly damn so what it means is. They're still pain. But what does that mean. If your quality of life goes up you're happier you're more engaged. You feel more connected. You feel more like life as something to offer to you. You learn how to live with the pain. That is not going away and people will ask me. So i learned to meditate. Will my pain go away. And they say honestly i have no idea. I have seen people with like pain headaches. Strange pain unexplainable pain completely. Go away through meditation or through. These practices in other people know. Didn't change but what. I truly believe is said people who really make themselves available to these practices of mindfulness and compassion. Then they will get happier like maybe ten percent right maybe more but there is something that will change in. I find that so hopeful because we can't get away from this fixation of if only the pain wasn't here then i would be happy are just finished. Crime of the century. It's on hbo. Max directed by a guy. I know and respect alex gibney..

john cavity nba headaches hbo Max alex gibney
"christiane" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"christiane" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Of thinking happening right and then of course that doesn't make it stop. Unfortunately we wish right if we could do that so we can. So but what we can do. In that moment we come back to one of our senses. That is a good inker for us. For example that could be the breath could be your feet on the floor right. It could be just like you. Orienting yourself in the room and said oh. I'm in this room right now. So the brain has limited attention span. Part of how meditation works. Is that we for once. Decide how we wanna fill that attention span. If we're not doing that the mind we'll do that for us. And it will fill it with all kinds of crap honest right so we asked again be horsing is like thank you not helpful right now right but who is saying what the mind is actually filled with and so as a meditative or like using his practices. We can say okay. I feel was was the awareness of my breath right now and then i cannot at the same time. Pay full attention to my thoughts in few my breath. I can do either at work or do you both like half but not really and that is also of course part of the practice. So there's a little bit like. I might like bite my arm a little bit when i'm getting shot. Fill my mind with one kind of pain. That i'm comfortable with it. I'm controlling on my own. So that the involuntary pain control by somebody else is less salient. Yeah you choose but the thing is so a lot of what's going on here. What is so scary that it feels like this assault befall control and i think one of the great benefits of meditation is. We are taking back control by choosing how we relate to it. Would you say that from a meditative perspective and this might be tough for some people to hear that pain is an opportunity -absolutely and it comes back to this like shoumei. The person who's never had paint. Show me the person who will never have pain so be the human body. Pain isn't essential function of our bodies to keep us safe. And then we have this thing happening that we call aging which we have to learn to come to terms with and we don't like to hear that and we don't like to practice with that but the more we can actually say like pain is part of life and not. Take it so personally coming back to this. Like what do i identify with right. Do identify with this person. That is in pain. And how unfair that is and all the mistakes that have been made right which is part of how the brain tries to make sense of it and that is also part of like we can release. Switch to saying like yeah. Pain is a part of life and since that will be part of my life experience. I can choose. Hi wanna work with said in how i relate to that and i really don't want to say that lightly because i know a lot of people really have excruciating physical pain so this is not like an easy easy fix with just to put a fine point on it when you say that meditation helps us relate to our pain differently how does it help us relate to pain we learn to not take it so personally so if this is just like oh this is what a body feels like that experiences. This particular pain to compare this is cristiano. Who has this pain. Because i had this accident because stupid driver didn't pay attention by so you can see how like the whole nervous system starts to get activated against through the story right said i gather this is pain and this is pain in this moment. This is what it feels like and the other part is which is really really important for people who suffer from pain or chronic pain is self compassion here. I just acknowledged that right now. This is hard. This is a hard moment right now and chew buy in. This is again the difference between self compassion and self pity that self. Pity is all about me and why it shouldn't be happening to me and self compassion is in opening up to like. Yep this is part of the human experience. And i can connect in my mind in my heart with all the other people who are experiencing exactly the same thing right now and in a weird way. That is really helpful. Can you get more technical or granular about how we can bring self compassion to our meditative game. When pain is their chronic or otherwise. Yeah again night. Kristen nef's three-part model of like self compassion. So the parts of like as a researcher that she has like broken down the experience of self compassion into mindfulness self kindness and shared humanity. So mindfulness same thing so what we just said is like kenya. Become aware that there's pain huge step which is really hard to get to that. Like i will off my walk around like for days before like something says. Wait a second. I'll that remark did have an effect on me for example because i'm trying to avoid pain this about like emotional pain right. Same with with physical So awareness this is here and then what we say is. Can we just acknowledge this in kim. We acknowledge that with the intention of kindness or we say like the tone of voice right so what we would say is an we often well like place ahead on the heart or on the part. That is painful inside like this really hurts. This is the moment of struggle in just in that way. That often what happens. Here's what we want is like. We wanted to be acknowledged that way and like a friend would do that in a way a friend would say you really. You have a hard time right now. Right and then something goes i e s. Thank you for seeing right in something softens and we forget that we can actually do that for ourselves. Yeah there's pain yes. this is true. Not avoiding just looking at it directly but with kindness and then so that's the self kindness and then really opening into this is what it feels like for somebody in my situation to feel that pain and then we can make internally in genetically however that works for you connect with the other people that have that same experience they know what it feels like mate and this is really the power of support groups. Where like somebody else looks at you and says i meet you. Get what you're going through right and it does something to our nervous systems also in this kind of self talk kinder self talk. I haven't been to. When i first encountered this notion. I struggled with it a lot. Just because seen corny to me a lot of people really like it so. I want to acknowledge that but for me. She's a little corny. But i've been able to. I get over myself and do it. Because they're scientific. Research strongly suggests at work. And i'm just. I'd like to suffer less. I'll take evidence based practices but part of being able getting over myself to do it. is not only just seeing the research but also adapting the language. You can make the language around so for me. It's more like row your language like this. You know what. I would say to a guy friend who broke a leg great. Yes and it's really in the translation right if the word stone land try different words or if language doesn't work try a gesture right. This is really why really love to work with Physical touch right because there's so much research showing somebody holds your hand when you're going through painful procedure that makes your pain level. Drop so if you a really in pain and you get a hug from a friend that makes you love drop and so we're making this jump in. I know this is like totally cornyn. I work at the. Va a lot right. So they're like some tough guy so we have to find some language instead of cycle so soothing.

Kristen nef cristiano kenya kim cornyn Va
"christiane" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"christiane" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Abc this is the ten percent happier. Podcast i'm dan harris. Yes yes hello. Everybody sit in meditation for a few minutes. And you're likely to experience some pain either physical or psychological and likewise if you hang around in the meditation scene for long enough you're likely to hear the following expression. Pain is inevitable suffering is optional. And that's what we're gonna talk about today. Boosting your pain tolerance through mindfulness and meditation. Because pain again. We're talking physical and psychological pain here. It really is inevitable. But can you reduce your suffering through mindfulness and compassion. I guess today argues yes. Her name is cristiano wolf. She's a physician turned mindfulness and compassion teacher teacher trainer. She's an authorized buddhist teacher in the insight. Meditation tradition teaching retreats in classes around the world. in fact she completed the iams spirit. Rock teacher training program in the same cohort as alexis santos and joanna hardy who are two mainstays of t. h. community. Alexis actually recommended her for the show. And i'm glad he did. She is the author of a new book called. Outsmart your pain and in this conversation. We talked about meditation techniques. That will help. You have a better relationship to your pain. How to work with the physicality of pain the stories we tell ourselves about pain and pain as an opportunity before we.

dan harris cristiano wolf Abc alexis santos joanna hardy Alexis
Who Belongs in a War Zone?

Throughline

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Who Belongs in a War Zone?

"Belongs in a war zone. We were sitting in the lobby and It was such a scene. You know you'd see peter jennings and then you'd see christiane amanpour and really cool right. 'cause everybody's just like you know. I belong hair right. Tara sutton freelance. Journalists did not feel like she belonged in baghdad. When she got there in two thousand three at the start of the iraq war and then up popped marla like hi. I'm marla marla ruzicka in jeans and a long afghan style sheepskin best. She looked like a hippie. You know mean and she was skinny and her hair was kind of uncombed. And she's a bedraggled cute but bedraggled and just sort of like floating around like what are you doing here exactly the two women start talking and tara. The freelance journalist says she's they're writing an article about iraqi children in war and goes i was just in afghanistan. And there's a lot of traumatize people there. And i remember like we were laughing. A lot of traumatize people enough denison like not your thoughts were what a ding dong like. Who is this person. I mean the first impression of her was mystifying. Macos quil lawrence admit marla more than a year earlier in afghanistan when she'd inexplicably popped up at the beginning of that war. How did she even get here. I'm in most of us. Took a pretty arduous route. Either people came across land from pakistan or got on some of the early flights that flew into an abandoned airstrip north of the capital. How is she surviving here. Where all of us have trucked in a about little cash to try and get by. She's come here without a place to stay without a driver or a security detailer and she's already couch surfing at this point right. Yeah and she didn't act like the rest of us. She looked like the rest of us. She didn't fit and by the rest of us. He means the four kinds of people that usually show up at the beginning of conflict.

