20 Episode results for "Chris Miller"

Chris Miller

10 Things That Scare Me

08:08 min | 1 year ago

Chris Miller

"Hey, if you're the kind of person who listens to a bunch of episodes back to back. I have a message for you consider supporting our weird little show with a monthly donation where public media podcasts, and we're only here. Thanks to your support. Any amount makes a difference? But my suggestion how about a monthly donation of five dollars. Head to ten things podcasts dot org slash donate. Or text ten things. Two seven one a one. Listener support it w in y c studios. Steady. Stand clear. This was an interesting thing to think about because I had to like considered like, so what is fear? Right. And I I decided like, okay, it's not a fear unless there's some like element of hope to it that this might not happen. Like in the context of my daughter saying I'm afraid that I may have contributed to my daughter's situation. And her struggles sounds like maybe I didn't. And to me. I'm like, no I did. Because it's I don't really question that you know, like I own that. So I'm not afraid of that. So anyway, number one escalators. I got a shoe or shoelace or something stuck in an escalator when I was a kid once, and my mom completely lost her mind, and we're like slowly going up, and she's trying to get my shoe out. See my mom freak out like that. It was like oh my God. She's I'm gonna die. Why moms giving up on me? Like, she's just like if this doesn't come out like see your kid. Number two. I'll never be in love again. I had a relationship since since my divorce where I was so convinced that I was falling in love like it. Would it had all that? Like just crazy kind of madness. But I soon as there was the first sign of friction it just everything just like evaporated like smoke. Number three. Catheters? Number four. Fail. My artistry course. Number five spiders slash walking into spider webs. Six. Ability to draw some day. I was born with rheumatoid arthritis. And the diagnosed me when I was like two or three, and there was a period of time where I was in a wheelchair and had casts up to my hips. But I think drawing was it was the one thing that like I was powerful. Like, I have a real memory of me sitting at a kitchen table drawing. This web of lines in spiderweb, and I would draw spiders in it. And I draw flies in it. And I remember I would draw parts of the web were on fire. And I I remember the feeling of drawing it and just kind of like being lost in the drawing, and I was making a world. But I was also getting to be in it. Number seven. My rheumatoid arthritis meds will stop working someday. Eight. Get fired from my job. Number nine. My daughter won't be okay. My daughter has a heroin addiction, and she's in jail and currently she's in prison, and she's she's relapsed. You know, many times and to compound it. So my daughter had a child so my grandson a couple years ago and last year his father, which was my my daughter's fiance at the time committed suicide, and my daughter's the one that found him in the closet, and she I. It's scary to me how much of my daughter's experienced is not experiences that I've had and they're not things I understand. I always felt like I had a life where things were difficult. Like, I knew adversity, and I I understood that you can get to the other side of paint, you you can beat things even if you can't make pain go away. You cannot let it take you down. But a number experience what my daughters had to experience. Number ten. My grandson won't be okay. My grandson calls me, mama. It could be totally innocent thing. But part of me wonders like is there this concept of of mama that was floating around in his head that suddenly went away. And did he just stick that on me? I just I just, you know, I'm not naive enough to think that there's going to be no fallout for this. Boy. My name is Chris Miller. Our ten things that scare me. Chris Miller is an elementary school art teacher and an artist who lives in Milwaukee. You can find ten things that scare me on Instagram and Twitter at ten thinks pod. You know, what scares me? That it really is a stark. What are you? Scared of tell us at ten. Thanks, podcasts dot org. Baby Phoebe Ravitch's here. I'm back with a brand new season of so many white guys from WNYC studios. This is the show where it talked incredible gas aren't just a bunch of white. I'm talking artiste apt horse. Bright people who are changing the gay. You're going to. So don't miss a single episode. Subscribe to so many white guys you get your podcast.

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REShow: Phil Lord and Chris Miller. Hour 3 (10-18-19)

The Rich Eisen Show

43:24 min | 1 year ago

REShow: Phil Lord and Chris Miller. Hour 3 (10-18-19)

