35 Burst results for "Christian Sager"

Neanderthals Used Glue

BrainStuff

03:59 min | 10 months ago

Neanderthals Used Glue

"There was a time when neanderthal was used as an insult with the implication that this extinct species or perhaps sub species of hominids was unintelligent and unsophisticated. But the more research that goes into how neanderthals lived the more we learn that they were quite clever. For example, they made an used glue millennia before we humans figured it out. Pay. Bring stuff is Christian. Sager here. There are some things people just can't live without. So we invented them way before we ever invented writing coats, knives, roofs, fire turns out. Another thing are prehistoric precursors needed that we still need today is the ability to stick one thing to another thing, and then you know have them stay that way which is why neanderthals had glue they might have been caveman, but they weren't savages now. Hormone neanderthalensis used their glue a viscous tar distilled from Birchbark to fix weapons on the heads of a tool onto a half or maybe a handle and neanderthals were actually the leaders in glue technology beating US Homo Sapiens to the punch by more than a hundred thousand years they began brewing tar two, hundred thousand years ago whereas the earliest evidence of modern humans using tree resin as adhesive appears less than one hundred, thousand years ago. Research published in twenty eleven shows that neanderthals had the ability to create in control fire. So does the fact neanderthals could manipulate fire to produce tar proved they weren't as dimwitted as we'd like to assume scientists have been curious about the process neanderthals used to make their glue a new study published in the journal Nature Scientific reports suggest three different ways neanderthal tar could have been manufactured after all it had to be produced. This stuff wasn't just secreted from trees growing in the forest, but how difficult was making tar? Tar Making is definitely a process. No matter which way you go about the research team figured that out through a fancy bit of experimental archaeology, they devised three different potential methods of extracting sticky stuff from birchbark the ash mound method where tightly rolled layers of birchbark are covered in ash and embers the pit role cigar roll method where one end of Bertril is lit emplaced burning side down into a small collection pit and the raised structure method where a birch bark container was placed in a pit beneath an organic Mesh, which holds loosely rolled bark that is then covered with earth and fire. After recreating the three tar production methods, the scientists assess each according to three criteria the yield temperature in complexity the team found that though the simplest fastest method, the ash mound method yield digest a pea sized amount of tar the most complicated time consuming method that's the race structure method produced fifteen to twenty times more and was also the most efficient. They also observed that regulating the temperature of the fire didn't make much of a difference to the product even though they have no evidence that the neanderthal way. Of Making Tar. was similar to any of their experimental methods making the connection between the Birchbark the fire and the tar would have required that neanderthals possess a proclivity for abstract thought. So whether they were making easy inefficient tar instead of something like the high yield method requiring a folded cup and a little grill made of sticks neanderthals had something going for them. They were seriously using their

Birchbark Ash Mound Sager Nature Scientific Bertril
Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

BrainStuff

03:44 min | 11 months ago

Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

"Of IHEART. Pay Brain Stuff Lauren Boban here with another classic episode from Erstwhile Host Christian Sager. This one has to do with some awesome environmental research almost never came to light. I'll let Christian explain. Stuff, it's Christian Sagar. If some of Earth's most barren wastelands could be transformed into dense productive forests by the most unlikely of helpers discarded fruit peels. It sounds like wishful thinking but that's exactly what happened in the nineteen nineties during promising ecological experiment orange juice manufacturer del Oro plunked twelve thousand metric tonnes. It's around thirteen thousand, two, hundred, twenty, eight tonnes of orange peels on top of bleak Costa Rican Pastureland eventually transforming it into a lush fertile forest but it's a success story that almost wasn't told del Oro donated a seven Acre or three. Hector plot on the edge of the WANNA cast t conservation area after being approached by University of Pennsylvania researchers, Daniel Johnson and Winnie. Hell walks who wondered how the company's discarded appeals could benefit the soil in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, the company deposited one thousand truckloads of orange skins onto the degraded land as part of the agreement but rival Orange Squeezer tico fruit sued del Oro a year into the contract claiming the company was defiling National Park Costa Rica's Supreme Court agreed, and after only two years, the experiment came to a halt. That could have been the end of the story. Were it not for Timothy Truer a curious ecologist at Princeton University in two thousand, thirteen truer and a team of researchers traveled to Costa Rica for unrelated research and decided to look up the orange peel plot. The site sign was so covered with vines in the land. So densely filled with trees that took the team years and dozens of site visits to discover it the team sampled and studied the soil at the site and compared it to samples that were taken in the year two thousand. It also noted tree diameter and species from the Orange Peel site and that of. In Year by pasture that wasn't treated with peels, the researchers found that the treated area had richer soil more tree biomass and a broader variety of tree species including a fig tree with a circumference equivalent to three arm spans. The precise reasons for this one, hundred and seventy six percent increase in above ground biomass are still being investigated but the researchers contend dumping massive amounts of nutrient. Rich organic waste had a nearly immediate effect on the land's fertility changing its lifeless soil into a thick rich loamy mixture. The researchers proposed it's also probable that the orange peel suppressed growth of an invasive grass that was keeping the forest from flourishing. The rediscovery of the experiment, a boon for barren landscapes and agricultural waste, but it also could have a major impact on earth. If more companies institute similar, environmentally friendly solutions to waste the resulting richly vegetated land could help isolate harmful carbon dioxide in the air and improve Earth's polluted atmosphere. So

Del Oro Earth National Park Costa Rica Costa Rican Pastureland Christian Sager Lauren Boban Christian Sagar Timothy Truer Hector Plot University Of Pennsylvania Princeton University Daniel Johnson Supreme Court
What Made the Prehistoric 'Hell Ant' So Diabolical?

BrainStuff

02:24 min | 11 months ago

What Made the Prehistoric 'Hell Ant' So Diabolical?

"Hey brains of is Christian, Sager here fire ants, carpenter ants, bull ants there. A lot of ant species that can cause a great deal of harm. The worst one alive today about two Guinness World. Records is the bulldog ant. It has killed at least three human some within fifteen minutes. But perhaps, the worst aunt ever was the hell aunt, a prehistoric insect that was recently discovered encased in a chunk of Myanmar amber dating to the late. Cretaceous period evolutionary. Biologist Phillip Barden of the Jersey Institute of Technology and his team wrote about the Hell Aunt discovery in the journal systemic entomology. The hell aunt got its name from its anatomy and behavior instead. Of having a typical mouth, the hell aunt had blades that stuck upward think like tusks plus a horn that was reinforced with metal scientists don't know for sure how the hell used. It's unusual appendages but they have some theories i. it clear that the ants tusks and horn were mainly used for catching prey. So here's one possible mo when it came to finding dinner when a tasty insect passed nearby the hell aunts jaw tusks would flip the insect up an onto its horn impaling it spearing prey does take a toll though which is probably why the Hell Lance Horn was clad with metal and if that isn't gruesome, enough researchers say this prehistoric insect. Some vampire like tendencies two when the ant snagged its prey, it's Tusk like jaws close to form a gutter, which may have been a means of funneling the insects blood right down into the ants. Gullit, the Helen scientifically known as Lingua Mir Mex- vladi was discovered in chunk of amber that was ninety, nine, million years old although it's unusual appendages were likely used to catch its food researchers say they may have occasionally been used defensively. This is not the only insect sporting metal either some present day termite species actually have zinc and manganese in their manuals. However, there are no modern ants similarly equipped.

Lance Horn Lingua Mir Mex- Vladi Sager Phillip Barden Myanmar Jersey Institute Of Technology Gullit Cretaceous
How Do Squirrels Organize Their Nuts?

BrainStuff

04:11 min | 1 year ago

How Do Squirrels Organize Their Nuts?

"If you've ever watched squirrels going about their squirrel business, you may have wondered whether there's any method to their for lack of a better term not madness. It turns out there very well may be. Brain steps Christian Sager here despite how common North American tree squirrels are in many cities, neighborhoods, outdoor spaces. A big misconception exists about these little critters tree squirrels store their food tree fruit like acorns in their nests or dense to snack on all winter. Here's the thing they actually don't do that I. It's to know that both the eastern gray and eastern. Fox. Squirrels Dine on a varying menu of seeds, nuts, acorns, tree buds, berries, leaves, parts of Pine Cones, and other food some of us well, we don't like to think. About like bird eggs and nestlings and as well you know they'll have the occasional slice of found pizza. Some of that stuff they eat right away the rest they take to the nest or den for later. But when winter approaches squirrels faced with a challenge, they know instinctively that food sources will soon be scarce. So they gather all the food they'll need while also keeping themselves fed day today. That's why they're so busy in the fall when mother, nature has made sure that all the acorns have phone from the trees second. Gray and eastern. Fox squirrels are scatter hoarders, which means pretty much what it sounds like they hoard their food and then scatter it in locations where they can easily access it. That's usually close to the tree holding their nest or den, but they often expand into areas of seven acres or two point eight hectacres in rather than leaving their goods above ground where other squirrels can steal them, they bury them and this is called cashing about an inch maybe two point five centimeters under the soil and squirrels are known to crack open a nut before burying it so they can. Keep it from germinating when it comes time to eat they forage for the nuts they buried while squirrels possess a strong sense of smell which allows them to sniff out nuts from under a blanket of dirt researchers have long noticed evidence of strategic intelligence in the placement of their food. For instance, one study in two thousand eight reported that eastern gray squirrels engage in what's called deceptive cashing. They dig a hole pretend to throw the acorn in while they hold it in their mouth then it cover up the empty hole and run off to another secret stash place and they do. This it was suggested to fool other squirrels who might be watching them, but a new study from professors in the Department of Psychology at the University of California Berkeley and published in the September issue of the Journal. Royal Society of Open Science claims that tree squirrels use a pneumonic technique called spatial chunking to sort out and bury their nut scores by size type and perhaps nutritional value and taste. Now, when they're hungry later it's theorized they can remember where to find what they want in other words. The squirrels put specific nuts in similar places to help them remember what nuts were. Wear I e almonds were placed in one general area hazelnuts and another and I guess pizza would go and a third area. This pneumonic strategy has also been seen in rats. The finding researchers writing the studies show that a scatter hoarder could employ spatial chunking during cash distribution as cognitive strategy to decrease memory load and hence increase accuracy of retrieval squirrels have got a lot to think about in other words they need all the memory tricks they can get. So the next time you see a squirrel digging up not know that she might have just found the exact one she was.

