32 Burst results for "Chris Smith"

China Imposes Sanctions on Three American Lawmakers

Kevin McCullough Radio

00:37 sec | 3 weeks ago

China Imposes Sanctions on Three American Lawmakers

"Lawmakers who have openly criticized Beijing's human and religious rights record. The BBC Stephen McDonald in Beijing in the latest round of tit for tat recriminations between Beijing and Washington, Seeing a U. S politicians have been named as the targets of unspecified corresponding sanctions. Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, as well as Congressman Chris Smith and Ambassador at large international religious freedom. Sam Brownback. Rule identified as the subjects of China's retaliation to last week's US measures, the BBC Stephen

Beijing Stephen Mcdonald Sam Brownback BBC Marco Rubio Ted Cruz Chris Smith Congressman China United States Washington U. S
Doctor Chris Smith Speaking About Coronavirus

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:57 min | 2 months ago

Doctor Chris Smith Speaking About Coronavirus

"The longer the covid nineteen lockdown goes on the more we learn about covid nineteen not least because being locked down like this. We don't have a great deal to do but ever expanding testing is teaching us about the spread of the virus will hopefully help us figure out how soon something like normality becomes a possibility he in the UK Health Secretary. Hancock has suggested that seventeen percent of Londoners may now have covid nineteen antibodies. I'm joined with more on this prime article. Twenty four health and science correspondent Dr. Chris Smith also a viral adjust at Cambridge University. Chris first of all that figure seventeen percent which suggests as I understand that seventeen percent of Londoners have been infected by cove nineteen to one extent or another. Does that sound like a plausible number? Yeah I think I think it does some countries and indeed some commentators in many countries hyping the number would be a bit higher. But Tha that does seem to twin with what we knew about the circulation of the agent. We New London was hot spots. We knew it took off their more than in other parts of the UK and this is also backed up by the that in the parts of the UK. This the Ciro positively right in other words. The number of people with antibodies against the new kind of ours is between five and seven percent so that does align with that so quite high circulation in London lower levels of circulation across the rest of the country but across the whole it means that the vast majority of people are not immune therefore only a small fraction of the countryside. Fall has actually called the new cry of ours. Is there anything we can infer from that figure in London? Not Merely about the level of infection but the the level of exposure what. I'm wondering is if you take a given Londoner for the sake of argument. Let's say it's Me Prior to lockdown traveling at least twice a day on Tube trains most of which were pretty crowded frequently being out and about in London which is a busy city speaking to. I don't know dozens of people a day as a journalist does is there any meaningful chance? I wouldn't have been exposed at some point. I it's very likely that you probably have encountered this. But he's whether or not you encountered any infectious dose of it because that's the key thing nodal viruses virus particles might equally and when a person is infected. They are producing from their body and all of their secretions of from the respiratory tract. So that's coughing sneezing just breathing droplets of moisture which virus particles in the they hope for in the for a period of time and it may well be that some of those virus particles that just stopped so although that virus particles and although they might have some genetic information in them they just might not go off like a dodgy firework you like them nothing happens so a person who breathes in some of those particles isn't guaranteed that will catch it so it's not a given if you're sharing it with someone who's infected. You're definitely going to get it. Because it depends how much they're actually issuing from their body into the that you then encounter but yes people in London had an above average Johnson counseling other people who were infected and therefore infectious and because of the high density working environment in London. The high density of traveling in London as a result of that the opportunity afforded to the virus to spread was higher which is why London took off soon took off foster and had high levels of virus. I've rule and I think part of this is probably a reflection on the London's also right next door to one of the world's busiest airports Heathrow which would have an she connected with the London. Transport system would perhaps have been a a conduit into the country with many cases arriving via that route every day. And then probably moving into the capital and helping to spread it if seventeen percent is not it yet is. I don't know whether this is a useful way to be thinking or not but is there. A number percentage at which a widespread lifting of lockdown measures starts to seem like a sensible way forward. Well if we're using how immune people all the immunity right in the population. Then we'd need to be up in the high tens of percent like sixty seventy percent of the population immune in order for this to have any kind of serious impact on the ability of the virus to spread because this whole notion of herd immunity. The word is unfortunately been misrepresented misunderstood by many people as meaning some kind of a strategy to allow people to catch the virus naturally into become immune as a country herd immunity just means that the vast majority of people are immune which means that there are so few susceptible individuals left in the mixture that the virus Kennel circulate. And so you protect the UNAMUNE few by the immunity of the many. That's what herd. Immunity means but in order for that to work. You need very high numbers of the population to be immune so when we vaccinate people against diseases like measles with the Mo. That's why we try to get to ninety five percent of the population because we know even when we get to ninety five percent the population. A handful of people just won't respond to the vaccine so that gives us a bit of safety margin and it means that a good. It to eighty five percents people are gonNA be reliably immune and that means the fifteen to twenty percent who not and this includes newborn babies every year just unlikely to encounter so unlikely to encounter someone who's actually got it that there's no transmission chain in the population that is potentially achievable for this new corona vars volunteer routes. Either we all catch it and we become immune and then new members of the population who bowl not yet an organic. Because there's no disease can eating or more tracks if we make a vaccine against this when we get the vaccine into everybody either way we arrive at a stay of heard immunity where this too few people who are susceptible in the population for the Vars to be able to maintain a transmission chain Christmas. Thank you as always. That was our health and science correspondent. Dr Chris

London UK New London Dr Chris Dr. Chris Smith Cambridge University Hancock Secretary Respiratory Tract Tube Johnson
How a llama could hold key to beating coronavirus

Monocle 24: The Briefing

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

How a llama could hold key to beating coronavirus

"Buffon's are working to isolate an antibody occurring in llamas specifically in one lama named winter. They believe it may yield a treatment for covert nineteen. Here's virologist Dr Chris Smith on Thursdays Briefing so-called camera in other words members of the camel family these Llamas Alpacas and also don't make antibodies like our own or they. They do make antibodies their own. But the don't exclusively make antibodies on their own. They made this other class of antibody. These H. is which I like a small or miniature antibody so this is potentially a real thing even though it does sound like something contrived as the wretchedly labored setup for an atrocious Pun Lama winter virus erected be something better luck next week for molecule twenty four. I'm Andrew

Dr Chris Smith Buffon Andrew
HOW THIS CEO INCREASED SALES AND REDUCED CHURN

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

06:35 min | 3 months ago

HOW THIS CEO INCREASED SALES AND REDUCED CHURN

"Hey everybody welcome to the PD. Revenue Leadership podcast. Hey what we do in this. Podcast is talk about what B. Two B. Sales and marketing Leaders operators experts are doing today to really break through and grow their businesses at exponential levels. Let's get it in the interview at the end. Give you an update on my courses and you can check out my website at B. Two B. Revenue Dot Com. And it's Brian G Burns. Aw on linked in they Chris. Welcome to the show was waken started. Tell us about yourself. Chris Smith on say of Happy Height shot in Melbourne Australia. We are a high CIA software that supplies league replied contract To businesses. We integrate with lots of fun software as well paying five use and emerging market later in High Chelsea S. And how do come up with this idea why he had a manufacturing business back in the day and Actually v Ceremony export market was the US back in the night and hightower's will be part of that sold that company you know you have a restraint of trade pretty tight I had the guy for manufacturing and food to something else so I started consulting and helping. Businesses grow in the export market. Very quickly are realized that they didn't have a grip on. Hi John and hi was very expensive. Lois holes contracts Blah Blah Blah. So I looked at the IMMERSION OF COMPANIES. Like zero dollars tops. Accompany site fifty dollars a month. You could get accounting softwares pretty decent somewhat. Let's do these for the CIA spice and lighter we are here we are today but it's a pretty competitive space isn't it we? It's quite a strange way. Will Wing Non added tingles guy for I think the reality of happy high CIA people talk about features features features right all the time but we are very useful feature reach grading the Gracious? That actually were sorry to take the credit but does come with human element that you get a qualified consultant Service and Services Service of its own fashion service. Sorry it's really for me. It's like competition out Bay. But you when you dealing directors or managers of Orange Prison. Whoever people just want that element all by getting get support integration of SASS product into is essentially change management and. It's hard and it takes time where we've got a very easy process sites in for lodging bars or small it can integrated very quickly and without any disruption into a company's. Y I have been doing previously so it's busy accession that regards instead of having to try to put a square peg in around how we have around. Paul Hall Ricotta Mike. It Nice and council as guess you're dealing with non technical people and sometimes the last thing they wanna do they have to learn a new system right and no matter. How Arcane their system is they probably know it is. There's right and the idea of switch into something else without that service is scary and I'm happy it was one of those ones where high chows not very happy people fear performance management. So I thought what the the catchphrase how behind charge Hijab now. It might be an we endeavour to do that and through working with out customers. Whether they're very technical or nontechnical we might that experience spies. Best spoke to them. That means that they can get on board into the subway. There's stress rings already with that. Change Management from on Pie device person with falling cabins of all these Hijaz stuff. Now maybe to the cloud all that must be really hot. It's actually not but we helped them understand that. So it's we've got ninety nine percent retention right clients so that's kind of unheard of in such sorry again it goes back to your top of China and when we say we're going to actually help you really do. Who Do you sell to certain size? Companies OR UH. Sweet spot's probably zero to two fifty employees. We have some logic companies or two thousand employees on and the saw it's built so whether it's ten employees will two thousand the largest science. It's really great. Take a sweet spot. Zero to two fifty wanted to fifty. I should say and And that seems to be where we really dominate the market here in Charlotte. Okay and what resources do you put towards marketing versus sales? It's been really interesting. I'll listen to your pod council time so to say generally without Machi solids we. It sounds you got in marketing. Really secretly putting at least ten to fifteen percent of Revenue Tamaki and you look at Sioe stuff. He'd said we'd like thirty percent of the revenue regime sales staff in the business side. Probably a fifty versus one hundred splitting you. Look at that part of the revenue but what we are doing a lot. Why very well is investing very heavily in partnership programs on main genuine partnerships? We accountant that. It's declined I pay your taxes. Do you J. Through these concerts. Okay no problem bye. Say you're using Zero Mile K. PIE or whatever? You should integrate with happy. Because they're going to be right like our. Yes but the difference is we hold the hands. Enjoy that relationship in a lot of equity with the Ken Cheese at that company. Put me onto right the captain's love us. I we pickup pickup spicy. They he will realizing now more than ever having a trusted pot and provide is it silently. GonNa do is very important is marketplace.

