18 Burst results for "Chris Ware"

"chris ware" Discussed on Chicago Tonight

Chicago Tonight

03:14 min | 4 months ago

"chris ware" Discussed on Chicago Tonight

"You bet more chicago families will be eligible to have the lead service lines in their home replaced this after the program launched by mayor lori lightfoot. Nearly a year ago has been off to a slow start. Wt w news reporter. Heather sharon joins us now with more details. Heather reminders us. The mayor's plan back in september. And why it has been slow to get off the ground well. Her plan had two parts. One would take federal money about fifteen million dollars worth and start replacing lead service lines for low and moderate income chicagoans now even though she announced that plan back in september application students start work opens till march and only about one hundred people applied for the program so this week she announced that instead of being a lower moderate income chicagoan had high levels of lead in their homes water. Anybody could do it as long as you had. Kids and meant those income requirements hoping that more people would have fought and more specifically. What are those income requirements or. What the ballpark here to be eligible. It's about yeah. It's about seventy five thousand dollars for a family of four so about eighty percent of the area's median income. And it's really to help those living in neighborhoods where these lead service lines can have the worst impact on chicago's chorus children. Or how does the city plan on paying for this because it is going to be quite expensive so in all the city estimates the cost eight point five billion dollars to remove the four hundred thousand sled service lines the city. The city can't afford it but there may be money coming from the federal government as part of an infrastructure. Bill that started moving through the united states senate today wednesday so that that bill does have a funding for a water service line replacement and heather. We are going to see you later in the program for spotlight politics. Talk about just that and a lot of other things. Thank you very much as always these parents and you can read heather's full story on our website that's www dot com slash news and up next chicago's colorful role in the early development of the comic strip. Stay with us A lot more to get to on the program including a look at why illinois republican congressman adam kindergarteners being ridiculed by members of his own party. But first we recently featured a show at the museum of contemporary art that put a spotlight on comics from nineteen. Sixties counterculture cartoons. Right up to present-day graphic novels. Well that show has a sister exhibition which opened soon after at the chicago cultural center it looks at an even earlier history of comics making the case that chicago truly brought comics to life producer mark. Tally has the story at the cultural center. That curator's walked through their cartoonish creation. They are acclaimed artist. Chris ware and the city of chicago's.

lori lightfoot Heather sharon chicago Heather heather adam kindergarteners federal government senate Bill united states bill illinois chicago cultural center mark Chris ware
"chris ware" Discussed on Do By Friday

Do By Friday

06:32 min | 4 months ago

"chris ware" Discussed on Do By Friday

"Let's just how. Can i say this without saying this to get a about fifteen. Blocks was twenty bucks. Oh way way my but no. That's just in passing but just to say there's a whole bunch of stuff where i've said all along probably since last march like i've always been. I wish i could draw. Because i really wanted to do a chris ware style new yorker cover of the day. We all come out of lockdown. I used to think. Remember my symmetric. Drawing of street do do do do do sons out. The birds are singing. The doors open. Everybody walks out and they've everybody has transformed into a completely different unrecognizable fairly humanoid. Like some maybe some people put on a few pounds fee. Some people now have like an octopus for ahead like who knows what happened in lockdown. But now that we're backing out little world that we so cool i'd funding but liam but i would you know what i'm saying like i always had stealing all along like i wonder how much we're gonna. It's gonna be so weird. Like ha ha. You grew a beard or whatever but the stuff of like. Oh my gosh think about how much we've each changed or how much all the things that we assumed had to be a certain way for better or worse in adult life we realized Unfortunately that's not the case and the possibilities of that and the perils of that and then the lake. The thing i've been fearing from the beginning isn't having to go back into the meat grinder. Reality were the people who have always been in. A position of power are still in a position of power which means that they're in a position to decide what reality is was or continues to be. And that's that's terrifying to have to all of our own little cognitive businesses that we've had time to sort of often like you know some people saw for more than others i. I'm fine like i'm i've got everything i need in the right personality to stay inside with my family and take out forever hashtag everybody but but when you're having to back into the meat grinder of reality and face all those power dynamics and then once again you're having your like set yourself up against different people in real life and it's sort of like i used to say about people who run stop signs and red lights where it's like. Oh we've had one person on a bike bliss through a stop sign. We'll probably be fine but if one person blows through a red light let's a dark red light like that's really bad. Extremely bad thank almost nobody else is running that red light but if two people run a red light at the same time you see where. I'm going with this. If we go beyond like the single asshole theory which i think is part of the kennedy assassination but if we move past the single asshole theory like what if everybody starts acting like that so many people are going to die. Y you know went to weirdos. Meet each other passing through the ri- it's going to be a weird time in in the new me kreiner and i. I don't prefer it. I'm not looking forward to it. And i continued to be the idea of like getting on a plane to go somewhere right now. Which is something. I'm dealing with is like really incredibly stressful to me. Because i know it's mean and my weirdness and my cognitive dissonance back in the world. But i'm also just not looking forward to having to deal with everybody else's cognitive business and aside from the cognitive dissonance part of it. It's like i've lost. It's like. I've lost my neo liberal muscles having to just let things go your ability to not a loans to be like a huh. Yeah yeah and this is why you i enjoy. Uae is my recording paused. That's okay everything's fine. We've got the zim backup the end the quicktime backup all right. Everything's school but not even nod along in a way that i mean yes. Speak up when you can about social inequities obviously but When i say that it doesn't bother me. And i don't consider it miss 'gendering when you accidentally us she. Her is the same reason. I don't consider consider it miss 'gendering when my mom is like. Oh what's wrong with you woman. When it's like a specifically when i was wearing a shirt that had a computer chip on it the m one it was it was a giant giant. M one on the back of my t shirt. that's next. Unisex hotness the guest. Yes sorry what are we saying. Look what we say. Unisex unisex can be a haircut nicole but my family because the raise knee has a woman obviously but they knew that something was up and the way they treat me isn't the way i think society you treats or prefer perceives femininity and not a good or bad way. Just just both. Does that kind of make sense like he like. You aren't like alex cheerleader. Which isn't nothing wrong with that. You're getting at the so. It's just so interesting that you're kind of getting the forgive me. These are all new words to me. Social this four part of this right. Which is like you got whatever's going over here here with yourself but then in the world you're also having to like evaluate when somebody does well. Somebody references anything about you and who you are and especially with something where you do or feel like you differ from what's printed on the tin that also causes a realization in your own mind of lake at the very least. How do i deal with this person. Who just called me that she that that must lead the things like self doubt or like i don't maybe me and if i am a woman you're gonna call me a bitch if i say don't call me right. I mean there's layer levels and layers. It's like wildlife tropic. Thunder and people say it's problematic. It is problematic but it's not problem problematic in the way you think there's layers and layers and layers and like this this that's also life is like i have to relitigate this on so many different levels at least on a cognitive basis and by the time i figured out what to do about it like you know my coffee is gone cold and he because there's so much nuance to it because tropic thunder pro problematic in different ways that a but the not for the reason. You think parenting things..

chris ware kreiner liam alex cheerleader kennedy Uae
"chris ware" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

08:39 min | 4 months ago

"chris ware" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Matter what competence in tamari. Welcome back to the monocle daily. I'm andrew still with me. Our guests monaco's kiara miller and chris mc. The european commission appears to have decided that it has spent sufficient time wondering when hungary and poland are going to get with the program. Vis-a-vis gay rights. The has begun legal action against hungary entire and dozens of polish regions over flagrantly. Anti lgbtq legislation in hungary's case. It is absurd. Law recently passed by hungary's parliament against anything that may promote homosexuality to minors. Though this really isn't how these things work whereas in the case of more than one hundred polish regions it is the declaration that they are. Lgbtq ideology free zones won't ever in the wide world of sports. That is supposed to mean. Jared this stuff is is weird from hungary and bits of pollen domain. It's just weird. That does seem to be the word that describes it doesn't strike you though that what we witnessing here is a kind of desperate dying gasp of this kind of nonsense or might it be undergoing some species of revival. I wish i could say it was dying gasp. But unfortunately perhaps i'm i'm a little bit pessimist but i don't think it is even though you always think that i guess social justice moves in a nice and neat kind of straight line towards the future. I mean i bring to this. The example of my home country of italy where an anti anti-homophobia law has actually been discussed. Senate this this week and you would think that it wouldn't be so difficult to decide. It's awesome sound controversial on the face of mode and what certain right wing politicians are bringing to. The debate is the idea that there are some controversial aspects to the law namely the fact that it seeks to safeguard the idea that people can declare their own gender identity also has in it some guidance towards having some awareness days in schools activities in schools and and this is considered wildly controversial by a number of senators who are basically saying that this is against impinging on their freedom of speech. Because it should be possible for everyone to have whatever opinion including apparently homophobic once they worried about the rights of children because in hungary like they think that they could be radicalized By the ideology a lot of people refer to things like the dictatorship of gender. I mean i think that's what really strikes me about all of these discussions the fact that the lexicon news is also wildly out of place which talking about dictatorship ideology propaganda. These things should be associated with extreme political movements not with social rights movements who are not dictatorships in any shape or form. And i'm people seeking to look for rights for minorities so i think that in the case of italy. Obviously this is the legacy very heavy burden of catholic traditions and probably the same cases is true of poland. But i do think that. For example in italy there are people who are being on the fence about the anti-homophobia bill who however however are friends with auburn. And so you can kind of see how here. It's a case of trying to be on the right side of history and i think italy has an opportunity and it really current squander at this point chris ware. Hungary and poland are concerned the ec- slash e. You do have a considerable difficulty. Which is if they do take pop at hungary and poland over this and they do now appears to be poised to do that. That kind of plays into the hands politically of the people there taking a pop out. I mean we've seen this from victor. All bound time without number he says or does something draft of this ilk E- causes uproar in the eu is then able to turn to his base and say look good old me standing up for plucky little hungary and traditional christian values against those devious lottery sloping western european elitists over the absolutely. And i think what's what's interesting for me is when you compare this with previous crises that the european union has had where there have been. You know where it's been threatened to break away. Particularly you know covered the the european debt crisis for many times it strike for many years it. It strikes me that one of the differences is that back then despite the rhetoric Also a say a defiance from greece which wanted more money wanted something different different a re- result if you will from germany and some of the other stronger members of the european union. At the end of the day it was grease that needed something from the european union rate at needed money. In this case it still had an interest in staying in the euro. It still had an interest in in the project and so therefore. It's it's threats if you will of not acting the way. The european union wanted to ended up bringing hollow and the european union was able to call their bluff in this case. And that's what strikes me. I think For the the danger for the european union is that you look at poland and hungary. They don't seem to have that same desire. An interest particularly among the governments to to adhere to what brussels once. And if anything exactly as you're saying they're more likely They're more likely to actually use this as rhetoric to fuel their own campaigns and so it's it's almost the other way now it's up to the european union to call their bluff and decide what they actually want to do about laws like this that they that you know. The european union considers to go against its own values. How do you respond to that. What do you do. It is incredibly difficult. There are things that the european can do as as talking about the news is that they are taking these countries to court. What is the result of that. What is the result of that court decision. At the end of the day they can impose. Fines is is a fine going to be enough for hungary and poland and their governments to change the way that they operate. I'm not sure it is if anything as we're also seeing now for example in poland separately with judicial reforms you know the local courts have also been said that you know european core. European law essentially does not apply within poland view. Their laws it's constitutional. It's just it's just leading to this possibility that poland and hungary at the end of the day might leave the european union. And if that in itself is not a threat anymore. If you can't tell poland and hungary you know follow our rules or you must leave if you know. Poland and hungary are tempted to call that bluff. I don't know what you do anymore right. Then that's this is why it's Even more existential crisis in some ways. I would argue then the european debt crisis was. Because you don't know if poland and hungary at the end of the day want to stay if their governments feel that their values are being threatened. Obviously nobody should have to white on this front. in fact. it's very arguable. That large numbers of europeans have waited far too long indeed. Several dozen centuries things have advanced as far as they have. But do you at least have any faith that eventually demographics will take care of this in that younger generations coming up. Now we'll just care less and less about this. I wish i could say yes again. And i think in a broader sense it's true And i do think that in italy for example this discussion has been going on for twenty five years. I don't think ever got the momentum than it has now because it is backed by so many young people across the boot who have really made this appropriate calling. And i think it has also galvanized people politically in many respects because a lot of the time the discourse in italy as very kind of bureaucratic not very interesting politically and this is really a cause that young people can get behind. I do also think that you know when you look at the violence. That's being leveled across same sex couples across the continent. Sometimes the perpetrators. Our young people..

hungary poland european union kiara miller chris mc italy tamari monaco european commission Jared chris ware andrew Senate auburn victor greece brussels germany
"chris ware" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