FOX Christian Sager Pine Cones Gray Royal Society Of Open Science University Of California Berke Department Of Psychology The Journal
Are Wolves Smarter Than Dogs?

BrainStuff

03:18 min | 1 year ago

Are Wolves Smarter Than Dogs?

"I've known some dogs that are pretty smart I've also known some that worked. Bless him. But could wolves be smarter. Brain stuff. It's Christian Sager, my dogs, winchester and se blue they are real smart. So I was intrigued when I read a new study that said wolves are more intelligent in some ways than my dogs and all their canine friends whether you have a chocolate lab or a coon hound scientists believe that some modern dogs and wolves descended from a common ancestor between eleven thousand and thirty thousand years ago the new study which was published in the September twenty seventeen. Journal of scientific reports is by an international team of researchers at the wolf? Science Center. In Vienna Austria, they found domesticated dogs cannot make the connection between cause and effect wolves however, can they came to that conclusion by testing and comparing how the two species searched for food after giving them hints about where it was located researchers used fourteen dogs and twelve socialised wolves in their experiments. During the tests, the animals had to choose between two containers one with food. And one without the first thing researchers did was determined whether the animals could make sense of communicative clues by pointing and looking at the container with the food researchers. Next wanted to see how the dogs and wolves responded to behavioral cues the experimental pointed to the container with food, but did not make eye contact with the animals. Finely in the last experiment, the animals had to infer themselves which container had the hidden food using only causal clues like noises made. When the experimenters shook the container with the food both the wolves and the dogs did well on the communicative clue tests all found the hidden food both species however failed the behavioral cue portion without direct. I contact neither dog nor wolf could find the food during the last part of the test. However, only the wolves could make casual inferences as to where the food was located in other words the scientists said the wolves, not the pooches understood cause and effect. Study Author Michelle Lamp from the Netherlands reminded. US. However that the differences can be explained by the fact that wolves are more persistent to explore objects than. As, because dogs are conditioned to receive food from US whereas wolves have to find food themselves in nature. What shocked researchers was that the wolves were able to interpret direct eye to eye contact that understanding of communicative cues researchers said may have facilitated domestication. The study is unique also in that it used dogs that lived in both packs and with families, but the results of the dogs were independent of living conditions.

United States Christian Sager Vienna Austria Journal Of Scientific Science Center Michelle Lamp Netherlands
What Ruined City Lies Under Tunisia's Waters?

BrainStuff

03:32 min | 1 year ago

What Ruined City Lies Under Tunisia's Waters?

"Episode from our former host Christian Sagar. This one is about the ruins of a lost Roman city off the coast of Northern, Africa and evidence about what led to its loss a. plus a more fishy finding. FEHB rain stuff Christian Sager here archaeologists recently discovered more than fifty acres twenty hector's of Roman ruins off the coast of northeastern. Tunisia. That's a small country on the northern tip of Africa and situated on the Mediterranean Sea the discovery has researchers believing they may have finally found some convincing evidence that the city of Neapolis not to be confused with the Italian city of the same name that Neapolis was wiped out by a natural disaster about a thousand, six hundred and fifty years ago in addition to streets and monuments. Researchers found about one hundred tanks that would have been used to produce a garum that's a fish based fermented condiment commonly consumed in ancient Rome. In an email, how stuff works spoke to Carlos F Norrena associate professor of history at the University of California Berkeley he says that the discovery is important because it lends support to the theory that Tunisia Neapolis was submerged by a soon Nami in the fourth century. That's a useful reminder that environmental catastrophe is not only a phenomenon of the modern world scientists wrote in a twenty thirteen study in the journal Nature that as soon Nami was caused by an earthquake that occurred in three, sixty, five C E in Crete. There's no sure fire way to know the extent of the quake since measuring tools didn't exist at the time, but scientists believe to separate tremors happened in. Succession and the larger one had a magnitude of eight point zero on the Richter scale. The resulting soon Nami destroyed about fifty thousand homes and killed approximately five thousand people in the city of Alexandria Egypt and because the geological fault at the center of the earthquake was located off the coast of Crete that Greek island was actually lifted up in certain areas by as much as thirty three feet or ten meters. Historian. Honest Mercer lineas recorded the event and the newly found ruins reveal that there's much more to the story. NERINA says, the discovery also illuminates the economy of Roman. North Africa and provides further evidence for the popularity of Garum in the Roman Diet. The detail is significant. Garum was a big deal throughout the Roman Empire and as Italian archaeologist Claudio Geraldino has NPR it played a major role in the society's economy. He says that according to the Roman writers, a good bottle of garum could cost something like five hundred dollars today but that they also had garum for slaves that extremely cheap. So it is comparable to a modern amenity like. For instance, the underwater findings of Neapolis and it's abundant manufacturing materials indicate that the city was a major historical hub Neapolis, which means new city

Nami Garum Neapolis Africa Crete Christian Sagar Tunisia Tunisia Neapolis Christian Sager Roman Empire Claudio Geraldino Mercer Lineas Rome Mediterranean Sea Tremors University Of California Berke North Africa Carlos F Norrena
What Do Hurricane Categories Mean?

BrainStuff

03:33 min | 1 year ago

What Do Hurricane Categories Mean?

"Are hurricanes categorized and what do those categories really mean Daybreak and stuff is Christian Sager here when hurricane season arrives each year on June first phrases such as storm surge, wind speed, and I wal- suddenly become part of the summer lexicon in the United States. But probably, the most important words to know about a hurricane are those that describe its power and those include whether it's a category one or category five. The variance between the strengths of these two storms could mean the difference between life and death. Now, meteorologists rank hurricanes from one to five based on the Saffir Simpson scale. The scale is a yardstick that takes into account a hurricane's wind speed, storm surge, and air pressure, and the scale begins with a category one, the least powerful and dangerous. Hurricane, and then it moves towards its climax at category five. The most catastrophic as the storm pushes across the ocean it gathers speed and strength low air pressure forces, ocean water into a huge mound near the I, which could create a devastating storm surge when the wall of water reaches land, the more heat and moisture hurricane consumes the more powerful. The storm becomes that's where the Saffir Simpson scale comes in. The scale was created when Robert H Simpson was director of the National Hurricane Center in Nineteen sixty-nine during the time Hurricane Camille blew through the Caribbean and into the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico. It's winds were clocked at one hundred and ninety miles per hour or three, hundred six. Kilometers per hour as it struck Mississippi and the official death poll from wind storm surge in rain was two hundred and fifty, six people in nineteen seventy one, Herbert. Saffir was working as an engineer in Florida preparing a report for the United Nations building codes that could withstand the onslaught of high speed wins. He eventually came up with a table that outlined the damage to buildings win can cause at various speeds. He worked up five categories of hurricanes based on damage. Each one could cause in nineteen seventy-two Simpson took sappers, numbers and correlated them with storm surge estimates in barometric pressure. The result was the saffir-simpson scale by nine, hundred and seventy-five. The Saffir Simpson scale was in widespread use local state. And Federal officials not to mention the public at large. Now had an easy to read and understand chart that outlined a hurricane's impact. While the Saffir Simpson scale is a good measuring tool it doesn't really tell the full story of a hurricane's impact hurricanes pack a lot of kinetic energy and as a byproduct, a hurricane's power increases exponentially from one category to the next as wind speed increases a category five hurricane for example, is five hundred times more powerful than a category one. How does this relate to property damage compared to a Category One category? Two hurricane can generate seven times. The amount of damage while a category five storm can generate a hundred and forty four times the amount of destruction.

Hurricane National Hurricane Center Hurricane Camille Robert H Simpson Saffir Christian Sager United States Mississippi Caribbean United Nations Mexico Florida Herbert Engineer Director Official
What's the Best Way To Park?

BrainStuff

02:55 min | 1 year ago

What's the Best Way To Park?

"Brain stuff Christian Sager here whether it's cooking an egg skinning a cat or building an underground bunker to prepare for end times there is usually more than one way to do most things when it comes to driving a car for example, motorists tend to have some wildly varying ideas about how to best get from point a to point. B.. That's not to mention timeless driving debates over how to occupy the far left lane on a highway when to turn on your lights or if you should pull over for a funeral procession, then there's the question of what to do when you want to stop driving and leave your car somewhere many motorists are united in their. Strict version two parallel parking. But how to navigate other spots is still a source of some debate is it better to turn headfirst into a parking space or to take the time to park backed in facing out in what some refer to as battle parking buckle up for the answer for both safety and efficiency purposes the experts say it is usually best to back into a parking space that's because having a wide field of vision is more important when you're pulling out of a parking space than it is when you're pulling in Katherine Peterman and architect who has helped design parking lots across the United States told us that when you back in its into defined. Space where people aren't likely to be. But when you pull out of a parking space, you're pulling into traffic and possibly into pedestrians Scher technological advances like rear side cameras and the sensors that make beeping noises. When you get too close to a person or another car, they can help make backing out easier. But the effect those cameras have had on reducing accidents has been gradual at best Peterman, and Vanessa Sola be a spokesperson for the International Parking Institute say that it's

International Parking Institut Katherine Peterman Vanessa Sola United States Christian Sager Scher
How Fast Can Lizards Evolve?

BrainStuff

03:50 min | 1 year ago

How Fast Can Lizards Evolve?