Tara Sutton Marla Marla Ruzicka Christiane Amanpour Peter Jennings Baghdad Afghanistan Iraq Tara Denison Marla Pakistan
Tiffany Haddish on Beyonce's Mama

Netflix is A Daily Joke

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Tiffany Haddish on Beyonce's Mama

"Know as crazy as miss teen miss teen in the momma. She had invited me. I got invited to her birthday party but she didn't invite me. Somebody else had they not. I was going to be there so what happened with the birthday party. Rights came in. Her suit was banging. I was like oh my god. This is amazing. She said the suit was christmas. Syrian house i. Chris riano may do all. I know i know christiane asked me. She's like okay right. he gets fresh off. the runway. Right is is put my feet. So i was kind of devastating so the and i thought to myself let me call beyond say mom and just take a shot in the dark thieves. Let broadest rice law copy say mama. Hey teams how you that food. Fbi was wearing danae at the party. Do you think will be barley. She was like you guys these she was talking about gifting so you not going to be able to finish it. I had three keys and you have none girl three. Don't worry about to saudi. She caught beyond the next day. Suit is at my house. The is like my door. And i was like oh my god beyond players. The both dolphins of women that girl power to the importance of women. That's what i love about her. In the end. I have put the suit on fit me perfectly. It was a little tedious. Because i don't have but property but in i copy on mama say hey miss teen if the perfect power as she was like if it's areas liberalism oppressor but everything else is perfectly. She was like wow

Chris Riano Christiane Danae FBI Saudi
Explorando el Instante con Camila Ibarra

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

Explorando el Instante con Camila Ibarra

"Let me like. Oh my staff human trafficking from alabama's. Yes we need the dmv n. o. J. except for learning list twins getting blisters. What's your heritage dive. Amelia's go was out those took on a separate Have asset one of your grammy gonna separate the Here is more useful elegance thousand years when he was Hoan as soon as i've ever lay story is pay scale. Get super porno instances lemire. They'll is presented scare you key. The is the joe. Go they alimony. You ain't got it's at been announced. Ucla overnight he gonna berto hamblur key. Less prisoners am doesn't the latin america unofficial said which was issue the most and believe that ian in the biens and thumbs. His nose is go acrimonious. You and he therrien russillo or is he in bigalow. Alert secret can make Geeky lucas that sioux city and the mutual is colonie said. Donald visit goes independent amid the to the question. Those is colonie semyon. Though be an exploration they have gannett is no porchet woman which Erasure sybil wrong lays the low sixty s fulfillment you to learn new jersey amusement. As course those the is is is lebron. look at percents. K alita is komo is muslim. Acela columnist mass mental pocket system. Paseo in every way bnb system muzzle celebration municipal expenses. Who program blake. Join me and explore under the semi and see as lucas as como que argument that ms must be an algebra. Neither is komo mail buddy mall. How do i address myself by son does say an low system operas us conspiracy though and thune says boorda hemp illiteracy. They don't have is opening. Meet a man. Oh it means is that they don't send. Peter is on a never known as if communication commission progressive limited colonie cello until Wisconsin than either eating here. We should christiane in three mahyco. In san jose california themselves stella me just Product style out of flick cinemas. Already give a distinct will not take to maintain meet unloading will not precipitating e of manal. Tatham makeable reverential. He our position luciano to limit the the that whole in salsa music. Don't go with people. He recommended real. Sarcoma is a component. This extreme wow it's surprenant that was on the border gate of blood you go. You're news alerts. You have done this. I forgot that you make the. So isn't this young. Little green ghanem into borough bar see less anger and thumbs his eye on them per se is exponential Make the give me. He was bobble premium pastas and which isn't spectacles spectrum. Your level or hemlock jingle mochis amigos de ultra spices. they're latin america hamblur. Mamiya where may i may. I is run swollen on. Wbz which he go. E which are the spaghetti said. It's kissy your rail coma. He supreme you out to the pasta seniors. That different this mandate is in manila's which is quintas ghalib's seon gone lows. Maria's gone alkaloids meet lessees mock exist and where he cook as as can him which simple does better we via name which are the was established. Those particular graphic does doesn't necessarily as much and does this glenda abbas lane. Guess it shut respect though who's just a witness Literal alcohol but still look in the radio. I'm gonna win in the industry in california that Sat on how it is toga. Promise on experience como que a head on commerce you your quake-hit has indicated quicker hip.

Berto Hamblur Russillo Geeky Lucas Colonie Semyon Erasure Sybil Hoan Lemire Boorda Colonie Latin America Amelia Sioux City Alita Manal Tatham Gannett Ucla Alabama Thune IAN
California Latinos hit hardest by coronavirus

NBC Nightly News

02:40 min | 1 year ago

California Latinos hit hardest by coronavirus

"Back now with the group hardest. Hit by covid latinos in california. They make up. Nearly half of all deaths gotti short says more in tonight's inequality in america. Okay it's the start of the night shift in one of the areas in la hardest hit by covid nineteen and christiane say is just beginning. His rounds not come on whether christian grew up in this predominantly latino neighborhood what he sees happening to his community. Every night is overwhelming blue. That means that a patient is in cardiopulmonary arrest. This patient to now has had heart stopped the total of five to six times. He says there are two types of conversations happened in these hospital halls that rock him to his core some among nurses themselves. Sometimes it's like. Hey you know before we go into this room. His wife was on another floor and she didn't make it a couple of days ago. She just passed away so remember. Don't say anything about that. Then there though is when patients turn to him and ask this. The absolute worst is when verbalize it when they say. Hey i'm not gonna make 'em i you know. What do you say to that across los angeles. Death rates among latinos are twice as high as the rest of the population latinos hospitalized around three times more often than white communities doctor edgar chavez works at a community clinic in his seen ten of his patients die from kovic many from multi generational households who bring the virus home and then spread it within their family. It's really hard for us to see our population doing the work that nobody else wants to do front facing exposing themselves to cove it and then dying from kobe and then not getting the healthcare that they need not getting the vaccine fast enough some funeral homes like this one are averaging thirty body removals a day and those are just the ones they can get too often having to families that they just don't have the capacity this right here. This is a refrigerated truck that was brought in to deal with some of the overflow. Meanwhile families we for funerals to bury loved ones like ramon bustamante. It was agreed. He didn't have anything for us. He was a single father and an essential worker at a grocery store. Who said goodbye to his daughters through. A glass window might not his head but sh scar retracted little hards. A community considered essential but suffering the

Covid Nineteen Gotti Christiane Edgar Chavez Kovic LA California America Los Angeles Ramon Bustamante
Trump addresses supporters at DC rally ahead of Congress vote

Frank Beckmann

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Trump addresses supporters at DC rally ahead of Congress vote

"Supporters of President Trump right now gathered on the streets of Washington, D. C. To call on Congress not to certify the results of the Electoral College for the 2020 presidential election. Today, protesters they're showing their support for the president. The president's son, Donald Trump Jr. Issued a warning to Republican lawmakers who are in challenging the election results. This gathering should send a message to them. This isn't They're Republican party anymore. This'd is Donald Trump's Republican Party. Among those at the Save America Rally in DC Shane Trio of Oakland County, he tells Christiane Ricky's helping the certification process will be delayed today, you know, keep keep keep the fight going as long as possible, keep getting the evidence out there. And hopefully I hope to God that we can get. This craziness overturned at

President Trump Donald Trump Jr. Electoral College Republican Party Save America Rally Shane Trio Congress Christiane Ricky Washington Donald Trump Oakland County DC
"christiane" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"christiane" Discussed on WTOP

"Think, Read this Christiane College football Saturday getting underway at noon in college Park, Maryland, taking on Rutgers, Terps, hoping to move to three and two on the year. This is the last scheduled the game for Maryland. We can talk about a bowl berth, potentially if they win. Today. Maryland is a 6.5 point favorite. And Turks quarterback Tolia tug of Milo He's had an up and down year but had coach Mike Locksley. Impressed with what he's seen out of his sophomore signal caller, even when we've had the stoppages, and we haven't been able to play games, his work ethic and how he approaches to gang hasn't changed. He's not one of those guys that when we're not working or games or canceled, he's taking the day off. I mean, the guy lives up in our in the gossip Team house. He's always there. He's always watching film. He's always taken notes at three this afternoon. Army hosting Navy up at West Point Maids and black knights will play with on Lee, their fellow cadets and midshipmen in the stands for the first time since 1943 the Army Navy game taking place at West Point. At eight tonight. Virginia Tech hosting Virginia. The Hokies are favored by three despite the fact that they come into the game with a losing record while you've a is five and four I'm Christiane Wtp sports coming up after traffic and weather how the Corona virus vaccine will be handled in our area. It's 11 16. You've put off taking care of your dental health long enough because of your fear of the dentist at the Cascade Center for Dental Health. We get it and can help you overcome your fear with.