CIA Chris Smith Consultant Service And Service Revenue Tamaki Brian G Burns United States Orange Prison Restraint Of Trade Melbourne Australia China Ken Cheese John Paul Hall Hightower Charlotte Accountant
Are the lockdowns working?

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:11 min | 3 months ago

Are the lockdowns working?

"Governments will be wary. That lockdowns may prove to be like wolves in rather be in being rather rather easier to stop than stop. But what do the scientists think? Well he is one on joined once again by monocle. Twentyfold Health and science correspondent. Dr Chris Smith Regular listeners will know that Chris spends his busy days working as a virologist at Cambridge University in Chris. First of all. Is it possible at all? I know this might be a bit of A. How long is a piece of string question but possible to quantify what difference the lockdowns have made? We think that they've made us turn the corner. Andrew as in when you model what this was doing certainly in the UK and other countries in terms of the growth of the pandemic and the number of cases it was growing exponentially and quite quickly. We saw the numbers of cases growing level and off and then admissions to hospital leveling off and then the number of people losing their lives leveling offer now beginning to to go down so this is certainly this intervention broken the chain of transmission or at least made it run through trickle rather than down a nice drag strip so it's definitely putting an obstacle in the way of the spread of the virus In terms of how long it's GonNa take for the peak to drop down get out of the foothills and onto level ground again though. We don't know that yet. So that being the case how and what certainty does anybody know? When do I even start lifting? Lockdowns how do you make that judgment? That's the million dollar question or in the case of what the U K economies being hit by billions per week and people really want to this question if I asked lots of times of lots of different people. Both Vala gist mathematicians politicians. I talked to and I get the same answer. We don't know So people are beginning to look at this from another perspective which is rather than what's out trigger point when to institute change the beginning to say. Well what do we think we could do to sort this out and walk? We therefore implement straight away spicer very interesting mathematician in Paris yesterday. And he's come up with very interesting strategy of carving countries up into a series of sales almost like mobile phone network cellular network cells. And thinking about how you call the country up not just arbitrarily doing in a way where you say. Well where are the people? Where do they go to work? We create sales where you don't divorce people from their work of course and these cells are ring-fenced so you have a Green Cell Novartis Activity Red Cell Virus activity so it's backed up by testing in surveillance and the idea is that you don't allow people to move outside their cell unless they have a very good reason to do so and you put in place. I measures in each cell to make go green by the vars control there. And once you've got to adjacent green sells a you merge together and so now people can move freely within that green area. You probably with me now. You can see you. Divide the country as honeycomb and slowly green or red turns to green under these circumstances. And this he says for a country the size of France or population the size of the UK. You'd be looking a five or six months of these sorts of measures in order to get control and have us bank to something resembling what life used to be like. What are we learning so far about public consent to such measures? Because obviously what we've been going through all over the world. These last few weeks has been absolutely without precedent certainly in reactionary. I think it just has been completely without precedent. So we're having to learn as we go along about what people are willing to put up with Have you been surprised in any direction by the cooperation of Publix? We knew that people were certainly very very good at getting behind this in the in the outset. And we know that people when you when you generally throw down the gauntlet in front of the people and say. There's a very good reason to do this. Let's get behind it people. Do I mean Captain told me who said I want to raise a thousand pounds by doing one hundred laps of my care home garden for my one hundredth birthday and threw down the gauntlet internationally and got twenty seven million pounds. He's raised now just goes to show. The people of re good at getting behind. The cause of the compliance was excellent. But when all this began the psychologists said to policymakers members of government there will be a period of time during which compliancy is very good and then people will begin to tire of this. And you won't be able to get them to do it forever. Many people pooh-poohed this idea but we're beginning to see evidence of this. Because if you if you look at the traffic densities own roads. Traffic density is rising again. If you look at the number of people who actually back at work numbers are going back up. People did get behind it to stall with but I think people are beginning to tire. And we're not going to be able to hang onto people's confidence in this forever so is is it possible then or arguable. Might even be a good thing that some of the lockdown restrictions being lifted that. We're seeing in some places at schools or small shops that those there's actually a psychological aspect To those decisions as well as a strictly medical one well one school of thought. If excuse the PUN is the by sending bag schoolkids what you actually do is facilitate a whole heap of spread through that sector of society and since we know the risk that school kids Ingende and given the schoolkids have younger parents on average the risk. Their parents is going to be really low. This is one way of a controlled spread through a sector of society leading to natural acquisition of immunity and resistance to this without actually placing additional risk in in the way of people who in my swamp so some cynics saying well one way to solve this problem. Is You just Let the scores Go back. And this will take care of the immunity and immunization naturally of quite a broad swathe of society. Now that's certainly one approach and other approaches to say we're not going to do anything to have vaccine. Most people agreed that this is impractical and at the opposite end of the scale completely to the vaccine and not doing anything is the we. Just go business as usual now. Most people are comfortable that we can't do that but so something somewhere between the two where we use. What will be probably much richer. Data informed by testing in terms of where immunity is around the country where the viruses circulating in the country and where people are living working commuting where the facility for spread is greatest. If we combine all of this information. I think we probably will end up adopting something like the model. I outlined that the Parisian mathematicians are proposing perhaps not identical but something which enables a degree of normality in some places reinforced by testing and surveillance together with Other signs brought to bear such as issues like vaccination when that eventually materialize. If it does an any drugs we can throw it this as well as continuing to protect the most vulnerable people either by shielding them or by testing the workers who are going to care for them and then only deploy workers to care for the most vulnerable people who know on our immune.

Dr Chris Smith UK Green Cell Novartis Lockdowns Cambridge University Publix Paris France Andrew
Duke freshman Cassius Stanley declares for NBA draft

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 4 months ago

Duke freshman Cassius Stanley declares for NBA draft

"Several more underclassmen to declare for the twenty twenty NBA draft Arizona freshman point guard Nico Mannion and UCLA junior forward Chris Smith both told ESPN their plans to enter the draft Duke freshman guard Cassius Stanley in Maryland sophomore forward Jaylen Smith both announced via social media their plans to enter the professional ranks Jaylon Smith averaged over fifteen points and ten rebounds per game this season while making it averaged fourteen points in over five assists per game for the Wildcats Cassius Stanley shot over forty seven percent this year for Duke I'm Dennis ****

Nico Mannion Chris Smith Espn Cassius Stanley Jaylen Smith Jaylon Smith Dennis NBA Arizona Ucla Maryland Wildcats
Coronavirus 'may have already infected half of UK

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:09 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus 'may have already infected half of UK

"Now. Scientists at Oxford University believes that Corona virus may have already infected half of the UK's population monocle twenty four. Th Health and science correspondent Chris. Smith is still with me. Chris. What will can you tell us about what this Oxford study says? Well this is early days again. We've got to be really careful about this so they want people to go away with the idea that this is now done and dusted while okay. Everyone's already had this job done. This is another modeling study. That is proposing that actually. There's been a big peak infections already. After the disease emerged from China in November mid November we think was basically ground zero and patient. Zero Seventy two November we think then have spread rapidly across the world and possibly swept through an initial cohort of people in the UK. Perhaps in the mid to late January. And that's renders loss of these people immune already and that what we're now seeing is a second wave and one of the ideas behind. This is the people who are really well connected a networked and were perhaps travelers or had international connections or worked with people. Who did they would have been in the first wave of people who caught it and then perhaps the less well networked people who are underneath them in the system a now getting this filtering through into them. I mean it's just a proposal is just an idea and at the moment we have got no data to support this because we don't have antibody tests yet but now the government of ordered some antibody tests will actually be able to tell and this is critical because when you fight off an infection you make an antibody response which then stays in your bloodstream. Afterwards and if we go looking for those antibodies we can then say who has who hasn't become immune to the infection and that proves they must have encountered it so now is the time to do those sorts of tests and you take a representative sample of the population test. Them see if they have antibodies. And you can then extrapolate that to the whole population and based on the frequency of people who are already immune. We'll get some indication as to how likely this other proposal is Chris. Just very quickly. How can these two very different models exist on the one hand you've got the imperial college model which has influenced the government thinking and on the other hand this this new Oxford theory? What how can they both be credible? Well the both speculative they're both mathematical one assumes the imperial model that no one is immune at the start and this is a new injection of an infection into a population. That's naive to the infection and their modeling. How it's going to spread that the assumption they've made the Oxford group is saying well. Actually let's assume that there is not true and that seem that in fact this got into the population and earlier. Data has already gone through. And that's why we're seeing these two different opinions but again it comes down to testing to find out who really has had this or not not just looking for who's got it right now but looking already immune that's going to night and I think we'll get to that quite soon. It'll be very interesting if it turns out it's right. It's going to be really really interesting. Chris. Thanks very much indeed We'll have more from Chris throughout the coming days and weeks and possibly months as we try and make sense of corona virus and what it means for all of us.