"We usually think of evolution as being near cosmetically slow process, and often it is after all living beings in our relationships with our environments can be really complex with dozens of genes, coming together to create the traits that help or hurt our chances of survival, but you don't have to be a germ or fruit fly or P. shoot to show change quickly. Today's episode is the strange story of a particularly swift lizard evolution. Stuff it's Christian Sager here so evolution takes time, but just how much time it takes is the issue. How long for instance did it take? Theropod dinosaurs to evolve into modern birds tens, if not hundreds of millions of years, but since the turn of the last century when American biologist Hermann bumpiest noticed that individuals sparrows in a population became larger as the result of one huge snowstorm, scientists have been observing instances of short bursts of evolutionary progress over a significantly brief period of time. definitive. Of rapid evolution are tough to come by though even in these days of advanced genetic testing, but a recent study published in the journal Science fines that over the course of just a few months green, a Noli lizards living in the area of the Mexico Texas border evolved rapid genetic tolerance to cold weather after an unusually frigid Winter Green Noli our warm weather reptiles that evolved on the Caribbean island of Cuba. They found their way to the mainland long ago, but a prolonged an extreme cold snap can really put the hurt on A. A population of no lease, the winter of twenty thirteen did just that before that year's famed polar vortex hit. However, the research team collected a no lease in August to find out just how cold one of these lizards could get before its motor function was compromised specifically, that is when it couldn't write itself. When it was knocked over, they collected no lease from five different sites across Texas and found that when gradually cooled in a chamber in the lab, the individuals from the southern most site became uncoordinated at around fifty two degrees Fahrenheit. Fahrenheit or eleven degrees Celsius, but the ones collected from the northern most site became unable to right themselves at around forty three degrees Fahrenheit or six degrees Celsius. Because the scientists already had genetic samples from the lizards in the first study when a few months later, temperatures plummeted to lowe's that hadn't been seen in fifteen years, the researchers went out and collected some of the surviving lizards from all five sites. They placed them in the same cooling chambers and found the southern. Most anomalies exhibited much more cold resistance than the ones had been. been collected back in the summer they could now stand strong in the face of forty three degrees, Fahrenheit or six degrees. Celsius aren a sequencing before and after the cold front also revealed significant differences between individuals from the southern genomic regions before and after the weather event by the way. Did you know that no lease? Living in urban areas have stinkier feet than their country cousins? Apparently, it's an evolutionary adaptation to having to cling to glass and metal now I want to be bitten by a radioactive ano- league so I can crawl wall.

Hermann Bumpiest Christian Sager Cuba Caribbean Texas Mexico Texas Lowe
"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

"The market for new entertainment electronics, you'll have almost certainly got an earful about the resolution of whatever TV screens or monitors you were considering. But how much does resolution really matter? Stuff Christian Sager here when we're talking about TV, we're talking about one big thing. Resolution Sharper Images, Crisper Action, immaculate detail in everything from sports to documentaries to video games in just a few years. We've seen the race move from seven twenty to ten eighty P, two four K. and beyond, and this brings us to today's question. Does TV resolution matter spoiler alert? The answer is yes absolutely or maybe a better way to say it is yes, absolutely, but with a footnote before we get to all the weird stuff that footnote represents. Represents! We need to understand resolution itself. Resolution starts with the Pixel. A Pixel is the smallest possible unit of a digital image, a single point of light when you hear manufacturers top about resolution there, describing the number of pixels on a given screen, so an old school cathode Ray, TV would display the equivalent of three hundred thousand pixels on screen while an HDTV could pack more than two million pixels into a screen. The STANDARD WAY FOR TV makers to classify resolution is with numbers followed by a letter. The numbers indicate the. The rows of horizontal pixels so think four eighty, I ten eighty P, and so on the bigger the number, the more pixels on the screen, the letters at the end of the numbers stand for I is interlaced and P for Progressive Scan. The differences are important, but fairly complicated, so let's save that one for another day. Using more pixels to create an image creates a smoother, less blocking or pixelated image, so at first glance it sounds as if more pixels equal a better experience, right not so fast slick. Here's where our footnote. Footnote comes in Pixel. Density itself is not the only factor in the race toward a better sharper image. If we're looking at resolution as the ability to discern fine details, several other factors come into play for instance. What's the source of the image? What role does color play? How close or far are you from the screen? And how big is the screen for example? If you're watching a small screen, say twenty six inches from ten or more feet away. Your I won't be able to tell the difference between anything from four. Four eighty two four K., the farther you are away from the image source, the smoother the picture appears as for the size of the screen. Well sure you could have a twenty six inch TV with ten eighty line resolution, and it would still have the same number of pixels as a fifty five inch, TV with otherwise identical specs, but the pixels would be physically smaller so in this context size definitely matters if you put a twenty six inch HDTV with seven twenty line resolution next to another twenty six inch HDTV with ten. Ten Eighty, you may not be able to tell the difference between the two. These are just a few of the pertinent factors in the overall equation. There's another big question here to does the human I have a resolution limit. How many individual pixels can the human I perceive? And that's a tricky question to our eyes are not cameras, instead their an initial step to an intricate process, involving loads of unconscious estimation and guesswork in our brains. It is true that after a certain point, the human eye is unable to differentiate or Or appreciate the differences between some Pixel densities with the right source material equipment and viewing distance four K. really can make a difference for example if you're sitting a few feet from a sixty inch four K. television with an ultra high definition video feed, you'll be able to tell if it suddenly switches to regular hd or brace yourself standard definition, the limits of HDTV a failure of technology. There are limit of our biology, if we can't tell the difference between a lower resolution, twenty six inch TV in an HD version then. Then! There's not much incentive to buy the latest ultra high definition TV set, but this isn't the end of the story. The race for higher resolution continues cameras that shooting four K. have already become the norm and each year bring new innovations. These ultra high definition technologies may not make for a better picture on a home television, but in a movie theater it makes a big difference in the future. We might not care as much about resolution. It's possible that other technologies like high dynamic range may become the next big thing. Today's episode was written by Ben Bullen and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other crystal clear topics visit how stuff works. Dot Com rain. Stuff is a production of iheartradio from more podcasts to my heart. Radio is the radio APP, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows..

Christian Sager Ben Bullen apple Tyler
Why Is Our Blood Red?

BrainStuff

02:49 min | 1 year ago

Why Is Our Blood Red?

"Hey grainstuff Lauren. Vogel bomb here with another classic episode from Erstwhile Host Christian Sager. I admit we originally wanted to do this episode. Hey because it's interesting but be because we are fans of horror and we wanted to demonstrate the episode on Youtube by dumping a bucket of fake blood over my head. Carrie style. If you happen to look it up. I apologize in advance for what counted as my acting ability at the time but the subject remains fascinating. Our blood is always read even in our veins when it looks blue. Here's why a brain stuff it's Christian Sagar. Do you remember in the movie carry where they dumped pig blood on that girl at her prom while the annals of human biology actually published an article in two thousand and twelve showing that humans are excellent detectors of pig blood but we are far less developed at detecting human blood. They concluded that human blood has no specific smell or appearance. That triggers immediate recognition. So blood is always read right. But why does it have to be read contrary to popular belief? It's not blue when it's in our bodies even when it's Deok's oxygenated but oxygen is part of the color. Along with the protein molecule haemoglobin the detaches to oxygen it carries from the lungs to muscles as blood gets pumped through the human body and while blood is always red shade depends on how much oxygen carrying for instance. When you cut a person's arteries open they bleed. This really bright red blood because of the complex formed between Hemoglobin Iron and lots of oxygen. But if you look deeper into the circulatory system and peered into vein that was delivering all of its oxygen. You would see that. The blood is a deeper Maroon. Color so veins they look blue or green mainly because of skin and skin. Pigmentation plays a big role. Since everyone's skin is a different color. Our veins look different. Especially because the tissue above our veins scatters red light. But let's blue light right on through. Even the Veins Reddish Brown. They appear to be blue from the outside. So is the way human beings perceived color another factor here as well yes. Researchers have shown that it

Veins Reddish Brown Christian Sager Christian Sagar Youtube Vogel Lauren Carrie Style
Why Can't You Tickle Yourself?

BrainStuff

03:12 min | 1 year ago

Why Can't You Tickle Yourself?

"Hey I'm Christian Sager and this is brain stuff. Pop Quiz Hotshot. Have you ever tickled an ape before it could work as tickling as common between many types of primates? What about Iraq? You ever took one of those. You'd know if you had because rats let out these. Little high pitched chirps when you tickle them kind of like rodent laughter. Okay so maybe some of you beast masters out there have tickled both Iraq and an APE. But can you tickle yourself? Probably not because that is kind of impossible now before we continue. Let's do a primer on. How tickling works under your skin. There are millions of nerve endings. That alert your brain whenever you touch something a light touch what we usually associate with. Tickling is analyzed by two regions of your brain the somatic sensory cortex which processes touch in the anterior cingulate cortex which processes happiness together. They processed the two types of tickle sensations. We can experience. The first is known as Missus. This is the light sensation. You feel when something like a feather brushes against your skin may be giving you goosebumps. The second gargle. Lisa's is like when your older brother? Hold you down and tickles you until you laugh. So Hard You pee your pants. This is the kind of tickling. You can't replicate yourself evolutionary. Biologists believe that the reason we laugh when we're tickled is an innate submissive response to a potential attacker. It's kind of like when a dog rolls over on. Its back and exposes. Its kill points to you these same biologists theorized that we developed tickling so we could teach our children how to defend themselves from attacks. So think about it. The areas where we're the most ticklish. The underarms the stomach the neck. They're also the most vulnerable to attack. Now this is some black widow. Red Room lethal training coming up here so pay attention. Your underarm is home to veins arteries. And because your rib-cage doesn't protect it. Someone could easily access your heart through there especially with a long enough blade. Likewise your stomach doesn't have any defensive bones and you neck also has two important arteries as well as your trachea bringing air to your lungs. Now we're aware of

Iraq Somatic Sensory Cortex Anterior Cingulate Cortex Christian Sager Red Room Lisa
How Does Anxiety Work?

BrainStuff

03:43 min | 1 year ago

How Does Anxiety Work?