Maryland Mike Locksley Christiane College Cascade Center for Dental Heal Hokies West Point Maids Tolia tug Army Navy West Point college Park Christiane Wtp Rutgers Virginia Tech football Virginia Navy Army Lee
"christiane" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"christiane" Discussed on WTOP

"Here's Christiane. It's Game day. The Washington football team taking on the Cincinnati Bengals, the line ranging from Washington minus 1.5 to a pickem. Dwayne Haskins, who is not starting at quarterback for Washington actually beat out Heisman Trophy winner Now Bengal starter Joe Burrow back in 2018 for the starting job for Ohio State, While Burrow was still a Buckeye Burrow transferred shortly thereafter that decision and ended up guiding LS You to a national championship. A year later, Alex Smith will be under center once again for Washington. That's a one o'clock kick off at FedEx Field also won. The Ravens host the Tennessee Titans. Baltimore is a six point favorite. And speaking of the Buckeyes number three Ohio State survived in upset bid against Number nine Indiana 42 to 35 staying in the Big 10. It took three overtimes in New Jersey. But it was Michigan. Outlasting Rutgers 48 to 42 shifting gears to the A. C C Virginia Tech got dominated by pit 47 to 14 u VEET worked Abilene Christian 55 to 15 and for the first time this season Number 21 Liberty loses as North Carolina State hangs on to beat the flames 15 to 14. I'm Christiane W to be sports coming up after traffic and weather group homes with residents highly vulnerable to covet, are working to stay safe. I'm particularly on a 7 47. Retired federal employees Open season starts on November 9th Take.

Washington Christiane W Joe Burrow Ohio FedEx Field Dwayne Haskins Cincinnati Bengals Alex Smith Baltimore Tennessee Titans New Jersey Michigan Ravens A. C C Virginia Tech Indiana North Carolina
NFL Weekly Update

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 2 years ago

NFL Weekly Update

"Chase Young, who leads all rookie defenders in total pressures out with a groin injury. The Patriots Chiefs game will be played either Monday or Tuesday, pending the results of further covert testing. Pro football talks Mike Florio reporting that one Saints player fullback Michael Burton, tested positive Following the team's flight to Detroit Saturday night. The team is retesting star Running back Calvin Come era after he sat next to Burton on the plane. College Football. Virginia, losing two top ranked Clemson, 41 to 23. Virginia Tech. Getting past dupe 38 to 31 Navy Crushed by Air Force 42 7 Soccer DC United worked by Atlanta for nail and it was the Washington Spirit over Sky Blue FC one new at Pimlico for the first time in over a decade of Philly winning the Preakness Stakes. As Swiss skydiver edged Kentucky Derby winner authentic in a photo finish, and finally the Nationals cutting ties with pitching coach Paul Menhart, who was with the organization for 15 years. I'm Christiane. W T o p sports

Michael Burton Football Chase Young Mike Florio Patriots Virginia Virginia Tech Sky Blue Fc Paul Menhart Detroit Clemson Nationals Air Force Saints Philly Soccer Dc United Washington Atlanta
Tampa Bay Lightning's Steven Stamkos will not play in Game 5 of Stanley Cup Final

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:15 sec | 2 years ago

Tampa Bay Lightning's Steven Stamkos will not play in Game 5 of Stanley Cup Final

"Finals of Tampa Bay defeats. The Dallas Stars The bolts of the champions, however. Tampa will have to try and do it without their captain once again. NHL dot com Reporting a Steven Stamkos will not play. I'm Christiane w T o

Tampa Bay Tampa Christiane W T Steven Stamkos NHL Dallas
5 tropical cyclones are in the Atlantic at the same time for only the second time in history

Nightline

02:07 min | 2 years ago

5 tropical cyclones are in the Atlantic at the same time for only the second time in history

"Tonight for the first time in nearly fifty years. They've ocean is home to five rapidly growing named tropical cyclones with one hurricane sally set to slam into the southern coast tomorrow for the very latest I'm joined by ABC News. Chief meteorologist Ginger Zee now Ginger Hurricane Sally is clearly strengthening as it approaches your location in Alabama? Where do you see the storm heading? Juju I'm in the heart of mobile and you've got things like that building with sandbags in front of it, and that is for good reason from here back through coastal Mississippi that's where the brunt of the storm is going to impact. So let's look at on the satellite got lot better organized as we went through today, and that's going to keep going as it moves really painfully slow to the West northwest it will finally start to make that northern tick tomorrow afternoon and evening, and we expect landfall sometime around midnight or thereafter early Wednesday morning. So this is a slow. Storm that means that rain is going to be a big time issue and part of the slowdown is that stationary front making it almost defense you see we stopped the clock at about midnight. It looks like it should make landfall somewhere close to Pascagoula Mississippi if it does by the way, make landfall in Mississippi as a cat to that's the strongest we've seen in. Mississippi. Since Katrina in two thousand five that looks like wrong place wrong time. Now, there are always multiple threats as a storm approaches. There are already dire storm surge projections. What worries you the most about Sally. Storm surges what loses most life and property and storms. So six to nine feet in some places others up to eleven. Let me break it all down for you get warnings all the way from eastern Louisiana through the Florida panhandle. Now, it breaks down and closer to the center of the storm. In the northeast quadrant, we call it the dirty side of the storm. That's where you'll pick up some of the hefty so. From Mobile Bay. Back through deloise pass Christiane that's where we're most concerned. Now we also have rainfall and I don't want anyone if they're inland to say, Oh, this is just a coastal storm. By no means, you get fifteen to twenty inches on top of that storm surge right at the coast. That's not good especially here in mobile but go up to Gumri or even Atlanta and you could see a half a foot arrange.

Mississippi Sally Chief Meteorologist Ginger Zee Abc News West Northwest Christiane Katrina Alabama Gumri Florida Atlanta Louisiana
EU Leaders Hold Summit on COVID-19 Recovery Plan, Multi-Year Budget

Morning Edition

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

EU Leaders Hold Summit on COVID-19 Recovery Plan, Multi-Year Budget

"Union leaders are gathering in Brussels for the first time since the pandemic hit Teri Schultz reports They will need to negotiate the use next budget and a Corona virus recovery package, but their views are far apart. Sometimes the difficulty of impending negotiations in you matters is gauged by how many shirts leader's pack for a meeting. This summit is one of those, so I've come here today. And tomorrow and maybe the day after work. Latvian Prime Minister Christiane is currents is among those in the middle between France and Germany, who favor maximizing the amount of money granted to countries hit hardest by the pandemic and the side nicknamed the Frug ALS, who say most assistance should be loans and paid back. European Council president show Michelle has to bridge that gap. I'm convinced that we see political true, which it's possible his budget proposal lays out almost $2 trillion in spending over the next seven years. For NPR News. I'm Teri Schultz in Brussels.