"Thank you for listening to this podcast one sports net production available on apple podcast and podcast wine as always a big thank you for running to the show we'd like to ask a small but very important favor of you it'll only take a few minutes and if you're one of the first people to do it podcast one will make it worth your time we need you to complete a short sir that's a that's a mom or dad or whatever that the number of times that he would be sitting with his kid and they're watching some show or movie answers some questions and potentially make some money along the way from all of us here at podcast one thank you for being a dedicated listener hour number three of the rich Eisen show is bowl plan I'll give you a piece of Advice Jeff Garland gave me wow oh how about this jeff garland gave me this piece of advice when I became a dad and you know he loves figure out what to do for yourself instead of watching this thing that you know that is not for you watch your Children Watch your kid watch them watches stare at them and the I two hundred and fifty people who complete the survey we'll get a ten dollar gift card to Amazon Dot Com and two Grand Prize winners will be selected at random to get one hundred dollars Amazon gift card about that is what's his name he's like forty eight or forty nine okay that's great tending cascade thing what's his name on Dj's need that is just not for an adult and it's just time to tap out and you're really tired and world's crazy whatever you might want to just walk out the door and do that sometimes I never thought about that until he told me that well he can watch me play video games now you see you're not getting a few months ah free money it's a win win. Our shows are supported by advertisers so filling this out will really help us catered to the needs of you as a loyal listener go to podcast one dot com site survey grant at night and I was saying if I had that life I probably would have what are you why can't you do it still now I'm too old I'm over the hill too old yeah the closest one to me is my heart my heart as trying to pitch the idea of getting a gaming system and getting into gaming and that's my like all watching the baby but I'm gaming like this is on the air what are you guys laughing about over their funding just del Tufo in the break talking about his heyday Dj -ing Okay Indus Seasons out of it and now they're back blessed the hearts which is a new animated series on Fox that started in September This what happens when you set saying I love your new girl and I'm like what new girl you're talking about yeah he said this this is some advice I'll give everybody out there before they even appear on it to happen before I found out that the baller sollers was being picked he loves Sarah I know that he loves you when he when he when he was sitting next to me here on the yeah when she was here right it's happened before magic happens so I won't reveal which one one hanging out with the kid you could pull out your that's your plan so good second tentative plan right now tentative plan is to have a child and then become an inward Gamer like the you you you come on the rich Eisen show you find out when you're on the show they just got picked up for season two all right that's what happens the rich Eisen show bumper on when the last man on earth was just coming out and we'll forte as you know was the last man on earth what a great show that was the J. I was born twenty years too early heart We said that twenty years too early meaning any if I was born it's not getting xbox just had a nice chat in the Green Room with Chris Miller and they haven't been on this show for quite some time actually I think they came out of them is a seahawks fan and others dolphins fan how's that working out ones the last man on earth one feels that the world is right now present that's being there's a difference between being in the vicinity and being present those a bad plan that's what you're saying it's a terrible here I mean we got a guy who goes for one hundred eighty yards then hurts his toe and doesn't play for three weeks we've got todd Gurley who has an incredible five day stretch against the bucks ditch man's spirit spread centerpiece you gotta maybe it's the team name because again we went with Andy Reid as the logo is one of the most incredibly innovative films I've ever seen literally two of the most dynamic idea men of this thought like how in the world are they going to have okay we get it he's on earth by himself what's GonNa happen now how can you go from there and they got trouble it's a DJ from my J. J. Green you want a seriously you won't no you won't know if you'll be don't PJ's that's what how Damian Williams on the side of a milk carton it's Shawn McCoy running around like with his loaf of bread I mean you WanNa talk about ball security the pink rich he's knows his stuff right now I music show when that baby when that when that baby arrives though it's all over it's a wrap it also I guess in a Fantasy League in Matthew Berry Celebrity League that we're not evolved or invited to the one that we are in where the reigning Chen uh-huh thank you thank you okay speaking of winning let's get to my picks this week here on the twenty years later I'd be making talent right now now asked Vegas Dj's that make two hundred and fifty that Best Day One pee wee football four-point suppressor he's got one point of pressure at works though for him at least it did last sounds like sports watching the kid I'm Mike into the game we were just hanging how about being present present but I might not kill and maybe we'll ask these guys their ideas people they they they brought the lego movies to life bring back touching the ver- meal atom bomb I'm sitting here talking about I mean seriously full disclosure cobblestones it's and it's GonNa stay that way for at least ten more weeks vance spreads do we change our team is the team who do you blaming the fact that now is you didn't do it last week because I was out of town if you will I was one week ago from today I was calling in from London I think right around now by the way I had I the seahawks we think we're back and then all of a sudden two days before last week we find out oh it's thighs so bad he's been hiding and he can't go have a pint in me when I called here can we bring this up tags you're walking the streets of one right your phone is cut hot girl is going to be out in the homes we're in we're in a crapper man you gotta do something here that we have right now richest. NFL pegues K.. Okay here we go I'm GonNa give you two marquee looks like one of those games routine two teams that don't like each other and for whatever reason for whatever reason the Texans doesn't matter on we're GONNA be strolling up here and there in a fantasy football we'll ask that because right now we needed Schlitz him up bad news for manfried centerpiece Davante Adams is out Donte Adams is out games the AFC south Leeds Online. And I'm going to take the Indianapolis Colts taking the colts they're at home they're coming off a bye and this just by the way that wouldn't be a bad fantasy team full disclosure we need a full victory this week or we go with or we go with what I I take moll say on Thursday night football pregame show asking him about are you going to have manning back or not what's going on with bill flush the entire memory down the toilet of that awful peyton manning year was it wasn't Orlovsky or who the hell was the quarterback for the colts but it was a Thursday night football game Thursday night football game everybody knew that they had to if you will suck for luck that was what we're talking about I had jimmer aim and change even on that night even on that night where the colts had just won the previous week for the first time all year long with TJ gates coming in a quarterback is is it paid manning is it you wanted Andrew Lock and they can't before I forget I I mean win got the loss I'm taking the colts in this one that was home in overtime in that was okay very good that's that's what I'm going with that one the different times just stopped walking walking go inside so we can hear you clearly because if someone else had called in out of in Pakistan is just for the draft and you've been the one who stood to personally I'm just getting should we go back to our old name no you can't do that the ball God's always put their seem to put their thumb on the scale for the colts against the Texans in Indianapolis I don't even know what happened there last year I do remember Frank Reich went the Texans already having clinched the AFC South Texas couldn't even win now date either two hundred and forty four yards and a touchdown only in I mean it was all up in the Air Reggie Wayne everybody thought that this was gonna be his last home game because he was gonNA leave as we all know he stuck around for Free Agency lucky how wondering what's going on in their season and I think the as always will pull it together an abbot good November and December just not tonight not Sunday night not this week eight hundred would have been real upset and we were trying to like literally not hang up on you but we're trying we're trying to end what kind do I had to I had to get to a meeting they really taught you know we come for name retouched Vermeil's called stop it there producers of Spiderman into the spiders which is and the Oakland Raiders. That's what I was looking at the Oakland raiders are coming off a bye week the packers don't have devante atoms they don't have maybe Geronimo I couldn't just stand something the only time I could do it wait so you're going to a meeting or go back to the hotel I was going to a meeting where was the meeting at at my hotel it is what I really feel and now it's now let me go hooked on a feeling here my unluckiest lock of the week go for absolutely going to happen I'm just saying I got a feeling take this twos the vicinity of a bank Here we go rich Eisen luckiest blame it on the button hooked on a feeling everybody that's the unluckiest lock of the week I'm not saying this is away on saying it right here I'm taking Dallas on Sunday night K- I think Dallas puts it pulls it together and comes up with this win and the Philadelphia Eagles will be the Josh Jacobs has a nice day I think Dennis Waller whose the whose story we fell in love with it hard knocks did you see he got signed well on nine million allison they don't have potentially MVS as tests was referring to him on Monday night football and the raiders are coming off their bye going down I guess some sort of an opioid bottle to try and not realize that he needs to apply himself to be in the NFL. Mike and Mike del Tufo you know it's coming Mike is now searching for life and got through it and now he's got this long term deal I think he gets in the end zone to even give you that I think the Oakland Raiders as we get ready for the autumn I'm taking the cowboys man who are taking the cowboys this does reek of eagles putting it all together on the road I'm taking Dallas I do not think right together we'll talk football and so much more with Phil Lord and Chris Miller next on the rich Eisen show okay this is a thirty second commercial and I'm going to throw a lot of numbers achy or lead Kansas City chiefs raider seven to one to win the AFC West Right now sneaky good are you getting on that kind of feel it but it's a hot take and I said the raiders are GonNa make the playoffs at ten and six they win this one or they're on the way and they'd be only a half game behind the matt four it in over time I think that happened in Houston last year remember that he went forward in overtime in Houston instead of just putting and trying to play for the Taiwan for the fortnight drain book guys I think this is a great idea thank you thank you Chris I know you guys have senses of humor you don't need to hear dollars a year through two thousand twenty three guys also per perpet- he purposefully started taking the please stay with me and just fifteen minutes you could say fifteen percent or more on car insurance this company's been offering great rates and great service for over seventy five years in any and will go into lambofield and pick up the fourth winner year knock on wood if you're with me maters getting five points week they will be healthy they are coming to lambofield where a lot of people believe they won't have a chance to win and I think Derek Carr puts it all together Oh says a team that is so untalented to lose four in a row and they're gonNA get their offensive line if they're offensive line comes back healthy then I'm definitely but I mean my ish segments of the week unluckiest lock of the week and my fourth down hot take right where I five four three two one amount of time just a couple of Dartmouth kids who made good and love football hey they played on Monday night here comes Oakland off a bye coming into lambofield and I think they take this win I liked Alan so I'm kind of stitching together thinking about it thinking about it don't don't do it you've got a baby on the way that you're going to ignore these video games hang on the phone is cutting out right and then you you told that you relate calling in in three all in love Putin stuff in front of us TV shows and films we can't get enough of the people who are behind the Lego movie and Spiderman into the spider verse and Tov Cocktail I don't know if that'll fit in the in the banner f. t. m. c. all right let me get to my so it is truly in your metric the an unlock Eli the painting that's unlock you like it yeah I I I believe again it's a short week for green completely Phil Lord and Chris Miller their new show that they have put in front of us on Fox called the hearts new animated series has just been picked up we'll sell it air yes that's what we've done Dante atoms and we'll disley and what have you okay so we're in the same boat yeah now you Chris Miller yes we're all over it's so it's going so poorly right now now you guys are in a fantasy league together team on Matthew Berry celebrity we are about to lose to the the dog with a pint with the dude it's not like I'm not splitting in AH play video games it'd be a first time dad I know I'm totally a useless appendage in my household so I'll just go down some sort of some halo fos some sort of we're buttoned up Phil feels that we were flat out buttoned up although my fantasy team just is blowing right now are gone me and Chris Brockman over there the time you need help you can speak to one of their trained specialists twenty four seven the company is Geico go to GEICO DOT com today sorry for all the numbers and in let's see at least a photograph based on Andy Reid at this year's owners meeting okay the anti annual NFL owners meeting all the coaches get to take a photograph together he sat eh it's tough for people to kind of get into somebody else's fantasy problems but it's mind so I get to talk to him again we we're wondering if a right in the middle of it and put his left and right legs wherever they dammed pleased I like thanks so we call him the man spread centerpiece named because you're seahawk fan correct that's correct all right and you fill orders a dolphin fan you down I'll go down that that fantasy road by any stretch of the imagination okay in Globe to he was elsewhere Salami dull hawks combination of the last man on earth and the Jump Street movies I've got Phil Lord and Chris Miller here on the rich Eisen show good to see you guys got it congrats on blessed the hearts being picked up for a second saints and get it wondering if our issue is our fantasy team name right now what are we got Well I don't know can we can we put up so they can he's the man but now I would have