"It's perfectly natural to be feeling anxious. Everyone does sometimes and there are plenty of things that anyone can do to help combat it a Christian goes through a few ideas end of the episode but in this one we wanted to talk about what's going on in the brain when anxiety becomes a disorder. Here's Christian brain stuff it's Christian Sager here. Listen I get anxious you do too but hey it is totally normal and healthy response. That keeps us from doing things that might actually be dangerous. Like sticking your hand in a fire for instance but when anxiety is so pervasive that it interferes with your daily life it becomes a disorder and most researchers believe that disorder begins in your brain there several types of anxiety disorders phobias. Ptsd and OCD. Or just a few and some forty million American adults suffer from an anxiety disorder according to the National Institute of Mental Health. But let's focus today on general anxiety disorder which affects close to seven million adults in his twice as likely in women. You're constantly anticipating a threat or disaster. That isn't actually present. Maybe you're worried about money. Health family or work in despite reality you'll expect the worst. The symptoms include restlessness fatigue difficulty concentrating irritability muscle tension and sleep disturbances. The symptoms officially become a disorder. When you can't control your worry for at least six months you may still be social or even employed but people with general anxiety disorder can have difficulty carrying out even the simplest of daily activities experts. Believe that general anxiety disorder is caused by both biological factors and life experiences good old combination of nature and nurture but anxiety is also recognized by many as an emotional response with neurobiological routes simply put the neural pathways in our brains sometimes lead to irrational anxiety in stressful situations encourage us to develop associations with those pathways by influencing which neuro chemicals pass through them the same way you learn to tie your shoe you can also learn to be anxious the neurons in your brain fire and overtime. They get wired together. One stressful thing like being stuck in traffic leads you to think of another stressful thing lake a car crash. She wants survived. And this activates. A part of the brain stem called the locus serious. This triggers the symptoms of anxiety by releasing neuro epinephrine into your spinal cord and parts of your brain while hormones like adrenaline and cortisol spread through your body. It's supposed to initiate an analgesic response to suppress pain and initiate defense. When you're under threat like if you were actually in a car crash and injured but when there isn't any actual threat all were left with is the jitters of anxiety a couple other things about the brain contribute to anxiety. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital found that people with a thicker venturo medial. Prefrontal CORTEX are less likely to get anxiety. Basically some brains have more armor against inducing situations than others. We don't have enough

General Anxiety Disorder Christian Sager Massachusetts General Hospital National Institute Of Mental H Ptsd Sleep Disturbances Muscle Tension OCD Epinephrine Cortisol
Can Your Eyes Pop Out Of Your Head When You Sneeze?

BrainStuff

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Can Your Eyes Pop Out Of Your Head When You Sneeze?

"If you sneeze hard enough and keep your eyes open while you do. It could your eyes pop out of their sockets fe their brains stuff. It's Christian Sager. If you're a person who has a nose eyeballs? You've probably noticed that when you sneeze. Your eyelids naturally snapped shut. It's the reason that sneezing while driving is a terrifying roulette game of death. But I've got a question for you when you were a kid. Did you hear the story that if you managed to resist this reflects and hold your eyes open during a sneeze that they would pop out of your head? I did in fact my ninth grade science teacher. Mrs Abraham told me this. Is it true though? Well short answer almost definitely not. Unfortunately we can't be perfectly certain as we would all like to be about this particular topic so here are the facts fact. One your eyes can pop out of their sockets. It's not very common but it can happen. Doctors Call Interior bulging of the eye beyond its normal orbit a case of exit. Thelma's if the gets dislocated from it's socket enough. That is equator is literally outside. Your retracted eyelids. This is known as globe blood. Sation fact number two if you WANNA sleep soundly tonight and every other night for the rest of your life you should not search the web. For images of globalization fact number three globalization is rare but it can be caused by a number of conditions of course gouging out an eyeball with a finger another instrument. That will do it. Some various types of traumatic head injury can cause the eyeballs to pop out of their sockets. Many cases of spontaneous globalization in the medical literature have happened while the I was being messed with in some ways such as during the application of a contact lens are drops or when a doctor was manipulating the eyelids during an exam. Violent vomiting has also been cited as a cause of eyeball dislocation. And I might add that. Whoever this refers to has my sympathies because that sounds like the worst day ever now if we are to believe our historical sources there may have been a few cases where a sneeze knocked. Somebody's eyeball out for example in April of Eighteen. Eighty to A. Us newspaper reported that a woman on Street car in Indianapolis burst one of her eyeballs in. The middle of sneezing fit. Whether this means she suffered globalisation or that are eyeball just up exploded or that. Journalists in the eighteen eighties sometimes reported rather dubious stories. Look it's hard to say but if we look at the more recent sources a two thousand to study reviewed. The Twenty. Six cases of spontaneous globalisation then known to the medical world. While most of the cases they found were triggered by manipulation of the eyelids the authors did also claim that a small number were brought on by other triggers including things like crying coughing nose-blowing bending over and yes sneezing so sneezing might have caused the dislocation of the eyeball in a very very small number of known cases. But just keeping your eyes open during the sneeze have anything to do with it as I said before almost definitely not and it true that eyeball dislocation. Doesn't happen every time you sneeze with your eyes open because you can go to youtube right now and look up videos of people sneezing with their eyes open. It's not easy but some people can do it in their eyeballs are. They're fine and they seem to enjoy showing off this disgusting trick but the complete lack of correlation between open is an eyeball. Pop Edge is a combination of the fact that sneezing almost never if ever causes the as to pop out. And the fact. That your eyelids. Don't really do any of the work of keeping your eyeballs in their sockets to begin with instead. Your eyeballs are primarily held in place by a combination of six muscles known as the extra ocular muscles. They control the movements of the eyes and are much stronger than the eyelids. So whether or not you can manage to keep your eyes open during a sneeze probably has little to no effect on the chances that your eyes will pop out and those chances are very very slim in the first place though possibly not zero

Mrs Abraham Christian Sager Vomiting Youtube Thelma Indianapolis A. Us Newspaper
Are Some People Immune to Mosquitoes?

BrainStuff

06:04 min | 1 year ago

Are Some People Immune to Mosquitoes?

"And here in Georgia or getting our first mosquitoes of the year for me. That means I got a bunch of bytes when I ventured outside for a socially distant walk yesterday but are some people immune to mosquitoes brain stuff. It's Christian Sager. If you're like most people you hate mosquitoes. They're kind of the Andy Dick of the insect world annoying and in some cases dangerous. If we rate animals by the number of deaths they cause these little bloodsuckers top the charts by a wide margin and this is due to their transmission of malaria and other harmful diseases. And whether your next mosquito bite causes serious illness or intense frustration. We can all agree. Mosquitoes are just the worst. But are some people immune to mosquito bites I? Let's be clear mosquito. Bites aren't actually bites when a mosquito lands on you she uses her purpose it's a long double tube mouthpiece to Pierce your skin and get at the blood underneath and yes. That's a she every single mosquito that has ever been. You has been female. They bite you because they need a protein in your blood to develop their eggs when a mosquito uses her antenna to sense the warm blood beneath your skin and then pops her bosses in to tap your capillaries one of those tubes inject saliva. While the other one withdraws blood. The saliva contains enzymes that act as a Mild Painkiller and thins the blood to prevent. Clotting your body interprets these enzymes foreign invaders and produces histamine histamine binds to receptors in the bite area dilating local blood vessels this increased blood flow summons. More white blood cells. And when you get too much histamine the bite area can swell and redden creating what's called a wheel yeah wheel. That's the word of the day now. Each person will react to a bite. Differently and your allergies will vary so. What makes a mosquito choose a certain person? Well there are a number of factors one of the biggest being that there are more than three thousand known varieties of mosquitoes. And they're not all looking for the same thing for those that dig a nice sip of human blood smell body temperature. In genetics play huge roles. According to scientists at Rotterdam research each human body can produce anywhere from three hundred to four hundred distinct chemical odors. Some of which are bug magnets and others. They might be bug. Repellent research from a chemist named all. Rick Burke shows that mosquitoes are particularly fond of carbon dioxide. That's released from explanation and the skin and they also like lactic acid which present on our skin after exercise now drinking beer being pregnant and being a bigger person can all also make you more attractive to Mosquitos. Diet and blood type. Surprisingly don't seem to matter so much. Everybody has these yummy chemicals on their body. But it seems that the people mosquitoes avoid produce higher amounts of repellent chemicals Dr James Logan from Rotterdam set up a pretty weird experiment to see if he could find these all important. Repellent Chemicals is teams separated people into two groups MOSQUITO FAVORITES AND MOSQUITO MS. They put these folks in body size foil bags to collect their odors for two hours and they used a chromatograph to analyze the chemicals. They'd collected and hooked electrodes up to mosquito antenna to see what the bugs thought of each smell. They found about seven or eight made a difference. These odors were present insignificantly different quantities between those people who were attractive to Mosquitos and those who weren't their study published in the Journal of Medical. Entomology cited to chemicals as significantly repellent. One called six methyl five Heston to one which apparently smells of Nail Polish remover. And another called Jared Acetone which has a kind of floral odor as of this recording the race to use these and other chemicals as a new. Super Bug. Repellent is in full swing. So you probably know that. Bacteria is largely responsible for the various smells of the human body. Each human being is home to a unique mix of trillions of microbes. It's sort of like a fingerprint now. Our genes may play a large role. In determining what sort of microbial life forms we end up hosting in two thousand fifteen a team led by doctor. Manuela Fernandez grand untested the Herod ability of attractiveness to mosquitoes using twins. The twins would put a hand into either end of a sealed dome along with twenty female mosquitoes. Now don't worry. They weren't allowed to bite. Researchers gave each subject in attractiveness score compared to the other hand identical twins had consistently more similar scores compared to fraternal twins so genes do seem to play a role. This may be tough news for the twenty percent or so of people that mosquitoes find particularly attractive. If you're one of the local mosquitoes favorite dishes. Remember to keep some kind of bug repellent with you and to wear long sleeves and pants if the weather allows especially in areas of the world where these bugs carried diseases like malaria or dengue. And I suppose there's a little light at the end of this mosquito net tunnel here. Some people do have a chance of building up a tolerance after repeated mosquito bites but for others. The allergy just

Histamine Malaria Rotterdam Andy Dick Christian Sager Georgia Pierce Jared Acetone Rick Burke Manuela Fernandez Dr James Logan Journal Of Medical Heston
Do Juice Cleanses Actually Work?

BrainStuff

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Do Juice Cleanses Actually Work?