Chris Oxford University UK Smith Representative China
UK to start preparing for killer coronavirus as deadly disease spreads to US

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:26 min | 6 months ago

UK to start preparing for killer coronavirus as deadly disease spreads to US

"In the past few hours the UK government's passed declare to the corona virus our to break a serious and imminent mint threats to public health. It's comes as the number of reported deaths in China stand set more than nine hundred. Let's get the latest on this with Chris Smith who is consultant altuve virologist at Cambridge University. Welcome to the broker. Chris Oh first of all. What does this announcement by the UK? Government mean in practice. Well this this is more kind of a policy situation. It's telling everybody we are preparing. We're putting into certain set of arrangements so that everything thing is prepared. Should the worst happen. The plan in place is not saying wow. The risk is suddenly changed dramatically. The risk is always been there with doing more testing etc.. We'll find out more later this week. I suspect us to really what the background level of this is circulating the country. This is more kind of the government saying that we've got various positions in place whereas policies in place now so if anything does happen we're prepared for it. Why is it gives us announcement now than what kind of considerations have taken place before that? Well things have moved on a little bit haven't they. We've seen very large numbers of cases now declared in China. There's something forty thousand. People have been confirmed as having having this agent. We've got something like four hundred thousand people being watched contact traced by the Chinese authorities. And we're beginning to see pickup beyond the the shores of China last week for instance we had one individual who caught the infection in Singapore. They'd never been anywhere near China showing the infection isn't just outside China. It's actually outside China and is spreading outside China so that was a step change. We've also seen not not one not two but now we're up to eight cases of people from the UK who have been infected with this beyond the shores of the UK at this stage but again reaffirming the fact that did he spreading. And it's quite transmissible so I think this is now a showing that there is a ramp up in in risk and so people are saying we need to be prepared for it now. How much can you tell us about different plans? The UK government's may have in case. The situation gets worse worse over here. Well Caen explain what we're doing in terms of the monitoring and diagnostic side because I'm involved in and from that perspective across this week the information I've seen suggests that we should be slowly phasing in testing local abort tree level now. What that means is that instead of samples arriving At a hospital say and being transmitted down to London where a centralized testing facility can look for this agent. The fortress in networks across the country will have their own. I'm tests so that. They can very quickly process samples from patients without the need to transmit them with a big delay down to London. Get tested set in the back so that is going to help to streamline nine not just monitoring which is going to be important but also getting a good measure on how many people might have this also getting an understanding of how we we can better control and coordinate efforts locally because the sooner we can give results to people with the sooner we can reassure them but be we know what to do with them because if a person needs to be isolated they can be isolated. A person doesn't spend ages in isolation using facilities or wasting their time waiting for a result. We keep the country moving so I think getting the testing is going to be the the first priority. And that's coming this week. We hope the total number of deaths in China has now reached nine hundred and eight and that is more during the SARS epidemic in two thousand to two thousand and three. How would you describe the situation? We're seeing now. What is the situation with the corona virus worldwide? Wii at the moment well the the fine grain data we have is coming from China because obviously there ahead of the curve in terms of hitting their first other countries including this one where tendons be reactive to where people have come from when they have symptoms so case definition here in the at the moment is question. One have symptoms. We'll have you been in contact with someone who has question to have you been in or were they in one of nine risk areas and those areas where they know the diseases circulating collecting at the moment so there may well be Z.. Circulating here on the streets of Britain and we wouldn't know at the moment because we're not going finding random people and testing them because we haven't had the testing Pakistan that would demolish our system. That's why but the point is that the chances are as we begin to look more. We're GONNA find more so more countries with more testing and Awada case definition is probably GONNA show an escalation now. The big question is always still lag. Phase as in China took a wall to give up its numbers before before they started to grow the way that they have recently is the rest of the world in that position did China export enough cases of this to other countries before we knew about it that there is already seething around the world and I suspect that probably was of cases of this. So it's going to slowly grow in smolder and then the numbers will start to climb. We don't know what the Matthias kind of I think what the next week or so is going to show us as we begin to look more but do we know how efficient the sometimes trucco Nian prevention measure have been so far. Well Yeah you're right to call it your Conan. I mean look what China's doing they've got people confined to their homes There were situations where people Philippine told you not allowed out. One designated family member is allowed to go shopping every couple of days. No one else can leave. No one can go to work and the repercussions of this is going to be quite considerable. Obviously the social ones. There's people who might be vulnerable. Who's caring for them? If you if you coke it out the house. There's going to be the psychological things you're going to get you know we're talking about people on boats stuck on in six thousand people stuck on a boat with that doesn't redefine cabin fever or what does and then you got the situation where We we don't know how this is going to spread yet so at the moment is it's really uncertain and so- China have resorted these really quite severe measures and the spraying the streets with no call it at all. But some kind of disinfectant with drones and with other sort of cannons to try and cleanse the areas and reduce the race and it has brought numbers down a bit in China but other countries couldn't possibly do China all doing and China is still just a still not not controlling this. They've still got two and a half thousand cases a day that that dog nosing with it so I think it's early days to say exactly. How far is GONNA go moment? Chris Smith from Cambridge University. Thank

China UK Chris Smith Cambridge University Chris Oh London Consultant Sars Singapore Caen Pakistan Matthias Conan Britain
Bordeaux wine fired into space to test ageing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:48 min | 9 months ago

Bordeaux wine fired into space to test ageing

"Were just hearing from our similar resident scientist Dr Dr Chris Smith in Andrus report. And we're pleased to say that. He joins us again to tell us. About a bizarre story that involves sending bottle of of Bordeaux wine to the International Space Station. Welcome back to the program. Chris so I guess the first obvious question would be why June. I'm asking myself the same question actually under the company who had doing this. I strongly suspect it is a publicity stunt first and foremost it's really expensive to send crates of things anywhere that loan into space and spaces the premium price tank. They say they want to find out what the effect of space radiation will be on the wine. Because we know that when you're up there in space even on the International Space Station there is greater degree of in incident. Radiation in the form of cosmic particles raining in on you. And they're saying that they want to see what the effect of one year in orbit will have on this vintage although we only notes from Bordeaux we don't exactly what winds they're going to send they haven't disclosed exactly exactly how they're going to do the experiment but it's based on reasonable principles. which is that? We know that wine does have a bottling age. Some winds age well some winds h less. Well we also know that the chemistry in the white carries on evolving once. You've actually made the wine and put in the bottle so it will be interesting. I'd say to see where they going with this. I suspect there was a say. It's not much more than a publicity stunt has been sent to space before. Oh Yeah. The Soviets were predictably way way ahead of the curve on this one and in fact some of the Soviet cosmonauts became very adept to smuggling more than their ration because the thing is while some space races are some space faring nations Much more constrained about their alcohol consumption actually in the same way as we used to give sailors a tot of rum. The the Soviets actually used to to issue a a drink vodka allocation to the cosmonauts. Some of them then decided this wasn't sufficient for their requirements and so they actually went on force diets before the space flights and use the extra capacity they generated by slamming a bit before they went into orbit to pack additional reserves into the inside. This space suits Now now they're all pictures of them. Drinking said Volcker in space. Whether or not they really did take much extreme spicer that night but yes certainly been booze in space especially could say that was the first booze cruise of any real note. Situation like nowadays can astronauts for example bring alcohol space or drink in space or they've been told they're not allowed to open these Bordeaux uh-huh samples that are going up but I suspect that they do. Yeah I mean we know this unless restaurants have definitely taken taken a taught I think was he buzz Orrin who when he was about several on the moon. I'm said Reich. I am going to going to have a pause for a moment here and during his paws yes she did have a sweet out of. I think it was a chalice that was given to him from Church. So thank you had a bit of community and why not. But I don't know about now whether or not there are different rules these days for for the people on the I aside I don I doubt I suspect they do get a little bit of drinking. Do you think there is an actual case for conducting research on what happens to why in in-space considering that you know looking looking at all those blinds to fly people to Moss for example they are going to be in space for months and months and months or even years will. Let's just take a step back and say well what's the point of doing anything anything in space. We're trying to discover. Actually the effects of exposure to that environment things like micro gravity etcetera. And I was talking to Jessica merely offer day. She's one the astronauts currently owned the ISS at the moment. She's a physiologist working with NASA. And the reason I was talking to was because she's interested in how things like geese fly over the Himalayas is because they gave from ground level right up to extremely high altitude and then back down again and that caught the attention of

International Space Station Dr Dr Chris Smith Jessica Orrin Scientist Himalayas Reich Andrus Volcker Nasa In-Space ISS Moss One Year
"chris smith" Discussed on The Big Ones