said would you suggest a team named for me but I got it's not the draft to one dolphin the very last round just that we would have a dolphin who was that it was our Wilson not a great choice for us but aw Zach hurts that's bad which is pretty good strong strong my ball Zach Ertz Yep is a yeah so speaking of which we thought it was the right thing to do the centerpiece got got anything else that we could throw a lot I got Sean Hockey League Flag Parade Adul- Hawkes Okay it's not crowded visit roll off the tongue it's logical I don't know if that will that will met you the gold let's talk girly were God Damian Williams we thought he's going to be that goes before the Shawn McCoy came to Kansas City and screamed that whole thing up yeah and then rush we got the call this morning at nine am exactly I told him I told him to do it around nine oh that's nice of you guys this is a really well produced show you know what I mean survey because the information you gave us can help make things better for the show and you as a listener just go to podcast one dot com slash survey and everything will be right there for you that's podcasts Dot com slash service AH hold on a second guys play poker to or you don't play I poco fantasies talk about bad beats and poker we've all been there you know he's gone now history he's on the waiver wire of life right what is it what is your fantasy team name what did you guys name too the best idea man in this town generation came up with si-ahmed so max mix match their team name is got a sodium pentothal he's hooked up to some sort of truth ceremony goes on I take and he just it's like a Molotov cocktail into the Lakers eight team name say it fast yourself make sense yeah yeah you know and that's that's miles teller the answer I know he's he's he's you do give it up that you bet I bet this is something you would charge for normally I'd say hey can we get Phil Lord and Chris Miller on our team man's spread centerpiece Avatar right there which is an emt I don't see him problem with more and more like Wilford grimly he went Patrick Mahomes and we saw what the hell happened last night so now we're wondering is it the team name do we go out and change the team name yeah it's the man's spread curse it is the man's free meals eh daily rate you don't punch up unless it is at least six figures in our dollar gross whatever this back end got we had the first take molotov cocktail molotov cocktail came from like Magic Johnson shows up and just speaks like he's elitist that's why he's so what what other ones do we have that we've come Chris Brockman that we could ask maybe not but we went Davante Adams I then we went with a snake draft we wanna make jams damn boom boom we're I find Taylor this week two miles teller Bob why did he have somebody is coming killer much better team than us we have draft injured hand movements one shade shy of gruden shade shy I dunno where we come up with that idea we just come up with ones and then he as you could see his filings yeah yeah that's what I'm saying I take molotov-cocktail got outtake CASSANDRA's solid a two in the pitch for the movie say it's going to look like nothing has ever looked before and which is a real easy thing to say possible thing to execute a year before the movie was finished nobody knew what it looked like it was just an idea of how movie could look if he wanted to feel like it was coming he and the agent would kind of get close to the same page would close the deal by bringing the player into his office dimming the lights no yes if you will in your in your mantelpiece this this was an Oscar winner for best animated feature and the question is why how did it come to look like book that came to life which turned out to be a real technical challenge to make it happen but we were sort of like why can't it look like the artisans buyer by not you know not just inspire this I mean walk me through the process of how this looks the way it is and came to be the way it was audacious enough auden's Zeke were going back and forth radiations like what's it like to negotiate with Jerry Jones because he had to do that when he was with the cowboys and he said that Jerry Wants Jerry Jones Votive candle which is by the way based out of demarcus ware came on the show and I asked him as Dak Prescott Colin Good Lord is it about spider man I don't know I can't figure it out early says spider two times in the title now this this put a statuette it said Senator John like why Jones Personal Odor as Jerry Jones personal great one ooh wow candles very strange so I'm the one who came up with it had to be voted voted I asked demarcus if it was sent the alternate world and how in one alternate world Peter Parker was just a lonesome loser and that come from your brains well we would uh-huh actually like it for like six months we could only make it look good if the scene was very dark we couldn't make anything look good in the data in a date you would be dressed in a suit this on the floor behind a desk and light candles in the room have a heart to heart like how much do you WanNa be a Dallas cowboy comes it is named feel like if you have to use a segment to explain it yeah it's no good a one percenter what we call the term of art he didn't recall Jerry Painter Jerry Jones Jerry Jones really excellent and one which would you choose Phil Lord if you had to choose one Garman Spread Centerpiece Jerry Jones Votive candle would soon time yeah but they're very smart people over there at at Sony Image Works and they and we work together for a long time and they made it look amazing and then the idea of how there was darcy another I do want to talk about some of your stuff because it is amazing spiderman into the spider verse by the great title by the way put the name you could sit be these guys can sit here and say you know that come up with a name that doesn't need to explain itself like the Lego movie yeah because it doesn't take a genius to think that it could happen okay or that we were working on on something right now okay in the back of our heads and then the clever sequel title twenty two jobs just right look we can all water ski behind you ought to call in the second desk so what is that process paper very beautiful untile yeah all right what about another lego movies coming anytime a lot of like are you done with lego movies I wouldn't say necessarily done but we might take a little break the Metro Yeah Okay got the plate twenty one jump street we just pick it up stand what you're doing damn it I thought it was a funny joke blew it we can have goes Mike Cameo on blessed the hardest there's still time the writers room of last man on earth and she was snl writer for many years and she's a superstar and he came to us. I WANNA do a show about my hometown the talk about it if it did or did not exist correct you can confirm or deny neither except we can I mean Nancy centerpiece does need to have a background story but it makes very curious what's the story of these guys are again keeping me they were planning to do another one of these that's the hope that's the moby. I don't think we're just something especially coy flow movie for little kids all day that's right that is that he is a great whereas dinner with Chris That's Newborn Dad Humor Oh dip blows the Lord the White House diplo like you was carrying co-star that's right how rude there's still time so where did this idea come from this comes from Emily Spivey was a one of the big rockstars never come up with a so much lovey white guy never like super secure don't relate to that and and in this case it was mostly about trying to support emily and the thing that she wanted to do pitcher jokes and sit there in the ah no kidding so just because it just comes down and you put it all together vessels are you guys going to do it again Carolina and all the interesting characters that live there and we were super excited to help her out and she's like she made it a really hard thing to pick up she's like I want my really close friends recording booth and like when we were staff writers hope that she tries are bit and and try to give her any whatever and a superfund joe funny so when you're putting this together producing directing it or writing it I mean how how much ca like how do you guys collaborate at the end of the Duke Blow Movie Right How do you guys work together I mean the coolest workout yeah the best part of this job is collaborating with other artists and and batting ideas around Kristen Wig and Maya Rudolph to be in it and then I bearing holds Kumail Nangiani Jillian bell a bunch of other people that's an amazing cast thing we find in the couch cushions yeah no one else is using every we're getting more into doing some original stuff these days because you know we've done a lot it's like taking these hidden hidden gems but I think you know sometimes leased F- is cool to we want to create something for future generations to read crack at and put your own spin on it if you could give I mean obviously you've taken you've been able to take a you know all of the hot properties like twenty one jump street and cloudy with a chance of me Oh I know you can get to like tomorrow if you wanted but the bengals are lurking just as much I know they lurk and I feel like this firm and deny you confirm and great I wasn't exactly another one okay I just feel like this team is just trying to win games so Ryan Fitzpatrick as you know goes I thought you meant the diplomat added world famous awesome we have it really more than anything it was just enjoying everybody's awesome work and then coming here and taking credit for I've done fill yeah you're really good at that when he was a senior and he he had like look I've come from behind victories in this last season and one of them was art has been picked up for another season renewed for season number to check it out on Fox at eight thirty PM eastern time every single night. If you wouldn't mind just sitting here Phil Lord and Chris Miller Chris Brockman I've never opened residual checks we have a guest sitting to my right who perhaps have con con along twenty five years it's a it you guys have a lot of draft picks Yeah you've got you've got some folks are they are squeaking by every week and and I am here for it I mean he's amazing Russell Wilson. Vp I would gristle employers alone are keeping US afloat in the in this year the pillars of our temple. Well thank you for community thank you for coming on Gosh really appreciated blessed the you great listeners for supporting this podcast certainly couldn't do this show without either of you I wanted to remind you that you can support my sponsors by going to my show page at podcast one Niki Good Games hopefully we'll go as well as pick for Thursday night football last night that's next on the rich Eisen show hey listeners just wanted to take a minute to thank all of my great sponsors and all of you O. Rien no you didn't get the memo I don't know does he's the he's the worst getting the memo guy he's never done have put a residual check on and bow as you know I did twenty two jump street that's right that's why you're the film was as successful as it was boot okay for about the executives of the future what are they gonNa what are they going to what bad ideas are they going to come up with if you could give the and of course supporting now back to the show the great brands rookie once said luck is the residue of design right dot com clicking on the support this podcast button and there you'll see all of my wonderful sponsors that help make this show possible so thank you for Downloading Subscribing v League take econ with Jay NFL. I don't know what to do with Chris you're going to be fired up that's what I'm saying so what I wouldn't normally think that you'd want to take a swing at one of those so it's always like they were down forced touchdowns and going in towards a quarter in the snow say one what did what did Jay fiedler big man dolphins an idea Phil what I'm telling you trust the process that's going to be fine it's a long how come you did not get him in your fantasy team we did do days keeping the quarterback of the Russell Wilson and we've got the New England defense and those up my residual checks on this show as I've done now for several years right and we've begun to do with in studio guests from the entertainment community figured why not do it with Jump Street for I don't know how figure this out free TV pay TV Internet rental ninety five cents for that will fit video and DVD guests and I opened a a CSI Miami check that's the only thing that comes close to that good to see you guys thank you for being back we'll do that and when we return for the Radio Audience Chris Brockman twenty two jump street it's entirely possible let's go glances killing the only thing they could come come even in the neighbors we have David Caruso you've Phil Lord and Chris Miller here since they were the directors and writers of the twenty two jump street movie they put me in how many times have I have these these on campus on Dartmouth look like did he stroll around like the cock of the walk on acid he looked like him and he was pretty mild manner and will forte correct yes so I just grabbed them and by we open them randomly these totally random at the last one with forty seconds left and he's trying to win he's also and I really like you guys I know well we we start with guys and we were big Jay fiedler fans so we were there check I can't recall what's made me happier in recent days you're very excited couldn't I can't recall I can't four games after allowing less than twenty points in their previous game which they did last week so I liked the buckeyes big tonight at Games on big ten network Mike oops here all the time we've had some sitting in the back and I just thought to myself you know maybe one of these is from twenty two jump street we'll just because you announcer of the football game jumps Bagman I'll I'll hold it up here for the television so you could see it's true had no idea it was the twenty two jump street check you could see it's all right there twenty two well moments ago we've learned so as stupid stupid as the residue of design stupid endeavor of me opening five hundred I'll give you a game tonight Ohio state versus North Western just give me the Buckeyes they're juggernaut right now minus twenty seven and a half they're five I have all right let's go to Saturday Michigan at Penn state give me the home team the nittany lions minus nine here's some stats for your rich Michigan to eight against the spread Ashley you put me in that fourteen cents residuals could you imagine a residual check with Phil Lord and Chris Miller here and it is in fact for ask ten games one and seven against the spread their last eight road games penn state coming off a great win against Iowa defenses played awesome gave up gosh at least the jets don't play Sunday so that would mean that the my week would be Yankees lose correct last night yeah under in Denver that okay so retooling last week sneaky good these are college picks ten and eleven on the year so we're right around seventy yards last week to the Hawkeyes Penn state six and one against the spread and their last seven home games against teams with winning records so like Penn state big on James Contests Likely surprised you were there for undisclosed competitive You got your foot your NFL pick quarterback but he played well put a lot of points last week against wake forest. I think there should be a high scoring game pumps a win comfortably but a lot of points Saturday unless you're going to high school with Susan Wagner High School and you WanNa bet against them you've run out of Alma maters of nine to