"The phenomenon is juice cleanses. What do they actually do to our bodies and what about? Us needs cleansing in the first place Christian Sager here. Let's talk about purity because we are surrounded by toxic stuff in this modern world car emissions in our air factory. Run off in our water herbicides pesticides in our food trolls and our comment sections. If our bodies are temples every pizza roll is a desecration. How can we become pure again? Well juice cleanses supposedly rid our bodies of toxins and restore our digestive systems depending on the specific and sometimes copyrighted cleanse. You spend a couple days to a couple weeks consuming nothing but liquefied fruits vegetables and maybe some nut milk since lots of people are pretty bad about eating enough fruits and vegetables. To begin with this may mean that. During a juice cleanse you'd be getting more vitamins and minerals than usual. These are substances that your body needs turn food into energy and to grow and maintain sells some even have antioxidant properties which means that they can help prevent cellular damage. Under particular circumstances. The benefits of these vitamins and minerals are real. But keep in mind that your body can only process a certain amount of them at once. After that you're just going to excrete the rest. Research does show that eating fruits and vegetables. Rich in these substances can decrease some risk of some diseases in the long run. The key phrase here is in the long run the best way to reap these benefits is to consistently eat five or more servings every day one juice. Benge isn't going to do much consuming. Nothing but juice for a few days also means that you'd get a lot less fiber fat and protein and way fewer calories than normal fats and proteins are just as essential for healthy cellular function as vitamins and Minerals and fiber in. The Diet is actually part of your Colin's normal cleansing system. It absorbs

United States Christian Sager Benge Colin
Why Don't All Skeletons Become Fossils?

BrainStuff

04:47 min | 1 year ago

Why Don't All Skeletons Become Fossils?

"Wanted to explore why there have been billions of living things on this earth across billions of years that life is existed but only very few have left direct fossil evidence brain stuff. It's me Christian Sager. You know when I'm digging a six foot hole in the middle of the desert. I start to wonder where all the dead animals shouldn't we be waiting? Need DEEPEN FOSSILS. Every time we go outside. I know that's morbid but you can probably guess that. Not every animal. That dies leaves behind fossil evidence. But why is that well just to get our terms straight? A fossil is any physical remnant left behind an organism that died long ago. In many cases. Fossils might only be things like preserved footprints or nest sites but today we're looking at direct remains of animal bodies like bones the likelihood that any particular animal animal body will become fossilized is amazingly small. It's actually less than one percent. So let's look at the stations of the obstacle course to fossils ation. I there's body type. Fossils ation has a strong preference for animals with hard body parts like bones teeth and shells animals with soft bodies like slugs and jellyfish. Well they usually just decompose completely disappear after death and except in a very few rare cases like freezing dry mammoth occasion and peat bog preservation. The same thing happens to these soft tissues on all animal bodies skin organs eyeballs etc. They all make excellent meals from micro organisms and are thus consigned to the ravages of rot the second main hurdle to fossil ization is exposure to become a fossil. You need to be one of the rare animal bodies that is rapidly buried. Soon after the animal dies this is most likely to happen in or near the site of a moving body of water like a river or a flood plain where runoff floodwaters or regular flow may quickly cover a dead body in sediment in might also happen in arid desert settings where wind can quickly berry animal remains in sand dunes. If the remains are not rapidly buried scavenging animals are likely to scatter and then consume them after all nature hates to pass up a free lunch and even a clean skeleton left out exposed to the elements will eventually be erased by the ravages of the weather that's decalcification erosion and corrosion. But let's say your bones are lucky enough to be rapidly. Buried somehow the next big hurdle is the sediment itself a nice dry sand or alkaline. Mud might be a good place to become a fossil but if your bones are buried in soil with a higher temperature and higher acidity your prospects are a lot slimmer acidic environments meaning soils with a low. Ph tend to dissolve hydros. Appetite a calcium phosphate. Mineral that is a main structural ingredient in our bones so many soil types unearth will simply destroy all the bones they swallow but even in friendly sediment over a long enough period of time bones can break down the organic proteins in bones like Collagen eventually decompose and the inorganic molecules in bones can be crushed dissolved or otherwise destroyed by physical force over the centuries. So if you want your actual bone structure to survive you have to be lucky enough to undergo a little transformation most really ancient bones we find such as dinosaur bones aren't the unaltered original bones that were buried millions of years ago instead. They're either a mineral modified versions of those bones or be stone photocopies to processes represent the majority of these cases. Perma mineralisation and replacement in PERMA mineralisation. Mineral rich water seeps into the buried bones and fills the pores of the bones with its mineral content. These minerals formed crystals inside the bones causing them to modify and harden over time. Sometimes this process is also called petrified in replacement the original bones can be completely dissolved but still leave fossil copies as the mineral in the groundwater completely replaces the shape of the bones over long periods of time. So let's say you're the rare dead animal that wins the fossils ation lottery and you just happen to pass all these tests. You still have to be found. The total surface of the earth is almost two hundred million

Why Can It Be Painful To Bite Aluminum Foil?

BrainStuff

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Why Can It Be Painful To Bite Aluminum Foil?

"Former host Christian Sager. This one concerned a strange bit of everyday science. Why can it be strangely? Painful to bite down on a piece of aluminum foil. Hey everybody it's me Christian Sagar now. Today's question is why is it so painful to bite into aluminum foil and if you're from across the pond you may be wondering right now. Why is he saying aluminum instead of aluminium? Well I'm American. That's how I pronounced it all my life I apologize. We're going to go forward with aluminum but it's a good question right so first things first. It's actually not painful for everybody to bite into this foil. It's painful for people who have fillings or crowns made of metal. You probably already knew that part. So let's fast forward. What is actually happening? Here it's sort of like making a battery. So how does this happen? Exactly well I. It's two different metals the aluminum foil and the

Christian Sager First Things First
BrainStuff Classics: Does 'Power Dressing' Actually Work?

BrainStuff

03:49 min | 1 year ago

BrainStuff Classics: Does 'Power Dressing' Actually Work?

"Brain stuff learn bomb here with a classic episode from our archives and from former host Christian savior this. This one was inspired by a book. Christian ran across about how to dress for success. It got him wondering can power dressing really make a difference socially or psychologically below their brain stuff. I'm Christian Sager and I've got a question for you. Do I look powerful. Well I I know you can't see me right now but I feel powerful. Some people even think that what you wear can produce this kind of confidence and who doesn't want to feel good about themselves. So what is this power dressing? And does it actually work well to answer that question? We have to take a trip to the smooth nineteen seventies when a guy named John Malloy came out with a series of books about dressing for success. He prescribed a uniform of sorts for both men and women. That would help them. Achieve Greatness in business professions for men Malloy recommended conservative business attire. That was high quality and fit well essentially a business suit in dark hue with a modest white shirt and a tie. Think Don Draper for women. He adapted this uniform. To include a skirted suit and a soft blouse with floppy or bowed. Neck pieces think Margaret Thatcher in order to achieve the kind of authority of the Iron Lady Malloy recommended. Women do two things. Don't look like a secretary and don't look too sexy. You couldn't wear waistcoats or contour jackets. Because they drew attention to the bust. Scarves were popular because they drew attention to the face and away from the breasts and floral prints and feminine colors like Salmon. Pink were out. But you didn't want to look to masculine either. Hence the skirt instead of trousers. This was the birth of power dressing and by the nineteen eighties. It became the way enterprising. Women learned to manage or limit the potential sexuality of their bodies and leave all that gross girl stuff like cooties at home but as they entered the corporate workforce in ever greater numbers. Some women wanted to modify this uniform while maintaining their professional appearance. One alternative model for breaking out of these fashion limitations was Princess Diana with her more glamorous outfits others were on TV and shows like dynasty designing women and Moonlighting enter broad shoulder pads wide lapels and a wider range of textures colors and accessories. Cut to the present day now. Most of these fashion fads have come and gone but you can still see their influence on politicians. For Example Take Hillary Clinton or Donald trump many of the tenets of power dressing are still employed. Today we just don't call it that anymore. But a twenty fifteen study reexamined the principles behind power dressing. It found that putting on formal clothing does indeed make us feel powerful and even makes us think differently. The authors of this study tested student participants in a series of experiments by rating their outfits and taking cognitive tests when the students switched out of sweat pants and into the kind of clothing. They thought they should wear to a job interview. The tests showed their cognitive processing became more abstract broader and holistic the authors. Also say that how often you actually wear. Formal clothes doesn't matter regardless of when you wear. These uniforms have become a symbol of power. There have been other studies into how clothing affects our cognition to for instance. When people wear white doctors coats

John Malloy Don Draper Christian Sager Christian Princess Diana Margaret Thatcher Secretary Hillary Clinton Donald Trump
"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Bomb and this is another classic episode from our erstwhile host Christian Sager. Today's topic features a bit of everyday science. Well every day for anyone who drives. What do those tabs on rear view mirrors actually do. Hey I'm Christian Sager and unwelcomed grainstuff if you have a car then chances are you also have a rear view mirror so imagine that one night you're driving home when some joker rolls up behind you with his high beams teams on blinding you. Luckily you're able to flip the TAB on your rear view and make the mirror glare resistant eliminating most of the light. But what's going on there. How can the same same piece of glass have two different amounts of reflection. This mirrors looks can be deceiving. See your rear view. Isn't just one mirror and it isn't flat instead it's built in what's called a pragmatic wedge shape and it contains two reflective surfaces. There's a regular Shiny Mirror in the back and there's a thin thin glass wedge right in front of it closer to the driver. The front glass surface is at an angle to the back surface. If you were to look at this mirror outside of its casing using it would be wedge shaped with the thicker edge up at the top during daytime drive the angled glass surface is pointing. Down in your observing. The reflection shirow the main mirror. But when you flip that little tab the back mirrored surface usually points towards the dark ceiling. You don't see that image. What you see instead. Is the image reflecting off the front of the glass. The glass only reflects about four percent of the light hitting the mirror. So it doesn't hurt your eyes to prove that this is what's happening opening. Take a flashlight with you. One night and play with your mirror now not while you're driving but you know while you're stopped flipped the mirror into glare resistant mode and shine in the light at the ceiling or sometimes try the floor. The fully reflected image will overwhelm the front surface reflection. So you can see the ceiling. This is just yes the mechanism behind the basic rear view mirror. More high end mirrors may have auto dimming electro chroma key technology which uses a low voltage power supply tint the glass.