The Big Ones

13:20 min | 11 months ago

"chris smith" Discussed on The Big Ones

"Wise each week. We discussed new ethical questions ranging from historical decisions to relationship problems to bring busting moral question questions can be complicated discuss but they're always fun to talk about because they force you look deep deep deep with inside yourself. Will you like what you see. Chris Smith wow competent so you so you guys. Chris Smith is here now. You guys know Chris because he is all over the television. You are you've been in a bunch of this. Space just went dead. He's all television. You've been like a guest star year a guest or king the the office the Mindy project the Wedge was Mindy Project and then hold on. I know one the free form show free forms show no kick hungry hungry which was all three of these shows are no longer on the ear but that's okay so easily right for you appeared constant on the young hungry. I was a I had a five or six episode arc. Oh the main in girl in that Emily Osmond yeah was such a good actress is she. She's phenomenal. I never saw a show. She's she's been a lot of other stuff till that new show with Brittany snow correct almost family or something yeah where they oh yes. I'm Chris is also a writer on. I don't have words today friends with friends with friends from college and you were in it. Fred funny. Show title runs with friends friends that is that's a great show. It's about your friends having other friends that you don't know that's that's bright because you just want friends that don't have any friends. That's because you're there. You're for yourself right friends about a selfish person who doesn't want their friends to have a life outside of Oh yeah. I like Oh. She's coughing. She's coughing. It was the emotion that came came up brought up some phlegm yeah. The form was gone until today. I'm telling you the dip in temperature. Oh Yeah Yeah it's a fall phlegm to fall now. Having Chris on the podcast has been a long time coming has been yeah so I'm glad you're here and you guys you. You also probably know Chris because he is has appeared on the alarmist. Which area show you. That's right because that's his wife. My wife is is Rebecca Delgado Smith and her. That's her show the alarmist yeah that's right and she comes home every day from work and she has to spend two hours working on the alarmists and I sit quietly looking at her. We've recently given her an assistant so we're hoping tha- Really Andrea Andrea Andrea Andrea has it's chip in with some of that helper factoid Cz yes yes. It's been good. It's been better but she's still really busy and I miss her dearly because she's so busy but sometimes you had to put your podcast ahead of your marriage. Always your marriage. I mean everyone at year. It was definitely all of our marriages have taken a hit us scenarios promise so Chris. We like to start off the the episodes. I don't know if you've listened. I have at my favorite part of the Intros when you say. Would you eat a muffin a week if you didn't have a Muffin I don't even know what I say he said every race and then you drift off so no one knows for sure so you know I've at least listened to the intro. That's awesome so this is the part though that we ask you. Do you have any little moral. Dilemmas is that are plaguing your mind. let me think actually. I just thought of one okay well. This is acting because before we started. We wanted to start recording and he started saying well. No let me run this by you because I don't know how to articulate it and then he started saying it like it was like he was a he was mark Twain Way and then when we said hey that's pretty good. Save it for the Mike. He yelled at US said well. You should have been recording it. Could you imagine if Mark Twain how to podcast you think it would be successful. I use lost in the sauce big question. That's really be so good. I definitely listen to that too. I mean as we all know val. Kilmer expertly were trays marched Wayne. I maybe areas could make an exception for bell. Yeah I mean is is it fair to say mark. Twain was the first part pot podcast yeah. I'm not gonNA fight you on that either. He didn't have a microphone. Buddy buddies sure how to pen pen and microphone without the wires. Maria just laughed so hard Marta Maria Right. She knows it's harder than walkout. I don't think I know this but she is literally in stitches right sees her own number number. One fan like our own greatest fan for it was kind of funny yeah like a microphone editing these big ones the one with Matt with the it was with the conjoined twins and I was doing it in bed at like midnight and my boyfriend was next to me trying to sleep. Ah I was I had headphones on. I was laughing so hard and he was looking at me and he went. You know you're laughing yourself right and I was like I can't to help. This is the funniest thing I've ever but it scares him. I it's frightening but it's also great and I know I agree. That's a good little one to actually. Is it okay to think that you're amazing amazing. I just think that I entertain myself. You know what it is. It's because you and I are both and these are the words of the head manager for years at Iowa well. He said that about me but I think it also applies to you. Were accidentally funny so we read it was a terrible thing to say but in some parts it's true because things come out of our mouths before we think that we are able to surprise ourselves. That's why my mind is constantly surprising me whether it's with anxiety attack or with a funny joke uh-huh no isn't that fun but in Christening auditioning for the show I was really. I had that room in stitches number. What like you did but like if you remember number correctly I was the one who drummed up the group conversation. Really Chris was Chris and I. We ended for a show together month or again. This would have taken both of my best friends kristen hurry. A- away to Canada for money here long got low close would've been in six weeks in Montreal. It would have been a little chilly but like just that beautiful it just would have been able to instill self find the money my God the money. I don't know what you're getting but I was getting This girl's never been on his show a little higher than yours. Mike was an act scale. They were squeezing all of us. Were all getting our our quote but it any network. TV money is just yeah. No it would have been great podcast now but what is but we I mean. It's fair to say Chris that I had that room and the waiting room. How do you guys have gone into. We Oh we made six nervous actors laugh like Oh my God. I've flown your light yeah. No I know we all. We both came out. It went okay anyway. What do you guys talk it. I am I thrive most in a in a in an environment when other people are nervous yeah because you don't really get nervous. I mean there's yes I am on the there is a worker lay down on the WHO with his head down got a full on jumpers what they do. That's what they do to make. You think that's not my roof. Though it's true all my God the neighbors roof a man of bearded men in all black jumper. That's such a shot anyway yeah. We didn't get it but I I like to think. It was my own personal victory that I made enough people smile those couple of days to last me a L. Lifetime. Yeah I made I made enough people small till asked me a few hours after the audience and then it was just back to the same old sad sack Jack Dark Cloud Guy Yeah Yeah. Wasn't that fun now. That was definitely the funnest part of that audition. I had a great time but I'm glad you guys are in it together. We didn't have to go to Montreal for two months. I mean I really would have loved for you both to book this TV show but yeah. I would've been sad. My friends were gone well. They just come out there. That would have been nice. I probably would have at least for a couple of days. Satan your hotel rooms and that's the other thing that where would we have stayed in some sort of decent hotel. I bet no they would. They were giving us a stipend stipend to go and get like an airbnb or something. Oh so interesting could've been called local live like a local remember when we went out to Atlanta to do neighbors and they put us in that like Red Rufin really but then we finally got her own places yeah yeah that was They had a kitchen though anyway Chris. lets get your little big one okay so I thought of a little big one in which was sort of cropped up recently in my life when the movie once upon a time in Hollywood by author director in writer Quentin Tarantino came out it was about a month ago and I did not like the movie but a lot of my friends Princeton and so this click Jesus Christ Maria says excuse me quick quick quick quick quick quick. How much did you not like it on a scale one to ten. I part of cleansing. It made me love. It not wait. No no no one I don't. I don't like it no more. Oh I thought it was all hey okay is skill or like scale on unlike hate scale. Oh I see so one is I hated it. Ten is I loved it. I loved it. What would I give the movie and the old classic one to ten yeah. You were saying like tended. I hated it made me throw up and dilemmas but I mix it up. Okay I would say like kiss hate scale he'd scale Yeah Lake. Get the movie itself probably only like four like I didn't hate need it that much but this sort of like context of like all of the attention it was getting and sort of like I thought it made me hate it even more so I would give it like a seven or an eight with like the context and what's a ten what on a hate scale is a ten what movies attend yeah yeah like what why hate a movie first of all like. I wouldn't even put it in those terms and rub you the wrong way. Can I can name a few. I mean if a subject matter is dealt list like the wrong way and you're offended by it and it's easy. That's hateful like a horror movie gets made and you're like why did this even get made. Why are we giving opportunities. Dude to these criminals I I know. There's been movies that I've hated a lot. Movies are aware of themselves. I ate then when you can tell the people are loving what they're thinking. They're so cool warrior. Do you have a ten that you hate that much. I don't WanNa you oh you know I'm in the industry or trying to be and so you don't you're in the industry. This is so gross at rh to say we're trying. I know it's not I truly is it is it's all relative yeah but you're relatively but I don't want to burn.

Chris Smith Yeah Lake Mark Twain Marta Maria Right Andrea Andrea Andrea Andrea Montreal Mindy Project Emily Osmond writer US Rebecca Delgado Smith WHO airbnb Fred Iowa Kilmer Matt kristen
Girlfriend of Browns DE Smith killed in accident

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:23 sec | 11 months ago

Girlfriend of Browns DE Smith killed in accident

"Horrible story on a Cleveland where the girlfriend of brown's defensive end Chris Smith killed in a roadside accident about to this morning Smith's car had a tire malfunction you struck the media wall median wall the girlfriend exited the car was standing on the road shoulder when a drunk driver crashed into the passenger side of the vehicle and on top of that the girlfriend had just given birth to their daughter two weeks

Cleveland Brown Chris Smith Two Weeks
To Keep Track of World's Data, You'll Need More Than a Yottabyte

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:36 min | 1 year ago

To Keep Track of World's Data, You'll Need More Than a Yottabyte

"Do we need more prefixes for numbers, especially for very large ones? Well, the international bureau of weights and measures is considering just that let's get more on this with Dr Chris Smith who is from the naked scientists that Cambridge University. Welcome to the program. Chris first of all, I think for listeners it may be news that the bureau of weights and measures to be I p m in its French acronym actually exists, but beyond that, what is the background to this story. Well, the bottom line is that I interviewed someone about ten years ago who was busy developing part of the square kilometer, right? Which is going to be the world's most powerful telescope. And he proudly told me that by the time. This telescope goes live the world is going to generate in the region of an exa by of data. Yeah. We got that very wrong because. World's generating hundreds of times more data in a in a year. And that and this is the problem. What's an exit bite them for that massive, what's terabytes or a gigabyte? Well, these real numbers that a prefix is in front of the word bind to mean, very big numbers. And they go up in olders of of magnitude three three magnitudes of ten. So for instance, when we're talking about a megabytes millions of bytes. I'm talking about gigabytes has billions of bytes terabytes is thousands of millions. And so on an exit bite is rapidly followed by Zetter, abide followed by a iota bite. Now. That's where the road in an as you can see that. We're actually getting close to the top of the SCO with y'all to buy switches one full of by twenty zero is because actually we think that within the next decade. That's roughly how much data we're going to have stalled on. So what scientists are saying basically is we need some new prefixes to describe these enormous numbers that we're going to start generates you not just the data that he physics than describing the universe as well because we're beginning to get into the regime. Where we need big big numbers to to be described. And we haven't actually got the scientific numbers defined to do that with. So this time, do you think the bureau of weights and measures will be able to predict this is of numbers that we have going forward when we're we're speaking about data will they create the right prefixes, or is there simply no way of telling. Well, the current suggestion comes from rich Brown from the national physical tree in the UK the national physical labar tree on Al effective equivalent of. What goes on in Paris where we do weights and measures full the UK, and he raised this point road to paper in the journal measurements. Which is what stimulated this discussion in which is in his paper. He put scored a couple of proposals. For new words that we could use going to be considered by the Paris panel in October his proposals all the Rona all NA, which would describe something with twenty seven zeros off to the number one and the quicker. Which would describe one fully by thirty zero. And the opposite end of the scope a really really tiny things. So a decimal points, and then a set number zero men the number the room toe for the mo- tens to the minus twenty seven and the quick to- tend to the minus thirty. So these are the numbers that putting Ford and they've been well informed by there's a mixture of Greek and Latin in the in terms of how they came to these these names, and it means that they using letters that we haven't used yet already and it does leave a be behind. So we still got one number when we run out of metro road. We got one more number. We could add beginning with A B. And he's already thought some suggestions above deca, which would be tend to thirty three an abundant. Oh, which would be ten to the mind is she three