07:54 min | 5 months ago

"chris ware" Discussed on Double Toasted

"Sued. Oh shit is going. Bring out the childishness and everybody man. First of all are really hear people complain about this. Ain't my is not my barbera. This is not. this is not my buddhist yogi. This is not my captain caveman. Y'all still doing that on the on the phrase they're going to bring doing that cal arts style where everything looks like. Steven universe is the new latest thing. They did it. Shit thunder cast. Now you're doing it to handle by. Baer i'll look at it and if it's funny i'll judge it on that i will will but i i would. I would like to see a different kind of art style. Kind of get famous now. You know i kinda get popular gear are not even give something new something that will get popular besides what we see. You know the current trend right now. I was trying to see if this guy went to know. Okay you want us. Something really weird. This is going to blow your mind a little bit. This is c. h. green blat. He chowder and on his wikipedia. Page under early life. You are there for some reason. Yes yes why. Why are you there stumbled on this. What's going on. This is fucking horrify. it says here. It's like he was classmates with future film critic corey depending on. What the yeah. Yes that is true Yeah he he went to you. Went to university of texas and I was. I was the the head of the graphics department at the school newspaper there and he came in to do cartooning in. He was my graphic assistant for a while and he also was a cartoonist. He did something called a little jesus. So yeah carl carl. Green pled not feel bad. Because is i haven't seen in years. I used to go to his dorm and watch tv and he actually came to the house one time. Hang out and we hung out a few times yet. carla's car. carl is at the time. I don't know what he's like today. But at the time couldn't ask for a nicer person in carl man car and he was funny. He was hilarious. Maybe we can get ourselves. Dt interview. i would love to to hear that. Especially because he's said cal arts and i agree with you. I think there's something about like the last ten years steven universe adventure time regular show. They all look different but they all the same a little bit and somebody said that i was very curious and it says here for some reason university of texas austin and then corey coleman right underneath it. Yeah no when. I saw that he did chowder. I saw green because green. Is you know i mean. I'm sure that's a regular name. But i was like only no one green black. I wonder if that is him. And i looked him up and it was like. Oh that's karl man. Yeah carl's been yet carl. I always knew carl was going to do great things man. Carl is extremely talented guy man. At the time he was so he was amazing he he drew with a sharpie and he would like everybody else drew these him and i have something in common. I drew with a ballpoint pin. That was very frowned upon by the artist out that That i worked with. He drew a sharpie and he was amazingly skilled with that man. I you know what the the funny thing is that i've gone to. I've been around and gone to school and at known some. My life is crazy. I've grown up our come up around people who have gone on to be extremely famous man. i mean if you want me to me i'm not donald say these things but i don't wanna i don't wanna make it seem like it's like i'm bragging are name-dropping link later your like your neighbor growing up like what name are you about to drop. That's my question. I've hung out with richard linklater a couple of times You know not not buddies. Not friends. And i will will say this i look. I don't bother people. I even saw richard linklater one time at a bar. And i know he saw me. He turned around. Like i was gonna talk to them. And i was like i wanted to say fucking too but i mean he's not mean anything. It's a real cool guy. But like i did. I shared a room with robert. Rodriguez cartooning there's a. What was his name Chris ware chris wears is a very popular cartoonist. i cartoon would him down at the daily texan. Alex jones your tongue out with alex jones. A couple of times in heat. I saw him every week for like years before we started our show. I've been around crazy fat talented crazy famous people. So you know it's weird. It's weird but is this. this is happened. I guess. I'm saying this is very interesting middle part of this de diagram of your hanna-barbera love and knowing this guy. So yeah. I always told you my in your interviews are like my favorite thing to watch because we get to see you gig out in real time about some stuff and make that happen. I don't know who you have to who you have to call to make it happen. Let's get that interview going man. Yeah man i would I would love to i. Should i mean. I remember me. I remember him. Because i was down to but a very memorable. I think you're selling yourself short. Sir you know what i would say that but speaking of the school newspaper my wife and i we got invited to go to the this opening some studio here in town and small studio production studio people have anybody can go in the space to create stuff but we went there. And when i was there i looked at my wife said because some guy came and i know that guy i said i'll hung out with that guy. We went out to dinner together. Sometimes parties of his. I cartoon for you know years at the school newspaper. He was there. His name is scott. And i forgot guys last name but anyway i said i know that guy and and i didn't know he wasn't star steering animals like scott. What's going on he's like. Do i know you like. Maybe things like yeah. Korea daily texan Did the cartoon for years there under you at one time like man. I'm not gonna lie to you. I don't know you like all right but we did talk and he came. He stood in nomi. But he's like all right. You're not lying. You're not some stranger that's crazy you go to school with me We might have lunch one day. We traded numbers and whatnot. So i'm not that fucking memorable to everybody again. I think that Especially if you did you said he was your graphics designer for a minute yeah. He was like a graphics assistant and then he was just. He came into cartooning for a long time right. I mean come on. That's a shared interest and nothing else. I'd nothing were at at worst. You're going to be able to talk about some cool animation stuff with someone who doesn't remember you at best it's going to be like a reunion thing for a second. I will get him on i. Will you know what that's a good now that he's got hit now. That has jelly stone coming up. It'll be would definitely will get a mom because now you'll want to promote this. Hbo will want to promote it. So i have no doubt that he'll come on man. I guess i'm just who what what wikipedia godwin and edited. This is my thing is. I'm just my mind's blown because i went to go see where this person went to school and your name is there and i don't know like you did this if you're secretly know who did this corey. I did not do that. I will tell you that right now. I didn't even know my name was in there so like all right. I'm going to send this to you as soon as we're done all right go on is it does it. Yeah man. we'll see we'll bring them on. Yeah you know what i'd like. I feel like. I have six degrees of separation like kevin bacon but not as wide as kevin bacon. But is this craziness. Yeah anyway anyway. Like i've been..

robert alex jones Alex jones carla richard linklater carl Carl Chris ware scott corey coleman six degrees Rodriguez carl carl kevin bacon university of texas austin today First one day texas chris
"chris ware" Discussed on I Read Comic Book

I Read Comic Book

04:12 min | 6 months ago

"chris ware" Discussed on I Read Comic Book

"Book says haled's on the best of the year so it was on my to relist on my radar for a while. I finally found a copy at the local library so decided to finally check it out. This is a comic that i enjoyed as a sort of formalistic experience. I enjoyed the the not at all this structure but as as a story in might be one of the mo mo most morose depressing comics. I've ever read. Oh so i very hesitant to recommend it. But i think in terms of formal structure and storytelling his actually really really interesting. It just as the story again is incredibly sort of grim at times so again the titular character. Sabrina is a woman who Disappears basically is presumed kidnapped and the rest of the book is basically how that affects the people in her life and is sort of follows. The main character you follow through most of the book is sabrina. 's boyfriend's friend from high school who is leading serena's boyfriend. Stay with him while they figure everything out. Try to find where she is. And the book sort of follows. His character in it follows the way that sabrina disappearance becomes distorted by the media in the internet. So the book is haram. Meditation on how the media in internet culture transforms things and being very vague here. But basically sabrina disappearance becomes part of a massive conspiracy theory and the people in her life. Start getting strange messages and threats because people baden's his conspiracy theory about her disappearance so it's a very topical book. Seen within this past counter year the real life affects that conspiracy theories can have in the real devastating effects. They can have so in. That regard is almost too close to the surface in reading it in the year. Twenty twenty one which made it kinda tough to get through. But i think drew nozzles artwork is enough to kind of make it an enjoyable Quote unquote enjoyable experience using. It really reminds me of chris. Ware read any of. Chris wears books. The art is so simple and formalistic structure and yet there's a sort of a depressing depressing aspects to the story. A lot of chris wears work strikes me that same way into knossos. Our work is so simple. The line work is almost the simplest cartoon work you've seen in. It's all just you know. Simple panel layouts grid work and yet you're sort of mesmerized by the simplicity of that make sense. There's more complex than appears on the surface and he does a thing. Where every every character has that sort of vague. mona lisa. smile where you can't tell if they're actually smiling or frowning. Their emotions are so clouded by the artwork that it's really difficult to get a sense of what they're feeling and i think that kind of adds to the oddly engaging in grossing aspect of the book despite it being incredibly depressing so i don't know if i'd recommend it i don't do a good job selling it but i think it's something if you want to see a very distinct unique voice in comics. This is a good example. Just a be forewarned that it's kinda will leave you gutted by the end of the story emotionally okay. So it's not x-ray robot part two. Gotcha exactly yeah. Isn't it interesting book. I'm glad i read it but again it's not one that i would would enthusiastically recommend especially if someone who's sort of prone to that sort of nine engaging with pressing betrayal that way so i'm speaking of depressing comics also read justice league last friday number. One this is a miniseries. Written by chips is dr ski. An art with art. By miguel mendoza. This was originally announced to be digital first series. That dc was going to do. And i guess they ended up just publishing it physically instead so grabbed the first issue..

miguel mendoza Chris sabrina chris Sabrina first series first issue dr ski mona lisa last friday justice league serena One chips character one Twenty twenty one part two
"chris ware" Discussed on NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

07:46 min | 8 months ago

"chris ware" Discussed on NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

"The more more big funding on the way. Yeah so. I think it was just last week that we were talking about the biotech sector and the fact that it is very volatile you know we have companies that come in for sometimes a brief time sometimes for longer and then they shut down as we discussed last week. Novartis is shutting down. Its longmont operation when four hundred people out of work. That was a civility that has now had a multiple users over the years from amgen to astra zeneca to a vectis slash Novartis and now it will have at some point another one but there is a lot of activity there. there are billions of dollars literally that are coming into the market For the biotech sector and in the latest one. We have a company out of boulder called in scripture which makes a gene editing platform. And they have just raised a hundred and fifty million dollars. This is serious and their Funding round That is Bringing their total venture capital investment that they raised over the years to four hundred and ten million dollars since the company was founded in twenty fifteen. So this was actually the largest funding round that they had and it comes on the heels of a mother very significant ones Edgewise therapeutics in boulder Just went public and raised two hundred two million dollars and then we talk last week. Also about some illogic now being valued as a unicorn and they're going to be adding a going public through a spec merger and That will bring them about six hundred fifty one million in net net proceeds so You know i was looking back at a couple of the some of the large deals that have occurred over the last year or two and pfizer in twenty nineteen bought a bio pharma in boulder for ten point. Six billion dollars more than ten point. Six billion dollars Last year accompanying boulder archer. Dax soul to in vita for three hundred twenty five million dollars so It volatile industry but Right now Other than the you know the random closures like novartis in longmont There there's a lot of activity a lot of jobs coming in a lot of investment coming into the biotech market and You know there's others. We've got a full collins company. That has is going public soon and has a a treatment For cova that is in Phase two trials. That's a company called cider calm in boulders era. I'm sorry in fort collins that will soon be public as well Through a merger so A space that is a very very important for the colorado economy and for You know the boulder valley in northern colorado economy. chris. I'm sitting here wonder and look. Why are we not in the biotech industry ourselves. That's kind of what i'm on and i know why i'm not. I'm not smart enough but could you maybe let me be a janitor at one of your biotech. I was going to pay for myself. Not for you take but for myself and it all has to do with brain cell. No trust me. It's a safe bet saying. That's my issues will. Chris would editor and publisher business magazine. Let's jump in here talking more about these big deals. It's encouraging to see it in some ways because it seems like you know the economy starting to become active again we had we had a stagnant period. But it seems like things are starting to pick back up Some big deals in boulder ball aerospace. And other big deal. Yes so this is This is the one we. We've been talking about their desire to expand their boulder campus. You know ball corporation. Their parent is based now. It wasn't in broomfield now based in westminster ball corporation Including the aerospace division employs more than five thousand people in boulder broomfield and westminster so very significant but ball aerospace as as we've talked about a couple of times has proposal to expand their older campus on east arapahoe and one of the key components is that they need an exemption to boulders height limitation so right now in boulder the maximum you can build is fifty five feet But that is only in select areas and the boulder city council. Older planning board is Going to look at I'm sorry the boulder city council tonight is going to look at whether to allow the fifty five foot fifty five foot Building to occur on the ball campus so that they could build what they want to build their They can't go over fifty five but just don't allow them to go up to sixty five feet and they're also looking at another one Kind of stagnant retail project in boulder is the diagnosis plaza which actually has many many different owners but the city council and is going to look at allowing Construction up to fifty five feet on one part of that That project which would bring housing into a What is now a retail project. So they'll be looking at these two these two areas to determine whether they want to allow a higher Height construction On the diagonal plows And with a ball aerospace so We'll know we'll know late tonight. Probably very late tonight whether the city council is going to Support both of those two projects will indeed think to. This could be something. That kind of sets a little bit of a precedent chris. Ware okay the they get it done now. Anybody who wants to go forward. i mean. obviously they're gonna have to go through the same steps but at least this would be a stepping stone to say. Hey they did it. Well I would. If i had to guess i would say city. Council is going to be a of. It is very controversial in boulder to build paul number one. And however i think there's a lot of support for Working with all aerospace In boulder to keep them as a major employer at the same time. There is support. I think on among city council members for For the diagonal plaza redevelopment and this is just a small piece of it. I the last i looked was. It's been a while now. But i think there may be up to fifteen or eighteen owners of different parcels on what's considered diagnosed plaza So i don't think that this would be leading to a wave of of exemptions or expansion of of of that cryer hike capability i. I don't think that will happen in boulder. I think these would Isolated cases that The city council made support. We'll see we'll see tonight. chris. Chris would editor publisher biz west. Appreciate appreciate your time as always my friend and we're running short on time but we'll catch up with the next week. Okay all right good. Thanks have that's chris. Would we really are running short attempt to. Let's take a break. No now presented by the jeanine nine agencies.

Chris fifty five foot Six billion dollars fifty five feet last week chris two hundred two million dollar next week Novartis two projects ten point boulder valley Last year four hundred and ten million d both tonight more than five thousand people a hundred and fifty million do twenty fifteen four hundred people
"chris ware" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:12 min | 11 months ago

"chris ware" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Pricing participation may very cannot be combined with any other offer a combo meal. But up up up to my former colleague at the Chicago Tribune, Rob Elder. Has gone on to bigger and better things, among them Hemingway in comics, which we've been talking about, in which you should, by one of the most from one of the most haunting images in the book is that illustration. Done for a Italian magazine in the wake of him and was death on July 2nd 1961 where you're writing the caption. This meaning may have been done when Hemingway's death was still being reported as an accident. This drawing wants me just haunts me. You tell. Yeah. Yeah, and had done And I own this. By the way, I bought this off of an art auction like Italy. Lucky Wow. It Zaha tingly, beautiful piece because it is not character. It's it's water culture, So it's you know, Hemingway. You know, looking confused and there's a gun going off. The shot is going above his hand, right, right, right. And so that's why it's sort of, um, hunting on and you know Hemingway's suicide. Is a huge part in comics. You know, I one of the things I actually missed. Andre for comic opinions out there, they'll know there's there's a famous Spider Man story called the Last Craven's last night when one of his most famous villain kills himself at the end. And I had asked a guy who I whose whose work I just adore jam Dema T. If he is the author of Presents last time, too, blurred the book and he said, Yeah, I love you, by the way Did you know Hemingway's suicide really informed that famous story that I did, and I felt so dumb because it's so obvious. Wow. But nothing that was also searchable. So Anyways, influence, you know, characters and storylines that haven't even you know, surfaces. I'm sure there's room for one more book about this, but it's really, you know, an amazing sort of Silvio's one. Another beautiful piece of art is illustration by Argentinean artist record or her any at the back of the book that would just on Obviously commission specifically for this book this This must have in some ways Rob Elder, Given you a Kind of greater appreciation for Hemingway. No matter what, your feelings, and you have your certain feelings about him and with the writer and about him and with a man, But this kind of larger than life and durability is really striking to me. Yes, it is. It is, but it's also something that you know he's a state can't control like that's the other thing. Yeah, fun out not only into parody, but Into all sorts of really interesting places that I don't think anybody you know, ever thought. There's this. There's this amazing book called the Life after and It's It's two comic book series done in the In the last Few years here and actually, um, area artist who goes by the name Gamboa, The HBO Gabrielle Batista illustrated a lot of this. And in this story, Hemingway is sort of the sidekick character. You know, He's the guide to purgatory, and it sort of helps lead this revolution in the afterlife. That's not that's not the only time he's a psychic, You know, he He hooks up with Wolverine during the Spanish civil war. In the Damn right crusader. He is sort of the bodyguard of the samurai s O, You know, it's really interesting the way that people use his legend to enhance their story. But it's also you know, three things. Very impressed by in the book is the The wide variety of styles the way in which only Bogardus used their pen and their words. It is just I'm not, You know, I suppose I should've bought the first Superman comic when it came up, but I did not rob and so, so I'm just Broca's ever. But it's an astonishing of art gallery the book represents Do not You think? Yeah, I mean, and we tried to mix up. You know some historical reference, but does but also you know, my my neighbor here in a park, Chris Ware, whose was one of the great Yeah, widely known for his New Yorker covers. Was sort of just poking around, and I sort of asked if I could help. Make sure to draw him anyway. He says. Oh, yeah, he actually shows up in this special edition. Close, right did And he's five years older playing football, you know? Yeah, yeah. Really interesting stuff. What are you done with him and wait now? Do you think we're a builder? Well, you know, I thought I WASI on a friend of mine. We actually pitched the book about of debunking Hemingway myth because there's some of the Internet miss out there. Um, I'm not. Yeah, but I'm not sure that the audience is wide enough. So you know, I've since moved on my my next book out later this year is about Elvis Presley and His Christmas used music and Christmas traditions. So I'm not done writing about, you know, Big live. I'm gonna in many ways. I'm now not you mentioned Elvis. I'm surprised he hasn't become something of a comic book figure. As is he has he. You know he does. And he does show up. But the Elvis Presley estate, I hear, uh, protective of his image. And so you know, you know, I have a friend who puts who Wanted to put Maryland Monroe in one of his comics, and, you know, he got waved off by. You know, the DC comics people that the legal department just because her image is sold in Elvis's image, it is sold. So, you know, I think they're still all sorts of very use and parody, um, protecting for that really used, But people don't often exercise it. So I'm trying to think I do think Ellis shows up in Todd McFarlane spawn, I'm sure also because of that, because of that very reason. You're not gonna find Michael Jordan in many comic books over the years..