Teri Schultz Brussels Christiane Npr News Prime Minister European Council Michelle President Trump Germany France
"christiane" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"christiane" Discussed on WTOP

"Years Christiane the Jacksonville Jaguars won just six games last year and it's been a bit of a tough all season as a standout defensive end Jana can gawk way has pleaded for the organization to train him and now ESPN's Adam Schefter tweeting out that Jacksonville has had trade discussions with other teams regarding starting running back Leonard Fournette ESPN NFL insider field Yates tweeting out five names to keep an eye on as trade candidates during draft week they include and god quake who by the way played his high school ball at friendship collegiate before setting a school record for sacks of marijuana twenty fifteen for net jets safety Jamal Adams Viking safety Anthony Harris and Redskins offensive tackle Trent Williams the dissatisfied seven time Pro Bowl left tackle once out of Washington and Redskins insider JP Finlay reported this week that sources have repeatedly told him that while the club once a second round pick in return for Williams the Redskins are willing to be creative in compensation I'm Chris Chandler Tempe sports one forty same prevent the spread of viruses with Michael and sons germicidal UV C. go to Michael and son dot com hi everybody it's Chris core we're all spending a lot more time in our houses these days and I know the last thing you want is to spend money but if you have a problem with your roof like a leak or missing shingles you can't just ignore it I talked to my friends at Ruth masters and here's how they will do their part Routemasters is now offering thirty six months no interest financing that's it no hidden fees no tricks straight talk and if you can't afford a whole new roof they will do their best to repair your existing roof of course they say if you need roof were done always get three estimates just make sure one of the three is from Ruth masters but honestly I don't know how anybody could beat this.

Ruth Chris Chandler JP Finlay offensive tackle Jamal Adams NFL Leonard Fournette Michael Redskins Washington Christiane Trent Williams Anthony Harris marijuana Yates Jacksonville Adam Schefter ESPN
Climate Change Experts Find Hope in Global Action to Contain Coronavirus

Climate Cast

09:22 min | 2 years ago

Climate Change Experts Find Hope in Global Action to Contain Coronavirus

"Face it. Life as we know has changed dramatically in the past few weeks and one unintended. Impact of the health and economic crisis is reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Planes aren't flying. Cars are parked. So how will this crisis and the choices we make in the next few years impact future greenhouse gas emissions scenarios Christiana? Figueres is a former executive secretary of the UN Climate Change Convention and Tom Rivett. Carnac served as her senior adviser together. They recently wrote the future. We choose surviving the climate crisis they also co hosts a podcast called outrage and optimism. Thanks for joining US via skype today. Christiane and Tom. Thank you very much for the invitation. Poll great to be here. Christiane it in the book. You lay out two extremely different climate scenarios in twenty fifty based on the choices we make between now. And then. Why take that approach? We thought it would be a helpful approach to take for two reasons one because whether we are aware of it or not we are actually choosing right now and over the next ten years between two dramatically different worlds that we will experience so we thought it was important to bring all that choice to the fore and walk readers through the consequences and the second reason why we thought it would be helpful is because frankly those of us who have been working on climate change for emptying years have tended to focus only on the doom and gloom consequences of unabated climate. Change all of which is true. And which is in scenario one but we have made less of an effort to be equally as compelling in our narrative about what happens with this world if we actually do bring down our emissions to one half of where they are now by twenty thirty. And what does that word feel like what does it? What does it look like? What is the experiential sensation that we will have out of a much better world? Take us through the scenarios that you envision in the book. Well let's start with the scenario that we don't want but it's a scenario that we're actually walking toward unless we take dramatically different decisions so that scenario is a scenario in which the first thing that hits you the quality of the because when you walk out of your condition home you will be hit with very hot polluted air. Which means that you won't be able to walk outside without a mask and you will very likely not be able to work. Play or exercise outside. Most of our human activities will have to be inside including producing food. We will also be experiencing vast slots of many continents that will be rendered practically uninhabitable. Meaning that there will be millions of people who will be forced to migrate away from home and livelihood putting enormous pressure on boundaries of countries. That are a little bit worse off at least from temperature point of view. But we'll be worse off from a political and social pressure point of view. This is a world in which conflict and very likely violent conflict will erupt and a world in which are democracies will really be threatened. That sounds pretty dire. Tom Take us through the more optimistic scenario where we take extreme action sooner taking the kinds of actions that will slow the flow of greenhouse gases to protect the ice caps and protect the other elements that we think of classic they around climate. Change will have all kinds of other benefits. I mean the ad will be cleaner. If we don't combust fossil fuels to drive 'cause to to combustion power plants etc. We will have avoided a massive public health crisis. Our cities will be clean and they'll be green. Birds will be in the cities that we can imagine cities that are reconstructed for human scale of life at something. We are not without much complexity at the moment around Corona virus but some people are beginning to experience that would be like a quieter place It would also be a world in which we have succeeded in preventing this collapse in humanity has come together and done a big thing. It is collectively avoided this moment of breakdown and as a result of that has come together and it is a world that is remembered. What's important you mentioned corona virus clearly were in a major crisis right now with Cova nineteen. It's a health. It's an economic crisis. It's playing out right in front of us but it looks like this has actually reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the short term. China has seen a twenty five percent drop in emissions. We're seeing this major. Stop in air travel and a dramatic reduction. An Auto Travel Christina. Do you have a sense of how much greenhouse gas emissions could fall this year if current trends continue? Well no that's difficult to predict because obviously it will very much depend on how long this epidemic last. However I do think that it is important to note that the drop in greenhouse gas emissions is you well pointed out an unintended consequence the difference between this and actually making very intentional policies and measures to reduce greenhouse gases is that the economic consequences of the Corona virus are fundamentally negative the economic consequences of decarbonising. Our economy are fundamentally positive because they will strengthen the economy they will provide millions of new jobs. We know the transportation and commuting is the biggest opportunity for greenhouse gas reductions. And we're in the situation where we have all these people working from home. What about going forward do all of these people actually really need to commute? Every day we live in an era of skype and zoom. What could we do to transportation emissions going forward? He and I think it's such a fascinating situation. I mean festival as Christiane said we'RE NOT GONNA solve climate change with a virus right so the temporary job in greenhouse gas emissions is only meaningful and useful if it gets translated into change habits which actually make some of these reduced emissions more prominent now teddy working video conferencing. The the the technology has come so far in recent years. But it's been met with us sort of general sense of skepticism that people can really do and the technology really works and actually what if the reading things about the last week is the people have been walking from home using these technologies and in most cases working really well and realizing the benefits of not having to commute in the morning not having to travel? I mean I myself have to travel most week somewhere whether it's up to London from where I live in the west of England or or or getting on a plane going across to Europe or something and now I haven't traveled for the last two weeks. And actually that's been great. I've really enjoyed being home with my family and I have been able to do the what that I would. Otherwise have had to do in a different way using virtual tools so they say that it takes between four and six weeks to really change in ingrained habit if you're engaging with a new normal. I think we're going to get at least that of this new normal to get used to now. How much of that can stick off towards. Is the really interesting question but on climate change different is good and this is a different thing now because nothing can excuse the tragedy and the loss of life. And we're certainly not saying that tool but these changes in habit can be good and we'll see what happens as that unfolds and at the moment is difficult to predict and Paul. I want to make sure that you know. We're not coming across as being making light of the fact that so many people are suffering right now. We are losing thousands of lives. We have many people who are affected an isolated. We have millions of people who are self isolating we have millions of people who are losing their income or the the entire informal sector is now really out hugely and deeply threatened because of the last a loss of their income. So we're not making light of the cost that this incredible global pandemic is actually having upon us. What we're doing is we are taking that with. Its full consequence and driving some lessons for a global emergency that has very different characteristics but from which some of the behavioral changes that we have already become accustomed to in just a few weeks might actually be helpful.