Eisen Oakland Raiders colts NFL Dallas Chris Miller Phil Lord Amazon football Jeff Garland Mike del Tufo peyton manning apple Chris Dj Indianapolis Colts Texas AFC Andrew Lock Davante Adams
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Shock Wave News

13:09 min | 6 d ago

The Adverse Effects Caused by Coronavirus Vaccines

"If you haven't heard about anchor it's the easiest way to make a podcast. Let me explain. it's free there's creation tools that allow you to record. Edit your podcast from your phone or your computer anchor will distribute your podcast for you. It can be heard on spotify apple podcast and many many more. You can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. Everything you need to make podcast in one place. Download the anchor app today. Go to anchor. Fm to get started. That's anchor dot f. m. to get started today. This is shockwave. News live you can find me online at shockwave. News dot net also right here on anchor. That's anchored dot. Fm anchor dot fm forward slash shockwave news and also on twitter. Twitter dot com forward slash. Shockwave news one. like share. Subscribe if you like this podcast folks okay and your donations are always welcome of course as always k. Let's get into it. I'm pulling an article today. january twelfth Twenty twenty one From natural news dot com natural news dot com and how was reading over the article and it is kind of It's a little I don't know. I have mixed feelings about the article. I think it hits home of what's really going on here in this country right now and what i mean by that is With all the disinformation Did her did. Not trump sign the insurrection. Act what's going on. Can trump's still pull this out on and on and on. So i want to try to clear up just a couple of things here on this podcast if i may and the first one is And reading the article In pulling for my own resources and information sources as well They're saying that the cia that is spreading deliberate. Disinformation across the net is doing an outstanding job right now. so basically. They're they're they're pushing noise folks confusion and as a result A lot of the realities out there becoming split. Let me explain here folks and other words. You have the Misinformation that the troops are there in washington. Dc around the capital. They're for joe. Biden's inauguration day like they think that The world's going to the world's going to end and that's why they're there. The protect joe biden another source. A deep embedded is also telling me that the troops are there. Because president trump had signed the insurrection. Act on the eleventh in that. They're just lining up and they're just preparing. They're preparing themselves to go into and civil chaos. That's why they're there. So what the cia and is well. They're guilty is that If biden is inaugurated on the twentieth january that they're thinking that the radical left attempted a color revolution a siege for washington dc but President trump and his secretary of defense. Chris miller chris miller is also a specialist in an expert at sei ops aiops meeting psychological operations that they have planned for this. This is the reason why trump has let go lots of people in the cia At least the leaders in the in the state department department of defense and different things like that because he has to put patriots folks in these positions if he does not put patriots in these positions. This is the only way that we can take back the country and this is a long shot but again this is constitutional. Okay this is constitutional. What president trump's doing and i support anybody any president no matter what as long as they abide by the constitution they are supposed to represent by the people and for the people and president trump's trying to do that he had a seventy million plus votes. You want to say eighty million. That was actually stolen from him. So he's doing everything he possibly possibly can should he. Did this. sign the insurrection. Act maybe a week or two or a month or two ago. Yeah maybe but again. In order to catch the people he needed to distraction in the capitol building and which he confiscated or a dod department of defense agents of the department of defence In that psychological operation where there was all the chaos and mayhem there Blm and mostly antifa were riding their at the capitol building Department of defense agents snuck in and compensated. Nancy pelosi's laptop. And of course i've heard Chuck schumer heard mitch mcconnell. I've heard i've heard a half a dozen big key players or more. That's why nancy pelosi folks is flipping out right now and wants her laptop back now if not she wants to impeach trump like yesterday because there's incriminating evidence on her laptop at the capitol building in her office that agents from the department of defence Went in and confiscated undercover actually being agents undercover in order to get the evidence to bring back and then the trump team will analyze that which they already have and they've gathered all the evidence which they already have. And you have to have things set up so you got to understand that the courts even on trump appointed three appointees. the courts are now completely shot. The courts are bought and paid for by china. Judge chief justice john roberts. I don't even want to get into that but allegedly and notice. I say allegedly. He's into the pedophilia a child. Pedophilia crimes. And and there's lots and lots of of of evidence of that he even went to epstein island so you know Photos don't lie photos thousand words but again i don't want to get off topic too much here. But you're not going to get just spokes at the capitol building the only way to get justice for we the people to protest peacefully and we the people to do something about it so the psychological operation that went down essentially With the shenanigans that went on at the capitol building and everything else and all the chaos Members of the department of defense undercover agents snuck in. They got a at least a half dozen laptops. Nancy pelosi's laptop because that was one of the most crucial. It's important that they got her laptop because all that information is extremely incriminating against nancy. Pelosi everybody else You know the fbi is planning to run Possible false flags of the capitol building in order to further demonize conservatives and set the stage for a nationwide gun confiscation You know this just goes on and on and on Matter of fact it was chris miller. Who's the secretary of defense acting secretary of defense. Now he's the one that signed the actual official order for the national guard troops to be mobilized in the d. c. Area trump has signed the insurrection. Act he has not officially announced the insurrection act so therefore once he announces that is kind of funny because national guard of course belongs to the state. that's how the states have their military support there all by volunteers or national guard which are volunteers. Once trump announces that officially. He has to wait for everything to come together once. He announces officially then all national guard. Troops are now federalized. and they're federalized under president trump. And that's what you gotta understand. And once once he's federalize that by just announcing they become federalized become federal troops troops the united states and not national guard that belong to the states they belong to the federal government and the president president. Donald trump is in charge. You know sources say that democrats. Left-wing wing were ticked and supporting massive buildup of troops in dc. Then they now are thinking that these troops were actually protect biden and they say Like trump is gonna command them so they're under the false allusion that that's what's going on. You know this is. This is a war this is like instead of Three d chess. Like four and five chests folks as what's going on. It's this is good versus evil. This isn't democrat versus republican. It is good versus evil here folks and what's going on is that this is trump's a last hope and again the cia and fbi are running. They are running operations of disinformation in order to confuse you. All i can say is folks hanging there one more week were at the twelfth hanging in there. One more week Eight days and the inauguration. We'll be here and president. Trump's gonna do anything. He's got a very short window. We're talking just a couple days a day or two and that's about it so just hanging here until the twentieth. And let's see how this all pans out be strong be safe I don't condone violence. I never do. I never will own peaceful protest as always. And we're gonna see this through to the other side folks. There is a glimmer of hope. As long as the disinformation. You can decide for yourself. What is true and again. The fbi and cia running disinformation campaigns. Right now to confuse you. So's the news those the media. It's all just a bunch of bullshit that's all. They're not going to tell you. Think about it. I've had people. Oh shockwave news and and this is peyton. You know it's not you think they're actually going to tell. The mainstream media is big. A mouse is the aren't as stupid as they are. Hey this is going on in. That's going on. They're not going to tell anybody they're gonna keep it secretly secretly wrapped up tight just between a small group of individuals. The people that only have to know those are the ones that are running the operation. Here so let me know. Anything about the podcast. Folks like share subscribe. Your donations are always welcome to help. Keep me on the air as always like share subscribe. This is shockwave. News you can find me online at shockwave. News dot net and of course right here on anchor that's anchor dot. Fm anchor dot fm ford slash shockwave. News and on twitter. Dot com slash shockwave. News one like shear. Subscribe if you like this podcast folks. Stay safe and god bless.

trump cia president trump Nancy pelosi President trump department department of defen department of defence chris miller dod department of defense patriots capitol building Department of twitter Judge chief justice john rober Chris miller biden joe biden Biden Chuck schumer Area trump mitch mcconnell
Episode 20: Fostering Connections with Chris Siemens and Evan Taylor