Hemingway Rob Elder Chicago Tribune Elvis Presley estate DC comics Elvis Presley Elvis Maryland Italy Chris Ware Dema T. writer Silvio Andre Michael Jordan Bogardus Craven football
"chris ware" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

18:30 min | 1 year ago

"chris ware" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Can be sync up automatically is just amazing. And if you can't listen, don't sweat it, you don't have to rush. You can keep your credits for up to a year and use them for instance to binge on a whole series. If you like audible offers, just about everything podcasts guided wellness programs. Performances a comedy and audible originals you won't find anywhere else and right now audible is offering you guys that's Tim Ferriss show listeners a free audiobook with a thirty day trial membership and Again, Melissa check him out the Tau of Seneca the Graveyard Book essentially those are just three. There's so many good ones out there just go to audible dot com slash him and browse the unmatched selection of audio programs. Then you're free title and start listening it's that easy. It's check it out. Go to audible dot com slash tim or text Tim Tiem to five hundred, five, hundred to get started today. Check it out audible dot com slash Tim. Hello Boys and girls, ladies and Germs Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another upset of the Tim Ferriss show where it is usually my job to sit down with world class performers of all different types, startup founders, investors, chess champions, Olympic athletes you name it to tease out the habits that you can apply in your own lives. This episode however is an experiment and part of short form series that I'm doing simply called books I've loved I've invited some amazing pass guests close. Friends and new faces to share their favorite books describe their favorite books, the books that have influenced them, change them, transform them for the better and I hope you pick up one or two new mentors in the form of books from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life. I had a lot of fun putting this together inviting these people to participate and have learned. So so much myself I hope that is also the case for you please enjoy. My name is Debbie Millman Hamid designer, the author of six books the editorial director of Print magazine the chair of the masters in branding program at the School of Visual Arts in New York City and host of one of the world's longest running podcasts design matters. When I was a kid, there were lots of rules in my house. One of the most horrific for me at the time was the very limited amount of television. I was allowed to watch as a result I read and I read a lot. I. Read Books, magazines, newspapers, encyclopedias and comic books even borrowed my mother's Redbook and Ladies Home Journal and snuck into my father's library to read the Steamy Sections of the Godfather when I was sure that no, one would catch me. My fascination with books began as soon as I could read and golden books were my favorite. As soon as I got into grade school I was introduced to the weekly reader and there was nothing nothing I look forward to more than the moment every week when Mrs Mayor handed out those gorgeous publications by Third Grade I was introduced to the Scholastic Book Club and while. My folks were stingy with television privileges. They were quite generous with my book allowance I ordered as many books as I could afford and when the boxes came in with my name on them, I spent a moment gingerly fingering the corrugated brown carton. It's it for a minute or two imagine what was inside with the books would be like and of course, how they would look. I've been in love with books ever since in university I majored in English literature and minored in Russian literature, and though I often joke now that I got a college degree in reading, I really have no regrets books have sustained. Me Nourished me provided solace and lonely times, and in one case inspired me to fall in love and subsequently changed my life. The books on my list are some of the books that have inspired and moved me over the course of my life. These books as Marcel Proust's famous description of the madeline ultimately reached clear surface of. My consciousness this memory this old dead moment which the magnetism of an identical moment has traveled so far to importuner to disturb to raise up out of the depths of my being but went from a long distant past nothing subsists after people are dead after the things were broken and scattered taste and smell alone more fragile but more enduring more unsubstantial more persistent more faithful remained poised a long time like souls remembering waiting hoping amid the ruins of all the rest and bear unflinchingly in the tiny and almost impalpable drop of their essence the vast structure of recollection. The following books are of my favorite and are told in the order of my discovering them. The Little Golden Book of words written by Selma Lola Chambers has been out of print for a long longtime originally published in nineteen forty eight. It includes gorgeous illustrations by Gertrude Elliott, and it is one of the first books I ever remember reading. When I was trying to find the book, again is an adult I couldn't remember the title I recalled it had little scraps of paper on the cover and featured different illustrations of pets and fruit somehow I remember it a carrot I thought the book was about art as the main image I had in my head was simply poignantly rendered color wheels before long before Ebay I searched for the book in New, York City flea markets, and finally I found it but discovered it wasn't a book about art ironically enough it's titled Words but the Color Wheel was still there the entire book magical imperfect in college I, read the. Life and opinions of Tristram Shandy gentleman by Laurence. Sterne. was first published in seventeen, fifty nine stern incorporated other texts from other books Robert Burton's the Anatomy of Melancholy Francis Bacon of death and many more into Tristram Shandy. The book also references, John Locks, theories of empiricism. The way we organize what we know about ourselves be the power of association of our ideas and employs visual techniques never ever seen before in any book. Prior the book is remarkable in that it precedes modernism postmodernism and conceptual art by utilizing these techniques, blank chapters, black chapters, white pages, playful type and doodles, and it was all done in seventeen, fifty nine. The life and opinions of Tristram Shandy gentleman is now seen as a forerunner of the use of stream of consciousness and self reflexive writing it is mind blowing in its entirety and one of the most inventive original books ever written. A book that I keep going back to over and over and is one that I included my interview with Tim Ferriss in his book tribe of mentors is the anthology, the voice that is great within us American poetry of the Twentieth Century, Gorgeous Lee, thoughtfully and carefully edited by Hayden. Caruth it was required reading in the Summer College Class I attended back in the early nineteen eighties. This funny looking book introduced me my most treasure deeply felt poem maximised himself by Charles Olson, which has since become the blueprint of my life, as well as the poetry of Denise, Levert of Adrienne, rich as re pound while Stevens, and so many more I still have my original copy. In though the covers come off and the spiders numerous places, I will never replace it. I, I read love the time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez in the late nineteen eighties. The book takes place in an unnamed port city in the Caribbean and remains unnamed throughout the novel headstrong for me Daza as the female lead in the story, and after a brief love affair through letters with Florentino Ariza she ultimately rejects him in Mary's you've Anelle or beano love sick and forlorn aretha is obsessed and tormented by his love for from Meena Daza. It's no use. He tells his uncle at the beginning of the novel. Love is the only thing that interests me and love was. Though Our Reza believes that from Daza is his soul mate and vows to remain faithful to her. He proceeds to engage in six hundred and sixty two affairs over the next fifty years. He does this while sincerely believing that his his saving his heart and his virginity for her. When for Menas, finally dies Ariza immediately returns to her and she slowly realizes they cheese loved him her whole life all along. They embark on a voyage to sail the Magdalena. River and in an attempt to keep other passengers from boarding the boat, the captain raises the yellow flag of cholera. He asks reason for how long they could possibly keep coming and going in this manner. Forever is his one word reply. Levin. The time of color is perhaps the most perfect book Everen. Perverse optimist by Tibor Kelman and edited by Michael Beirut and Peter. Hall truly influenced how I practice the discipline of design. Tibor Kelman was one of the most influential designers of the twentieth century. He founded the design firm M and company named for his wife Myra Kelman and produced groundbreaking work for the talking heads restaurant floor. On the limited an interview magazine. He also had a keen eye for great talent and higher. The designers including Stefan Sad meisters Stephen Doyle Emily Obermann Alexander is Lee Scott, stolen Alexander Brebner who all went on to create their own firms or have joined other firms and have had great great success. Perverse optimist first published one year after keyboards death in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine features, anecdotes, and commentary from Kelman's clients his staff, his peers and his friends is an incredible book about an incredible designer thinker and bad boy provocateur. My next book is General Theory of Love Thomas Lewis Fiery Amini and Richard Landon? We are now surrounded by a world of activity that can't be seen. The patterns produced by the splash of raindrop happened too fast for is to catch. Is it possible? We could direct our brains to see more the authors of a general theory of love written in two thousand one right this. The scientists and artist boasts speak to the turmoil that comes from having triune brain. A person cannot direct his emotional life. In the way he bids his motor system to retry cup. He cannot will himself to want the right thing or to love the right person were to be happy after disappointment or even to be happy and happy times people lack this capacity not through a deficiency of discipline. But because of the jurisdiction of will is limited to the latest brain and to those functions within its purview emotional life be influenced but it. CanNot be commanded our societies love affair with mechanical devices that respond at a button touched is not preparing to deal with the unruly organic mind that dwells within anything that does not comply must be broken or poorly designed, which has Charles. Olson might say makes for difficulties were neo Cordell brain has the ability to organizing convey logic and reason limbic brain inspires and can involuntarily feel love yet according to Lewis. The verbal rendition of emotional material demands a difficult transmutation poetry a bridge between the NEO critical and limbic brains is simultaneously improbable and powerful. A general theory of love is a book about human love in all its forms and is written in a brilliant poetry inspired narrative. I'm going to be talking about two books now, together pattern recognition by William Gibson and brand gap by Mardi new Meyer. In his novel pattern recognition William, Gibson has one of his characters described branding. In this way all truly viable advertising addresses, the older deeper mind beyond language and logic. You know in your Olympic brain, the seat of instinct, the Mammalian brain deeper wider beyond logic. What we think of as mind is only as sort of jumped up gland piggybacking on the rip Chilean brain stem and the older mammalian mind but it is our culture that tricks us into recognizing it as all of consciousness the Mammalian spreads continent wide beneath it mute and muscular attending. It's ancient agenda and it makes us by things. That we do buy things to help us fit in and feel more comfortable and being part of a larger tribe. So to speak is no doubt. One of the benefits of branding brands create intimate world's inhabitants can understand and where they can be somebody feel as if they belong I think Mardi numerous dates best when he confides his thoughts about tribes that he belongs to in his book the brand gap, we can belong to the callaway club and we play golf. The Volkswagen tribal we drive to work the Williams Sonoma tribe when we cook. A meal the Nike Club when we work out, he goes on to say as a weekend athlete my to nagging dotes are that I might be congenitally lazy and then I might have little actual ability but I'm not really worried about my shoes when the Nike folks say just do it. They're appearing into my soul I begin to feel that if they understand me that well, their shoes are probably pretty good I men willing to join the tribe of Nike but to see the world in brand tribes is to take position of much more than. Just a theory of the world it is to possess a theory of all the activity in it perhaps an entire science and he thought Gee that tells everything we want to know about human behaviour I. think the way New Meyer describes brands is probably one of the most poetic and forgiving of the place that products now have in our lives. The mammalian part of our brain is indeed the part of the brain makes us want to be part of it tribe and I. do think that we buy brands that make us feel part of. That tribe in order to be able to participate in that tribe. But I think it goes deeper than that we're buying brands and products to be part of a tribe because now in a day and age and culture and world we're living in we are otherwise tribe `less we feel tribe listen disconnected because despite our technological connectedness where emotionally and physically further away from our friends and family than ever before in human history we've now replaced our closeness with people with closeness with brands that at best can only represent that we are close to others. Pattern recognition is a novel written in two thousand and two before facebook and Youtube it launched. But somehow predicted the creation of both the brand gap was written two, thousand and five but it is one of the first books to present a unified theory of brand building. Individually, they're both great books, but together, they provide a unique perspective that the power of brands have in our lives. Building Stories by Chris ware. Chris Whereas Building Stories published in twenty twelve's is so much more than a book. It is fourteen individual experiences full of and we heartbreak joy and elation humans living their lives stacked in a box fourteen interlocking stories of the residents of Chicago apartment building the fourteen pieces and building stories included, Game Board newspaper two hardcover books and various ephemera filled with lonely frustrated people aching for connection. There's the one legged thirty something woman who is also the central character living on. The top floor for restricted with her husband gaining weight and wondering what happened to her James There's a lonely old landlady living on the ground floor couple living in the middle floor with relationship problems and Branford the best be in the world who is truly a thinking be the design is not limited to the story of the presentation of the book. It is central to the narrative bowling stories is remarkable and sets the stage for an entirely new way of storytelling. My last book is the book hunger by Roxane Gay when I first read Roxanne Gay's two thousand Seventeen New York Times bestselling book hunger a memoir of my body I thought I was reading my own diary, her words hit me like few other books have simultaneously seen understood and heard all this from a book lines like I am full of longing and I am full of envy in. So much of my envious terrible pierced my heart mine was two then came this statement I was a gaping wound of need. I couldn't admit this to myself, but there was a pattern of intense emotional masochism of throwing myself into the most dramatic relationships possible of needing to be. A. Victim of some kind over and over and over that was something familiar something I understood man man that I understand that I understood it until after a lot of therapy I didn't understand it anymore, and then in an accurate moment of courage I asked Roxanne to be a guest on my podcast she said, yes then she said no a year later a generous friend put in a good word for me and I took Roxane gay out on a proper date five months later she was finally guest on my podcast and one year later we got engaged sometimes books take you very unexpected places that change your life in every imaginable and unimaginable way. Thanks for listening. To a few more things before you take off number one, this is five foot Friday. Wants to get a short email from the joy getting short email for me every Friday that provides a little morsel of fun before the and fiber. Friday's a very short email share. coolest things I've found I've been pondering over the week that could include favorite new albums that have discovered could include gizmos and gadgets and all sorts of Weird Shit that I've somehow dug up. In the the world of the Esoteric as I do, it could include favorite artists that I've read and that I've shared with my close friends for instance, and it's very short. It's just a little tiny bite of goodness before you head off for the weekend. So if you want to receive that, check it out, just go to four weeks dot com that's four hour week dot com spelled out just drop in your email and you'll get the very next one and if you sign off.