Tom Rivett Christiane Skype Carnac Christiana United States Figueres Senior Adviser Executive Secretary Cova Paul
Irina Falconi on Life as a Tennis Pro in the Coronavirus Era

The Tennis.com Podcast

06:14 min | 2 years ago

Irina Falconi on Life as a Tennis Pro in the Coronavirus Era

"I have. Nfl Coney as you guys know. She's a w shape pro hugely affected by the suspension We just got announced on Monday morning. That there's no w Ta play until May At at this point now the way things are going I mean I'm in New York Arenas in Orlando I'm expecting that to be pushed back more Irene out. Let's start with. What is your life like these days? Well to be honest I just got back from Sam's Club where I was able to stock on quite a bit of dried and canned goods Just because I've been hearing whispers and rumors about actual You know we're probably going to end up getting quarantined in our own homes So if that's the case I mean we're just trying to prepare ourselves early. We're not really coming contact with anyone other than people that live in the house So thankfully there is lots of trails outside that you're able to go out and no run sprint. Do Whatever You can to kind of keep your fitness up because I mean as of now as of last night The USCCA center which is only five minutes away. Where I usually train it's close. It's completely shut out. Shut down and locked up so unless you actually go to some public courts public facilities where you're not really hitting with anyone that has corona virus It's kind of hard right now and The thing is you don't WanNa be hitting too early. You don't want to peak too early since as of now it's May second. It can be even further than that so it might just be very light hitting if that for the next couple weeks but just maintaining fitness. I think is the most important thing and thankfully. My fiance built a boxing gym in the garage. So we are good to go on that on that front but Tom Yeah. You are lucky to have that because I think a lot of a lot of players will be desperate for space and room if they live in an apartment especially you have a Nice House. You have that garage. I mean that there is some positives and all this chaos when all I started unfolding in Indian Wells cancelled and all this was happening and it was like okay might be four to six weeks. Spent my initial thought was like oh well okay look. Income is obviously a problem for players. But sometimes you guys have injuries that last four to six weeks. Sometimes you have illnesses that last two to four weeks in the grand scheme of things. It doesn't seem like a very big chunk of time but now that things escalated so severely it could be three months could be six months it could be. I don't know and that's the hard part is when you're sick and injured you kind of have somewhat of an idea like hey. I'm working towards this goal now. It's like I'm working towards what? Yeah that's the other thing because for example. Let's say you do have six weeks of where you're trying to rehab from an injury. You have the option if you want to go somewhere if you WANNA go and travel if you WANNA go just go to the beach for a couple of days or anything like that. You have that luxury if you want it now in this case it's like Oh man. Flights to Costa Rica and Ecuador in Puerto Rico are like less than one hundred dollars. It's so tempting to want to go out and travel. But you can't so in a sense you know a lot of tennis players. We tend to complain that the season is long. It's very very You know it's it's tough on the body So the fact that we have this time to kind of just almost regroup. It's weird time in the year because it season just kinda started But Yeah I think it's just it's very very weird. I don't think that there's another word to put it another word that you can really describe it because I mean with the Olympics coming up I mean I'm in a situation where I have a special ranking so does that mean that my special ranking Kinda freezes because once I start my first tournament I only have a year to use up all my special ranking tournaments. So that's another thing that we're just have absolutely no clue whatsoever and with the Olympics. Coming up I mean. Do we know whether that's GonNa Happen? I mean a lot of girls are just in limbo right now. It's never a good place to be in when you're uncertain So as of now I'm just taking it day by day to be honest. I'm just enjoying the crap out of it. There's no other way to see it. You just have to see it as an opportunity And one of the things that you know you can do is Ago Christiane was posting different. Things that you can kind of do while you're in this state and You know whether it's facetime ing with people that you probably haven't talked to in a while. Learning new hobby cleaning house from you know had to tell there. There's a lot of things that can be done during this time. So I think that if you go about it the right way you can see it as a very positive thing whether it's for me whether for the world I think we just have to see it in a positive light. You'd have some positive spin on this thing. It's nice to hear but it's also I. You mentioned Christiaan heff players been talking a lot of you guys been communicating with each other. A Lot I know you're probably not hanging out a lot but has there been a conversation between you guys. I mean at the end of the day. I think a lot of the players are just kind of Speaking the same boys right now in unison which is suffering Soleil. Y'All do not go and be around other people do not put yourself at risk and do not put others at risk So I think we're all trying to find ways on how to have the new ways to work out at home because that's pretty much. What a lot of players are doing. I know I was speaking to Madison and she said. Hey We got some board games you know. So there's that so yeah. I mean there's there's a lot to do and I think a lot of players I mean it's that uncertainty but I have a feeling that they're gonNA come back pretty

Olympics Tom Yeah Nice House NFL SAM Indian Wells Tennis Irene New York Ecuador Soleil Christiaan Heff Madison Costa Rica Orlando Christiane Puerto Rico
Taylor Swift donates $1 million for Tennessee tornado relief

Doug Stephan

01:13 min | 2 years ago

Taylor Swift donates $1 million for Tennessee tornado relief

"Taylor swift has decided to give a million Bucks to help tornado relief from the national situation earlier in the week she was hello she lived in Nashville since she started there when she was like fourteen and I think I lived outside she said national my home and the fact that so many people lost their homes and so much more as a problem and middle Tennessee devastating to me so she makes it to the response find encourage fans to donate as much as they could as well she has done great things I think she's a pretty smart about stuff like this for charitable efforts toward the city of Nashville go back ten years or so she founded that Taylor swift charitable fund in response to the natural flood which took place in twenty ten if you're a member she made donations to both the country music hall of fame Nashville symphony's gave a hundred thirteen thousand Bucks today Tennessee equality project and then there are other country acts like damage J. Christiane have a pledge hundred grand fifty thousand respectively there toward the relief fund as

Taylor Swift Nashville Tennessee J. Christiane
"christiane" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"christiane" Discussed on 600 WREC

"I. B. dot U. S. so now the state of the union this is tomorrow's going to be today is this one's a stadium was the two weeks ago two weeks ago yesterday okay and it is still being talked about now what state of the union address can you recall that had a life span of two weeks any president can stay in the union speeches in his reaction at night the next day on the next series of news events overwhelming people forget it Nancy Pelosi is still upset about what happened at the trump state of the union two weeks ago she said number of your Christiane among poorer still talking about it two weeks later once again proving when has a state of the union show been talked about this much only one hi I am part of it so Christiane almond force there is I just want to ask you when your ripped up the president's state of the union address did vice president pence say anything to you well he may he may not even know he was just looking straight at the president I was very disappointed in the fact that the president used the chamber of the house of representatives the people's house as a backdrop for a reality show giving the presidential medal to Rush Limbaugh but that's something you should do is own office when he started talking about a person so respected in our country diagnosed with cancer we thought it was going to be talking that John Lewis and even if he's talking about Russia congressman and civil rights.

president Nancy Pelosi pence Rush Limbaugh John Lewis congressman Christiane almond vice president Russia
Fashion and War in America