Christian Sager
"christian sager" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

10:47 min | 1 year ago

"christian sager" Discussed on KTOK

"Blow your mind my name is Robert Lamm and my name is Christian Sager he Robert have you ever been standing at the edge of a cliff or building or maybe you're waiting for a train like a subway train you just think I should jump well it never quite manifested itself as I should jump within it I find that for me it manifests itself as what if I did jump yeah and I can I it's this intense contemplation of the choice I have in the matter and the fact that I could if I wanted to fling myself off of this cliff you know falling to the Grand Canyon go in front of a train or at the very end of this the night that I encountered a top of the Empire State Building I've ever been up to the top the Empire State Building you know that they have these babies like being in a cage match I know you have basically no way you could throw yourself off the Empire State Building at least not on a whim it would take you take some some some planning and some effort but what I did find myself struggling with was what if I threw my wallet over the side the street below that would be horrible and so I ended up wrestling with that possibility which is kind of like throwing a piece of your life over the side yeah isn't there that adage and I think house of works is even done an article on this about like what happens when you throw a penny over the side of the Empire State Building ho yeah and I think there's the the urban legend is that can kill a person yeah I know the sciences line that I seem to recall it doesn't quite pan out it's it's been awhile since I've looked down but I still I'm not gonna go throwing pennies are thought my wallet would maybe just box emitting had yeah probably with my wallet would probably not go through somebody yeah well the other one of these is captured in we're pretty Ellen's any home movie yeah when Christopher Walken is talking about how he wants to swerve into traffic and at night he's looking at the other headlights coming the other way they're all related and this is a you you out there probably going like this is real morbid guys where you going with this this is an actual phenomena and so so common that it has multiple names and there has been a major study done on it so we're gonna cover that today it is the sudden feeling that we want to put ourselves in harm's way examples of this often include the urge to jump off a tall building or to veer into oncoming traffic the French term for it is a lot of hell do vin day which means call of the void which I really like and that's how I how I came to this is this is this pretty brutal hardcore band that I like called call of the void and I was typing it into Google the other day in an article on this phenomenon popped up and I was like I've never heard of this before and then I said to you let's let's talk about this yeah I mean I knew about it I've had the experience but I feel like most people have had the experience I would I would definitely like to hear from anyone who has not had some variant of this now you mention that is because often refer to is called the void and some of our listeners my recommended the the reading at the top of the episode as being from Jack London's nineteen oh three novel the call of the wild I like how this particular bit from that novel certainly that this is the main part of the novel that always sticks out in my mind because it gets into similar territory as the call of the void the idea that with a split decision you could bring being added on being yeah in this case it's the dog and really them but the dog also represents much about the the central character in the call of the wild as well what's strange about it is it's like the ultimate form of control when you feel like you don't have control right right this ultimate expression where like Rick like you think I don't have control over anything that the one thing I can totally control is I could just kill myself right now I wanted to which is horrible to think about but I think we're gonna get into it there's like a lot of theories as to where this thing comes from I don't know about you but like when I've experienced I ate I feel it in the pit of my stomach like it's like a full body sensation it's not just like a little lake fought like whom wonder if a if a jumped you know this is weird yeah it gravity is a visceral kind of vibe from it in it's not so much like you having to hold yourself down right but sometimes you do kind of I have been in places where I feel like I I kind of want to squat down and maybe touch the ground a little bit yeah even though I'm not near the edge now one thing I will say is that I have not felt this recently because I find that when I am in places with ledges or anything of that nature I tend to be there with my wife and son so I'm more concerned about them falling out office actually my son being like just for going on five he falls off the stuff all the time yeah so like he and he ends up generating all of my anxiety about people falling or jumping and that I don't I guess I have less room for myself sure well that makes sense based on the cognitive dissonance theory that we're going to talk about today they that your parental authority would like override override the biological like brain stuff that's going on theoretically here that causes that there's a whole theory as to what causes this seems close but let's go through all this stuff and kind of figure it out before we do that I wanted to add a John Paul Sartre observed this decades ago and he said that this emotion is unsettling because it creates an unnerving shaky sensation of not being able to trust one's own instincts which is which is really interesting like I I hadn't even thought about it is that that like you feel like so I just expressed as a thing where it's like you feel like you're in total control but then his version of it is you're totally out of control well it's kind of the you know it's it's another reason I like the call of the wild a quote here because he talks about this thing being splendid and terrible at the same time death into two states goods like standing at the edge of the Grand Canyon like Yang canyon is an awesome experience to see that much emptiness but it's also you feel vulnerable if you're gonna go and you want to go in style that seems like that'd be kind of like a beautiful way to do it well a lot of people have yeah I mean I'm not suicidal don't think that audience and we're gonna talk about suicidal thoughts in relation to this as well because it's pretty serious topic but I could there there's something there is a a beauty to it and this is where Mr Sigmund Freud comes in and we'll we'll we'll talk about that as well but first let's look at the more recent study this is really the hinge of this episode so in twenty eleven a team of scientists from Florida State University decided to investigate it and this was in the journal of affective disorders and the authors of the paper were led by a woman named Jennifer Haynes she's was a graduate student she's currently faculty at Notre Dame in this was at FSU's joiner lab when you might be gone why would anybody want to study this like where did this come from well the idea here is that it could shine light on the whole idea of a death drive that some suicides are impulsive and have nothing to do with depression and that was interesting I hadn't really thought of that before myself but I could reading up more on Freud's death drive theory I guess I could see where that came from yeah I I do have to save for my own part I am I am I would retain the possibility that that exists but I'm rather I'm rather doubtful that suicide yes can occur or door does occur in any significance to any significant degree completely isolated from depression or willful intent yeah like the idea that someone's just like I could jump off that into the canyon and die let's do it bam done see into the air like I can see the impulse being a factor if there is already some underlying depression or if one already had some sort of a a plan in mind and this is just like this is the day that I act on it yeah so I you know I think that it's worth saying like from my subjective experience like I said I myself am not suicidal and I haven't I've had what we refer to later as suicidal thinking but I've never had suicidal planning and there's a major difference right in India and this is sort of the call of the void the high the high place phenomenon those are those are versions of suicidal thinking that's about as far as his client for me right yeah it was too subtle thinking I feel like is often tied into with the with the romance of suicide because you have so many stories in in beyond these generally a very lopsided in their presentation of suicide the display it is this this noble poetic paying the doom dreamers and doomed lovers and Julie yeah yeah yeah but I I know we've all been teenagers so we've all had moments were like all my life is so tragic and you might envision this scenario but is it good to your point is a difference between envisioning it drew daydreaming about it and and thinking about when everyone will say when you're gone versus actually putting some sort of plan in place the for our listeners I do want to establish up front you know I have experience with people who were suicidal or have committed suicide so I am sympathetic to that and I don't want this episode just to feel like it's Callas this is connected to that but it's of this this suicidal thinking that goes along with the call of the void syndrome seems to be a far cry from the actual act of it in but we're gonna get into that the end of the episode so back to this research they found that more than thirty percent of the people they talked to said they had experienced this phenomenon at least once and the researchers refer to it in their study as high place phenomenon they weren't taking into account like throwing yourself in front of a train or driving an oncoming traffic they were also curious whether it was related to a person's history of suicidal thinking and from their findings they found that it is common even among people who have no depression or suicidal thinking history so this was their methodology.

Robert Lamm Christian Sager
"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Stuff to blow your mind? My name is Robert. Lamm in my name is Christian Sager today. We are going to be talking about a drug. We're GONNA be talking about M._d.. May also known as Ecstasy. Let's see but specifically we're going to be getting into kind of in this episode what the breakdown of it as how it works in chemistry how it works in biology what its effects are human body then we're GonNa do a second episode. That's is going to be mainly about experiments have been conducted for what thirty years now maybe longer on how you can use to hear all kinds of things or at least alleviate things from cancer to using it in psychotherapy and using it to help people with P._T._S._d.. You can think of it as a one to approach to looking at a particular drug and view guys and gals like this we can take the same approach with other substances in the future yeah definitely it seems like once we did the research for it seems like this is rife. This avenue is right for for more research and episodes along these lines. I'd love to do another kind of episode. That's based on the pharmacology of a designer drug or commercial kind of street drug. DOC science-based open minded exploration of what the substance is what its properties are and then how can those properties conceivably be used to our advantage and a non-recreational way now before we get started. I want to remind you all where you can find S.. In all the other things that we do a lot of people that we encounter actually think that the podcast is the only thing that stuff to blow your mind is but we actually have blog posts and articles that we write every week <hes> that are available on stuff to.

Robert Lamm Christian Sager thirty years
"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert lamb, and I'm Christian Sager. Hey, Robert who said the following the legality of cannabis is outrageous an impediment to full utilization of a drug which helps produce the serenity and insight sensitivity and fellowship. So desperately needed in this increasingly mad and dangerous world. Well, that's of course, a quote from mister x from the early nineteen seventies. Mr. x he's that guy. Who's on the X files? He replaced the deep throat character and like season three right? Is that true? There's a Mr. X zone. That's oh, yeah. Totally totally. He was like they're inside informant. He's the guy from twenty one jump street. He said that. No, no, okay. Turns out. This was actually Carl Sagan. Why? Yeah. Mr. Mr. x was his his his marijuana advocate pseudonym back in the day. Well, Carl Sagan must have had a contact high. That's my worst pot joke that I'm going to tell during this episode. But yeah, so Carl Sagan said that, but we didn't find out about that. Until after he died, you know, I learned Carl Sagan saying that listening to a podcast. I was listening to the dead authors podcast with Paul Tompkins. And Matt Gourley was his guest pretending to be Carl Sagan, and they talked about this quote at length. Yeah. And it's and it's more than a cord like it's a full p. Yeah. In in which he talks about his experiences with marijuana the effects marijuana had in his own life on creativity on making connections things outside of his out of the scientific discipline. But he at least alluded a little bit too. It's it's used to make scientific connections as well. So we figured we did a two parter on MD. May there are a lot of positive comments about that. And we thought you know, what maybe we should do this as kind of like an ongoing series where we explore different drug substances the cultures around them, but mainly the science of how they work and the potential medical properties that they have right? Yeah. As well, as you know, some cool historical and cultural material as well more way more so than MDA cannabis is a subject where you could easily have a stuff to blow your mind esque show that just covers nothing but marijuana like each. You could look at a different tweak. You could look at a different historical tidbits, some different cultural tidbit. You could look at some new study about its applications. You could look at some new study about it's, you know, the tackles it from a, you know, drug abuse drug prevention angle, there's just so much material out there, you could just go on forever. And we're not going to go on forever. We're going to we into pieces here. Yeah. We we did our best to condense it down Roberts. Right. There's an absolute Infinity of pot research out there. And that's a good thing. Because there's a lot of things that we have to learn from this one plant that are our species has become totally obsessed with. Yeah. I mean, we stand in an interesting place in history where acceptance of marijuana his growing in many circles, we see a lot more research scientific research going on right now than we have in the past. And yeah, it's it's hard to exactly predict where we'll. Be ten twenty thirty years. Yeah. Who knows? Yeah. But yeah, we're going to give it the old stuff to blow your mind Shakir. And if there if you want more information or you want more of a general overview there a couple of great articles over it. How stuff works dot com. One on marijuana. How marijuana worth another one? How medical marijuana works? That will give you the basics. You know us. We're liable to maybe dwell and some of the weirder. Cooler things about the topic. And you might very well want to then go back and explore some of the base. Yeah. I want to start the episode with a disclaimer that like what we're going to do isn't the standard. How marijuana works type episode? Right. And in fact, our colleagues over at stuff, you should know how medicinal marijuana works episode that you should go. Listen to if you're looking for something like that..