Tim Ferriss Tibor Kelman Charles Olson Roxanne Gay Tristram Shandy Thomas Lewis Fiery Amini Tim Tiem William Gibson Nike Scholastic Book Club Seneca Daza Chris ware Marcel Proust Ladies Home Journal Florentino Ariza Gabriel Garcia Marquez Melissa Caribbean New York City
"chris ware" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"chris ware" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"And my cholesterol down thirty six points so it will improve your health and transform your life that it researched and chosen as the weight loss program of the Dallas Cowboys organization and fans go to SO TA weight loss dot com so we lost dot com soda Chris ware and the cowboys are set with me state of the art school to her state of the art we close stuck at home house maybe feel smaller than you'd like well more space you wonder if it's possible to get a new house right now with Todd yes you can it's Chris krok touch money is continuing to help families who need to find homes or sell homes during this challenging time touch money with the township money home selling team if your circumstances change he'll let you out of the contract free and clear call my agent call talk to money today two one four three one zero zero zero zero eight or go online over under agent dot com over under age and dot com and start packing automotive expert and nationally syndicated talk show host Jerry Reynolds is the last weekend of April with car dealerships open it back up it's a near certainty that the porting center will go down at the forty of fifty five star Ford dealerships on April thirtieth obviously with America coming back there's no need for so here's what you missed almost every new twenty nineteen point twenty four you get zero percent APR for seventy two months even with less than perfect credit it's true in the past only people with the best credit got the no interest deals but now people with credit problems can crop up there's also zero percent APR for eighty four months or no payments for six months or the biggest rebates in five star Ford history don't miss out you've got to April thirtieth to get to five star fourteen Carrollton north Richland hills Lewisville and the only Dallas store George Bush and independents online at Sampath dot com with approved credit through Ford motor credit Dana last year Texas got experience wants you to know that they're open for business as usual I support this local DFW family business that has been operating in the metroplex for more than thirty five years the owners are military vets who are committed to upholding our second amendment rights while encouraging education.

"chris ware" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

14:49 min | 2 years ago

"chris ware" Discussed on Bookworm

"KCRW DOT. com Michael Sulfur. Blunt this bookworm mm-hmm. It's that time again when I have the privilege of talking to one of my favorite writers. I'm talking with Chris ware about his new book. Rusty Brown published by Pantheon. Although what he does is is called a graphic novel. I believe that these three major works of his are the equivalent to the chronological destinies and a faulkner novel. These are about people in time and space ace and locating their spaces and their times and they've got a writer who notices when three people depor sleeping next to one another in a rocket ship illustrating a science fiction story that Theref- I'm masks folks make asymmetry. That makes the reader pure closer. Oh look at that. Look at how. How beautifully designed these masks are? Isn't this funny. It's a brilliant item in a story within in a story. Nothing escapes attention here. There's no I just did it because I had to fill the space in the space is always thrillingly complexly meaningfully filled now. I wonder how do oh you do that. Wow well that's really nice for first of all for you noticing and second of all for Caring and third of all for asking I do it. Because that's the way life is that life is jam packed full of detail and and information in the closer. You look there ever more that there is in the finer you look the more that there be it. The more you get in the more there is to remember the introduction to Rusty Brown is in in the form of a reminder some of the most beautiful pages in Jimmy Corrigan were double page spreads of snowstorms use. Your snow was unforgettable and so two here there are these six pointed stars these these various hexagons each them different from one another and there are millions of them. We never see eaten that we have to trust are also different and this is the way life is the constant array of difference which may be trivial difference who can say the air. The meaning is between one snowflake. I think under different. Yeah I leave. A novus necessarily true that they're all different. I guess I mean you're talking about millions of atoms coming together here but maybe there's two that are the same it will never know. They don't last very long. Needles Toussaint fact it's only until recently did scientists figure out how they actually formed and were able to to make motion pictures of them. Forming in the laboratory actually took that formation method. I guess it's strange to think of it as a method is as my way of kind of writing and structuring this book. Would it be fair to say that. The characters in the book as well as its design nine replicate the implication of the vast nece and incomprehensibility of constantly formed too soon. Yeah definitely yeah. I mean that's what I'm trying to get as to get a sense as much as I can within the limits Mitsubishi Abilities and and to get it down on the page the sense of incomprehensibility of everything. Something extraordinary meets them when they the open. The book Rusty Brown by my guest. Chris ware I wanted to ask you there. Are you're essentially three major families in this book. Who are they There's with the central characters is the is the title character Rusty Brown though. He's not really the main character. He sort of just that piece of Grit in the center of the snowflake around which everybody orbits his father William Brown is a failed science fiction writer or if maybe not failed. He writes one really effective story in the wake of sort of the heartbreak that he experiences after his first sexual relationship in nineteen fifty five and then he goes on to teach English this small parochial school in Omaha Nebraska. Ska where then his son goes of course of your teacher. You can get a discount on your kid's education and then another character named Jordan lantern. Jason Lynch who's a Wealthy kid a teenager in the one part of the story who torments rusty Rusty Brown as a as a little kid Stops him in the hall. SPITS in his glove is mean to him. Calls him names And that particular chapter actually tries to tell tell the entire story of Jordan lint and then another character Joanne. Cole who is Rusty Brown's teacher in Third Grade when Jordan Jordan becomes Jason. Right how does that APP. Why I think it happens to everybody? Doesn't it a certain point. You feel like the name that you were given doesn't quite describe you in the you WanNa assert take control of your not only identity but you're supposed destiny. I guess I mean we all kind of do this one way or another. My own daughter assumed a name that she she preferred to the name that my wife and I settled her with when she was born. My mom did the same thing. I actually took my grandmother's and grandfather's surname surname. When I was sixteen years old where Just as a way of sort of I guess doing that in my own way and and align myself with my the grandfather who was a newspaper editor and reporter and managing editor and my mom who is also a writer and reporter so and in his case case. It's Jason was a very popular name when when I was a kid and I think probably you know when you were kids somewhat so Jordan is not a name necessarily one would wanNA have so. He's trying to trying to set himself off from this sort of stayed Republican upbringing. That he's got but then that comes back definitely to him and kind of takes over as he inherits. This Dad's business well. He's also at that age. He's trying to be a rockstar. That's she thinks he can be a rock star. His proof heartbreaking. Breaking that he can be rock star is that his father has enough money to buy more the new guitars and amplifiers that Jason can twist his arm right into providing him with right so he's in the books class structure. He's one of the rich kids search. Who doesn't examine the sources of his wealth and therefore doesn't understand frequently the kind of pain that he causes around him and that he witnesses Sousse yeah an auto biographical to you know? I definitely grew up Not Wanting and feeling I'm very lucky and feeling loved. I think it's fair to say you know I took me a long time before I realized the circumstances that I was in. We're very lucky and a wanted to try to write about that but also to try to sympathize if that is possible possible with the kids who might not have been the nicest to me when I was growing up since I was not the most loved kids in school and it said in in the architectural shape of school that I attended when I realized as an adult that I'd actually spent more time in that school than I did at home if I ended up all the hours that I was awake in that space it was more than I was at home and I inhabit that space every single night when I sleep yes and and well the difference between my elementary school and my high school they live in me. There are more experiences that happened in elementary school in that building. So you still dream about the space in those spaces uses. I bet even you can feel the space even without the detail and you'll recognize him in your dreams. Although it was difficult and not easy I found my favorite teacher. The teacher who was my fourth and sixth grade teacher. She took us to art museum. uh-huh she didn't like the school library so she took us to the real library where her friend the head librarian. Let us take out a don't books. Shaver life good for her. I had a teacher named Jackie buyers in I think seventh grade and I was supposed supposed to do a class project about out of Africa was supposed to have read it. An came in with a poster board. That was quite clear that I had not. I think I'd just drawn the continent of Africa with a bunch of arrows coming coming out of it and she looked at me and she said you didn't read this book did you. And I said No. And she said okay. And she handed me a copy of Steinbeck's of mice Jason Men and she said read this by tomorrow or you'll get a feeling great so I went home and set myself up at my mom's Desk desk secretary feeling very sorry for myself and thought okay. I'M GONNA choke this down. I'm GONNA do this. I can do this and up until this point. I had read almost exclusively comics and science fiction and I started reading that book and at a certain point I felt this feeling. Come over me that. I'd never felt before that I was inhabiting this book. And these people away in sympathetically that overcame and by the end of the book I did never cried at a book before but I was at that point and it was that moment that I realized that a book could get so deeply inside of you in a way unlike any any other experience that I had and I know at that teacher changed my life because of that. I'm talking to Chris Ware about his wonderful new book. Rusty Brown you see you've populated the spoke with what others might think of as unlovable people and and you find in them. Some also finding stains the aspects of them deeply embedded that are movable. I'll tell you because I was teased kid too. So I you know share this quality most of us do those guys who is so awful. He Make Fun of my name. He'd make fun of my walk. He'd make fun of anything. He could anything. I didn't get beat up but I did get as humiliated. It'd it's possible to be and I even met a person who was in the junior high years later. WHO said to me? You're lucky to be alive. I would have assumed you would've had to kill yourself on our so constantly. Sounds like getting beat up to me. That's sort of emotional thing but you have to like. Why was he doing that? Why every day did he feel that he had to come in? And do that. And I'm sure you did the same thing I did. which was you probably tried? Tried to be nice to him. Because you thought okay. We'll maybe I'm not being nice enough for. What am I not doing that? He wants me to do still years and years later I ran into two girls who were in my class and I mentioned his name and they say oh he was off. Oh he was the worst person I ever met. He was so frightened and I realized he treated every I thought I was being singled out. Wow I lost my individuality one day to learn that this grief had been extended to a whole class of people people and what I find in this book. What's moving to me is that it takes view the reader to all kinds of painful moments each of the characters have them the man who can still smell his girlfriend's perfume? Although she's gone she even gives him a a hundred and twenty five dollars to go away and he uses it to buy comic books which helped him escape her. And each each of these people three different families have a moment of sorrow so beautifully soul ecstatically rendered that the book becomes unforgettable. That if we are and I don't consider it to be a comic your pardon. Pardon me I consider it to be a life. Chronicle and that these characters are orbiting one another in an experiential you'll way where their desperation sadnesses rhyme with one another until the rhyme becomes so inevitable and so beautiful that it's like a song of life the most careful reader there is. I really think fast I say I mean that's what I've been aiming for with the with the story and they're really pretty minor. I mean there's really not necessarily a lot of pain and sadness in it but there's a to me it feels like that's life you know those those moments are in inside all of us..

Rusty Brown Chris ware Jason writer Jordan Jordan Michael Sulfur faulkner Africa Nebraska William Brown Jordan lantern Mitsubishi Abilities Jason Lynch Needles Toussaint Joanne Jimmy Corrigan Sousse head librarian Shaver Jackie
"chris ware" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"chris ware" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Correct and that was out of her brother again saying whether or I know that was actually Flacco humana's doing the harmony vocals weather and of of rehearsal for lack of a set of several songs today yes I'm still living yes Sluggo still I I think he semi retired because of his thumb really hurts in many places because you have to anchor that when when you're playing the accordion and he uses a little strap still on the bottom which puts a lot of pressure on your phone when your player and with all the years that he's been playing it seem to be bothered him a little bit but he's he's still a pretty active my brother runs into him down in San Antonio once in awhile he likes to hang around some some places that they both frequent they were Dwight Yoakum so I think you said something about this before the music started yeah I was a a warns eve on some got a million to and then we started out with the mingle doing rather there for a while I told you earlier in the day that we're going to do a Johnny Cash song and use it no I don't see it here but now that to I always I always like mean goes playing in that and it was one of those things that's all this is a nice turn of events on on country music but you're good at the con who want the style Chris there of the Wisconsin Historical Society has a little book on you designed for for children because everybody could pro can profit from Bobbi I think he has some do it get not organized well I did the case that I was doing a badger biography series and death one of our good friends Kathy Gilbert's daughter in law well not really daughter in law but fictive daughter in law my a certain of was doing her do this dissertation work on a Latino the specially in us Texas Texas Texas Mexican immigration to Wisconsin for Mike with Mike migration and I said you know I talked to Chris plaster about this because that I used to in our in the textbook for fourth grade of Wisconsin our state our story win in the chapter on migration and immigration I use Chris's story because I knew it plus Chris is a friend and it's a great story so in this is bilingual and it's and yell and my at my it interviewed a Chris ware dissertation and I said she said that was a wonderful resource thank U. S. at how bad a book on and she wrote it where she was writing her dissertation and it is wonderful and the only book the Historical Society has ever published its bilingual we have this the textbook is there's a Spanish language version but this is interspersed paragraphs and it's a beautiful story and in my mind about Chris is pretty proud of well I I the reason I like this because intact re reading it well it's a hooded is said who is the comedian line enough about you what about and now he she did a fantastic job and I actually learned quite a bit about the history of the immigration process of when they brought up V. blast settles which meant arm in arm they brought the workers during World War two from Mexico and have them here legally and they they were there to harvesting and and tending to cattle here while there was a shortage of workers and this program lasted up until like the mid nineteen sixties before was abolished and the soul Amaya filled in a lot of the questions that I had as far as well when the program started and how was it initiated and what went on to make this program work so I found it quite quite to educational so I'm I'm very proud of the fact that and thankful also to Bobby for and mentioning me and having maybe part of the process that went into this as great book and then and the nice thing about it is it's it's for young readers in school so what better way to learn about another culture than when you're a kid we have a young reader in the studio with yes all right well but he's one of Acker had so that this book tells the story sort of up to now what if it's five years old now yeah but that we we hope that you have a much longer history that you're around for a long time well at but your voice is still good for for a tour of yeah thank you well actually I've heard of some of the early recordings that I did I got for that voice sounds like real nice and young and there's no there's no fray on the outside of it and kinda like the voices when they for a lead and the range was much higher than it is what we're really pleased that Chris is with us today it's gosh Chris potter of course he's the host and the U. chose the music and he's providing the commentary that I learned a lot today well how long a retainer well with all information yeah your memories good but it's hard right yeah so I do have a line up next we have a a duet by receita federal non this and who was known as the Senate Tony as First Lady of song and then that was the name given to her by lady bird Johnson and her effortlessly unloading singing an exceptional vocal tone mater star and local radio in in the early thirties and over the years her talent broader and she was even an actress and was featured ends a lot of films her more of a prominent role was she was and John Wayne's the Alamo but the reason that by I love a love seat that was because her voice reminded me a lot of my mother's voice singing voice so I remember my mother singing the in the mornings what she was cooking his breakfast and getting us ready to go to school and on Sundays singing so that's why this do it holds a very special place in my heart and and it's the song is called Esperando which means I'm waiting and it's a the song was written by Raphael they left us and it's a receita feminism the vocal and Laura Laura kind to the other singer and it's the battle via orchestra that's a a providing the a musical background and then the the second selection that we're gonna hear is by Linda squad Linda's got a strange history to her not strange it's a but in nineteen sixty four at the age of six she got a recording contract and by the age of eight she had a a mega hit with a song called for the holy those pimples and it became set it's called the little beings yeah go over here and there yeah yeah yeah and what not at that age but she came back and read it but that was her hit and it sold well over two hundred fifty thousand records and of course that probably nobody's ever heard it around here they will they will not but legally those being those are some of bill favorite may I know he's a he's like anti he likes those beans but it's since she had that big hit she got to be on like hello all these big room tours that featured the host several Jimenez salute to lose so he an overlap of those any travel from a California to Chicago and she says it was an experience of a lifetime tearing with so many big acts that and having the public accept her as being an equal to these big stars and it's one of my favorite S. songs for the holy this being those it will start with Rosita and Laura S. spit on Rundle.