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:15 min | 2 years ago

Fashion and War in America

"Are currently in the midst of international fashion week. Yes and last week. We talked about the origins of the semi-chaotic relationship between fashion and Hollywood film. But we only got into the nineteen thirties so today. We're moving out of the thirties and into the nineteen forties. Which of course takes US straight into World War Two and on the show? We've talked a lot about fashion and war as it relates to Europe during World War One and World War Two but less so about the relationship fashion and war in America and it's actually incredibly fascinating because throughout the nineteen thirties. America's changing perception of their homegrown talent was reflected in Ariz- leading fashion magazines. Such as Vogue and Harper's bazaar at both of those magazines began to feature American fashion designers more and more throughout the decade. Elizabeth Haase reflected on this transitory period in American fashion in her book. Fashion is spinach which was published in nineteen thirty eight and in it. She writes quote in the late twenties ninety percent of the drawings and photographs. Where the work? A prison couturiers and. She's talking about Vogue and Harper's bazaar and then she says many pages and both magazines are now devoted to close created in America for American Life. The outbreak of World War Two and nineteen thirty nine mark significant shift in the fate of American designers who having continued to operate in the shadow of Paris throughout the nineteen thirties. Were suddenly left to stand all on their own and during the German occupation of Paris from June nineteen forty to August nineteen forty four. Many of the leading French couture houses were forced to close and those that did remain open did so under severely limited operations and some pretty severe restrictions as well right and for those of our listeners. Who might not have heard? April actually did a fantastic interview on stuff. You Mr History class which we featured a couple months ago so check it out if you want to learn more about fashion world war two so for the French fashion industry. This meant that communication with America during World War Two. It meant that one of their most important export markets was almost entirely broken and in one thousand nine hundred one after American designers and manufacturers presented promising fall and spring collections New York Times fashion journalist Virginia Pope well. She declared Murck City to be the fashion center of the world and AIRCON designers may have come into their own during the war but they did so under restriction and regulation beginning in nineteen forty two American fashion designers had to grapple with restrictions imposed by regulation l eighty five which were government imposed sanctions at severely limited. Just what designers could and could not produce the purpose of l. eighty-five was to conserve materials. Needed for the war effort and this included fabrics such as silk cotton wool. Leather Rubber Nylon. So you know pretty much. Every material that you need to make clothing and footwear and the regulations thus restricted just. How much material could be used in the making of new garments so we had campaign such as make-do-and-mend which encouraged people to avoid shopping altogether by mending their old clothes. Something we of course support very much today. L. eighty-five essentially challenge the very nature of the fashion industry itself. As we all know depends on the production of new seasonal clothing styles to stimulate consumerism and as we establish last episode Hollywood films while they were actively complacent and encouraging fashion consumption throughout the nineteen thirties and costume designers like their fashion designer. Counterparts were not exempt from L. Eighty five regulations during the war in an eighteen. Forty four article in the New York Times renowned Hollywood costume designer. Edith head called L. Eighty five quote. The greatest boone ever came to fashion designers in Hollywood so it would appear casts that in the nineteen forties costume designers still considered themselves as fashion designers. And she goes on to say about eighty-five quote. It vanished super luxury and brought us all down to Earth. Today we create sensible styles for women the kind that they can actually wear and she goes on to say how. Well I remember the day when we would swirl Fox skins around the hem of a secretary address or wipe satin uniform on a trained nurse. Now we hold to stark realism and by this time had been the head designer at paramount. For seven years she had taken over for her predecessor. Travis Banton in nineteen thirty seven and head like baton began her career in film working with Howard greer in the nineteen twenties as a costume illustrator before climbing the ranks and indeed head is certainly one of the most prolific and fame designers from the Hollywood golden age. Numerous books have been written about this prolific designer who April has eight Academy Awards for best costume design and wait for it. She has four hundred and forty four credits. On that's intense. She worked for almost sixty years in the film industry so she had an incredible career her first credit it dates to nineteen twenty five and her last film is dead. Men Don't wear plaid with Steve Martin. That released after her death in nineteen eighty two so she died in one thousand nine hundred. One at the age of eighty. Three head is quoted and Margaret Bailey's nineteen eighty-two book those Glorious Glamour Years as saying quote. I do not consider a motion picture costume designer necessarily a fashion creator because we do the script tells us to if we do a period piece then we recreate fashion. That was done before. And if we have a character role we do character close. It is only by the accident of a script that calls for fashion an actress that can wear fashion that some of the beautiful clothes will emerge. I don't consider myself a designer in the sense of fashion designer. I am a motion picture costume designer. So just how did head go from identifying as a fashion designer in Hollywood and the nineteen forties to firmly distinguishing herself as a costume designer by the end of her career? I love this answer. You pro because it actually lies with the advent of yours new-look which is a little unexpected as many of us know nineteen forty seven witnessed this dramatic and sudden change in fashion. Thanks to the unprecedented success of Christiane Yours Premier collection and he introduced dresses with nipped in ways. Those padded hips and full long skirts and they stood in direct contrast to the war regulated fashions of years prior which is why so many people loved them. Unfortunately for the many films released the year that this change took place. The costumes were immediately glaringly out of fashion again. Dino Dior's new look was significant reminder. That though film cost you may be perceived and interpreted as fashion it will never be able to truly contend with the whims and follies of contemporary trends. And Edith. Had designed costumes for eleven films that were released in nineteen forty seven so to say that she was affected is a bit of an understatement. Here and looking on this period for the book. Edith head's Hollywood edith reflected quote. I learned my lesson. The hard way just offered Dior brought out the new look every film I had done in the past few months. Looked like something from the bread lines with each screening. I vowed that I would never get caught by fashion trend again and became a confirmed fence sitter. Although despite her weariness of fashion trends did not keep her designs from apparently sparking them as was the case with address she designed for Elizabeth Taylor and a place in the sun which was a nineteen fifty film in a nineteen seventy-eight article for the American Film Journal. Edith wrote my dress for Elizabeth Taylor and a place in the sun was taken up by manufacturer of debutante Party dresses. Someone at paramount wants counted at a party thirty seven Elizabeth Taylor's dancing. All studio designers have created something that influences fashion. But a good costume designer. Shouldn't try to influence style though. Naturally he hopes to hit upon something that many people will like

Hollywood Edith Head America Elizabeth Taylor New York Times Paris Paramount Head Designer United States Vogue Europe Elizabeth Haase Dior Ariz Academy Awards American Film Journal Travis Banton Harper
How stress is making you sick

Amanpour

02:37 min | 2 years ago

How stress is making you sick

"Next guest is here to help. He's Dr Ranjan Chatterjee and he says stress. Today is in fact making us physically sick. Some eighty percent of the health issues that he treats can be traced back to stress and it's made worse by blurring work and home life. Dr Chatterjee join me here here in the studio to diagnose the issue and give us what we all need to manage it a prescription Dr Ron Chatterjee. Welcome to the program. Christiane pack you very much. Having having so the book is the Stress Solution. How stress to you right on a scale of one to ten scale WANNA turn? It is what does that mid December Sumba now. I'm going to say about seven to eight. Maybe it's today. I'm going to say eight. Because his cumulative is cumulative I'm anything unique unique riots. I'm busy got young children. I've got a wife. I've got a busy job. I see patients are released. Weekly podcast right books. I appear in in public. I've got lots going on at the moment. I'm I guess I'm feeling the pressure so I've got to be honest. I'm trying my best to apply a lot of the principles that I talk doc about but it can be challenging but that means you are the perfect subject to be writing about because you are feeling all these things. The people of your generation and people in the workplace are feeling juggling too much essentially. I think I'm juggling a little bit too much of the moments and the thing is you never really get to a perfect set of balance. We're all looking for work life balance as if it's an endpoint that suddenly when we get that everything's GonNa be blissful life always changes lives shifts surrounds. The stress is a serious problem. Let's be really clear about this. The World Health Organization a calling stress the health epidemic of the twenty first century. And actually it was a paper in two thousand Thirteen Journal of the American Medical Association. It was an editorial I should say where they suggested that. Seventy to ninety percent China all patients come and see the doctor and any given day is in some way related to stress. Seventy to ninety percent. Yet you are a doctor. What do you actually find your surgery? I see things like anxiety insomnia inability to concentrate hormonal problems. Blooms type two diabetes even things I could. BCC and high blood pressure all these seemingly separate problems can have stress as a route driver. I think we really need to give stress a bit more attention. Not only how widespread problem is but also some actionable solutions. So people feel

Dr Ranjan Chatterjee Dr Ron Chatterjee World Health Organization Christiane China Thirteen Journal Of The Americ Ninety Percent Eighty Percent
Erika Jayne Gives Fans an Underwhelming 30-Minute Concert

Bitch Sesh: A Real Housewives Breakdown

04:13 min | 3 years ago

Erika Jayne Gives Fans an Underwhelming 30-Minute Concert

"I was at Eric Jane's on concert in New Jersey and Melissa Gorgon was in vip introduce we talked and then the the show was actually thirty minute as long it was very short show no judgment everyone works through their art was it though like how much was each minute it I mean it was she did she has three songs that we love and that she has deep cuts what would and so don't you kinda call them deep cuts as though like when you know billy Joel this is classical music yeah it was so Melissa feel me getting tired in this thirty minutes set and so she saw me on losing steam and she started to hunt me to get me excited for the concert and honestly her hauntingly got me back into the show and I was able to finish out seizing sent out in the audience as sort of a fluffer she was in we were in VIP it was like there was like a separate set of people and it was like pressing she she knew I was like part of press and so she got me excited and I I think that that's the sign of a good friend and who sees some people not maybe not during the show I enjoyed the show she's reading energy energy for someone to lose steam and I'm sorry call your thirty minute shower it wasn't a great show it was tough expensive with a great number as it is I did number power to the songs because when I see feels very lacklustre through the screaming I could totally wrong she is great she had spent a lot of money on production yes so you always see the talent lies you really see the production the dancers are bringing it Oh it was a beautiful her videos are where she comes up cuts you know what I mean like for her to stand up for answer for thirty minutes it's like that's a lot of time for some artists well it's not like J. Lo where she's going to have amazing answer this that and the other but still the main event remains Jaylo yes it's almost she's overshadowing herself which is both smart but also there's a comparison you can't help but make yeah yeah yeah he songs I would not do a single hover no she did her deepest saw her old saw did she try to break it down at any point like where it's just like her in a Mike and just really yes so she has honestly a gorgeous outfit sorry it was honestly a gorgeous outfit she was wearing like rhinestone cowboy boots that were like Christiane something released and like a gorgeous robe I'm and she likes RAV and it's like black and there's like lights in there are no dancers it's deconstructed but it's doesn't sh- it's not the same like are they doing halo is the horse and that's that's the that's the Halo Lopez brings down I'm still I'm still jenny from complexities gorgeous just say though I think it would behoove Erica if any of her hangers-on are listening Mikey's rolling love I love mikey dolls I we work video that she bring it down put on the robe and do now we know how much do that way with her teaching because this is where the fans are coming from and she taught to read to do that and why not do it. did you not do it and also make it kind of like shade for on poorly APP reform exactly I think that would be a good performance I was really deeply invested in Erica she was a house that I latched onto the most and so this arc I am not on the train where do you find eric now I yeah well she just doesn't want to give up her soul to reality TV which is beautiful like that's a good person but it's not a good Riady the listeners across America or across about five states are longing in their cars right now because for the what we've needed all this time which is she doesn't want to give up Saudi television and for that I cannot forgive that is a noble worthy cause get off my teeth exactly makes her brave makes her smart but it does not make Kerr a lovable star and you know why I'm angry at her for doing that is because Asia has a soul to give up would you don't be she gave us that promise that she was willing to we're down her whole life and her life seems to be doing okay and I don't like