marijuana Carl Sagan Robert lamb cannabis Christian Sager Paul Tompkins Matt Gourley Mr. Mr. x Shakir ten twenty thirty years
"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert lamb, and my name is Christian Sager, a Robert ever met a person who doesn't like music. I do not think I've ever met anyone who just across the board doesn't like music. I've certainly met plenty of people who seem to dislike music and certain scenarios. Yeah. Because I'm the type of apes of music, you mean types of music, but also music in certain situations. Like, I certainly known people who don't like music while driving. Okay. I'm of the mindset, I want music on all the time just about music choosing music. I know a lot of our colleagues have difficulty writing while there's music on. I don't have that problem. Although I do like sort of, cultivate, playlists of stuff that helps me to write, you know, mostly instrumental stuff, there's certain music that I can listen to the has vocals that I can listen to all writing. But yeah. So, you know, I know lick you have known league various sort of iterations of people who can't listen music during certain times, the only met like one or two people in my life who just don't they? They literally say, I don't like music and has so alien so difficult I comprehend because it's like hearing someone say, oh, I don't I don't like food. I don't like drinking liquids it almost seems inhuman in a way. And I think like when you hear that at least in my experience people will kind of think like, oh, that's the trade of a psychopath. But it's not it is actually not we've talked. Psychopaths on the show and that hasn't come up as one of the symptoms. But also as we're gonna talk about today. This is a real brain condition. Yeah. At least a couple of different conditions. We're going to discuss. Yeah. I think they both served to remind us just how tenuous our sensory experience of the world. Really is. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean think about you and me, right. Like, the audience probably knows if they don't already that you are really into electronic music, and you cover it for a stuff to blow your mind. I'd say weekly, right? Yeah. Yeah. And and I as many people have heard on other episodes grew up in the pumpkin metal scene and still listen to a lot of that stuff, which a lot of people find unlistenable and distant leaving, you know, my wife, and I'm okay with that. But it's interesting because dissonance plays into these diseases as well. Well, here's a quick question for you. And I think this helps to sort of this helps a lot of us try and comprehend what some of these. Dishes are like, yeah. What what's type of music that? You just really don't get that. You just can't really listen to you don't understand. And and you're willing to say, yeah. I that is not for me, usually like NPR style jazz. I don't want to just say jazz in general because there's plenty of stuff that's being done in that area. That's interesting. And I like, but like that kind of like background elevator music jazz. You know what I mean? Like that. That drives me crazy. It's like fingers on a chalkboard for me. It's I I have to say jazz as well. And part of this could be I mean, the the view I guess is the jazz take some getting used to you have to be you have to immerse yourself in it, and I.

Robert lamb Christian Sager NPR
"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hi, I'm Christian Sager. And welcome to brain stuff was the last time you got to use an eyelid spectrum. You know, those small metal prongs that push your eyelids. Open clockwork, orange style well-made, drew. I hope the answer is never. But if you have been subject to one of these uncomfortable devices, it's probably because you've had corrective surgery to your vision. See our corneas are like windows that allow light to pass through our retinas where it's converted into electrical signals to our brain. If you have eyesight problems, it's usually because you're I can't focus an image onto your retina for centuries we've relied on external lenses like glasses or contacts for correction, but with modern technology surgeons can actually alter the shape of the I it self using lasers to change its focal point the most popular technique is called Lazic which stands for laser assisted in Souto CARA. Toma looses. It's very effective at treating several visual problems ESP. 'specially nearsightedness before any reputable doctor performs Lazic they're going to give you a thorough pre-operative eye exam. They'll measure your current prescription in manually check the surface of your cornea with the die called flora Cain. Other tests map, your corneas top Agassi and measure, the exact diameter of your pupil to qualify for Lazic. You'll need to meet a certain range of vision, corneal, thickness and pupil size. It's also risky. If you're pregnant have severe heart problems certain diseases or take some types of drugs once you've passed pre-accession you come back for the actual process conducted by both the surgeon and a technician operating the laser machine, they'll put a topical anesthetic in your eyes too numb any discomfort, and that's good. Because the next step is to pry open your eyes with special tape and that.

Lazic Christian Sager Souto CARA flora Cain Toma technician Agassi
"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Bob and today's episode is another classic from the vaults. Our erstwhile host Christian Sager is here to present these scientific side of a fashion argument that keeps cropping up. Do you really need to wash your jeans? Hey, brain stuff, I'm Christian singer and not to get too personal. But when did you last wash your jeans, you don't have to tell me if you don't want to? But here's the thing. Whether you're wearing a pair of busted Levi's or brand new rod Dunham from some fancy boutique, your pants are part of a debate that designers and customers alike have been having for decades when should you wash your jeans and do you need to wash them at all? Well, let's look at the basics denim is a kind of cotton with the twiddle textile. We've in a twin weave the thread called the west. That's the crosswise yarn passes under at least two warp threads. And those are the length wise yarns in most genes only these warp threads died meaning that these other threads the west threads remain white. That's why blue jeans are white on the inside that blue shade on the warp thread comes from a die. Call. Called indigo. And unlike some other dies, indigo doesn't penetrate the cotton. Instead it sits atop the yard on the surface of each thread over time molecules of indigo chip away causing the fabric to fade this fade makes each pair unique so much so that the FBI analyzes Denham patterns when tracking criminals. Yeah, that's a real thing. The more you wear a pair the more broken in they become you'll see the appearance of fade patterns whiskers on the front honeycomb patterns behind the knees. And so on not all genes, however were created equally. Let's divide them into two rough categories. There's washed and raw washed denim is just that washed after dying to make the fabric softer in reduced shrinkage. Then in a process called Sanford's -ation. The trousers are moisten steamed and stretched to reduce the shrinkage rate. Most genes are Sanford is these days raw or dry denim. Can be Sanford or Unsan for is d-. If it isn't it can shrink up to ten percent. One washed sometimes washed denim is artificially distressed to give it a broken in. Or worn? Look the fading of rod Dunham on the other hand happens naturally over time, depending on the daily activities of the person wearing the jeans the longer you go without washing these genes, the more pronounced fading patterns will become Personalizing your pants once you have a pair of jeans..

rod Dunham Sanford Christian Sager Bob Levi FBI Denham Unsan ten percent
"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey, wasn't Mr. for blow your mind. My name is Robert lamb and I'm Christian Sager. So Robert. Yep. Sideboard word cyborg and here that what does it mean to you? What is it? What composites up immediately? Well, you know, I'm kind of depends on how far back in my own time when I go like I can't help it instantly go back to being kid. Yeah, we're cyborg mint Terminator cyborg mint RoboCop. And so you and I are both children of the eighties and that's yeah. Yes, cyborgs were at their height of popularity. Probably. Right? Yeah. This idea that like there's a machine, but it's it's got at least a little bit of humanity to it, but nothing. Nothing that's going to hold it back much like a terrorizing robot or this this brutal metal bad ass. Yeah, I am in a tease this a little bit on social media, but for me, I am mmediately go to a comic book character named cyborg and it's. A character that was I created in the seventies and that's seventies eighties. That's when I was reading his comic books. He is an African-American character who becomes a cyborg because he's in some kind of like athletic accident or car accident or something. And his dad is like a cyber next genius in rebuilds his body, and he becomes a superhero joins the teen titans. A lot of people out there may know this character from the teen titans cartoon show in the last decade. My nephew is telling me all about cyborg. Oh, really? I was hanging out with them in the past few months, and it was kind of I was impressed because it sounds like teen titans has done a good job of sort of giving a thoughtful treatment of cyborg. Like, what does it mean that this character is a little bit machine and a little bit human. Have middle ground as he walking. It's kind of, I mean, the cartoon is is more of a comedy, but so the the caveat that wanted to place on this is, you know, DC is rolling out its big summer, blockbuster universe of superhero movies and then cyborg is going to have his own movie and he's going to be in the Justice league movies. Okay. And I haven't seen it, but I guess that Batman v, superman movie spoilers like hints at him in somewhere. So I kept thinking as we were doing the research for this episode, which if you guys out there, haven't guessed by now is about cyborgs. I, I kept thinking, you know, the people who were writing and doing all the pre production on that cyborg tent pole movie right now. I really hope they listen to this episode because we got a lot of interesting themes going on here with the idea of cyborgs and yeah, unreal. And that is what this episode is going to revolve around now. Certainly we've had episodes in the past that have dealt with sort of like mind, machine interfaces, including Joe, and I did one in the past few. Months, I'll make sure we linked to that on the landing page for this episode and there will be doing episodes in the future. I'm sure about cybernetic enhancements, prostatic limbs, etc. But this episode is as the title implies, it's about what do we think about when we think about cyborgs? What is the the meaning of cyborg as a word? And it's a trope and as a metaphor for understanding the human experience? Yeah. And what I especially got out of it is that cyborg in general, there's a lot of philosophical arguments to make that we're already cyborgs and that it is.

teen titans Robert lamb Christian Sager Justice league Batman Joe
"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey, welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and it is vault time. We shall enter the door hangs open, the void calls. What have we got today? Robert? Oh, well, this this week we have cyborgs. This is an episode that I did with Christian back in twenty sixteen April nineteenth of two thousand sixteen to be specific. And yeah, it's a fun discussion of just this. This kind of amorphous idea of cyborgs, right? Because we all we all have our favorites, right? The Manby cyborg the helper movie cyborg Claude van Damme. Yes, clearly that's everybody's favorite, but then also a few other small independent films like RoboCop and Terminator films, you know, and also by mentioning that some of you are already probably arguing in your mind and thinking, well, RoboCop really a cyborg or was he just a robot that they put a face on as a testament to fallen cop? Do you and our seemed colleague Christian Sager address these questions in the episode? Yeah, a little bit because. Ultimately, it is kind of an amorphous torrent term this term cyborg. So we talk about like where it came from some of its origins in our considerations of of travel beyond our planet of changing astronauts to better survive the harsh conditions of outer space as well as how the the idea of of of the cyborg has been taken up as a is kind of a metaphor for say feminist identity. Oh, interesting. I don't think I've ever heard of it that way. Now I feel like I've got to listen to this. Yeah. Well, I figure out what you guys talked about. Well, yeah, let's let's do. Let's all dive in and explore the world of cyborgs. Welcome and stuff to blow your mind from how stuff works dot com..