Flacco humana Sluggo five years
Lynda Barry and Chris Ware: Making Comics and Rusty Brown

Bookworm

07:32 min | 2 years ago

Lynda Barry and Chris Ware: Making Comics and Rusty Brown

"Some thirty years ago. Art Spiegelman was led to agree that if we could take frequent breaks he would come into the studio even though he has to smoke back then. It's around thirty years ago. Art I smoked two will go on breaks together. Either he said okay. We did a show and we became immediate friends and one by one he introduced me to Chris. Wears work to Dan Klose's work. I think you Chris Dan Clouds and chip kidd a book designer. Were on the show together now. Finally after thirty years of being toned than I would would love Linda Barry that she's inspiring that she's improvisational explosive. I Have Lynda Barry here for her book making comics. And I'm curious about how you own wall because Matt graining. The inventor of the simpsons is a part of this and the Canadian artist named Seth Is. Did you all get together. Well I I met Chris. I remember you being a key in my mind. You're a kid and it was when mouse to the second book had come out and art called me on the phone. He was in town to sign books and he said I want you to meet this kid. He called you a kid. I want you to meet this kid. He said he can draw anything. And I said okay he goes. No I actually mean he can draw anything and I remember being in this Restaurant restaurant or a cafe and that you didn't talk very much and you just sort of leaned back and looked terrified but I remember I likes Hugh immediately and I didn't know your work and I didn't know what you did but I just remember liking you immediately so my relationship with you. Chris is a procedure. Cj Work or even precedes me. Even knowing your work I just remember you as very young sort of timid White boy why I knew you before I knew your work too because I remember seeing you on the David Letterman. Show shell when I was in high school and you were the funniest guest that he'd had and I thought who is this person because your work didn't appear in Omaha World World Herald or any of the Omaha papers at all but you were a personality that was clearly one to be contended with and you you clearly cannot flipped out the host of the show. I don't think he knew what I did. Honest held a gun to his head and just said why does she do uh-huh and there'd be on the other side of the wall because he wouldn't have known well then when I finally met you with partly you're talking about when I was in Chicago a you're the funniest person in impersonate ever remember me. Just laughing. At everything he said was true. I just sat there and giggled. Linda's work when I got to know it I I was not only surprised. Funny it was but it was maybe in the mid eighties or so and in the late eighties where you started really do serious storytelling retelling in your strips in completely knocked me over. I couldn't believe the stuff that she was getting at in her stories and strips and how deeply deeply felt it was. I was sure that it was all autobiography. Because if it was drawn with such conviction and even to say those words drawn with conviction didn't really apply to comics at that point and I was shocked to find out when I think I read an interview in the Comics Journal with you that it was fiction. Shen that you were writing and eight started stealing from you immediately because you had something that I so desperately wanted which was to be able to write something that felt real and felt like it was emotionally grounded and came from a point that was human which at that point in comics was almost unheard unheard of and I kind of from studying your stuff and trying to write stories about my own life. I found myself kind of channeling. Your Voice but through channel in your voice finding my own voice. You know who was who was a big influence for me was John. Wilson was nuts. That's your series. He he did nuts because it was in the national. It was the national lampoon but it took a childhood sadness seriously And it really had a big influence on me him and Dr Seuss. Whatever you think nuts you know? Oddly peanuts I never ever bonded or attached to peanuts. I don't know why I think it was too close to the sadness was a little bit too close. I'm you know I'm the Family Circus Lover which everybody but he just yeah? I'm the Family Circus Lover. I loved family circus but Peanuts was too sad for me Well what's warrantless is. Linda's new book is making comics and aside from being a marvelous assignment book. which which will take you from the childhood activity of drawing monsters all the way up to making comic books? I'm a big big fan of her book. One hundred teams in making comics. She says something that amounts to if if you're uncertain about something do it again and again and again and so the first two or three pages of making comics is devoted to different versions of one hundred demons. One hundred demons one hundred demons one hundred the demons and you see altogether. They make a beautiful gallery and a wonderful Kalash and VATS. When I discovered about Linda Barry is that her work is a collage of feeling of vision John of faces of forms of animals of monsters of demons? Tell the story again and again and again and again says Gertrude Stein and you will have told the story. And that's what makes the work. It seems to me so earnest funny but grab you by the scrub of the neck heart. Something I was thinking about how many books I've read for the second third or fourth time and had that experience. It's the same book but I'm seeing something I have never seen before and which can also also have everything to do with three other books read in between and suddenly those three other books put this prism and you can see this new kind of color combination And that's one of the things. I love most about books as kind of how their endless and Chris's book Rusty Brown is one of those ones that you can dwell in forever

Chris Dan Clouds Linda Barry Peanuts Comics Journal Art Spiegelman Lynda Barry Cj Work Dan Klose John Omaha Gertrude Stein David Letterman Dr Seuss Chicago Seth Matt Hugh Wilson Rusty Brown Thirty Years
"chris ware" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

12:08 min | 2 years ago

"chris ware" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Of The New Yorker Chris welcome to one day thank you for having them collided in terrified to be white terrified the I. B. ages the I moved into muse to miss sitting alone at a table and staring out the window and and you're actually part of my work avoidance regimen actually I have the radio on all all day long and listen to your show regularly on. anyway so it's kind of it's mixed what we'll we'll try to make an impact I'm thrilled yes okay good good I will do I will try I promise to make this as painless as possible and I will include as many listener questions as possible especially those of you who are fans of Chris ware's work of graphic novels or you just have questions about the genre so comment on our Facebook page tweet us at one eight or email one a after W. A. M. U. dot org. tell us about rusty brown and the story what's it about. boy I was hoping you were going to ask me that well you already said so you're already terrified and I've asked questions you're hoping I am not off to a good start band this is this is not going well for me there's a reason we cartoonists do what we do which is so we don't have to do this talk about ourselves but it it's as you said it starts out in a day in nineteen seventy five starting with the kids arriving at school and breaks off around lunch time and then kind of splits apart into three different stories about three of the characters involved in the in the previous part of the book so it's it's eat and then it's it's the first half of a book I've been working on for a long time I should in my own pathetic defense say that I've been working on other books as well it did in the graphic novel called building stories about twenty twelve or so so the comics is an incredibly labor intensive and very dense and an economical medium and I'm and so it's it it takes a while I mean my main aim is to try to make a book that says is dense and as rich as bad as as I think real life is but it can you know take some tinkering well let's back up and talk about the art form for a second then I'll come back to rusty brown we heard from a number of our listeners who really love graphic novels I love graphic novels myself here's what Shelley left in our inbox my name is Shelly I'm part of the book club in to a less Utah and one of our members chose the graphic novel my friend Dahmer and we all really enjoyed it I never thought a graphic novel would be anything other than comic book now I'm looking into the graphic novel prequels for this Stephen king's dark tower series and I'm completely enjoying it Shelly thanks for sharing your thoughts with us Chris I think a good just foundational place to start would be how you conceive of a of a graphic novel Shelly said she never thought of it as anything other than a comic book is a graphic novel just a comic book. more pages or is there more to it than that I mean I think that's kind of how it started or how little we cartoonists started and certainly in my generation we grew up reading that stuff but this further I'm concerned I think comics as a medium and as a visual medium I mean a block of said that memory is is is an accumulation of images they if you can conceive of the comic book medium as a combination of not only words and images beau images that are meant to be read a gate and deploys a kind of strange ability that we humans have to read images as well as see them so you have the solution on the pages something actually happening before your eyes when it's actually happening in your mind and memory at the same time then as well I think it's it's it's probably the one visual medium where you can kind of create a sense of the multi layered experience of consciousness where is officially even at this moment where I'm staring at this carpeted wall of the of the month of this recording studio I can visualize of other things at the same time without seeing them as well as remember various parts of my life when I was otherwise similarly uncomfortable so it's there's there's there's a lot going on in the human brain that I think comics can at least try to get a little bit of a of a of a attempted getting down on the page what were some of your early influences were you a fan of comic books growing up or did you kind of come to this John real a bit later I was more than a fan of comic books as a kid certainly superhero comics I believe them as as almost sort of a gospel truth I really thought I was going to grow up and get super powers and then when I grew up the back you know and adolescence and I exactly the opposite thing happened in fact things just kind of fell apart at that point from I realized that the IBM was this was not a one thing kind of fed this liar something of course now that superheroes are at the forefront of American culture which is interesting but more than that I read the. peanuts I think with that kind of a of a wound but that is it was such a warmth to Charles Schulz's work and he was really the first cartoonists to create a sense of somebody on the page that you not only you care for better almost through I really think Schultz's accomplishment in the art form is is to create the first empathetic cartoon character and Charlie Brown and without that and with the rest of us cartoonists really would still be operating it kind of a base level I think so you said that you prefer being called a cartoonist rather than a graphic novelist why is that. it might be an old quote at the end yeah you know it's the graphic novel assassin's both kind of a like maybe like you're trying to be a little pretentious and fancy which I really a a bag really kinda cherish the the the place that comics having culture the trash medium because nobody's gonna come to a cartoonist and and assume that they're that they're like a painter or a writer you know the thing no more of that there the when you read it the comic strip the justice and if you don't like it that the cartoonist is an idiot and I really I made church that so but I I at the same time he is if the after trying to explain what it is that I do to regular socialized human beings it's easier to just say I'm a graphic novels and that seems to kinda now stand in for a cartoonist who writes long books does that change over time though I mean now that you know of the Marvel cinematic universe has been such a roaring success you know of entries in game is now the most the highest grossing movie of all time and you know people are are seeing more of these crossovers between printed comic books and movies and TV shows and theme park attractions I wonder from your perspective is as an artist whether it's easier to talk to people about what this art form is calling yeah that thing that that started as a comic strip with the comic book yeah like I can kind of relate to that. I think the problem here is that this kind of a conflation between form and content comics is it as a as a they're not a genre there a language and a medium through which stories can be told in at least in America the superhero genre was the was the content of them for many decades simply because they were was it was a way of late bilking kids out of their milk money really was like the cheapest way of producing stories in kind of a John content and making money off of them and now that that's moved to to cinema thank you there's nothing about super heroes or that sort of over inflated masculinity that has anything to do with the medium of comics itself just it it's just an American sort of association in Europe the most popular comics are westerns you know go figure I don't even know what that's about exactly but. it will be speaking to a graphic novel artists to wrote a western that caught our attention will speak to her in a moment is but for now we continue our conversation with Chris ware who who's new work is called rusty brown also the author of Jimmy Corrigan the smartest kid on earth but if you're from some of you who have been getting into this art form Jenny is in Murray Kentucky and Jenny emailed my eight year old daughter just got me into graphic novels back in the early nineties I read the series the babysitters club now there's an author who is reimagined these wonderful and and Martin books my eight year old loves them and I do too rusty brown is a very different kind of graphic novel than anything I've read and I've I've done not read every single one but I've read watchmen I've read some of the graphic novels that are basically just kind of comic book anthologies this book as I understand it was about eighteen years in the making it is massive it is about seventy percent the thickness of a phone book like I'm in I'm gonna let this book fall on the desk in front of me listen. the books got some half like you could you could you could do something to somebody with this book how does a story like this that is this big that is this expansive come to be I mean did you know that rusty brown was going to be this much book well I knew that it would take me awhile on that it would be kind of long but I tend to work very improvisational oriel Lee and organically I guess those are fancy words to basically say I make it up as I go along because I found that in the past of a scripted something it would arrive can a dead on arrival and just not feel real and I realize it's because I wasn't listening you're paying attention to the pictures on the pages I was working so the result of this then is then that the things can kind of spiral out of control but really that's kind of what life is all about it's about spiraling out of control you have an idea of of who you are and where your life is going to go but it almost never goes in that direction you're always readjusting what you you think your hands are so and I wanted to do a book that that had some of the halftime and weight of real life and really doesn't necessary it's not clear what it's about because I really feel like the the books that I've been most moved by our fall into that category like Anna Karenina or Ulysses and there you can't really say what they're about necessarily but they have a sort of complexity and richness in a tangled mess that you can't really grasp that seems to point it wife itself and this is just the first half of the story is that right yeah hi I'm in a again I'd like I've done other books at the same time I work on piece meal as I get tired of working on one shift over to another and I'm working on to others right at the moment but that's part of it too because we all remember our lives it over our entire lives in as we go on those memories change and shift and readjust Intel in some cases they almost turn and allies so this is kind of an attempt to get it that way that we rewrite our own stories of ourselves and how they shift in comics that. it's a medium as you work on things you need do you plan to draw differently as time goes on if you look at peanuts when it was first when it first began Charlie Brown looks completely different than the way he does when he did when Charles was Charles Schulz was older so I'm Joshua Johnson you're listening to one a. how much of this book if any is autobiographical one of the characters is named Mister where it said in your home town of Omaha it also does a lot of really very intense themes in the book it feels like a very you know adult story in a medium that can be associated with kind of kids literature but how much of this book is a reflection of you as opposed to a reflection of things you wanted to explore well I think I mean even if it seems I want to explore it's still a hundred percent me whether I make you know I mean the fiction is really just operating on yourself it's and it's it or experimenting with trying to bring people back to life that may be a mess or imagining what if what if one's life had taken a different path there what would it be like to be another person which is really I think the most important thing that we as humans can do is to try to imagine other people and to try to try to feel through other people because otherwise what's the point of being a life you know and I I think fiction provides not necessarily a guide to doing that but sort of a a rudder that you can put in the water of life to kinda help steer you may be a little bit in that regard..