Dr Chris Smith UK Zetter Paris Cambridge University Ford Ten Years
Chinese researcher claims first gene-edited babies

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:16 min | 1 year ago

Chinese researcher claims first gene-edited babies

"And finally on today's program research in China has sparked a huge control in the scientific community. He GM coup of Southern University of science, and technology and Shanzen says he's been genetically editing babies a process that's banned in most countries because of ethical and medical concerns. Well, I'm joined on the line by Chris Smith who is from the naked Santus Cambridge University. Chris aims to help the public gain a better understanding of some pretty complex issues in science. So Chris let's start with the science bit. What exactly has he been doing? Can you tell us about the process of editing human genes? Good morning. The first thing to to make everyone aware of is that we don't actually have any evidence for this. This is all hearsay or what this person claims. No one has presented any substantiated evidence. These stories are true. So we must take them with a pinch of salt and a face value. It may not have really happened. But what he Jan que- says. And he went to a meeting in Hong Kong last week and told people this is that he has done what we call crisper this genome editing on the embryos of seven couples extensively to reduce the risk of embryos developing or presenting on this earth is's receptors for HIV. So in other words, this would make these individuals. If what he's done has really happened much less -ceptable HIV infection in the future. He says he's edited sixteen out of twenty two human embryos from seven couples that eleven of those embryos we used in six implantation attempts. And he says he has one ensuing pregnancy which resulted in twins and of those twins tests show, and these these are twin consensus is as you know, I don't know if he's actually got the babies yet. But certainly the he's saying he's got a twin pregnancy. One of them has had both copies of this particular, gene that he's going for edited the other has just one. Now, how it works is basically. You take the egg. And you take the sperm the fathers in these individuals had jive e so they washed sperm to make sure there were no HIV particles there. They then used one single sperm to infect sorry, infect it being jetted into the embryo into the fertilizing it at the same time added this crisper, gene editing tool which was there to remove gene called CC all five delta thirty two or to cut into that, gene. And that's the one HIV is sort of doorway to get into our cells. And so the rationale is if you change that gene HIV can't use it. And therefore your body is much less susceptible to Jarvi infection. We know at the moment how different than is it from the existing practice of screening genes for disease. I know for instance, Huntington's or something you can make sure that the that the embryo does not have that, gene. Right. Well, there's a a world apart between screening and doing what we call preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and what is. Stint, simply editing, a human embryo to change its life course, because you have to remember that when you do this on a very early embryo in this way, every cell in the body of that individual is going to inherit the change that you have made with preimplantation genetic diagnosis, if you have a family history of of a catastrophic disease Huntington's disease is one example, there are many others, then you can take a cell from a developing embryo, you can look at the jeans, and you can then tell the parents with certainty this individual does or doesn't have this particular condition. That's all the same. Because at that point. You can give them a choice of whether or not they want to continue with that pregnancy, including even implanting embryos. You can you have a choice. They're here. They have changed these individuals at the genetic level, and that means every single cell in the end, I think crucially, the cells that are gonna make sperms and eggs will carry this change, which means not just those individuals, but their offspring will also carry that change. And that means you're changing the germ line of the human race. And that's very very dangerous because this stage these tools are in their infancy. We're not very good at using them on animals yet loans. Humans. I mean, of course, the ethical objections are enormous tr- cermony questions is it ethical to change genetic code to save lives. And if we do have that technology is it ethical not to use it..

Chris Smith Hiv Infection Huntington China GM Santus Cambridge University Hong Kong Southern University Of Science Jan Que Shanzen
Raiders All-Pro Khalil Mack facing $814000 fine for holdout

WGR Programming

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Raiders All-Pro Khalil Mack facing $814000 fine for holdout

"Readers. Defensive end, Khalil Mack continues to hold out according to ESPN Adam Schefter by not showing. Up the camp before their first preseason game Matt will. Be fine eight hundred fourteen thousand dollars, and ESPN NFL analyst Damian what he says paid. A man you pay Jon Gruden hundred million UK. Paid Khalil Mack, what's, going on with that What's going on with that man I got I got from listen I don't know what commit Khalil Mack is but here's what I do know, this man was. A former defensive player of the year all different magazine the final season of his current deal is seeking, an

Khalil Mack Espn Kenley Jansen Buster Olney Jansen Jon Gruden Red Sox Darius Geis Jd Martinez Chris Smith Mike Trout Adam Schefter SOX Mike Social Baseball NFL Matt Analyst UK
David Irving, Kellen Winslow and Morgan discussed on ESPN Radio

ESPN Radio

02:16 min | 2 years ago

David Irving, Kellen Winslow and Morgan discussed on ESPN Radio

"Espn radio sportscenter the two hundred nineteen million dollars in cg chris smith if the spurs offer leonard the supermax is off season he could sign a fiveyear extension worked for proximity to hundred nineteen million dollars topping out nearly fifty million in the two thousand twenty three season alone but according to espn's chris haines leonard has grown frustrated with how the spurs scandal from squad injury and feel the team turned on him when he sought a second opinion sources tell espn eager morgan house yvette cooper prefers the city of angels particularly the lakers pt is michael wilbon lays out what it would take for the lakers to lamb the twenty six year old superstar i gotta get brandon england back for starters and maybe i mean i'm not gonna let hawaii litter join your team because he wants out what he's under contract that's not going to happen so the lakers would seem to be a good fit thin particularly if they can still successfully pursue lebron james and or paul george so i mean that's got a lot of sides to reports that the celtics would be interested in finding leonard issues available in the nfl cowboys defensive lineman david irving has been suspended four games for violating the nfl's substance abuse policy urban was suspended the first four games of two thousand seventeen for violating the performance enhancing drug policy former nfl player kellen winslow the second pleads not guilty to sex brain related charges he remains jailed with nobel in pieces life in prison if convicted coming up on monday we'll wrap over what was a glorious weekend for the us open at shinnecock and t minus four days until our plus world cup labron watch and more monday goes wingo six eastern espn radio espn sportscenter allnight on espn radio and the espn app and espn radio is presented by progressive home insurance getting a quote is easier than ever backwards sportscenter allnight on espn radio and the espn.

David Irving Kellen Winslow Morgan Spurs Chris Haines Leonard Espn Nobel NFL Chris Smith Cowboys Celtics Paul George Lebron James Lakers Michael Wilbon Yvette Cooper Two Hundred Nineteen Million D
Golden State Warriors defeat Cleveland Cavaliers to win third NBA championship in 4 years

ESPN Overnights

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Golden State Warriors defeat Cleveland Cavaliers to win third NBA championship in 4 years

"Sportscenter no team in nba history has ever overcome a three to nothing deficit in a best of seven series i'm chris smith and the warriors well they kept it that way as the sweep the cavaliers with a one week eighty five win in cleveland durant named finals mvp with a game for triple double he had twenty points twelve off the glass and ten dimes hurry poured in thirty seven and sank seven from downtown the question is will this doomsday team dominate in the future well on golden window mike freeing doesn't see a major break oh it's hard.

Cavaliers NBA Chris Smith Cleveland MVP One Week
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