Eric Jane New Jersey Melissa Gorgon Thirty Minutes Thirty Minute
Boris Johnson and Trump: Whose day was worse?

Amanpour

09:07 min | 3 years ago

Boris Johnson and Trump: Whose day was worse?

"Welcome to the program everyone. I'm Christiane Amanpour in New York where world leaders speaking at the United Nations General Assembly President Donald Trump's speech was heavily focused focused on his domestic reelection agenda lashing out at what he called a permanent political class he railed against China and Iran too and later though he seem to relax at a meeting with his closest European soulmate the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson but both face major crises at home controversies as the call into question their commitment to the rule of law and democracy itself here in the United States the latest scandal to engulf the president his phone call to the Ukrainian leader and request to investigate his political opponent the former vice president Joe Biden and he is now facing renewed calls for impeachment here's what the president had had to say as he arrived at the UN. It's a witch hunt. I'm leading in the polls. They have no idea how they stopped me the only way they can try through impeachment humint. This has never happened to President before. There's never been a thing like this before. It's nonsense and when you see the call when you see the readout of the call which I assume whom you'll see at some point you'll understand. That call was perfect. It couldn't have been nicer and even the Ukrainian government put out a statement. That was perfect call. There was no pressure. Put on them whatsoever. So of course we are waiting for a transcript that call but as for Boris Johnson before he took to the podium the Supreme Court at home home issued a momentous decision that is controversial five weeks suspension of parliament was in fact unlawful and it's another in a string of severe blows that he suffered since becoming prime minister and vowing to push brexit through do or died. Yes obviously this is a voted that oh we will respect and we respect the judicial process so I have to say I strongly disagree with what the justices found I didn't think that right but we will go ahead and Paul comeback and parliament is coming back tomorrow so democracy. Chrissy and rule of law are in focus on both sides of the pond today with me now to discuss share our oh he's the former French ambassador to the United States and also to the United Nations and Jane Harman. She's president and CEO the Wilson Center and she also served nine terms as a member of Congress. Well let us get to the heart of the matter I started by saying both these issues that we've highlighted do in fact speak directly to the commitment of our leaders to the rule of Lauren democracy. Let me ask you first because the president of the United States is in the crosshairs right now well they both fit it was interesting to hear Boris Johnson and just say that he will respect the decision. I think the alternative is to go to jail in Britain. It's very clear what the role of that court is. and I think that means that he may lose his majority because what will happen unless he can pull a no brexit deal together which he doesn't seem to be able to do you may have to extend the deadline is that Farrage Farraj brexit tears will bail from the Conservative Party and I I don't know where the future leadership of what about the president of the United States. I mean here now. There's increased pressure on Nancy Pelosi who stood back from this idea of getting in meshed in an impeachment but this huge amount of pressure on her now right here is ah of course the rule of law should prevail here. I think it's important to see what the whistle blower wrote and I think it will either leak or be given to Congress soon and then we'll we'll have more information. I think a partisan impeachment is a very sad result of this. Should it come to that. I saw the movie in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight against Bill Clinton. what happens is the president gets stronger. This will feed his sense of grievance. You just showed a a piece where he said that hat and and it will keep us divided instead if we wait and get more information and there is a bipartisan way forward. I think that will be much healthier for the country and for the rule Jira aerobic. I WanNa ask you also about well. Let me ask you I actually about the UK Parliament and the You you K- Supreme Court that has determined that it was unlawful and unconstitutional. What Boris Johnson did I know you're looking at it also in a lens of Brexit. How what do you make of the rule of law aspect of it? I think it would be embarrassing. Ears debt for a lot of citizens especially you know the people walk close to the the populist wave that we are facing it could appear as a new attempt by the establishment to block brexit and so I do think whatever my personal feelings towards Brexit of course I would prefer the UK to remain in European Union. I think that the UK has to leave you. You you know fifty. Two percent of the of the British voted for it you know in France we add a referendum in two hundred five here about the EU Constitution Institution fifty five percent of the French said no and eventually it went through the parliament and today the populist are still saying you stole the vote of the French so I I really again. We have to respect the rule of law but we have also to understand that there is a sort of tension between what the citizens want expressed express their anger and decision of the judge really interested to hear you both you on the on the on the Donald trump situation that an impeachment might in fact strengthen him and you're Democrat so I'm saying it in that regard and actually produce a backlash and you're saying that even the Supreme Court ruling might produce a backlash. That's interesting. I mean Boston well. I think there is an alternative. I I think Nancy Pelosi suggested last week that the the procedure of the office of Legal Counsel at the Justice Department that prevents sitting President President from being indicted might be overturned by legislation and if courts consider. Let's come back to court whether Donald Trump pass committed crimes. I think that would be better than a partisan impeachment. What worries me about this is that there will be democratic. Support in the Senate a Dick Durbin has just come out in favor of impeachment and there is growing a consensus in the Democratic Caucus in the house so I think she probably has to move well. I'm a hearing actually that CNN sources are confirming that Speaker Pelosi is going to start an announce the process towards impeachment the formal the process which everyone knows is is basically the beginning of impeachment but what happened in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight was not pretty the better movies to the Democratic Ready President Bill Clinton and Republican stampede to impeach him. several counts were adopted in the house but in the Senate he was not convicted it and what happened was he got stronger and the driving force got weaker. the better movie was in the early seventies when I was a young council in the Senate the Nixon impeachment which was bipartisan bill call in then a freshman in the house later a Republican senator and then Secretary of defense had the courage to join the Democrats crats and the whole inquiry was much more low key in serious and after that the Democratic Senate leaders are the Senate leaders Republican Senate leaders came to Richard Nixon and said you will be convicted and he resigned and that was an orderly process based on whatever were were the facts at the time so I'm hoping that if it comes to this and impeachment is very sad thing to happen but if it comes to this and there certainly are a lot of allegations out there that it will be bipartisan and it we'll be done in a manner that gets the respect of not just our country but the world I mean so far. There is no indication at all that they'll be bipartisanship because the Republican Party has become the trump party in terms of all intensive for people who are leaving running against trying to run against the three of them Gerardo. I would like to play you a couple of soundbites because I want to ask you about the credibility of some of the reasons that president trump is giving for having tried to talk to the Ukrainian president. I'm I going to play the one that that he said earlier the conference talking about a congratulatory they treat message to the Ukrainian president. It's just play that conversation I had was is largely. Congratulatory was largely corruption. All of the corruption fixing play was largely the fact that we don't want our people like the vice. President Biden is done creating big corrupt already in the Ukraine

President Trump Donald Trump Boris Johnson United States President President Vice President Brexit Speaker Pelosi President And Ceo Supreme Court Senate Joe Biden Congress Prime Minister Republican Party Christiane Amanpour United Nations General Assembl Uk Parliament UN United Nations
 The Latest on the Kashmir status