Chris America eight year hundred percent seventy percent eighteen years one day milk
"chris ware" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"chris ware" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Chris ware's latest graphic novel has been called a work of genius I'm Joshua Johnson will meet him and talk about the popularity of the panel page next time on one AA. it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep I'm Rachel Martin and I'm no well king good morning Porter Rico has had a hard couple of years it's still recovering from hurricane Maria the governor recently stepped down after popular protests and the territory has huge amounts of debt Porter Rico is an unincorporated territory of the United States it has been since eighteen ninety eight and it's a recent difficulties have raised a really old question one that's been asked for years what should the relationship between Porter Rico and the United States mainland B. how connected to the AP and peers history podcast through line took a look at the U. S. Porter Rico relationship in a recent episode and I'm here now with one of the show's hosts from teen Arab we hear on TV. so this relationship in short between the U. S. and P. are a super complicated why what happened yeah it's it's a story that most Americans don't know because it wasn't really reported much here at the time but it's a story that looms large for many Porter Ricans even galvanize Porter Rico's nationalist movement to push for independence from the US and the story starts with another pharmacist nineteen twenty eight hurricane centrally bay was the name of the hurricane and the storm killed hundreds left hundreds of thousands homeless and devastated economy any coincided with a big public health crisis in the early nineteen thirties the Rockefeller Foundation stepped in and sent a bunch of doctors to put a Rico one of those doctors was a man named Cornelius Packard roads. yeah Cornelius Packard rose dusty to his friends and Dusty Rhodes. yeah and they're driving doctor should come down from the mainland to put a Rico before and they.

Chris ware Joshua Johnson Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Porter Rico hurricane Maria United States Rockefeller Foundation Cornelius Packard NPR AP U. S. Porter Rico Dusty Rhodes.
"chris ware" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:05 min | 2 years ago

"chris ware" Discussed on KCRW

"Comic books. That's true. And Chris ware another one of our favorites the people you've heard talking on bookworm. Because as far as I'm concerned there were is, as great an interesting as any of the novels being written in our time. And after all, let's face it to in our time, Lovell's are collapsing. They're not the art form of our time. No, no, it's tremendous change. Occurred in just our short. You know, short three or four decades. Things have changed in ways you wouldn't have expected. I mean in the positive sense for me as an artist. It's great that the graphic novel has taken hold. I'm reaching an audience willing to read, five hundred page comics story. Seriously? But it's also the tremendous change that happened in the printing industry. Like I didn't see. I wasn't expecting that to come. I don't I don't believe books are going anywhere. But it is not exactly the world that I was planning for when I was seventeen years old, and I decided to become a cartoonist now this book pied fans is basically in two colours. How do you describe those colors? Well, I guess I would say that I would probably say memory blue is that. A lot of my work is use two colors. And this one is primarily gray and blue and I use a lot of blue and I wouldn't say that I like sat now when I was twenty five years old and said, like, why am I picking the color blue? I like the color blue but over time, I think I've come to recognize that there are two or three colors have a melancholy quality to them. Specifically shades of blues and greens, maybe a few rust colors. It's the underlying tone of most of the work, I do, I would say is melancholy, and that's you wanted to you want it on the page and sections of this book have appeared in an ongoing. What does that magazine cooled? Pelota ville. That's yes. I've been doing that for I don't know thirty years or something. And you've been putting together pieces of coin fans for twenty years. Yes, I think it's almost it was almost exactly twenty years the making of this book. Now, of course, I didn't work on this book every day for twenty years. It was done in between. I know exactly the truth is, if I had worked on it every day, it would have been done in five years, but it was one of those projects that much like the past, lingering, this book lingered on for me, too. I. Having spoken. To art Spiegelman Chris ware. And now to Sieff who's born name is Gregory. Gallant. I think these projects are painful. Some obvious reasons or story about his phone in concentration camp. But all of them Jimmy Corrigan's modest little oil on earth who is losing, his parents and. All his smarts. He doesn't know how to keep himself. Yeah, there's a lot of pain in that book for sure. And in this one too. Do you think? No, I'll give you a hint. Theanswer his. Do you think that great Ord involves a good deal of pain? Well, I would have to say, yes, of course, it's hard to imagine great art that didn't come from some sort of. Space of pain. I can't remember I just read a quote, in an obituary of a an Israeli writer whose name, I can't bring up right now, very famous writer and he said, no wound, no author. It's as if. We'll certainly aren't speaking loop one by one. The people who write graphic, novels are putting superheroes behind them. In order to embrace the phantasmal sadness of life. That is no longer daily life. Yeah. It's interesting. Certainly, cartoonist from my generation specifically grew up with superhero comics, and that's why we ended up drawing comics. I mean, it's not an accident when I was a teenage boy, I love those comic books. And so I spent those years from ten to twenty or whatever. Learning to draw every day, copying those kind of comic books and only when you get to like the age of twenty or something somewhere around that, and you lose interest in those power fantasies, I always say it's like I was tricked into being a cartoonist at that point. I'd put all that effort into learning the medium, and then I didn't know what to do with it anymore. But the funnier part about that was then when I started to figure out what I wanted to do which was to talk about real life. I felt I needed another ten years to unlearn everything, those comics had taught me because you can't really tell you can't the medium, the medium is more complex medium than you expect. But it doesn't work best with the tools that are meant to show people flying and punching each other. Well, the great American. Literary critic who thought that cartoons and science fiction reports of food richer, this -ly Fiedler points out that let's face it, the guys who invented superman Jewish. They wanted to dunk into a phone booth and become the man of steel. Absolutely. This was a childhood fantasy for Jews in America. And by the way, the enormous bookworm staff has located it's no wound, no author. That's IMAS Oz. Okay. Great. That can happen so quickly. At a time when more and more of our art forms are depending completely on pump, you, Larry and success, these graphic novels or at least the best of them are depending upon a sense of said, -ness of melancholy of failure of it's true. I mean it's interesting that if you were to talk about the, the American comic book as a phenomenon you would say that it's about success. It's about bombast and it's about, you know, maybe it's kind of an American lie. It's interesting that the comic book when it was taken to us for more serious stories and quotes, that is actually seems to be the other aspect of life. That is like, where most artists have gone now might be reactionary, of course that you would want to move as far away from, like the most typical subject matter. But I do think that like. With interesting about the medium is, I think it's well, suited to stories that are interior to stories that are slow and two stories that are melancholy. There's something in the actual way you read a comic strip comic book that lends itself to an interior experience, maybe even more than a novel couldn't we say that every story of civilization is about the form of. Loopless ation. Good point. It's an interesting point, it is not it is hard to write about the past or about memory that doesn't involve some element of. Decline like the idea that things have gotten worse. Or perhaps, it's that the past is always lost. So characters can't help. But like look back on it with some kind of idea that there's something ideal. They're seeking the decline in full of the Roman empire. Everything. In some way, gets the decline of novel. The decline of painting the kind of the American song. Canadian songbook to there is. Yes, although it's not certainly it's not as Canadians are not as good at, mythology ising themselves, as Erica. So, yeah, you'd be hard pressed to get people to dredge it up instantly. I'm talking with a wonderful Canadian Seth he's a graphic novelist. He's the author most recently of CLYDE fans. It's published by drawn and quarterly. Thank you for joining me. Oh, it was a.

Chris ware writer Lovell Pelota ville Jimmy Corrigan CLYDE Sieff Erica Fiedler America Gregory Larry twenty years twenty five years seventeen years four decades thirty years five years ten years
"chris ware" Discussed on Brain Fuzz