08:28 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"Question right here nail love this one. This is just a really self-aware question. You know, a lot of people are they think so much of themselves in that they can do everything and they don't ask questions like this. So I love this question look is this is a good question. You ready. What if I suck at writing guy. What if I suck at writing? How could I make my content more readable? That's a great question. There's in the book. There's things called the the creeds, right? The marketers create the schedulers create in the closures creed and by the way, just on a side note because we're, we're talking about the book, but not everybody has it actually let me know in the chat, you guys really quickly give me a quick, yes or no. Do you already own the conversion code? I love to know yes or no. Do you already own it? Oh, cool. Thank you on six copies, make sure we get you a couple organs for the course. Yeah. Okay. So just I didn't know how many people would have it already, but basically if you if you already have it, congratulations. If you don't have it, Amazon, audible should at least mentioned that that people can go buy it. It's really good. You get the hardcopy digital or audible, the audible version people love the. Guy that read it has a really sexy raspy voice. And so you'll have to spend about seven hours in your car with me to get through the code. That was while I was worried about our thing today. We were going to little over here on the time, but you know, the actual audio book is seven and a half hours. So if people really want to know how much there could have been today, that's a lot that we could cover Neil seven and a half hours. So let me go back to the self-awareness question. If I suck at writing, how do I make it more readable? You know, they're just admitting that they shouldn't be the one blogging. There's a couple of ways. One is you could outsource it hire freelance writer. There's a great website called freelancer where they have writers. There's another great website called writers access Regan hire part time writers that will be kind of if you're just like I'm out, I'm not touching it. Somebody else ride it for me. If you actually just wanna get better and you want your writing to improve their definitely apps for that. I would recommend Graham early as a great place to start. If you plug grammar in into chrome into your computer, it'll basically grammar check and spell check at a very sophisticated level everything you ever type. So Graham really kind of a do it yourself app that would help you write better, but freelancer writers access great places to. And we actually have a program at curator called or marketer. And when you hire our marketers, they actually write the articles ads in emails for you. So obviously were enough Shen there too. If people are interested in that. Great question. All right. Let's see. Here's a really good question. Look is Camaro quick today was bring your kid to school a, what is it bring bring your can't show work, paying kids will work day. So bringing Lucas up here at the end, he's a sharp kid. He loves soccer. He got a perfect score on his FSA last year. Very proud of that. My friend and you have, do you have anything you want to say to the people watching about what you've heard today here about the code? I feel like I learned a lot. I feel like the strategy on calves really good create and then nothing that you create works if people don't know about it. So you got to advertise those are data, a low of good job looks awesome. Thanks for coming Lucas. Whereabouts around. Up here buddy that he's gotta make some money. Listen guy, he goes, yeah, and and honestly, our goal is to teach complicated stuff so that a kid or you know somebody that's not quite tech savvy, he is dick savvy, but you know, people that maybe weren't born in the video game. They don't know what contra is the other still going to saying, what was that contra thing? He's about what was poke, poke him on what, but you know, this generation is definitely plugged into Lucas. Thanks for coming. Glad to get to sneak in there. All right, two more questions, and then we're going to wrap it up. This is a question I get a lot meal, like answering this one. If I am doing video and I'm doing Facebook and I'm doing Instagram and I'm doing YouTube, right? So what what I would call plan on the spokes, right. You've got the spokes in your your site is kind of the hub. The question is, how do I know if something that I put out on the spoke should go in the hub. So if. If I do a Facebook live or if I do Instagram, you know, video, when do I turn the corner and put that on my actual site? That's a good question. So the way that we think about that is more so evergreen versus real time. Okay. So if if you put something up on social, it could be a tweet or an Instagram post or a Facebook post. If you put something out there on social that is going to be valuable for six to twelve to eighteen months that is when you might wanna consider embedding it in a blog post on your side or putting it in a page, if it's something that is going to be kind of shared today and gone tomorrow, that's the whole point of Instagram stories. That's the whole point of social media is that you can kind of share a lightweight thing that isn't the full blown thing. Right? So I would say if it's super timely and it's just a tweet or opposed or a video that you did today. You can just let it stay on the spoke. But like as an example on Tuesday and you guys should all go to our YouTube channel because on Tuesday, I did an hour, long class on how to change all your Facebook audiences based on all the changes. Facebook just got forced to make. And so that would be a good example of, you know, a pretty in depth topic that you probably will get lost on if you didn't kind of understand the conversion go before he watched it, but that was a Facebook live that we decided, you know what that should go on YouTube because the title of that Neal was the best Facebook ad targeting options. So it's kinda timely because it's in the news. But if you think about that on YouTube, people probably search on Google YouTube all the time for like Facebook ad advice, Facebook ad audiences had a target Facebook ads. So if it's key wordy or if it's evergreen, we try to put it on. The site like the video editing with Jimmy. If you go to curator dot com, slash F B changes that Facebook live will get embedded on our site long-term. So part of its if it's evergreen, part of it's what the quality of it is part of its if it's timely or not. If it's keyword or not, hopefully I did a good job answering that question for you. I, I don't know, ask Sarah, chatted all the questions. I'm sorry if I'm not saying your name on the questions. I don't know who else. And as you, the next question I think that's a good point is the curator brain is evergreen in one of the things. Is it updates in real time, but when the community makes Shane ges and spends more money in the Rangers getting smarter. So so that's the most powerful thing is having furious engaged, like generator pioneering when they actually do those changes implemented. The brain gets martyring everyone that is participating correctly the the best way to explain that his word never sure what will work the best in six months or twelve months. Even though people ask us all the time Worzel this headed that was. Why we built curator the way we built it. We knew that, you know, as long as good ideas go into curator is always people publishing content running ads in doing email marketing. Gonna always know what's working best right now. So we don't know what's going to work best in six months, but we know that it will be at the top of curator when our clients log in. So that's why we built this. The way that we did it look is you're getting massive love in the chat and south, you really our cat. Several other people. Liked your appearance there. All right. Last one. Let's see.

Facebook YouTube Instagram Lucas soccer Graham writer Amazon Regan Neil Shen FSA Rangers Sarah Google Shane ges
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

07:07 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"What the most popular websites in the world use. Like this is a billion dollar company called stripe, look what they do. They give you two buttons. They give you a simple menu. I could go to fifty sixty Silicon Valley websites in a row, and they're all gonna have about the same layout. So don't try to reinvent the wheel. Take a look at Omni, look at their about page, look at their testimonial page. Click on their schedule page. Go into their menu in what you'll find is that there's there's a standard to the web. You know, this is a good example. Hopefully this alone for me here of a seller page Neil, where the is basically is one of those trapdoors member. I was saying earlier, I'm of timing out here at the GOP too much stuff, open bro. It'll be a bad time for the website to go down this during a demo. Let me pull this up because I, I wanted a lashawn under the, uh, slash dot com. Slash bowl is lifelock if yeah, I want to show people how like if I were to just go to a random site, like even if I just went to curator. I mentioned kind of what is the stuff we, we actually lost the weathered. Nothing's loading. We'll we'll talk through. If I, if I went to curator right here, we go. We'll our team must be watching in they, they fixed it knowing I would. I would be irate. But what you're doing is you're finding this stuff on your blog. Like we said that actually has. That kind of worth registering for mindset, right? I mentioned on curator that we had great my ads in the menu. Yeah, the, you know. So this is that concept that like if you're gonna meet our team, if you're gonna hire us or explore system, those are those money pages. I'm gonna leave wide open. I want you to go to those want you to dig through those. Read through those degaulle on those. When you go to these, the certain, you know, when you identify like, no, this one's actually worth registering for that is going to be. We're not gonna take you to something that you don't have to register for. So that's what I was talking about earlier is whether a gerbil or a piece of content you create, what are the things on your site where you can put that form where you can require that they register in for us. It's things like great. My ads like a mention long form, video content. This is another example where inside of this person site. They've got a trap door pay dry. They've got a whole page about selling a whole page about buying a whole page about their team, a whole page about reviews, but they wanna get some seller elites. And so this is an example of a page that it doesn't do anything. It's just a landing page. The only thing people can do on this page is start to put in their address and then go to the next step. So that's an example of sort of having a landing page tucked away in kind of hidden within your website. So you've got the website and you've got all the info that these are those trap door pages to get your home's value to get a fifteen page. Custom CMA may with all the listings from your neighborhood that just sold in the last week that starts to become worth my email or my address. See what I'm saying. It makes it a lot of it is in the positioning of those lead magnets or those trapdoors hope, hopefully that makes sense for people. Let's do some audience question. I wanna get into some of the audience QNA. All right. And I know Sarah is actually dropping all of the links to all these sites right in the chat and town, and hopefully you guys get some ideas from these sites. You'll those are seven, my favorites, but there's tons and tons of different curator. Examples we could pull from, but those are really great. Looking websites in the key is you'll wish to invest in design. You get all the trapdoors Bill that comes part of your presentation. You're listening appointment. This becomes part of it, isn't that just hiding it? I know some, sometimes some of you guys think curated like the seaward. You don't even want to know about it. But like when you're at an appointment that's between shine because nine percent the ages in the world that have anything like them and it looks great. So that's one of the big opportunities. Investment design is creating conversations is not just having it on the internet, but talking about marketing, your marketing is how I usually describe that. You know, it's like we know that your Zillow premier, whatever right. We know that you're fifteen years without about review, but ultimately you've got a market, your marketing, you know, you gotta be so comfortable with the marketing that you're doing yet that you actually end up marketing that marketing you gotta feel comfortable talking about it, not just that you have Facebook go in super specific on the ads in hell. You'll do not. We do email marketing. No, we have a database of fifteen thousand buyers that are ready for your listening as soon as you say. Yes, like that. Yet stuff matters a lot. And I will say that you know, part of our secret sauce is that we work with successful agents. You know, part of our secret sauce is were exclusive by market. Part of our secret sauce is that were a little bit expensive because as the people listening right now, a lot of real estate agents are just awful at what they do. So a marketing company is useless. If we send people to some. Body that uses. So we typically work with number one agent number two aged team organized wanna go to the next level. Wanna go from thirty to forty million from ten to twenty million from fifty to one hundred million. We don't usually kinda start the fire. We really are better at pouring gas on the fire, Neil. I'm gonna answer the questions because they're on my dashboard here. I'm gonna go rapid fire through these questions. The number one. How and remember if you have if you hear your question, Sarah's helping us track this. You're going to get a signed book for free. We'll mail that to you today. First question is, how frequently should you add new and fresh content to your site? That's a very good question. The way that we coach it is we coach weekly. We think that if you can create advertise in blast once a week and by the way meal, that really means like call it forty weeks a year. You know, if you hire our team, they would basically do it three out of every four weeks or so. Throughout the course of a year. So two to three times a month. If you have more of a marketing team, we got Steve, we've got a net, we got the crew, you know, if you have a team, you might wanna actually, you know, weekly or a couple times a week, but once a week, twice a month is a good cadence. When when someone hires our team to do all of their marketing for them, it's typically three to four times a month that they're cabin. So that's a really good question. This is a really common question