Robert lamb Claude van Damme Christian Sager Joe McCormick
"christian sager" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on TechStuff

"Of those early recordings and i can tell right away that they had an incredible idea molly would leave the company in 2011 with caroline ervin joining the show and then christon caroline did an amazing job evolving the show into a strong feminist voice caroline and kristen left how stuff works in late 2016 the show itself has returned and now has new hosts emily aries and bridget tied the first episode of the show ever was due men and women have different brains it published february fourth two thousand nine i suspect the answer is yes because we can all share the same one on january twelve 2010 we launched a new show called stuff from the science lab but we would brief brand that suit this is sort of like factor fiction we changed the name of it now it is known as stuff to blow your mind this is a science based podcast it's currently hosted by robert lam joe mccormick and christian sager although our editor alyssa in lower milk was an original cohost with robert julie douglas would also hosts some of these episodes of the show and the first episode ever was called amazing infestations and 2011 we launched a shortlived podcast called stuff to make you smarter this was hosted by rob and chris who were not actually part of the editorial department and the show explored all sorts of various topics but didn't quite last half a year the first episode launched a may 2nd two thousand eleven and was called of cinema and sound the story of music and film the final episode was called can we teach our children to be bully proof and it published on september 19th 2011 so this was a time when we were actually opening up the ability to podcast beyond the editorial department and it turns out that podcasting is the requires a lot of work and sometimes it requires more work than you can put in and still do your regular job at the same time so that isis.

caroline ervin kristen robert lam joe mccormick christian sager alyssa robert julie douglas rob emily aries bridget editor chris milk
"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hey everybody this is chuck bryant here from stuff you should now and i've got a new solo podcasts that i am so excited about skuld movie crush where i talk to your favorite people about their favorite movie in it's really that simple i sit down with janet barney contignent tickner taro and john hodgman and kevin pollock and ken jennings of jeopardy fame and we all just have a great conversation about what they're all time favorite movie is going great so far but he did get launches november 3rd an apple and everywhere you can find your podcast welcome to paint tough from how stuff worth bay brain stuff with christian sager might dogged winchester and as he blew they are real smart so i was intrigued when i read a new study that said wolves are more intelligent in some ways than my dogs and all their canine friends whether you have a chocolate labrador akhoon hound scientists believe that some modern dogs and wolves descended from a common ancestor between eleven thousand and thirty thousand years ago the new study which was published in the september 2017 journal of scientific reports is by an international team of researchers at the wolf science centre in vienna austria they found domesticated dogs cannot make the connection between cause and effect wolves however can they came to that conclusion by testing and comparing how the two species searched for food after giving them hints about where it was located.

chuck bryant john hodgman kevin pollock ken jennings christian sager wolf science centre austria janet barney journal of scientific thirty thousand years
"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey you wasn't acceptable your mind my name's robert lamp and i'm christian sager you know christian it it seems that we should be able to look at where we've been in the past and therefore extrapolate predict even simulate we're we're going in the future right does it does seem that way and i think that that may be is a product of licht the last century of our uh scientific thinking does that make sense yeah well i mean there's definitely one line in particular that were were the were often referring to and generally a misquoting i think a lot of the time and that comes from philosopher georgia sunday yana who said quote those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it that would of course tend to imply hey if you can't remember the past than you can avoid these pitfalls in the future that there some uh there's some system that can be employed that even though we're we're strapped to this linear existence just hurtling through time into the future uh if if we have some concept of the road we've travel will have a better idea about the road to come right yeah answer to bring it back around two are a nerdy nece in our fend him for stephen king and uh the newlypopular a dark tower universe uh there's a quote from king here that he used in the stand under the guise of rental flag life was such a wheel that no men could stand upon it for long and it always at the end came round to the same place again.

georgia stephen king
"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Right now a gap factory and banana republic factory save fifty to seventy percent on everything in stores and online that's right fifty to seventy percent off everything celebrate the port with this from nineteen nine that banana republic back three and to get back stores these third of hor ninety nine let's say but text or forty percent off glaring salins du thayn was through the door locator for your nearest gap factory and banana republic back restore or shop online welcome to prayed from how stuff worth favoring stuff it's christian sager here listen i get anxious you do too but hey it is a totally normal and healthy response that keeps us from doing things that might actually be dangerous like sticking your hand in a fire for instance but when anxiety is so pervasive that it interferes with your daily life it becomes a disorder and most researchers believe that disorder begins in your brain there's several types of anxiety disorders phobias ptsd an oecd or just a few and some forty million american adults suffer from an anxiety disorder according to the national institute of mental health but let's focus today on general anxiety disorder which affects close to seven million adults in his twice as likely in women you're constantly anticipating a threat or disaster that isn't actually present maybe you're worried about money health family or work and despite reality you'll expect the worst the symptoms include restlessness fatigue difficulty concentrating irritability muscle tension and sleep disturbances the symptoms officially become a disorder when you can't control your worry for at least six months you may still be social or even employed but people with general anxiety disorder can have difficulty carrying out even the simplest of daily activities experts believed that general anxiety disorder is caused by both biological factors and life experiences good old combination of nature and nurture.

banana republic oecd general anxiety disorder muscle tension salins du thayn national institute of mental h sleep disturbances seventy percent forty percent six months
"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on BrainStuff

"How step or just a brain stuff it's christian sager remember that time in battle star galacticos when that one character was blown out in era lock in doubt or space without a suit know what about when it happened in two thousand wonder arians's the galaxy are sunshine yes we all dream about travelling in space but if movies or any indication we spent almost as much time thinking about flying around up there without a suit on so let's answer this question once and for all what would space actually due to a human body well here's the good news you wouldn't i instantly yeah you might actually survive for a little bit out there how do we know because somebody tested it out on dogs in nineteen sixty five researchers that brooks air force base in texas exposed to several dog stewing your vacuum the dubs survive for up to ninety seconds but if they went to minutes or more they died when re pressure is and if your first thought is they did this to dogs look i'm i'm right there with you researchers at nassau did the same to chimpanzees in all eight nineteen sixty is finding that they could last up to three point five minutes and then there's been a few accidents where people got in the end reed pressure i just like a technician at johnson space center who lost consciousness after twelve seconds this was just before the moisture on his tongue began to boil that's right.

arians technician johnson space center texas ninety seconds twelve seconds five minutes
"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"I'm christian sager and a regular host robert lamb is not with us today he's off chilling somewhere else christian i or flande solo this is going to be part two of a two part episode on animal intelligence in cognition specifically with regard to a book that we read by the the prime a tal adjust and evolutionary cog meant to shin with every the turf got here out how you it's singler eyes yeah cause i'm intelligence not frowns default who wrote this book are we smart enough to know how smart animals are right yeah so if you if you have an we encourage you to go listen to that other episode yeah far one will will lay the groundwork for this one that we're talking about today and within that episode we mainly used evolves work to talk about the history of how science has looked at animal intelligence and in this episode we find yourself now in the present day looking at a field that do fall likes to call evolutionary cotton mission right and so this is sort of a synthesize to feel that has come out more recently by combining the best parts of previous ideas like that you know the comparative cy call adjusts or the behavior wrists these are the people who emphasize to learning and conditioned responses and then they fall adjusts the people who specialised in studying animals in their natural habit has to see what they're naturally inclined to behaviors score yet insert a recap very briefly from the last episode he compares the wall between studies of behavior is i'm and studies of apology and even now going into at the listener cognition as similar to it e all edge in specifically he compares it to the video orgy between science and creation as well so that's saying that there's like a pretty pretty hard to stop in between them it's not like it's easy to argue from one position to the other in fact and i don't believe that he came up with these categories but this is with in the book that there are three types of players within this argument okay about animal.

christian sager robert lamb
"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"christian sager" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Of the fire a monkey what what was this previous year here we're exiting we're of the get okay so by by goat all baby's born today still goat's but pretty soon they'll be fire monkeys instead that's right yeah they are twelve different animals involved in the zodiac i'm a big on a particular already have wrap ops tiger rabbit dragon snake horse go the monkey roost or dog can take and then it goes back around okay so we'll get to know those animals a little bit more as the episode goes on but we should have a little disclaimer here the beginning if you're like wait a minute i thought we were going to be talking about science and that's hard cast so we are going to be talking about chinese to stroll she in this episode but it's worth noting that we're not necessarily endorsing chinese a stroll it's your any form of a starlet you're given nation as an accurate tool for learning about reality but instead examining it as a thing that exerts a powerful influence over human culture and behavior yeah the methodology in the symbolism it's fascinating and it's also potent in eastern culture and we can actually study the ramifications out from an economic standpoint from berth rate standpoint it's all really interesting stuff so yeah if you're your role in your eyes to be a straw wedgie there with this because we're going to get to to numbers are going to get to the sun it's okay we should check in real quick with what the stuff to blow your minds animal signs are before we move on so as we said i'm a tiger but it turns out i'm married to a wrapped rats run run strong in this world and i i appreciate their powering craftiness are other host on this podcast christian christian sager is a snake married to a rabbit.

christian sager