Pod 4 Good

44:33 min | 7 months ago

Episode 20: Fostering Connections with Chris Siemens and Evan Taylor

"Welcome to another episode of Pod for good podcast here from the change agents making Tulsa and the world, a more vibrant and inclusive place I'm your chief Philanthropy Jesse Orch? Vice Admiral Philanthropy Chris Miller. And today our guests are Chris Siemens and Evan Taylor from the Tulsa. Advocates for the protection of children, an organization, which by the time you hear, this podcast will have a new name. We talked to Chris Evan about the new fostering connections rebranding for Tapsi we also talked about the importance of fostering and putting the child I both in language and in action. Finally we talk about how you can help. Even if you aren't called to be a foster parents, enjoy and get involved. We are very excited to have Chrissy humans and Evan Taylor from the Tulsa advocates for the protection of children on the podcast today. Chris Evans Hello. First off I believe today is June eleventh on June twelfth. You are all can have big announcement. You want to talk about that. We are so June. Twelfth is our official name change big reveal day. We are planning on changing our name on facebook. facebook live changing our name to fostering connections. Fostering connections from the Tulsa advocates for the protection of children. Yes, which as we discussed? Many times is a hard name to remember. It is and doesn't specifically say what it is. You all do exactly yeah. Fostering connections, it speaks more to what we do in the foster care community how we help the families and the children that we serve in foster care in Tulsa in contiguous counties, and it just makes it easier to remember speaks more to our brand in our mission, and it just gives us an updated fresh look, and we have a new logo to go along with it. That is that's exciting. I mean new things are always exciting and I know this is something that you all been working on for quite some time I would like to talk about what. Did, but I also know that fostering connections is going to be tweaking. Some of what TA PC did so. Won't you walk US through what? What fostering connections is going to do. That's different from the organization that exists at this particular moment. So as of today. Tapsi, Tulsa advocates for the protection of children is only really on one social media channel actively. We are currently on facebook. When we turn over to fostering connections, we will be accessible on twitter on link, Dan Instagram facebook Youtube Evans done a really good job and getting all those lined up ready to get started for us to get active more out there in the social world to help connect people especially now that we're going through the the covid experience, and we're also launching a new mobile resource center, so we're purchasing. Purchasing a truck or large van? We haven't really narrowed it down yet, but the that will give us the opportunity to go out to rural areas that Sarah on Tulsa and visit the families that aren't really able to come to us to get the items that they need to care for the child in their home or actually to meet the necessities that the child in their home needs such as like clothing diapers, carseats in everything that a child would need upon media placement, and then once a month thereafter. So I think one thing they just kinda. Take a step back. Just talking about foster care in general l. just say there's been some interesting depictions of foster care in pop culture. So can you talk a little bit about what you see is the purpose of foster care and wide so important I have been a foster parent for about twenty years, and I've seen so much through the system I've met so many biological parents who? Have the child's. Best interest at heart and whether that is. Remaining in the home with them, or they realize that they love the child enough to where they can't take care of the child in their own home, and they go ahead and relinquish their rights and allow them to be adopted by Ostra family. I feel like the most important piece about the child or about providing foster home for the child is to making sure that child is. Secure stable healthy. There are a lot of experiences of the child has gone through and has been extremely traumatized. Who knows how many times many times over before they were actually removed from the home and our job as foster parents is to minimize additional trauma in to help the child address. What current trauma has been? They've been exposed to and to help them. Get the help that they need in order to move forward to be as successful as they can be. And you've referenced pop culture and how foster care is depicted and. I mean unfortunately. Some of what you see is true I've seen. Children come in the door with PJ's on that they've worn for two days and bathed and showered uncomfortable, just really shy and just. Just not sure of. They can't trust anybody. Side seen that and I've seen. Kids come in that literally have a trash bag full of belongings and I've seen my personal experience. I've seen a baby. Come to me with a nine, even a full onesie, just a shirt. He was nine months old with a shirt and one sock, and that's all he came with came to me at three o'clock in the morning. I didn't have Formula I. didn't have really any baby appropriate foods. I ended up mashing up a banana before. Before I could get to the store to get some formula, but I didn't have diapers, so you just never know and that's as a foster parent. You don't get that nine months planning period of getting everything set up planning naming. Don't know what age you'RE GONNA end up getting you. You just don't know so. It's just a whole different world. It's just a different experience from what I can imagine being a biological parent and a foster parents. So, which came I was in your experience fostering, or was it working with this organization Tapsi? As Fostering I. As a young girl I did not want to give birth. I decided as a child that I just didn't want to go through that experience. It wasn't something that I just had to have I. I always wanted to adopt and crazy turn of health events and I had to adopt if I wanted children, so I'm not able to have biological children, so we decided instead of going the private adoption route we decided to go ahead and look into foster care, and like I said that was about twenty years ago, I've been involved as a foster parents much longer than I've been involved in even the nonprofit world working with with a youth in any capacity. Of Question for forever. Who is your now? Into your one month time with tapsi slash fostering connections I. Know From Your Pass Work you have you have been a a pastor? You have run a church. You're very involved in sort of the social justice world in Tulsa. Have you found just helping people versus your pass jobs? This has been. A while wonderful ride this past month. jumping on board of. Going in full force for the name change branding all this different things, it's been wonderful in the past as a minister of a church and denomination. Sometimes I felt kind of restricted in the work I could do. Because in order to get funding or in order to get different things, there was always that restriction of faith. And joining on with fostering connections, it just has opened a whole new world. Am I goal is the community engagement director is really just to bring awareness to this and the work they did. We adopted our oldest thirty eight. Jess at seventeen and I wish I would've known about Tapsi fostering connections. I wish I would've known that. They were there because very similar circumstances, but needing school uniforms asap and not having the financial resources to get the exact pleated skirt. Skirt color of the school colors, and all these different things that really would have made a big difference in my life, and so and the life of my oldest daughter I'm wanting people to be just more aware that it's there and what they do, and it's just been a great ride to be able to share that. Hey, there's this group at Tulsa. We're doing big things. You may have never heard of us, but we're here and it's not just for. Foster, parents, it's for people in the community who have a desire to help children and. Anyone who has a desire to help children needs to know about fostering connections. I think especially now there is a I think a greater sense of. The trauma of just living, if you are in in certain situations or certain backgrounds or ethnicities and In all those cases is using children who don't get the most attention because they don't normally have advocates for them. And when you look at Chris and I sort of phrased pot for good to people as a way of drawing drawing attention to the great work, being done in Tulsa and Around the world depending on who we're interviewing and especially with your organization like I want to let people know there's a multitude of ways they can help. They don't just have to become foster parents. There are there are resources. They can donate if they've had kids themselves. There are things they no longer use that taps Lee sash, fostering connections needs, can you? Can you give us a rundown of things that you? Help foster families and foster children with that people could could help you with. I'm sure the our biggest need. Probably you're right now are just items for children were always needing Formula I urge. Nicely used smokey's of furniture CRIBS, clothing school uniforms, stumbling that we're doing actually right now are working on a summer drive for outdoor activities like pool, noodles, life, jackets, and swimming goggles and water games and Little San Bucket stuff like that the children can get outside and enjoy and one thing that we've I. Guess is a good place to insert does we're really trying to refocus our donations on good quality items with of course except used items, we want the gently used if your child wouldn't wear it. Don't us. It has a big state on the front I mean that's. Mentality within fostering and other nonprofits I know that something's better than nothing the when you're talking about the attitude and the the warmth of child who's might have been shifted around a two or three different homes, and a matter of weeks, a matter of yours to have good quality. Nice things helps them and makes them feel more at home and more relaxed with the environment that they're yeah. So. Would you don't donate those like shirts that? After a team loses a super bowl and they have all those shirts. You don't want those don't. Make I. WE appreciate the sentiment, and we know people just want to health and we know that people WanNa do that, but when it comes in reality, we don't want just like secondhand. Dirty stained worn out shoes stuff like that I mean and it and it also takes a huge amount of work from our staff and volunteers to sort through all these items were actually asking folks right now to come pick up. Bags of items that they need to be. Sorted into wearable, not wearable and good quality quality and moving on from that, and and that's true with a lot of nonprofits all over, but especially with foster children. We want them to feel as comfortable as they can. In what they're wearing the games. They're playing and all the other activities that we provide for them. And then it'd be a little nitpicky right now. We prefer person first language so children in foster care. AM. Sorry guys out there. That that's important again, that's something. I've been people. First language trainings, multiple times and I. Still Mess Up. No, that's important like it's it's. The worst thing that's happened to someone shouldn't be the defining trait right, and these these are children and they want. Children always want right one of the things. Chris you told me about that still affects me to this day is like the fact that they don't have a lot of things that are there's is one of the reasons like having the resource center that you have set up as a store and having your Christmas event so that these children in foster care can get presents that are. There's like how important that is like. That is something that would not occur to someone who is from middle class family who's always gone birthday presents and Christmas slash. Hannukah presence right. You. Don't realize how important those things are. Because those things are yours Ryan Jesse on. A conversation that you and I had led to me doing this research and what I have found is that there's approximately a twenty dollar a day discrepancy between what the reimbursement rate is for child, foster care living in a foster home, and what it is to raise a typical child, in the US, and that that's huge, and not to say, the typical child doesn't have any other needs or or or any other health, concerns or anything channel in foster care most likely will need to have therapy appointments. Additional doctor appointments visits with bio families things like that that that really