Amanpour

07:56 min | 3 years ago

The Latest on the Kashmir status

"We looked the heating tensions between two major u._s. Allies a nuclear armed nations india and pakistan. It all kicked off on monday. When the indian prime minister narendra modi announced that he was removing kashmir's special status from the indian constitution putting its autonomy in peril in an address to the nation today the indian prime minister doubled down saying that his actions would free cash of terrorism in a nutshell kashmir is a contentious piece of land split split mostly between india and pakistan and they have fought three wars over it already. The pakistani government is responding so far by suspending trade with its neighbor the and downgrading diplomatic relations as this tense standoff develops we have asked for indian officials to join us but they've so far declined and i'm joined now by pakistan's ambassador the to the united nations me lodhi ambassador. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. How serious is this in the view of your government. I don't just mean politically for your government but regionally and what might do given the tension between your ought to nations christian. Let's i get the facts straight. How was this crisis triggered. It was triggered by illegal eagle annexation by the indian government off the state of jammu in kashmir which is an internationally recognized dispute in fact where i sit at the united the nation's it is a dispute that is functionally on the u._n. Security council agenda because there are a series of u._n. Security council resolutions that have of course on india to allow the people of jammu in kashmir to freely determine their destiny through a so the crisis is triggered by an illegal an illegitimate action by india and let's just get the rest of the facts straight. The facts are that there is a blanket curfew in occupy genuine cushman people. There are locked up. It's called a lock down which has entered its fourth david. Actually this has been a prolonged lockdown. These people have been deprived tribe of the liberty for seventy years or more now. They're going to be deprived of their identity because the action by the indian government what does it actually do. Ooh what it does is to also allow the indian government to bring about demographic changes in dublin kushner and therefore to really really threaten the identity of the kashmiri people as far as my government is concerned and my prime minister and my country's concern. We reject this move. We heard what prime hi mr moody said just a few hours ago and it was a dishonest deceitful and disingenuous justification of their action which has no basis in law and it's certainly flouts in flagrant violation. Security council has been ambassador. Let me ask you this. Let me ask because those are very very tough words. You're using you are the u._n. Ambassador you've just reminded us all how this is enshrined in international law given the dispute you should be resolved according to the international community so what is the united nations and the security council going to do about this so they taking it up well. I have been in meetings with top officials and i have reminded them of their responsibility. Pakistan has going to go to the security council. It is going to remind mind the security council and its members indeed all of the united nations of its responsibility and what is that responsibility that responsibility is to ensure and let me say to christiane for your viewers and important resolution. It's called resolution thirty eight of the security council and the paragraph two of that resolution says a country does not have the right to materially change the situation in cushman and that's precisely what the indian government it has done so my country wants a peaceful settlement of this issue. We've always called for a negotiated settlement which is an accordance with security council resolutions russians and in accordance with the wishes of the schmead people. Let's not forget the issue is about people it's about the people who have been deprived of their right to live the way they want to be governed the way they want to end today even pro indian politicians in in kashmir have been locked up so if prime minister narendra modi's says that this is in the interests of the jungle in kashmir people the question he has to answer is why do you have to lock up the entire state of genuine kashmir why because no cash media will accept what the indian government has done a we we we. We don't accept what the indian government has done. We checked it and we'll go to the council and we'll make all these points at the council and we will insist that the council implement its own resolutions because i think the choice right now is do we want to live in a rules-based world where international law supreme or do we want to live in a world which is ruled by the law of the jungle and this is what india has done it his floated international law and it has flouted security council resolutions. You mentioned lockdown and lock up. We've heard reports that opposition politicians in in jammu kashmir have been arrested and as you say landlines are down. The internet is down. Mobile phone is down very very difficult to get an idea of exactly what's happening on the ground there but i do want to ask you because the whole world knows that this piece of disputed land has been the cause of three wars between between your nations and today your army chief the the pakistani army chief said that the country would do all that's necessary go to any extent to support cash mary's and then the foreign minister said the pakistan is not looking to respond militarily so can i hear it from you. Do you think that there's is going to be a military solution to this or do you still have diplomatic intentions. No i mean we have said very clearly that all diplomatic diplomats and political options are on the table pakistan has no interest and no desire to escalate the situation. This is an escalation that was triggered by by an illegal and illegitimate act and we would like the international community now to stand up for principle for law for justice and to address the plight eight of the kashmiri people as i keep saying christiane. This is about people in that state in an occupied state an occupation that has been brutal india has moved additional troops into occupied jammu and kashmir why obviously to suppress the voice of the kashmiri people but one day the curfew will have have to end one day these restrictions will have to go and then the indian government will hear the voice of the kashmiri people and that voice will be to get get out of kashmir to leave kashmir and to reverse this illegal annexation but that's also gives rise to all sorts of worries because if they do protests as most people believe they will and some have suggested they will if and when this curfew is is is raised that also could trigger a response so let me ask you because obviously president trump has met president prime minister modi of india several times and he also just hosted prime minister imran khan oh prime minister at the white house and when they were talking president trump said that prime minister mody had mentioned. Maybe he into mediating in this. Let me just play what president trump said. I was with prime minister modi two weeks ago and we talked about this subject and he actually flea said. Would you like to be a mediator or arbitrator. I said

Indian Government Prime Minister Kashmir India United Nations Pakistan Narendra Modi Jammu Pakistani Government Christiane President Trump Donald Trump Mr Moody Cushman Pakistani Army Imran Khan White House
Venezuela's Maduro says he's ready to negotiate as Trump calls Guaidó

Amanpour

04:41 min | 3 years ago

Venezuela's Maduro says he's ready to negotiate as Trump calls Guaidó

"President Donald Trump up the ante with Venezuela today personally, calling interim president y to offer support then his Wade are taking to the streets again following a call from Guido for people to put more pressure on what the US now called former President, Nicolas Maduro. Why does also urging the old powerful Venezuelan military to get on the side of the people while my Doro is ratcheting up pressure on him treason old why does assets and barring him from leaving the country, but he's also leaving his door open for talks telling Russian media that he would negotiate with the opposition for the good of Venezuela for the world and its future. But just not about their demand for new elections. Komo's specula- is the opposition's new envoy to the United States and he met president vice President Mike Pence at the White House yesterday. He's joining us now from washing. Mr. Vecchio, welcome to the program. Thank you very much for having meeker San. So this is a really important moment of the president of the United States of voice support early on for Mr. Guido. And now he's actually picked up the phone or they've talked on the phone anyway. And he's got support Guido from President Trump. Can you tell me exactly what kind of support the president offered? I think the most important thing is to support our agenda, and that's what we have been talking with the United States and also with Latin American countries and the European Union's union on our agendas, so clear Christiane, first of all we want to end user of power of mother, then we want to move to a democratic system establishing a transitional government. And after that, we want to call for a free and trust election as soon as possible. This is our were again, this were we want to move forward. And that's why we are requesting the support of the international community on it is important to mention I mean, this is not only about the United States. Again. This is a fight between, you know, the free world against dictatorship. I get it. I know you're saying this is a fight between dictatorship and democracy, just explained. For people who are watching, and they think well, hang on a second president Madero claims that he won the elections and won Guido has not been elected president describe how you going to square that circle. And how you going to resolve what many might have is a question, Mark. Will we have to keep in mind that my Ludo conducted a fake election last year in order to to keep six more years in power. So that was declared by the oil. Yes. In the InterAmerican system as illegal as illegitimate election. And that's why he's not longer the president. His doesn't have how thority to conduct the Brazilians the of Venezuela. I'm the given that we don't have a prison. In the constitutional order and following our constitution under article two three three uterine half constitutional president the president of the national assembly has to assume the competences of the present. So that's why we are claiming they'll get him a sea of a long way though as interim president of Venezuela. And I understand that you won't even be in a position to be able to organize new elections for quite a while. So given that and given that Maduro says he's willing to negotiate with the opposition only not over your demands for free elections. He says he's going to stay till twenty twenty-five when theoretically the current term he's embarking on expires. What is your plan b what do you do if this continues and persists and my Douro holds onto power. So as I said Gerstein, we want to continue with our agenda. If we don't stop do they use her patient of firewood of my. I mean, the crisis will be even worse. So we need to stop that on. If we're willing to negotiate our agenda on on they know that. So we need to put more pressure on the streets with our people. We have the momentum. We have the leadership of one way up we have the institution of the national assembly events wheel. And we have this report of the international community. So I hope we can conduct as move transition in order to establish a democratic government and this stop the suffering off Venezuela. So obviously, we're seeing pictures, and we know that people have come out.

President Trump President Donald Trump Venezuela Interim President Mr. Guido United States Nicolas Maduro Vice President Mike Pence Komo White House Meeker San Mr. Vecchio European Union Wade Gerstein Mark Christiane Madero