Brain Fuzz

43:35 min | 2 years ago

"chris ware" Discussed on Brain Fuzz

"The drawing studio is solid and up to to full speed. Painting is a little challenged in a pollock like barn structure where there's some daylight but <hes> keeps you honest. You had a studio move your move. You still have a lot in storage site. Oh oh it's yeah yeah. I've had to pack to do any work. He stood to realize i mean luckily unlabeled everything thing pretty meticulously but <hes> you know you could you. I realized how spoiled one becomes after having a set environment and you're constantly you know reworking it to suit your needs and it's like when you suddenly just box that up. You can't even if i moved into a finished space. It's it's still take me. I'll betcha a year before it's you feel like you're me know where stuff is but you know what i mean like kind of. Make it your own again. There's the physical aspect of moving stuff but then there's the mental and emotional aspects of dental was settling settling yeah so it's definitely a time of upheaval but you know i'll tell you it's it's been great though in terms of <hes> terms of changing your working methods nothing like being you you know up at like the drawing table you know seven something in the morning or or at midnight which those extremes weren't as wasn't a frequent occurrence in the studio is more of a big block of time in the day so now it's like a con- on finding there's more extra time to to work so actually changes. Your workflow is not just the physical justin to that yeah but you know seems like a lot of folks. Folks are always looking for everyone's looking for studio space or waiting for their building to get condemned or you know ah i mean we're sitting in. I was looking around at all. These signs a lot of building around us a lot of these look like they could be great artists faces but we are actually this would be ground around zero gentrification sure that's been right behind the city of atlanta and actually yes in the shadow of mercedes been standing much of a film career gentrification. We also have ground zero for filming in atlanta's well like his hat nice nice touch but i wanted to zero in on a couple of destinations specifically ah i wanted to share this with you because i think that there are a lot of things that a lot of things that we can learn from the french museums and galleries can learn from of course the top tier museums and you see you can't compare so many of the places you frequent with those sure but there were a couple of notes that i made here first of all. I want to thank you my friend. Silvi- silvia was actually hopefully getting us around to <hes> that's sylvie with <hes> slashed slashed peres. This is contemporary art. Instagram's great sylvie helped us around to navigate all these different spaces which is not like any other city really that you can kind of jump in this really some navigation there alleyways and that you need to know you can't it's not easy to just to just jump right in and so we did that and now of course added another level to the two are to the trip. One of the biggest surprises was the palliative tokyo. I saw great show. There was reviewed extremely well but i don't. I really wanna talk about that. I wanna talk about the going along with some of the stuff that we've done in the past. Yes institutional critique stein okay first first of all. This place was open until midnight. The hours made more sense with the flow so often. These galleries museums closed at five six o'clock right this place twelve twelve a._m. Wow yeah just an amazing facility and wonderful restaurant cafe bookshop jong you would have the flow in this space was really something i actually picked up one of the catalog from the show that i saw this job. We'll get the format of this perfect bound out yeah. That's gorgeous so a lot of times. When you go to show you have to pick up where you want to pick up. The cataloging can't afford it in this case lose package so nicely and ford ably what would your what would you look. How would you describe this joe. What is this so. It's really nice paper stock. It's perfect found it's <hes> slightly oversize certainly something you can keep and yet a magazine tight format that could reproduction color. I mean i'm fascinated by it. Yeah very true ads in which is fairly telling well it was it was just a great experience all the way around i don't even wanna get into the <hes> exhibition itself which was which was great the whole point but <hes> no it it comes to change the way you can go there and just appreciate the experience <hes> that's enough which of of course with pompidou's the same way with pompidou's well. You could spend much time as you want there and maybe see the art or not but it was. I was taken by just how much these places are. Destinations and you want to go there the weather it's just you know to have coffee have launch <hes> shop in the bookshop. I mean the the bookshops alone. Were enough that that alone is a destination the hours again. How many times have you been somewhere in the places closed its or maybe they said it's open and this took it out of it because it maybe it can become a social destination with hours until midnight. It makes it. What day were you there. When you say that was like a friday night okay that makes more sounds like a tuesday think wow that's even crazier. You know what let's look. I wanna because i think this is an example lampl of something really done well many times if you've been in new york and you've got five o'clock close and oh yeah you know what i'm saying i used to just keep a little cheat sheet of you know back in the days. When a lot of museums had different days days they were closed. Whitney was closed. Whatever monday or tuesday and keep track of it right but if you don't do your homework on the front ends you you may have walked along way or twelve to twelve twelve to twelve and it doesn't that make more sense to you for the consumer sure i mean but back to staff and budget. I'm not gonna work yeah. <hes> it was also <hes> <hes> as i said many great gallery stops but i want to mention this and brought this because i just had you in mind when i actually purchased so the artist lucia laguna gallery karston greg yeah so this work and willing to show notes that brings us podcast dot com but but this work looks good in the book it is breathtaking in person scale color right yeah hawks where i had the sense of looking at this and not being able to put it in any kind of category really oh that's good i mean you can see just orientational and you can turn the so many different ways that actually sounds like a successful <hes> doing experience you know instead of trying defined the taxonomy. I would trade places like my. I'm trying to shut off my brain going. Oh there's obstruction with representation and like who cares you. You take something for everybody in this. Wouldn't you say yeah yeah good different paint application very i'm jealous us. I mean in terms of that experience. You know to see something this color obviously. It's just it's different. That's not like you know like new york kind of life that it's right yeah and it reminds me a good way of some other painters in other parts of the world. That's great when you can get in the flesh beyond you know looking at it on instagram. I don't know i don't get i would. I would think that this would yeah. There's some installation shots in here. I can see how that's probably a breath of fresh air to walk in. Just take it and these are pretty large. It looks like some of them anyway. Oh that yeah. I like these <hes> when you're centimeters but one hundred forty by one hundred eighty cents sounds like a lot of senators yeah no these were the in in different scales but then matthew revel in the beauty of this monograph concert short or visit brain funds podcasts dot com the show notes and links to resources like this one and always be taking something else from them. It's nice though there are a lot of <hes> lot of entry points into this work sometimes dead at center. Even yeah really exciting to hear people describe <hes> paintings like royal painting but yeah well. I think we're just iran. I there's some nice over the mosque like yeah imagery. That's right and color field trips and yeah very that's a good sign again. Lucia laguna guna gallery carson grab just a just a highlight just one of the many highlights on this <hes> on this visit we were they of course for the yellow vest protests protests as well and we had just left one of many of our museums and we knew we could see plumes of smoke on the horizon we need the protests were happening. Just started though correct this was the second week and and so it was intensifying and <hes> you yeah midday we're we're seeing the plumes of smoke on horizon and we decided to move from this museum is kinda. Keep an eye on it and then <hes> and then so we're like okay well. Let's stop here. We'll figure out what we're going to cafe right. We're having we're having muscle meal and some drinks and we see one of the yellow a ah couple yellow vessels <hes> older coppell and they and they <hes> are walking by and you can tell they're they're done protesting for the day but they decided sit down. Emma cafe will keep their son they can't invest on. They had a meal and it was just the sense of ooh you know. All of this is happening. Let's stop for right now and it was so different than the american response to something like if that happening on the road of course these these guys have so much more experience with this kind of event than we do and i mentioned this to a friend so you know this is what happened in. Oh yeah yeah i was there once and there was a some sort of police activity in a building adjacent to our cafe. We saw we saw guys repelling down the side of the building and then breaking through the outside windows to raid this and then the and then smoke. I guess they asked the waiter. They said she we leave in he gets you haven't finished desert as just a different different mindset. Oh yeah yeah and i don't know if it's that i don't know if it's that <hes> environment that enables you to have twelve to twelve museum hours or if i don't know what comes first i i can't answer. That's that's obviously the need need for for travel. Opens your eyes. If you have thoughts on that and you're listening. Please share them. We'd love to hear from you. You gotta stack of stuff here. I do but some of that that we've touched on and i don't know if you've ever been into how to say his name but it's a it's amazing german. She'll make our flurry and henkel von donnas honors mark no. It's a heated movie called <hes> the lives of others which i totally missed the theaters it's in german subtitled title but about stacy even just watching that on a laptop which blew my mind that came out in the two thousand six. It's a totally missed. It totally miss yeah so then the reason i dove that far backwards because there's a new movie that just came out. I did see in in the theatre. They'll never look away. Which is the hype surrounding it as it's loosely based on garrett rector so filmaker reached out out like sent him a note request for an interview because it doesn't do a whole lotta and i think what is the eighty seven now i think he's eighty seven while i mean but of course now he's totally dispelled film and said that the directors had really but <hes> so who knows where what's true and and what's not but it's interesting but it was three hours nine minute movie goes to a theater like for me. That's that's your talk about a captive audience else but <hes> prepared. It's in the right frame of mind but it's just beautifully filmed and what treat to be taken can out of your normal environment. <hes> i forget what how would it gift. Real movie can be in the with other people a lot different different than watching something on a laptop or t._v. Year youtube all the brakes and checking your phone or you're just sitting engaging engaging with something never looking away. Did you awhile did you do did you do the art van gogh movie to you did and yet saw that willem dafoe was amazing amazing. Yeah it's it. There are some moments that are very disconcerting and or purposely like discombobulating. Yeah the the camera work at times that i saw it with a filmmaker occur friend of mine who was bristling at you know cameras should be steady and but perhaps you were they were trying to show the state of the mind of a vincent but yeah willing to focus so believable and even if you just took the sound off just visually watching that's the scenery cinematography cinematography was fantastic novel right. I wish novel. It's good not one of those uplifting necessarily kind of movies. You know we were joking. Oh can for you know going into never look away but now it's like. I don't think this is going to be a beer movie. I grew up here before let alone time like schindler's list. You're not gonna sit down like crackup raca bottle. I think i'll just take this yeah. <hes> there was really intense moments but yeah i mean i definitely came out of that has to my friend greg and <hes> you know kind of having a good espresso after that film sitting there i was amazed how affected we both were and really yeah in fact one of those where you're you're talking about and you're trying to put the pieces together and say you like that film. There was an of an emotional impact yeah. That doesn't happen all that often for me so i was just like this is amazing. There was one that i don't know if i've mentioned to you the square did we talk about that. Refresh my memory well. It takes some crazy crazy turns but it's a nice it's it's a it's an interesting look at i guess on some level the performance art okay and a critique of the art world world and then you have <hes> all kinds of other things. I don't wanna ruin it for you when you see it at the end of it. It's one of those peddling europe that did yeah. I think twenty seventeen i believe was the other thing i've been binging on. <hes> chris ware the artists. I'd some funny. I heard i saw an instagram post of yours. Yeah but chris ware now want meijide ice-covered rediscover for a while. It's it's funny because he talks a lot whether you know there there seemed to be words that are verboten say like cartoon graphic illustration so he gets into a lot of that stuff but he's had new yorker covers he certainly i think i've probably was first exposed is building stories in the new yorker a series so yeah picked up like the monograph which is amazing this giant box. That's full probably like i say there's at least fifteen to twenty different formats of seen slash <hes> beautifully printed but then again the content <hes> in a couple of other younger <hes> graphic novelists but <hes> i think it also it funnels into my current fascination with drawing and and just again seeing how far people are pushing that medium you can appreciate it on so many different levels daniel clouds the reason holy dana classes they sit on a stack at my house and daniel clouds did <hes> go swamp in ghost world the the movie that resulted from the comic with thorburn's scarlett johansson <hes> steve buscemi. You would love this it. It's like i'm telling you it is is one of those rare situations where you can enjoy the movie and the book equally i always i love when i dipped into some pool that i was not aware of but there's another of artist and let's see dern aso nick dern aso i guess has published a new book that is just blown up called sabrina. It's funny that you've gone. You've said before that you missed out on what did you say mr comic books and that's not on graphic grassings novels thing definitely comics <hes> were all around me as a kid my one of my uncles fanatical comic collector the marvel and dc all in the plastic bags on inboxes and yeah and it just was it was too much work. I i loved you. Walk down to the <hes> the cigar shop by the subway with them a good excuse you know obviously back when magazine shops you know there was tons of stuff to look at it out gum. God knows what but <hes> you know an early age. It just seems so overwhelming. We're the healthiest star also now so records was probably a little more appealing. If you're going to hunt for things yeah covet i would not have heard of this individual but for instagram graham and and it's always that perfect storm of it's like two or three places so it's like a c or an it's like you know you're going to see it like in the new york times or whether who else but i still think like wow it's hard enough to draw and tell us store or paint let alone then fees and for the same person to fuse like what a skill set telus story visually and verbally. I'm like aw yeah i don't. I don't possess those <hes> do you think about aw i wonder how many movies are still like story board or t._v. Shows are they really story boarded or having that kind of mind how the attention to detail but just you know some of these artists like chris ware man that guy just his devotion to that craft and <hes> seems like even his undergrad. You know that was this continual. That's not really are and despite being written off off by your peers or by instructors. I mean most people i think would just give up and he kept saying he's still able to do that. I think it sounds like he's probably one of the few aside from like the next echelon of the crumbs and in that world <hes> do you <hes> you know mark ryden. I don't okay <hes> this. This is an interesting kind of space because i think about these illustrator artists now here. He has a graphic novelist graphing. Okay so i think if graphic novelists but then there's this weird kind of space when i think of artists like <hes> mark ryden and then you know hi fructose magazine and i recently saw talked about this in an episode <hes> maybe it was last year two years ago. There was a high fructose show and they got into a lot of trouble with it. I don't know if you remember that and it was actually over mart rides work. I think the catholic church got really irritated with something that mark right did and he plays with different images and often in often could be construed as sacrilegious or oh but that's an interesting being space between you know how you get from a museum when you're showing work that could be considered considered illustration but then it's not a you know in in the case of high fructose. That's an art magazine in its <hes> and i don't wanna get get into that hole and i don't want to get into the whole thing amazing that it's impossible not to. It's impossible not to but but i also maybe perhaps more interesting would be how is it possible for the blurred lines now from two to occur and i think it's probably with technology. Don't you think i mean so much more as possible in illustration. It'll become apparent perhaps win. In future episodes better being edited now <hes> spin on the table quite a bit the you know the art slash craft ongoing debate mike clearest vision on it. It's still a matter of positioning the and it's the power of the artist or the the person somebody has to determine whether it is heart and then push shift shift and not take an answer i mean philip guston was charged with you know possibly treasonous act of abandoning abstract attract expressionism for for quote illustration or cartoony. Look how ahead of the curve he he was the takeaway for me may. Is that what it doesn't matter. If you enjoy it enjoy it and enjoy it on whatever level you want to enjoy it sure let's talk about it and that's the most important thing there shouldn't be any of this. <hes> i think he probably get some of the separation in academic environment where you have the speaking in terms of drawing class <hes> aw are they using graphite or are they using a digital pen. I think it's impossible in this world our world kind of travels to <hes> somebody's always thinking somebody has a pure vision or you know either. You know whether it's painters thinking that's it or sculptures installations the only way to go or someone's always looking down at somebody else and again it always comes back down to positioning and who mentioned that movie before i'd say because of thinking of gerhard richter keep looking at a lot of these artists that have have been extremely successful and the work certainly is magnificent. Perhaps might not be once cup of tea but one thing that stands out out an artist set of like made it to that superstar level. It's the way they talk about their. They don't talk about their work. That's true it again. It gets back to that power of how is is it communicated that telling you all about and all the inspirations or not and sometimes i think the ones that keep tight lip or continue to change the yeah that's true you know. I mean bob dylan. <hes> very i mean in that kind of elusive something to be said for that versus like word at age right now where i think there's almost too much you know what i ate for breakfast and i listened to and everything went into making such you need. That is that really essential. We've had some brain fuzz alums that are <hes> particularly good at this talking just enough and maybe not talking metal on on something and then one that you know you had a i wish i would have had the privilege of c._n._n. Show in new york but paul stephen benjamin comes to mind and terms of of being on very solid ground what he's doing why he's doing it what he how he wants an audience to experience it probably in my opinion still one of one of the he's like he's really got together and i was thrilled like wow what an accomplishment. Ah you know a solo show in new york in a gallery of that level yeah congratulations man. He's earned it in another episode. We talk about the bruce nauman retrospective and bruce down. There's an artist and he's another one when he i we actually happened to have. That's a stack in the stack here. That's the <hes> that's okay in retrospect yeah. You've mentioned that this this particular <hes> review discusses the east coast versus west coast are you. Are you part of the club. Yeah yeah or yeah but yeah but just again being some kind of other always not not new york so you know i know it said that in many discussion discussion but it's still astounds me will if you know if you're familiar with with <hes> nouns work there are some pieces that come to mind specifically <hes> where sure it's informed by his ranch lifestyle <hes> and also the neighbors you know in a ranch community you called her aunt's community in a ranch <hes> when you when you live on a ranch and you have neighbors they have very specific skill sets and it's it's interesting to see how much of the work this. This was the first time that i had seen <hes> specifically <hes> so you of course you would nominee have some of the taxidermy works and but <hes> <hes> i saw some other works specifically old in i guess the the knife skills of a neighbor and you think about the conversations that occur occur in that kind of environment versus the conversations that would occur from studio to studio if you were in brooklyn right isn't that about about inspiration and and feeding and getting outside of the same. You're always the same stuff yeah. I'm saying this as much for myself as i did. I did see documentary documenting on <hes> joe cocker of all people that woodstock performance but anyways fan for two years later. He's living out he's married. He's living living in colorado and same thing they're talking. Voice overs talking about how like got to know the neighbors and they hang out and you're thinking how the hell hangs out with like joe oh cocker coming off the road and just you know now and then that persona but they're still people you know but those conversations so as artists yeah i think i think that's what makes the most interesting word in the case of now or other other hobbies or other. You know instead of just all being if you're totally just you know yeah yeah navel-gazing <hes>. I don't know i think most of the people that i consider successful seem him to have a <hes>. One prevailing trait seems to be a fairly social skill set well connected or but a diverse you you know pool of friends and interests. That's that's not a smart successful person. Ah yeah i'd say so i'd say so and now the brain fuss audio pick of the day you some time ago you pay courtney barnett as is a an audio pit was just courtney barnett in her oh entirety specific but when i look at what i'm listening listen to and what's sitting next to the next to the turntable i had to do. I do some serious thinking about this. It's difficult to get a kinks strategy together because for so long when we dig into this a little bit more here. Are you saying that you're picking the entire soubra. No i'm not going to take on bridge. I think you're going to have a. I don't know how you feel about this but i'm going to think i hi but i think you're gonna have a problem. I'm going to select a certain section of the king's catalog. Okay 'cause it's eh. It's i enjoy it but it's also interesting to me from a creative sample and let's let's let's unpack this. Okay okay first of all. I don't know if you're familiar with the story listeners. Now you are joe with the kinks and the conspiracy theory around round. The kings may be shut out of the american market so with the british invasion. There are a couple of suspects one in particular. It is said that they did some did some stuff behind the scenes. They were banned from the u._s._o. They could do a height of their popularity in the sixty s but i thought it was due to an altercation. Physical altercations like journalist started his as i have read that it was that will there may have been real reasons but that there was definitely some some work you've done behind the scenes team actively. Keep them out of the market all right hang on okay. It was a federation amusement. The trading and the ban lasted from sixty five sixty nine that it's tremendously long all right say that again all right. Nobody knows for sure but the best answer would is this source. Here's this whiskey whiskey of some some yeah something like that but apparently was a union type thing. I'm telling you there was apparently that was violence so there was violence involved but they fight fight between in may of sixty-five between davies and drummer mick avory left davies and the hospitals and landed avery in jail. They fought with promoters blah. Blah blah was subterfuge. Though you can't tell me that the year so you know the the kinks even amongst themselves were physically glee abusive and it just i love cakes. Wow like trying to get along with them but i mean that's that ban now. That doesn't mean their music could be played. I think they would have been it took them longer. I think yeah and they outlasted when all those bands broke up. I think some of the stuff that they recorded seventy is their strongest august which leads me to the period of most interest to me for the kings is nineteen seventy seven to nineteen eighty-four before beginning beginning with the sleep. Walker misfits came next low-budget in nineteen seventy nine. I am not so much at the time of recording fan of sleep walker and misfits as i am some of those later records but each one of us has like a key yes either one or two songs that if you take the singles approach you'll have yes people like oh yeah so so just to run through these. You've got low budget in nineteen seventy nine. There's a live record in there. Which is do you really one for the road. Yeah one for the road released in nineteen eighty. It is a good it is it is it is good. Listen <hes> give the people what they want. Nineteen eighty-one a fantastic fantastic record you can always find it for like six ninety nine vinyl shots nine hundred eighty-three state of confusion and then for me one thousand nine hundred four word of mouth is where that's where to me this encapsulates a period where i believe ray davis davis had he had really honed his his songwriting skills into this. I'm going to write these tight songs and we're gonna produce. Put these songs on record but they're also going to serve a purpose. This is arena rock and if you think about hair bands and everything my i would argue that all of that is as a result largely on the arena it was made possible with with the kinks in during this period is that is that <hes> do you think i could defend. I think you could defend it. I mean think about what against all the synth bands you know second third. Whatever you wanna call it braschi british invasion or reinvasion. You know i mean they have keyboards in the bam still are driven yeah so in the case of <hes>. Let's just pick one of these low budget. Okay low-budget is is an interesting record for a number of reasons first of all some could could accuse ray on handwriting. Pandering pandering is exactly the word he's talking in in in low budget. They were not only dealing with a low record budget to record a look a low budget to record this record. Yeah they were also speaking directly to the american <hes> what was happening with the oil crisis and economic concerns uh-huh in america but for the king's because they had been down to deny for so long the american was the promised land sure let me just let's run through these okay. They had a hit with a wish. I could fly like superman which capitalized on discoveries you had low budget which spoke specifically to a malay's of the malays the song a gallon of gas now. I'm falling captain. America right is that the one cat america yeah and what are you specifically doing is is is is appealing to his audience which is america <hes> and finally conquering america in a way that they were unable to do recipes but when i love about this is the songwriting is so tight you may not like all of the sounds necessarily or the production during that period but i i what i love most about that that group of records is he defined to find an audience. It was very marketable and yet some of their best music. They had a huge hit with come dancing during that period but then there are these other songs like <hes> living on thin line from word of mouth was later featured in the sopranos. Oh that's and that's also on that that same record with <hes> do it again. I'm in the first time. I heard that thinking. Wait a minute because it's it's it's hard day's night that opening lang but it's not like the true and there's an ode to that misspell gic back look without it being he's not the first to have that love affair with the states of the you know the stones keith in particular like with the whole western cowboy myth that's right and then all the way to youtube with joshua remember. This is like literally like a lobster with the the u._s. And here you know as documented in rattling home yeah played every single day on cable on but i mean i mean think about a thing they were you know had a hit or a few hits but you really got me you know but for the who did anything the cancer ended and so he's like they've been around for so long and like you said being banned here certainly yeah hurt them and then to hear van halen. I guess that has seventy eight with a cover of you really got me and it's an amazing cover. Wow i mean to you without much power behind. It and that's not something that happens that much anymore like i mean some people are still cover songs yeah to to have your first hip cover of all those bands. All those british bans started with doing covers. That's true if you people were writing their own material yeah that's true but <hes> i think they kind of invented the playbook doc yet long with the beatles and the stones but his is always the case they don't. We don't think they get the credit no they don't i mean i think it's probably again. Dan going back to you. Know ray is very irascible. Yes whatever i wanna use but i think it's it is talk about like vindication in but the fact that king songs feature so prominently in wes anderson films which i want hand probably didn't like ads because the hipsters but <hes> but there's such a deep catalog. There's so many i mean i love the beatles. I love the stones i think i love the kinks more than longterm made. He's a better songwriter and then the feel for me and it's a certain period yeah but the kinks like pound for pound. You're like wow yeah yeah <hes>. It's a lot of what we're talking about here actually if you if you look at <hes> ray davis book marikana in two thousand thirteen <hes> talk about a lot of what we're what we're discussing housing here one of the you know one of the things going back to that <hes> give the people what they want you know one of the criticisms is that he was doing exactly that giving the people what they want the did the music was good but it was also highly marketable in highly marketable for a reason and it sounded like the time that's one again i bought that one that came out you know and i'm thinking like what was what was popular and you're talking about. A time of like you know. The knack had exploded exploded that record had come through but think about the power pop khanna sam joe jackson dan. I'm the man got the clash <hes> and to hear <hes> around the dial. You know a song about the decline of of rock radio which that's when it was starting i mean they're still were like the morning deejays as you listen to the radio now again that's right very timely social social commentary political tali marketable and then to get better things assam added up yeah. It's good style. Yes i mean record just emotionally. It's it's when i think of england it's like. It's very it's moody. <hes> there's some there's a lot of a lot of grey. I'd i'd like i'd. I'd put at that on when i go home today but what i mean just creative genius word. That's tough no yeah but he's he's up there and oh yeah i married chrissie. Hi for a little bit worked on i. It's a crazy story. Yeah the relationship with the brother. I mean that's. I don't think that's just for you know they were like an oasis type thing like they just don't seem to be able to get get along. I mean you know like my brother and i fought like brothers will fight you know <hes> and then it stopped at a certain age. You know you kind of outgrow it grown men. Yes still still beating michetti of each other. It's a crazy story in you. Just don't wanna reason you don't hear a lot about it but hey you've heard it here and all right well we could talk about the kinks round <hes> but now we have to go bowling getting out into taking like whole portions of artists careers. I've started you started. Maximilian american trend here other supersized that you can <hes> <hes> you can find out more of course <hes> about what we were discussing references links all kinds of stuff at brings us podcast dot com and we've got a lot of exciting hiding things coming up of course global team and also <hes> conversations at least one in the can already and <hes> got more on the way got some illegal embargo. We have at least one an embargo and it'll it'll be a great <hes> we got. That's some good stuff coming up. So rumor is that all future subsequent rainfalls releases are going to be on the set set true. <hes> disseminated that way. There's some discussion there's some discussion about <hes> cassette and <hes> also <hes> cassette box sets to to connect with joanne massey's take could show notes and discover other episodes at brain fuss podcasts dot com engage in joined the dine on social media with hashtag brain first podcast and on their organically grown instagram brain phone podcast in the next episode subscribe to bring fuss podcast. When your favorite podcast platform i tunes google place spotify and stitcher.