takes the money out of the pocket of the foster parents to provide a lot of these things for because the reimbursement rate is so low, so that's where we really pride ourselves in coming into play is. We have those items to help with that discrepancy that may not be twenty dollars a day worth of items, but it still helps I mean it could be a couple of packages of diapers to get him through the first week or couple jars, formula or something, car seats, and things like that that can really relieve the foster families in that way we we acknowledge the foster families are doing the best that they can and we are. We're in with them to help. Provide for the children in care to kind of piggyback on what Evan was saying about about how people can help us, or if they're not able to foster how they can give some other ways that I. I! I suggest to people as obviously volunteering with us. We always need volunteers whether it stuffing envelopes. We get a lot of baby dolls. End and we get a lot of baby doll outfits that they don't necessarily match, so we have youth. Come in. They play with the dolls. They get them dress. Do their hair. It's a really a fun time for them. We have people go through age appropriate and can think of the word I'm trying to say age appropriate books for the children to read. We have volunteers that we need Christmas for kids during that time, which is between November and December. I mean there there's there's all sorts of opportunities within the organization, but just says. just helping. Another foster family is huge. When family gets a child in the home, it's not necessarily easy to run out and go to the store so bringing the foster family dinner, giving them gift cards, offering to babysit offering to just go out on a walk, letting the the parent nap or things that you would do for A. Typical family and I say that air quotes, but biological family those are all all nice and great things for foster families to receive as well. It's just it's. It's viewed differently in culture, so we just WANNA put that out there that we could use help as well well. You mentioned that. The children in foster care often enter foster care without a lot of items, and also as I'm looking at your own website I see that. Do like Weird Federal Requirements Foster families don't get reimbursements for the first first few months. Is that still the still the way it is? That can be depending on. The timeframe and the type of foster families, so if you're a traditional foster family, you go through all the training. And then you're approved for placement. Reimbursement starts the next month for the previous met, so it's always in arrears. If you're kinship, family may already have the child in custody. or in your care in your home, but then you go through all the training, do everything that the H. S. requires or that the agency that you're working with requires and. It may be several months like you said that. After you get reimbursed for that child, so you have to be licensed through an agency in order to provide a home for that the kinship, so there's there's different types of foster care, but yeah I mean it could be. It could definitely put a financial strain on folks. Especially now we're. We're talking about. During covid nineteen, where a lot of families may have been released or furloughed from their from their jobs, so that definitely affects the income of the families, but they're still at twenty dollars day disparity. So speaking of if if somebody does want to become a foster parent, or would it be parent who fosters how? How would they get started I? Mean you mentioned there's some training they they have to go through a process. So if somebody just who knows very little about the process in wants to get started wants to start fostering. How would they go about that? So thankfully until the end, even in Oklahoma, we have a variety of. That provide resources for foster parents to get the training that they need to become licensed as luster parents, so or parents who foster normally what people would do is Call D. H. S. call the child, protective services, or whatever it is in their state, whatever it's called and start there there are agencies who subcontracts in Oklahoma with Oklahoma, H S and their private agencies that do support the foster parents. DHS still works on the child and of it, so they work really closely together, and it's really up to the foster parent on which agency best meets. The family I had. We've just decided to go through DHS. And that's what I've always done. And it just depends on what works best, but typically the first call would would be made to d. h s to get the information and they would help guide the conversation from there. How how is that been working during the pandemic like? Are there people answering the phone answering the phones at? The moment or is it? I'm just curious about how this process has been working well, people have been allowed to be in the room together. So? I can answer that question, but it's not really because of the pandemic a lot of. The local office until set was recently sold to. I don't know I forget who it was sold to sold to another organization so. The staff who office downtown were displaced prior to the pandemic. Yes that kind of puts an interesting spin on things, so they have been working from home, and then the pandemic, and then all staff across the board or I say most staff across the board at d. h. s have been working from home as a result of that they have found that staff has been more productive that they've. Had an increase in productivity. The staff has generally been able to do. Most of their job, if not all of their job from home, so many of the counties within Oklahoma have closed their state offices, and the workers are working from home because of that. I guess our love extrovert. The Met Office work done at home. How. How's the pandemic affected? What you all do? It's it's a challenge. We're making it through, and we're kind of at the point of of slowly opening APP I have been working from home this entire time I've been to office a couple of times just to pick stuff up sign checks and such. We did have to close the resource center for quite a while. We weren't accepting donations who weren't allowing people to come in and get any items, and then we slowly opened back up to where we could have appointments. Requested and we would meet people at their car with items that they need for the child. Donations are now being accepted. Now were opening backup to the point of having the resource center open from nine to five on Tuesdays and Thursdays, which is shorter than are typical hours, but it's. Better than nothing, and so people are able to come in and do their shopping. We're just asking that that people wear masks if they are able to. We do have hand sanitizer available for them to use immediately when they walk in the door and when they leave, we ask that there's minimal touching. We do. We do practice social distancing within the center. Our staff is wearing masks and we are sanitizing. On the hour we have a cleaning schedule that we follow and everything all the way from the desk to pens that people write with our sanitized on is scheduled throughout the day so slowly. We're getting back there, but we're bringing where we have a lot of culinary practices that were putting into place. And Evan, can you talk a little bit about what it's like joining a new organization when you're in the middle of this sort of work from home life? Yeah I can't have. been buried probably the most unique hiring process. Most unique job I've ever done I making this joke with Chris her and I have not ever physically met you. I've met just about everybody else along our great board. Members to that have been bontade and stuff that Chris and I have not actually met face to face yet. been. It's been interesting and I've been. I started working from home from the Geico just started slowly transitioning into the office with our online scavenger hunt. We've been doing for the past or weeks. I've been doing a lot of gathering from local friends and artists and stuff to donate to that and have all that at the office scenario thing I do feel more productive working from home, and like at eight o'clock at night. Something it's me I can type it in her in the morning or Chris to that a little bit. Be Able to have the freedom to do that, but also. Feel the passion of what you're doing and knowing that the lives of children are being changed every day because of this work, and it's it's A. It's a feel good, warm, fuzzy feeling. It's just a great fit and we're so excited. Have Him on board. Even though like you said I have not met him in person yet, but it. It's just it's just a natural fit. We're just we're thrilled beyond belief, and there are many of those three o'clock in the morning work times. I did notice an email from you last night that was. Nice. Well. I can imagine that it would be very difficult for a child in foster care who is trying to fit in with a new family that may already have some siblings. There may already have some other children in fostering that it'd be very difficult for them to fully be themselves when they're trying to fit in so. Are there resources that you provide to help the foster parents and help the children as well so that they can navigate those situations? There are a foster parent groups that that are available through D.. H. S. in through other organizations in Tulsa at at the Resource Center. We have talked in the past and this is something that I really want to get going in the future is having activity times with a certain age group to do some sort of activity together, so they can be in the same room together. They talk. They can have fun. No judgment you know nothing whether it's making scrapbook or learning how to make balloon, animals or doing makeovers or something like that. That's just a vision that we've had for a while and trying to build that community that is part of our mission within the the children that we serve. And to try to get them as much support as we cannot just with adults among each other. So. I WANNA. I WanNa talk about branding and marketing and all those things. Because like as Chris and I have talked about many times like the organization's name as of moment, Ta, PC, noth- easiest to remember not the easiest to explain to other people what you do, walk us through the process of when you decided to change your name how you got the I imagine a cost money to build a new website to print new. Letterhead to print new business cards new t shirts whatever it is, and then you also went through a process of coming up with a new name like I want tell me the story of how this happened. My very first day with organization three years is about three years ago today it was pretty much three years ago today. I walked in the door and met my my co worker at the time and pretty much was like I'm going to change the name of the organization. No. No disrespect to the folks who did name the organization because at the time the name fit what the organization did. It's just morphed over the years to do more more community were less work like at the capital doing actual advocacy work, so it's just it's time for a change. And so that conversation lasted a couple of years. We had a lot of other businesses to take care of prior to changing our name so with the new leadership that we had elected last January with. With Emily Board Chair. This was her. Her goal was to get the name change during her term as president as board chair, so we threw around a lot of ideas. We did a lot of what I call brain splash, just throwing words that come to mind on the board and trying to figure out what words come together. If we wanted an acronym of we didn't want an acronym, wanted to keep the ABC acronym, but changed the words I think I don't remember who was came. came up with fostering connections, but we narrowed it down to like a list of three or four names in revoted and fostering connections was was it and everybody seems to really like it fits. There's many connotations to the name like I mentioned before could be fostering child in foster care or fostering helping and the building connections in the community, but the child's family so with our new logo we decided to remain or to continue with the hearts one to to honor the folks who. Did come up with an who did build Tapsi in the beginning. The heart has always been a part of the logo, so he did want to honor. That end, the heart of the mission to keep that as part of our as our our logo with a new logo SAIC, so it's all the pieces are there? They don't really fit perfectly, but they fit to make a heart, and there are four different colors within the mosaic, and each of those colors represent one of our programs. It's unique. It's special I love it. My Mom's maiden name is heart, so I have. A. Fascination with hearts anyway. In personal, but we're just real excited