Neil Sarah lifelock GOP Zillow Facebook CMA Steve billion dollar fifteen years nine percent forty weeks four weeks
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"Everyone. Thanks again for tuning in today. I'm here with Chris myth author of the conversion coating today. We're going to be going through tactical advice to help everyone on the call today crack the conversion coal, and that's what today is about. The conversion code has been going viral. You know, on a scale when it's in the book is absolutely amazing. Sixty thousand book soul. Some more than sixty thousand copies of the converge code has been, you know, spread throughout the universe if so, is in you know, six different languages. English, of course being number one, but Japanese polish, a Portuguese. Also Russian Russia right now is popular for a number of things, but you know, we're going to get through the conversion Kobo through some taboo vice things you guys can execute today next week next month, that will definitely help you grow your brand and your business. So I have a quick personal story. You know, I've known Chris now for about five years. You had the very end of the book. He talks about closing, we're gonna go through the entire code, but know I remember him teaching me Bissett pieces over the last five years, but that's how the opportunity hick is brain today at the very end, you know, be sure to stay to the end. We're going to cute. We're giving away books, so it's gonna be a great great interview today. So Chris. The conversion code. You know, why did you create it? Why is it going viral? What what's what's the reason why sixty thousand has been sold across the cross. The world while part of Neil is it's a really timely topic like sales and marketing are always invoke United man, and it's just a new era. So it's like if you go look at all the best sales books of all time, all the best marketing books, all the gurus most of them, you know, basically came up with their codes pre internet pre social pre video, pre YouTube pre items, pre email everything. And so I would give these seminars on one topic, Facebook ads, email, marketing website, design. I would do a class on one topic and people would be so thirsty for that one thing. And but but what I, what I realized was there's a lot more than one thing to crack into conversion code. It's about sales and marketing work. In unison. It's about like we're a lot of people right now. They love our classes on Facebook. They love our classes on email marketing, but then they can't figure out why they don't convert. It actually starts way back with the fact that their website is ugly in. That's why no one's picking up their call. So there's there. You know, I was growing up. I know you love video games. Neil's like Pok Mon the original and the new one. And I used to play a game Neal called contra probably before your time. Contra. Okay. So contra had a coat. And basically if you put in up up down down, left right left, right B, a start. If you typed that in before he started that specific combination of, you know, characters gave you superpowers, you're invincible yet. Everyone has wanted to try to think about, like with all this new stuff with Facebook and text in email in blogging and content, and you know all this kind of hustle culture that we see happening. Let's take a step back and let's give people that order. What? What is the up up down down left right left right B, a start for growing your business online. That was what I thought about. So you recognize there is a simple framework to helping a business maximize their brand in grow. I will say, I recognize that there was a complicated framework advocating will help simplify fair. If you actually just look at the cover, you know, we're say, hey, there's Facebook, there's hashtags resigned to deserve Snapchat. There's all this stuff. How do you turn that into money? And so I think what I did a good job of is took a really complicated for Mula in and said, here's exactly the recipe to make the best meal possible online. Got it. And I, I didn't include every ingredient. I included the ingredients that I guarantee taste good. I know they're going to help somebody's business. So left Ryan gave us the framework in the first, you know. So what's the first step to really track Nicole west step one because you don't wanna miss that one. If you missed that won't stop on fixed. That one is step. One is identifying, do. I need to start all the way over on the internet should do any to start from scratch, or do I need to fix what I've done? Because you step one is going into it knowing that you don't know it all. Step one is going into it. Knowing that I've learned a lot in the last decade about Facebook and email and all this cool stuff. Maybe I should work left to right like you said, and that's why the conversion code works because you start with step one. And then when you're done, it's ready and it's hard to figure out what those steps should be in the order they should be. So step one is very simple. Step one is this idea Neil that if we're gonna do ads and we're gonna do emails and have a CRM if we're going to do all the other steps that come next step one is you have to look amazing on the internet, your website, your about page online reviews, content, blog, your your, your hub, I call it your home

Facebook Chris Neil YouTube Russia Bissett Kobo Neal Nicole west Snapchat Ryan five years
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"Dealerships are screwed guys and they did it to themselves they did it because they're sales process and their customer service sucks if you wanna know how to put a nail in your own coffin that's how now i will say this coral black is about to become a best buy these big dealerships that don't give a shit are all about to become blockbusters and best buys and blackberry because what i'm going to do is i'm going to go there in touch it and feel it and then i'm going to ordered on my phone so if i'm a car dealer how do i survive how do i compete how do i make sure that actually have a dealership five years from now will number one is you need smarter marketing number two you need better technology and number three you need stellar sales and service i mean if you think about like guys i want you to look at it good a coral black chevrolets website and then go to carve on his website tell me that technology doesn't matter tell me that user experience and user interface and design don't matter of course stay matter if these dealerships would actually put their tv and radio budget into social media if they would actually put some of their budget into their own website if they they'll put some of their budget into their own content marketing not having to pay the radio and television premiums now avenue direct mail and newspaper bullshit we'll guess what would end up happening they could spend the rest of it on sales training and coaching in service those are the things that can make an immediate and a dramatic impact on their business so i'm no i'm not the only person that's been through this process with a car dealership i know i'm not the only person that got excited about buying a new car went on line got sucked into the marketing and then went and had a terrible experience in fact i think every single day people deal exactly what what i just dealt with and when there is a better way when there is our nerve ah or a car von it out there people will find it people will use it and people will tell their friends about it and when that how.

blackberry social media sales training car dealership user interface five years
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"I can emphasizes enough guys this is one thing that i think is so important to the process of becoming a better decisionmakers not to become fatigued with how many choices you have to make every single day chris as thing every year where the end of the year his he he goes around with a people he committed kiss most with and he says you know what should i be working on in 2018 and he tries a boil it down allow this exercise he tries of boil it down to only a few things a few kind of core items how do i best use my time and almost always it comes down to maybe two or three things now as founders we have the option in the ability and the freedom to work on anything we want at any given time but chris realizes that his ability to decide upfront that hey these are the three things i'm going to work on allows him to do his best work so we wanna think about from becoming better at decisionmaking we want to think about how do we reduce the amman decisions we make every single day last one for guys here today uh one of the better ways becoming a better decision maker is to identify what's changed in the last six months and last year last few years that could affect the decision you're going to make famously web van and company at launch 1998 employed i think of their peak around three thousand employees they were the first online delivery service for home groceries where we will go go on web bans website they can order groceries online and they do deliver to their to their home and you know they launch they raised are eight hundred million dollars and venture capital and within three years there are bankrupt.

chris venture capital amman eight hundred million dollars three years six months
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"Decision is exhausting and it can really fatigued you there's a wonderful book that we have here at the curator of boston office called the contrary and leader concern leadership arraigned by stephen sample and he talks about this concept of is this a hill you're willing to die on is this a hill you're willing to die on as a concept you know often attributed to to the revolutionary war which is it at some point you have to make the decision are you willing to die on this hill isn't that important to you to your organization to your company that you're willing to die on the hill and and this is a really helpful exercise when it comes to decision making because a curator we have three very stubbor very opinionated uh in difficult to deal with at times founders between chris myself and andrew and in the reason that we there's no drama at our company were five years and were generating tens of millions also revenue and at this point in the in the history of most companies there's usually a power struggle and there's usually a lot of in log cases law people just just other are leaving the company or or issues with you know who's in charge and the reason that we don't have those issues that most companies of our size and upward trajectory suffer through is because we have from the very beginning with all the anthony we've all in our own minds have decided the hill that were willing to die on so when it comes to marketing and sales chris has certain things that he wants to do and if someone wants to challenge him on a at a hill he's willing to die on for beyond service and support and product their shells i'm willing to die on and certainly for andrew for a business operations and a technology platform standpoint those hills he's willing to die on and.

stephen sample chris anthony marketing and sales boston andrew technology platform five years
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"What i want to talk about on today's call is this fate of market the power of focus facebook advertising the best three sales questions video marketing the importance of faith this call is being recorded welcome everybody i thank you so much for beyond today's call when it won the cover in today's call is hannah make better decisions and how to become more effective every single day by developing me skills there's a wonderful quote i saw recently by jason freed someone who's a someone we admire very much at curator at one of the founders of base camp he wrote in a medium blog post if you want to feel good brainstorm about it if you want to appear good test it but if you wanna know if you're any good ship it and we're love about this quote talks about one of the things that were so passionate about here curator which is this idea of actually executing on our ideas and in order to be geek become great execution you has become great at decision making decisionmaking one of those skill sets that that pays dividends if he can develop it like communication like ride in like selfimprovement is one of those skills that if you get better at it impacts every aspect of your business in every aspect of your job in every aspect of your life see there's a cost to becoming a poor decision maker you tend to overthink things you tend to procrastinate you you're slow to act you suffer from analysis paralysis uh and this creates a lot of suffering unnecessary suffering as entrepreneurs and as employees and as team members is one of those things that cause a lot of frustration for people especially when you're constantly bombarded with the amman decisions you have to make every single day so in today's call i'm going to cover three skills you can develop and three tactics if you will the again at that can help you become a better decision maker now let's get right into its in the first one is this is something that we think a lot about curator was do you even have to make a decision on it said the energy in the effort that's involved in require to make.

facebook jason selfimprovement hannah amman
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"And we'll be scared about the idea that the internet is always on and you gotta be available 247 so what would your advice fee to somebody they hear a message like that and they want to always be available but they also want to life like have options on your website that like allow you to be available 247 to ease tons of and they're like managing early management's isn't the basically allow us to be available at all time so it's like little things like interkom or having someone pop up like hey let chapter a little bit don't just brushing off i know he was like i'm just trying to be a customer and i want to figure out how to be a customer to customer support like shatti we're not going to be able to help because you have to have a net flakes minds you have to create this original content that only you know but then you have to put it on the internet 247 ito you you can always be responsive without always being available you know i was looking at a technology called groove to manage support tickets and then we have a knowledge base that we use through inner com and it shows us like pay four hundred times last long a customer went to send in a support ticket but then the wikki suggested the answer we didn't get a ticket that's a huge legal i was interested in what damage from hotspot spot said about the content so they found that twenty percent of their content generated ninety three percent of their leads so they were doing too much and a lot of people focus on quality not earn out quantity instead of quality so they're doing too much so they cut down on their blog 50 percent and they found that the time on the block significantly was higher than before i love it and it's actually something anyone can do i mean if you go to your x.