new york Instagram ray davis davis joe cocker youtube beatles mark ryden america atlanta chris ware mercedes pompidou justin Silvi- silvia tokyo stein ford new york times willem dafoe Lucia laguna guna gallery
"chris ware" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"chris ware" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So it's like me walking me standing is. It's a lot of me thinking me at my desk. You know, whatever I've got stuff of trees and like little stuff too. But that makes it so that it doesn't take very long to do a comic strip drying. It is actually really laborious even if it's crappy so the stamps, it's a miracle, you just like stamp stamp. There you go there's ten stamps. It's done. That's so smart. You should start selling these staves word. Nobody wants to stamp of me gazing in a flower as an. Again at CBC dot C. If you wanna stay talking to you. I want to get your thoughts before we let you go on your industry. Do you mind the term graphic novel, by the way, I used to hate it at Norton used to say he was what was it? A subterranean engineer something like that. I see we're worker graphic novel has exactly the same quality. As like, I said, I'm a cartoonist or a comic book artist. But and I fought it initially. I originally called my books I'd say they were graphic novellas which I thought was kind of like a smarmy joke. But, but ultimately at some point you're like, it's over people know what a graphic novel is that is word that means something different to them than a comic book. That's right. So I've just given up it's fine perfectly acceptable term. Okay. I'm well. Then given that last year's man Booker prize included, a graphic novel for the first time the book was Sabrina by Nick or NASO. What went through your mind when you saw a graphic novel or comic? On the one of the most prestigious lists and literature to be honest. I figured the time had come. I was not like oh my God. There's been a long process of inching towards that a few years ago. I believe Chris ware, the graphic novelist. He won the Manchester. Guardian prize? And ten years before that Spiegelman won the Pulitzer like you can make this sort of like incremental movement towards it. The thing that most made me happy was is that Nikki Nassau's book with a good book. I mean, really good graphic novel to be there. And it's like it deserved to be on that list. It would be unfortunate. If it was something kind of iffy or two comic book. But he I even think about the form of like the long form comic or or the graphic novel. I mean, it's only relatively recently that the things right? Yeah. And that was not seeing this coming. I mean that answer. I just gave does not include the twenty years were this wasn't coming. And I started working in alternative comics. They were called back. That's what they call them. Right. Yeah. Such it's almost worse than graphic novel. But maybe it's worse anyhow when I started back in the eighties. There was only one generation of cartoonist before us who'd been using the comic book as a serious medium. And that was the underground cartoonist of the nineteen sixties and early seventies. And they were using it quite differently. They were hippie artists. You know, so it was all drugs and sex. And I'm sure most people remember the fabulous furry freak brothers or maybe Robert crumbs work that would be the one. I'd be more familiar with. And that stuff, you know, that was very influential to our generation, but our generation we're the ones who said like we want to start to use it as long form to try and tell like adult stories, I'm sure that in nineteen eighty that wouldn't have been the exact answer I gave. But ultimately, the literary form is where it went. And there was a long period where that did not look like it was going anywhere. In fact, I can remember very clearly in around nineteen ninety eight ninety nine it looked like it was done at the publishers who are doing these comics and these graphic novels were going out of business. The sales were terrible. And then I've still never quite understood. What happened within the next couple of years? There was a turnaround the graphic novel suddenly got a foothold and things have been much better since then one of the big themes in fans is aging is the passage of time. I'll close off this way. Then when when you picture yourself is turning into a neighbor assignment as an older man, maybe aging into your clothes a little bit. What do you hope that life? Looks like. Well, the truth is mostly what I'm looking forward to is. Or hoping for is to grow into the experience of just being an artist rather than a cartoonist. I'm now, I'm not denigrating cartooning. I am a cartoonist lake to the core. But what I mean is for the medium to just mature as another art form to not feel defined by the pop culture status of it to just continue to explore like the experience of being alive as an artist through a form that was once pure pop culture, but has slowly Morphing into just a regular artform. What about your routine you're gonna keep that going? Yeah. Thank you for.

Spiegelman Chris ware Manchester Norton engineer Booker Nikki Nassau Nick Robert twenty years ten years
"chris ware" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:29 min | 2 years ago

"chris ware" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Based on the terrifying. Novel by Stephen King, the author of their places in this world and bring things back, but they don't come back the same freedom. Cemeteries was not in cautioned in my faith. When it comes to the weather. We all wanna know what did stealing say watch for updated. Forecasts of Chicago's most trusted meteorologist, Tom skilling. Weeknights WGN TV. Nine twenty one on seven twenty WGN. We're talking to Ken Cranston who wrote the three escapes of Hannah Arendt, and the his work is going to be an exhibit. I say exhibited because it's never been in this particular form before I know people know who you are you've been interviewed all over town. You're from Chicago, you're one of our very, but your work is going to be on display at the spur institute for Jewish learning and leadership at six ten south Michigan avenue, and it's this Thursday March fourteenth, the receptions at five thirty the program begins at six thirty. You can get tickets and find more information expertise S P, E, R, T U, S dot E, D U. And can you're from Chicago, you left this briefly. But you're back now. You're up in Deerfield. I grew endear grew up in Deerfield. I live in Evanston and teach depaul in the couple of locations. I love Chicago. It's a great environment for people that do what I do. Chicago is actually a kind of a very important center of people that do what we call comics or graphic novels. I mean from Chris ware to Dan close to. Emil ferris, and there's so many people doing so much tremendous work in town. I feel very lucky to be here. And do that I wonder if you mentioned the show yet. No, I have never been like this before. No. And I have had my work and some smaller shows, I'm, you know, working doing some cartoons for the New Yorker. I've had shows of New Yorker cartoons and stuff like that New York. This is really very different when spurt isn't we talked about it? It's like walking through the book sort of. I mean, they've they've kind of helped me break it into three sort of theme attic areas, there'll be some giant. They've blown these cartoons up. So you're used to holding the book in your hand biking at its small now, you're actually going to be kind of being like an Allison wonderland walking through the book. There giant story story boys of the frames. And then some of the original drawings. So you can see a little bit of the process because you know, it isn't just like you sit there and draw it and put it on a page, and they broken it down to kind of the development of her THAAD rethinking because she was a very very difficult pugnacious character. And I don't think if she if she wasn't. She wouldn't be interesting. You know, so. Relatable? I think there's a lot of historical instances in the book that people can relate to. Yeah. She always was looking what do you got? What are you questioning, you know, she she took the outsider point of view and prove it, and she she the other thing that was fascinating about her though. I mean, I think it'll although I don't love this term. She was a bit of a rock star in that. She was always at the at the best table in the best place with the best people hanging out having the best conversations. I don't care if it was in the nineteen thirties with people like Peter Laurie or a navy Albert Einstein Marc Chagall, a big character in Chicago. These were important people and then in the forties in the late thirties, you know with. The impressionist max Aaronson in the other people trying to flee. France. And then in New York with all of the very heavy a New York thinkers in the partisan review and stuff like that. And then Chicago people like, Saul bellow, and all of a sudden, she's always at the table and very often maybe her and Mary McCarthy in a couple not many women. And so this this again makes it an interesting character for me to try and figure out what's driving her. She died in nineteen seventy five. What do you think she would say about today about Chicago today, specifically with regard to were about to have the first female African American mayor in the city? What do you think she would say about Chicago today? I think she would be well, I mean, there's a lot of issues in Chicago. She would be absolutely thrilled that an African American woman be since it's such a large part of the population in the city is getting that kind of recognition and that kind of voice. Because she feels that all voices need to be heard in the public space and listen to each other. And that's a huge part of the people that make up the city. So I think she would be delighted about that. I think she would be she liked to always have the outsider point of view. And because she tried to separate the private from the public, and she lived through a very tough time where the walls that separated you from tyranny weren't very very strong and constitutions were like houses of cards. And instead of you know, she went she ran toward fires. She ran into fires and she didn't always solve them. But she did a darn good job. She she stared reality in the face. And she was an example of what somebody professor at the university of Chicago, recently robocalled tough women. She was a tough. She was an unsentimental person. And that's okay, I loved it. She she brought so much to the party in terms of her her strength and her clarity and freshness of vision. In one of the things is I was doing all the research. I went through and I looked at a lot of books. I mean of you know, I look at the most basic things like college textbooks from the sixties and seventies to see how they reported her. Yes, she wasn't in them really a lot of them on purpose. Or did. They just didn't know who she was. She just didn't. She just wasn't. They didn't have enough pages. I I don't know. And then I started reading into it. And of course, I'm joking about that. I mean, she belonged there. Yeah. And I think a lot, you know. So she was such a I called her. You know, like a virulent truth teller. And that's where this tyranny of truth comes in the subtitle. She she felt you had to face reality. And she felt you had to to speak it each of us to one another in the public arena. She was very taken with. Kind of original Greek Athens, type democracy, and jeffersonian democracy and people just get around in figuring it out. I call it kind of the mess of the ongoing present, I think you've definitely done her Justice. You're a brilliant writer. You're brilliant cartoonist who inspires you. Besides my wife. She's rolling her eyes. She's she's she's she's sitting next to you. But she pulled her chair so far from the microphone. There's no way. I'm inspired by there are so many incredible people doing great work in the comics arena right now. I mean, I started out as I always wanted to get into the New Yorker magazine is a gag cartoonist is one of those single panel cartoonist, and it took me I think I got there really quickly. It took me about twelve years. That was fast. And then I always read comic books. I when mouse came out by art Spiegelman that made a huge impression on me. Books like fun, home Persepolis? So, you know, and then I go back even to this obscure kind of semi, you know, respectable comic thing that I inherited from my great uncle co classics illustrated, which did nonfiction often. And so I was inspired by them. And I I also read widely. I love biographies. I love history. I'm very curious about people, and why how their life makes them create what they create recently. I've been thinking about it. And I kind of forgot about this. And this is an author that maybe some people in your audience may know about but she's kind of off the radar Barbara Tuchman. Okay. Who wrote who wrote history in such a lively way? And I think one of the things that's really wonderful about being able to combine words and pictures, which is something that I did when I was working in design and advertising and something that I've done when I did the gags is it's an equation. I was never very good at math. But it's one plus one. Equals three when you put the words and the picture together. It's larger than the sum of the parts. Right. So I've been very interested to to use that picture and word to bring to translate these ideas in a way that our human to people because, you know, call me crazy. But I think philosophy is supposed to be something that we can use our life. I agree. So I'm a translator. It's a lot of hard work on my part. But I figure if I can teach myself in pictures, maybe I can teach that teach but get her into the conversation. And I'm glad you do it. I'm glad we are talking about her a Titanic. The three escapes have read a tyranny of truth. Ken, cranston. It's so nice to meet you, and I can't wait to see you on Thursday. Please get out and see this exhibition is wonderful exhibition at the Spurs institute for Jewish learning and leadership six ten south Michigan avenue on Thursday March fourteenth. Thank you so much. Thank you very much. I appreciate it. Pleasurable C N Thursday, seven twenty WGN..

Chicago WGN Ken Cranston Deerfield Stephen King Tom skilling Hannah Arendt university of Chicago New Yorker magazine New York France spur institute Chris ware Emil ferris cranston Barbara Tuchman