for the new luck. Our new website will be launched the day of the end. The reveal as well so. Tomorrow. Or a week ago. We're going back in time or maybe a month ago. If they're listening to a month from now, that's true. Yeah, breath or evergreen, so if you're in twenty twenty one, you have missed his reveal quite a bit. Jesse Ford Me. One of your new brochures and I I really liked the way the logo ties together with the branding of your programs ended. It does feel. Very unified the marketing together, and it feels like it creates a very unified vision so just looking at that. It's very easy for me to see. What what you all do, and what your purposes? Our mission and our heart in everything stays the same with with how we serve the families end our goal with trying to normalize the lives of the child as much as we can with what we do to help them. That all stays the same nothing about that changes. Our mission doesn't change. It's it's our luck and refill like like you said. I mean it makes us feel like we can move forward and have more opportunities with the new name and the new look, and how everything does Kinda fit together in a more unified way than what it was before. I'm wrong forward to. Moving for with awareness of everything to with fostering connections, I mean it just says so much and me coming in so and just having fresh eyes and fresh years, and learning about the organization and everything I see many more people like myself. Who had no idea what tax she was? The fashion connections just says it all and the one color I think that I don't know if it was planned. This probably wasn't a Christian. I haven't talked about this. She talking about the four colors. The first thing I saw when I looked at the logo as with fresh eyes, not knowing anything else about. Was the gaps between the colors? And as this group, fostering connections is filling in those spaces, and is bringing that heart all, and whether it's through any one of our four programs or anything like that I call it kind of the fifth color there that connects us together and moving forward with connecting us with various other groups I'm really looking forward to expanding our reach and expanding not distance also in our surrounding. Communities to let people know. Hey, we're here and. We need your help. We want to help a child Phil Loudoun special. I think that like the metaphorical difference between your old logo. Your new logo is that. The amount of pieces of the heart it points out the fact that. Taking care of a child in the foster care system is not just about the you can see right there are. There's so many different parts to making sure a a child feels loved and taking care of and wanted that allow those things are not things. People would necessarily think about right and the difference between the filled heart of the old website, and the new one is like it takes lots of different things, and some of those things are identifiable in some of those things might have to be explained to people. Absolutely and I get questioned all the time and I'm sure. Evan you did as well as how can you be a foster parent? I would get too attached to a child I wouldn't be able to let them go and Meyer response typically is that's the point is to get too attached. You're not doing it right if you don't get attached and honestly. When and if a child does leave your home to either go live with the family or to be adopted by another family, or go back to bio family, or whatever the reason, a couple of things one that whatever you have done in that child's life has made a huge impact and will never be. Forgotten either in their cognitive memory or their body memory, and then to I tell people that. The hurt that the child had with whatever it was day experience and then leaving. The people that they trust to come into totally unknown situation is far worse than whatever hurt and pain. I may experience when the child does. Win An child as leave so. looking at it that way I kinda. Put it back on on the person to kind of help them like rethink like yes, you do to attach and it's Ok and there really is no such thing as to attach, but I understand what people are trying to say. It's okay that's that's the whole point is building that bond building that trust with with an adult and then just making sure you have yourself care when the child when the child does an leaving and that way, hopefully that home will be open to accept more children in the future. Elections job is not to get more foster families. It's a calling. It's not for everyone one of our own style. Just really want to reiterate is that people want to? If people care about it, ELP give. We have a texting platform online. Giving stuff like that to help continue us are to continue our work in the community, because foster care is not for everyone and going back to that question, you asked earlier about what the first steps of becoming a foster parent if someone's interested. To foster parents talked to him as you might find out. Maybe this isn't for me, or you might find out this calling you on your whole life. So that is a good segue into a question that we always kind of ask in that's. How can what is the best way for people to connect with you to find out more about your organization to find ways to help? Ed, think in terms of fostering connections since since when this comes out, that'll be the connect with you. Yeah, you're you commuting goes with. Your building all this stuff. Evan come on. A best ways for people to help now is to go to our website. Go to our social media sites go to our facebook page or instagram whatever platform you choose and learn. Learn first and then give second, and whatever level that you can give whether it's financially are of your time or donation Oregon a couple of different avenues coming up soon that are different ways that people can give especially during social isolation and stuff like that that we will be announcing on all those things, but it's more just about education I. Think Awareness First. And then to give later because it's so important, the work that we do, but we don't want people to just be happenstance about it, we want. People that are passionate about what this means and. Developing relationships with US fostering connections with people. That and different groups to really speak to what our missionaries and that's to provide for children, and if you care about providing for children, you can provide for children I don't. Care if you make minimum wage or a million dollars a year, there's a way for you to hell. And we can, we can have your new website. Social media profiles things like that in our show notes as well to make sure people can connect with you. Keyword search coach. Show notes for Jesse later anyway. I if there's a way to be overstepping my bounds here, Chris. We really want to thank our board. Members on cheers, because a lot of our board is not. They're not foster parents. Some of the people in our border, not foster families, and we're always on the search for more folks that don't necessarily fill a calling to be a foster parent that see the need and realized that these kids are these children are everywhere in our community and our churches in our homes, and our boss dogs whatever? They're everywhere and our job to take care of them. Shout to Emily who is? Connected me to this organization in the first place. Who are who, also for some reason, actually enjoyed those seven am coffee meetings we had. Anyway. Poor Jesse. Not I'm not a morning person. This pandemic has not making that easier. Our final thing again normally in the before times when we'd have people to my studio to record this podcast and Normally end with having our guest like look around my nerd cave and pick out something that either like calls to them or that they're. They've been staring at the entire time. I want to know what it is in these remote interviews. We serve in asking people. What are they doing when they're not working, which for nonprofit people is never but. When? You're not working especially during this pandemic staying at home. What I call the last time Chris like your pop culture, pop pop culture junk food. Something that yeah it. Yeah, you're probably pop culture junk food. What are you watching? What are you reading? What you listening to to relax? decompress self and not yeah. Well, just finished watching documenting series on apple, TV called visible. If you haven't seen it, it's very eye opening It's based on the. Culture of the LGBTQ community television and movies over the past fifty sixty years and Have a back story of all the shows that I watch reruns of were talking about Golden Girls which Mary I'm to bed, go to bed, show, and then music too I. Just Love Listening to music as loud as I can car sometimes. and. With my younger children are huge Taylor. Slip fans so I'm in quiet. Taylor swift of auto these essentially she writes catchy tunes. I also liked to cook with my kids. And Cook for my kids out of a relaxing thing. I don't like cleaning up. I do like. Experimenting and not only recipes and seeing if this don't tasted. So, so we know Evan would have chosen my fun. COBB golden girls that you might be able to see behind. Yeah? Nice, yes. Golden girls all right. How about how about you, Chris, so I am home all day everyday with five children, ages eight and under so you don't have any free time. Time. I am able to get to my computer to do maybe ten minutes of work here and there during the day time they go to sleep I'm exhausted so I go to bed pretty early and then I do get up. A couple of hours in the middle of the night ends not. So many people received emails real night last night. Was the last TV show you watched from beginning to end Mike. Boy. Pop Patrol! Yes yes. Control Jesse. Yeah have no, my, so my husband, and I after all the kids do go to bed. We redo record some shows that we watch and we make time to to do that, so we do record and like to election datelines, datelines, and he has a lot of sports shows that he records and we watch and so. What are these sports you speak? He's an absolute denial that there may be no sports, says He. Is He watching Korean baseball? He. Anything that is on anything. And all worth even off. He'll watch. He Watches I. Guess There were NBA. Players doing virtual basketball game. Virtual Virtual Game Horse. I believe Yeah Yeah you. was all over that yeah. But really I mean in all. Honestly it is, it is fun is challenging, because we're not used to all being together twenty, four seven without school without taking the kids to daycare, school, or anything and me going to work, but we do it out every now and then and we'll. We'll drive around the lake pack. Everybody in the car. Go get ice cream. Though drive around go run errands and stuff I met a few trips. Myself have some. Of the House who get out get out of. The city permanent yeah. Yeah, so I, was I was going crazy when we were in the full phase, zero lockdown I guess in April, mostly I was I was very unhappy trapped here in my, even though you think, I would love being trapped my minute studio. I was not I was like I need people. extrovert and that's probably the hardest part of everything. Twice in April. I got to see my co host Chris for like five minutes. We're like the best two days of that. Delivering a microphone. I was like I was like beaming days. So. Well again, thank you both for taking time to talk to us about the incredibly important work you do, and we'll make sure to list all the all the new stuff in the show notes and tell people that like they don't have to become foster parents to help you. There's many different things they need, and especially if they have kids themselves, they probably have decently good things that they could donate to you. Because like how many car seats are just sitting in people's Garages Right now like good quality carseats as Noah. That's right. That's right, but like things for kids are expensive and a lot of times they just stay in people's extra bedrooms or garages, or wherever, or if they have the money to buy a new one for you, so because new things are good to. Absolutely. Thanks guys really appreciate you taking the time to talk to us and learn more about what we do and especially the need out there. Thank you. Hope you all enjoyed our conversation with Chris and Evan again? There are many ways you can help foster families here in Tulsa. You don't have to become one yourself, but they are in need of. Items they are in need of time. They're in need of your ability to sort thanks, so please look at our show notes for all the different ways you can get involved. And as always please subscribe. To this podcast anywhere podcast can be found ever feeling real helpful can leave a review on apple podcast, and maybe if we get enough, I'll read them on the air and would for feels like the one hundred time I've said this inventory, but like five. Don't forget. Wash your hands and get done.