customer support knowledge base ninety three percent twenty percent 50 percent
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"Probably not see i think at the end of the day companies are looking for data the more you know the the more you can sell appropriately and has a marketing company we always have the pressure to show our clients that we're getting them quality traffic quality leaves proper rules from adam grant prison organization of the colleges said to make the unfamiliar familiar cell is something like when you're a really cool innovative suggestion you bring it to a coworker are calling for our manager and they're like oh that's like a really cool suggestion we can't do that because he never tried that before i do think it's important that you want to create a culture where people are open to suggesting ideas and it it is very tough one every time you come with an idea he does somebody squashes a down i do think that it's harder to stand out than ever before another thinks he has you which i think we remember gulf with them girl an audience said pick a song clapper is that the person that you can guess what it is and he says book make it like an easy one like something that now now i did too and goes uncle little start in jenny you can get it it was just the idea that like if it's not in your head in a it's harder to portray when it's not your idea that he kind of mentioned worby parker and taking things at work in other industries can planet contextualising it unit yours so buying eyeglasses online seemed like a crazy idea and everyone the key was like no you need to be able to try to monitor it a took netflixing model he took zepos model and you combine them all in now multibillion dollar company yeah reminds me of google google hazzard thing twenty percent time one out of every five days the people that work at google get to work on anything they want and through that creative freedom g male google calendar like half the cool stuff that we use maps to it was created my sons he got accepted a gifted and they were like teaching the the students in fifth grade the importance of sort of blocking time to to work on nothing and i think one thing that's interesting i know a lot of people watch.

worby parker adam netflixing google hazzard twenty percent five days
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"My name is chris smith almost bestselling author and the cofounder of curator fastgrowing full service digital marketing company this is my show curried is where i talk about what scott my attention basically what gang and helping businesses grow and what i want to help you grow your business faster if this episode my toughest sharing their top take away from one of the biggest marketing conferences in the world clubs claus bell brought members of the curators team to learn as much as possible so that they could bring that information backed up our company and see your work it focus on the action will live by it's actually worth implementing this is curated episode to inbound we saw the link didn't booth and they were telling us that there is a three pixels that you can install on your website and you actually get the information of on his visiting your website you get their perks athens things like that things that people put in themselves on link you'll get the information on is visiting europe site of the great for our clients than it was the great for us acuity what kinds of small businesses are looking at our website and then lincoln will give you what are they gave you eight shot data so basically can you could go to our clients are or even for our cells and say you know like eight percent of the people that visited from linc dan were doctors and fifty percent of worked for companies larger than three hundred employees so they don't give you their email the risd.

scott claus bell lincoln chris smith europe eight percent fifty percent
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"Instagram ads by the end of this year are going to account for ten percent of facebook's total revenue and not only that instagram is also predicted to have more net revenue than both gugel an twitter and then if you think about instagram stories because that was really the killer feature when they ruled that allah was a game changer the concept is the the stories actually disappear there are already two hundred and fifty million daily active users of instagram stories they already overtook snapchat for that so if you look at sort of water the people doing that are going to instagram what are the consumers looking for well in march of this year over a hundred in twenty million instagram irs either visit in a website got directions called emailed or dmd business a hundred and twenty million people in thirty days either visited a website got directions called emailed or d d the business and sixty percent of instagram users have said that they actually learned about a new product or service on the platform so what do you do how do you take advantage of it well here's a couple of protests that we need to start using number one is geo tagging when you actually put the location and you can do this in a post or he could do this in a story but host with location when you actually tag the location has seventy nine percent more engagement them post without a location i can tell you guys that like when we were going through the hurricane and when when i go to a conference like when when i add the location of where i'm at it almost doubles my views so location is critical so if we're posting something about amy up in toronto we should tag toronto if we're posting pictures from excellence in austin we should tag austin you have to tag the location and such a big bestpractice the other thing and part of the reason you want to use the right hashtags and you want to use the right location is there right now.

facebook instagram twitter snapchat austin toronto seventy nine percent sixty percent ten percent thirty days
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"What i want to talk about on today's call is this fate of market the power of focus facebook advertising the best three sales questions video marketing the importance of faith this call is being recorded so what i want to talk about on the marketing call today guises instagram instagram is exploding instagram is a juggernaut that businesses can no longer afford to ignore and i wanted to talk a little bit about why instagram is blowing up and then how we can take advantage of of it as a channel so the first reason instagram is blowing up i can't tell you how many people i meet just day to day that they just sort of say like i like instagram better and it's because of the photos like i don't know if you guys know this visual data is actually processed sixty thousand times faster than text and forty percent of people will respond better to visual 65 percent of people are visual learners and the other thing that's really caused visual content this is according to hubs spa is actually ford times more likely to get shared on social media so the the main reason the instagram is exploding his that it is a 100percent visual platform sure you do at a little tax to your post but pictures when i said in the conversion code image is everything suet start with amazing beautiful photos and because instagram's exploding here's some stats on how businesses are using it like in 2017 there are actually now seventy one percent of businesses that are using instagram but what's crazy is there are now eight million business profiles and last year at this time there was only one point six million so in one year they quadrupled the number of the of businesses that are using it in fact facebook which obviously owns instagram.

facebook social media instagram ford seventy one percent forty percent 100percent 65 percent one year
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"How many people watch videos this is something i have learned the hard way you can still get thirty six more 36 percent more or likes on photos than videos so you definitely don't want to go all in with video on on instagram because the photos are still would get the most engagement bore definitely seeing people consume the video there it's just when they consume it they don't engage with it as often as far as like what to post and just thinking of our content strategy you know a net pulled this from words dream they they kind of quota gary v but it it makes a lot of sense like it should be an 8020 roll like eighty percent of your stuff should be jabs in helpful and high level branding and twenty percent of your stuff should be right hooks and stuff that tries to get a leader tries to make a sale so the 8020 role which i think applies to most social media most email marketing definitely apply here the heroes a really interesting status for us what kind of content to post instagram photos that feature faces get thirty eight percent more likes than those without a face so please keep that in mind as we're launching our instagram strategy is people are looking for other people so things like product shots are things like a picture of the office like those can do great too but faces get thirty eight percent more likes than pictures with out faces they also found that almost fifty percent of captions and comments already have emojis so you can definitely used emojis in your post over on instagram which is cool.

instagram social media thirty eight percent eighty percent twenty percent fifty percent 36 percent
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"Sarah's questions what are good questions to ask to gauge how they're doing with their calls uh call boxx number of calls per day when i think about that question which is so common it basically what they're the answer you guys saw it in the room like nobody wants to call 100 people nobody wants to get hung up on ninety times to find the two that are good even if you find the two it's like demoralizing so the gauge is that because it's hard people quit and then when they quit they feel bad and then they blame themselves but ultimately they're not they're they're taking in action which is the worst action so i would say that we know that it's a position of weakness that people don't call their leads fast enough they don't calm enough times and they don't know what to say and and i think what we can do is instead of saying wolf fix that i think the new pitches like we understand that and so we've actually build our system in our coaching in our training and our mastermind in our conference around flipping the funnel we actually think that you're gonna love calling the leads that have eight hundred marketing points that are on your testimonials page right now we think you're gonna love calling the leads that have opened the last five emails in a row and opened the one that said are you selling your home soon so when you do great marketing and you build these funnels the right way and you send the right messages you are the neil you can close leads at the same rate that we do a curator but yeah it's a little crazy digital just generate hundreds of facebook leads amman and just pretend they're all going to convert you know like.

Sarah facebook amman wolf
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"And we didn't actually make make them registered a read that either but then we had actually done a webinars bowel branding where we got really specific and for that one at the bottom they had to register so we're not calling someone that just register for a webinar we're calling someone that engage with the vase those quote interacted with the amy younger an article and register for the webinar so that's why we call it ten times at the bottom and get a good deal on the phone in a lot of our clients and a lot of people that do marketing having to call a hundred times at the top to get a good deal on the phone so that sort of at the highest level the other thing is that even if you do inbound marketing and you do build a great final for your business people are savvy like when you use cold call tactics on top of the funnel leaves even if they're inbound leads it's still feels like a cold call feels like a telemarketers so i have a few questions here that i wanted to answer for you guys because i know that it was a complex session but it has really opened people's eyes to what's possible so jeremy had a great question he said what is the most effective way to communicate the flip the funnel strategy and a demo so they understand it even if they're not a client and i i know i really hit on that but the easiest way jeremy sometimes we speak in kind of what people call inside baseball you know you're using terms that people don't know so if you're a client you know what the magic millions you know what the chunky middle is and you know what the sweet spot is that's on the graphic that i use that was in the notebook that i used but the way i tried to explain that before i even started that session was.

baseball jeremy
"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

Calls with Chris Smith

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"chris smith" Discussed on Calls with Chris Smith

"So the concept is pretty simple how would you explain flipping the funnel and the way that we do advance marketing for our customers how would you explain that to somebody that's not a client yet at the highest level i can explain it guys it's that we believe in attracting people to our business not chasing people it's a track don't chase and to do that your warming up euro leads through marketing activities you're you're leading marketing do the heavy lifting where normally somebody would have to call a hundred people to figure out the two good leads you can let marketing do that for you like we think about this when you talk to your leads like we didn't call you because you registered to unlock a blog post we're patient we know that we have systems we know we're gonna send you more marketing we know we have a unique value proposition as the company so what we're trying to do is work trying to let the marketing send people down the funnel not the phone and that way when you do call people they want to hear from you you if you call the right people at the right time what to say as easy it's just that most people are calling top of the funnel leads and using a bottom of the funnel script so that's what we're doing like the example i used at the conference's think about the funnel as a as a path it's a customer journey it's it's a slide that people go down where they actually see the same thing throughout the side so we use the example of branding at the top of the fawn all at the magic million the big wide audience we did a really great quote about branding by jeff bezos your brand is what people say about you and you're not in the room and because that was a beautiful graphic and there wasn't a laying can we didn't try to get anybody to buy anything they liked it they shared it they comment on a went viral for very low cost that was our top of the funnel but if that's all we did we won't get any business so we then took the audience that liked that post that engage with that we showed him a case study about branding from a customer.

jeff bezos