Tulsa Chris Chris Evan Ryan Jesse US Tapsi Evan Taylor Resource Center facebook Oklahoma Foster twitter Chris Evans Chris Miller apple TA PC official Tapsi
Ep130: Structure Before Success

So, Here's My Story...

25:06 min | 1 year ago

Ep130: Structure Before Success

"I love crushing dreams when they should be crushed. A business is messy and unpredictable. Sometimes lonely hello and inspiration can often come from really weird places. We pick up where the bullet point blogs and highlight reels. Leave off they start with a stories Welcome back to. So here's my story. I'm Jodi and Elliot tells a story today today about the cannabis industry and But we then anyway about. I don't know why I decided to whisper it that whatever. Not Very secretive. Nobody some fascinating donating facts about turnover in the cannabis industry and we get some really great conversations about recruitment and vetting for people and also structure and organization from an HR perspective given how important it is to have rule sometimes and expectations and so in in keeping with The discussion about an industry that has not yet well-structured John. We're we've decided on the fly with no structure whatsoever to do a little bit of a drawing surprise with the call contest. Sort of Sir raffle thing. We have been getting a bunch of new members in the facebook group. We're going to start picking up some activity there so anyone who is in the facebook group by the the first the end of the first week of January. Let's just say January seventh. I don't know pick a date something like that. We are going to do a drawing of the people who are in the facebook group and have made some kind of comment or post or something and if you're in there you'll be eligible for several prizes that have as yet to be determined including gift cards and whiskey glasses. So so here's my story glasses. Maybe time with us. You know you never know who knows who knows speaking of the facebook group. I do want to welcome our newest members. Chris Chris Miller Christine Collins and Karen Kimera. Thank you very much and so to get into the facebook group that two easiest ways to get there you can find a link on our actual facebook page which is so. Here's my story facebook page. There's a link to the group you can find link from our website at so. Here's my story dot com or you can text the word story two three four five three four five. Are you ready to go So here's my story. And it involves the cannabis industry other than cannabis. Industry immediately makes it less cool. I'm sorry it involves a lot of weed. Allow a lot of lead. And as you I know force cannabis is legal in a number of states. I think it's actually up to ten but yet it's significant rain degrees. It's varying degrees. The industry has had to go from something. That's you know distributed on a more localized undercover basis behind the dumpster in the alley near the elementary school to an actual industry and the transformation is really interesting because it has to did they have to take what is an unconventional and in many places unwelcome type of business and turn it into a real live. The business in one of the ramifications as reading is that makes itself known in HR so not surprisingly according according to a recent study over eighty percent of the employees in the cannabis industry where it is legal like the industry industry that however topic of the industry like being in the industry like I like making highs. And so I'm going to be a pie. Not so much. They actually like intentionally sought auto industry to be employed Dale being in the industry however there is over sixty percent turnover and I think that the the statistics I read most recently were over. A third would not recommend the individual company they worked for to a family member KNBR. Who's seeking employment disconnect? Yeah tween people. It's not like it's not like these people just took a job at a call center on our 'cause they couldn't get a job anywhere and they're like okay. Get me. There's an intact. They've never really liked the industry. This is where they want to work. They've made believe that that it serves a purpose. They they enjoy it. Whatever it happens to be they want this industry but they just don't like where where they're working and so if you dig deeper some of the issues that the employees reported surprisingly only involve a lack of structure and I suppose but you would think that they go in because they like? I don't want structure. I'm go where they sell weed because stereotypical that may not be. We cannot step over that eh because I want to work. Where can I work that super chill right right? I know where I can work. But they found that a lot of the employees. Actually you want an employee manual. That tells them when they have time off. They want Benetton so yeah. Retirement backed the things that come with the word industry the structure and support and clarity and defined exactly but a lot of the people who have jumped into the industry in insofar as opening companies Whether they're local shops or whatever. They've opened the shops to mirror the culture culture of the product that they're selling And so they open it with a tube with my apologies to outback. No rules just right. MHM approach right And so I find that the dichotomy between the expectations and the reality between the product lines again with Theresa Yeah I just find it. I find it really interesting And the the struggles that at this industry has in actually transforming into a real live business. Ask something that was just done undercover. Oh my gosh okay so I literally just I wrote down like nineteen things that I wanNA talk about but a couple of quick things one. I think that all like we jokes aside the other. When you're seeing play out here is what happens when it industries goes from nothing to something really quickly because because there aren't a lot of of you know I think think things are grow any anything not actually not? Even an industry grows really quickly but a business grows really quickly. I see this happen a lot when something starts and then suddenly booms you don't have time am too you know you're you don't have like years and years and years of getting to your tenth employees to sort of figure out some of these middle. I've got all this stuff They also I just happen to know what we'll get into a little bit. There's a there's a lot of really unusual issues that cannabis industry has that not all their people who like a lot of merchant accounts. So you won't work with you. That's why they take cash only because technically it's federally illegal. And so if you're a merchant account company if you run credit cards your leg legally and your state but all the money's not there so they hands number of banks won't work with the payroll services are payroll all services are out You know insurance is hard to come by because underwriters or like. We're not sure how this plays out legally anyway so they have all these wacky hurls but just that that that makes all those. Hr things all the more difficult. They can't just call eighty peer paychecks. Or pay you know the the the typical payroll companies and say here. Take care of this for me so they they have a bunch of other things but I do. I do want to For anyone who has not picked up our used panty industry episode that we we did. We did an episode on the US Pani Industry that we never published. It is available on our website at. So here's my story dot com or you can text the word story two three four five three four five. I bring that up not selfish for salvage promotion purposes but because there are some parallels here I mean that is a thing that went went from the whole reason we did. That was an industry in the episode. I know is that thing because you told me it was a thing but a new industry that that is actually that was why did the episode was my my fascination that this wasn't when it came up on this radio show that I was listening to the fact that I assumed that when the woman mentioned selling her used panties that she meant like on craigslist or something as it turns out there is I. I don't I don't know where the line is for industry but there are are there are structured websites with best practices and frequently asked questions and rules and regulations not regulations like governmental in mental regulations but unbelievably at there's there's a whole structure around it so it is. It doesn't if this topic interests you. That is also a place where we talk talk about this something going from you. Know off the books back scenes kind of thing into a widget or w Bush actual business stripe rules some structure. So so what do you think back to your story This fat this. This fascinates me that is eighty percent of people are really into the industry radio but then thirty three percent you said roughly a third. Roughly a third won't recommended to won't recommend their employer to a family member or friend and looking for a job and there's over sixty percent turnover rate six percent turnover. Yeah so so that's where hr it's that That that that sort of cliche but very true line of people don't leave a company. They leave like their supervisor. And I think I think it also has to do with part of that supervisory pieces is their clarity are. Do you know if you read any of these books on What makes for a great leader? There are those things are the expectations clear. Do I feel supported. Do I have what I need and my do. I have some flexibility and autonomy and all those things tie back back to. HR types of things. So if that structure's not there you really outpace it That's really fascinating. It is one of the one of the issues. Is that Even with the people that because of the turnover you've got individuals there at at various shop. So they're called called bud tenders. Okay so there are you learn all this just from the no I actually learned it because because I have A number of friends who are speakers to the cannabis industry gotcha okay. And so. That's why I learned the term bud. Ten don't have to tell you I started laughing. Nothing I'm like really really. Is that your word. And it's like no man. That's that's what they are. So they're bud tenders and just like a bartender who's realize realized his or her job There are different varieties different strains to for whatever you WANNA call them and product knowledge is what what separates a good bud bender or bartender shot from one. That's just kind of space right. That's exactly right. And so what they found found. Is that The vast majority of people who work in these shops don't really know their products that well they might know. Whatever printed description comes with the different varieties but they don't know they can't recommend there's no internal training? There's no place to get the internal training and so these people become dissatisfied with their jobs because the don't get better at their craft. They don't earn more money. There's no way as Daniel pink with mastery mastery autonomy and purpose right so they have purpose and they may have a degree of autonomy but they don't have an opportunity to master their craft because it's such a nascent industry industry right because the people who have established the various companies very often. Don't look at it as a traditional business they're gonNA break all the rules right there In a rebel type culture and what they wind up with is people who want to be in business are unhappy being there. That is so fascinating fascinating. Because there's because we talk so much about you know your company projecting your values and making a stand for your values so it's it it's so oh interesting. It's not saying that you have to necessarily be someone that you're not but if you're if you're going to have any business that has people in it like it or not you have to deal deal with what people need in order to be able to do their jobs. Well that is. That's so interested in what to what degree because I want to wrap this back. And sort of broaden auden it to businesses that aren't just cannabis To what degree do use suspect in our just. You know we're now we're just making it up. But how much of that do you think. Think is because of the nature of the industry itself. I e its cannabis in who you making stereotypical judgments about who's into the candidates industry versus versus it. Just being a new and rapidly growing industry and and so it hasn't developed into those Although sort of industry best practices and those kinds of things I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that is the cannabis industry only. Because I think you've got a you've got a very from the statistics. It's you've got a very committed in an exciting excited. Workforce or potential workforce who really likes the industry. But what you don't have is really good on boarding and vetting processes so that you've got people who are like I know this look. My son goes to University of Colorado Boulder older. I'm not saying anything about him. But I'm telling you I know some of the culture and you know I've been out with his friends And every single one of them. If you ask them hey did you want it. If you could get a job anywhere you have to get a job during the semester. He could get a job anywhere. What would you do so if the choice comes down to Arby's or working in one of these jobs they would work in the cannabis industry any day of the week? But they're not vetted so they're like hey it'd be really really cool. Let's see that brings up a whole other layer of question for me though is is that because it's romanticized. I mean like when people talk about anytime I have a client Ryan. WHO's having a I want to burn it all down day and they say to me I just WanNa open and then any kind of restaurant or bar you know that speaks more to me way way more about the fantasy of having a restaurant or a bar because if you've ever worked in a restaurant bar it's a it's a somewhat miserable it can be somewhat miserable industry? It's but it gets very romanticized as if you'd be you know nor was looking Bohana cheers. Yes bed-and-breakfast big romanticize when when it's a it's a What's the word I want? I I can't think of a not a slog but but it's a twenty four seven job. It's really really intense. And so I wonder we talking about expectations at the Yes. They're not develop but I can think of twenty industries like the entire startup industry which is more than an industry that there's a lot of variants in there but those are companies that come. I'm about nothing. Grow really quickly. Don't have a lot of policies in place aren't having this kind of turnover issues. That that that some of these places are so there has has to be another variable going on here and I. I wonder about this like Romanticize. Expectations of ood work in a cannabis industry. I think that's true but I don't think it's just cannabis. I mean for example when I when I applied to law school the year I applied to law school The I was told this is anecdotal but I was told told that the number of applications to law school had skyrocketed and the reason they did is because the popularity the show L. A. LAW IS LA LA law or or a law and order in order and CIS. Or whatever if you'd go into law and they think that they're going to wander into trial and have these mic drop moments with with assistant. Da who happen to be looked like they stepped out of the pages or whatever same same with with architecture so we've talked about. We talk about architecture allowed on the show and I'm sure that funeral I'm going to design Zayn my vision for the city scape and then what are they doing. You know details details in my world testament. They're they're sitting in a library and you're looking up precedent for Code Review Evidence Elisa Code Review and so I think that there's a lot of romanticizing goes on. Not only in a new industry like cannabis but in bed and breakfast and in restaurants and in law and in architecture And and so I think that the burden becomes even more pronounced in the interview recruiting mourning process us to manage those expectations. So you don't crush somebody's dreams right although if you are. It's good to vet them before they start getting a paycheck checking is is to love crushing architecture. Dreams like that sounds really harsh. Does sound a little love crushing dreams. Only Ooh only because I would like crush dreams down breaking open a walnut and if if the nut inside is actually an architecture nut then that's great but if the walnut nutshell around it you know if there's no not in there we would have people come and say like I wanna I think I want to be an architect. We would have them do some kind of internship or a summer thing. These are high school and college. Kids and I had more than a few this one Guy David who is actually now a publisher in New York fascinating. I read this book that I loved called I can't remember what it's called now. It was it was about a couple who who has WHO commits to having sex for a hundred days or ninety nine days in a row? Not Ah just do it. It's called just do it and get to the back and I look at the public and it's this kid who did an internship at my architecture firm and who after the summer was leg no thank you. This is not what I wanted and I reached out to him and he's like Oh you found what you wanted to do. And he's so much better suited for that He would have been miserable in architecture. So I I love crushing dreams when they should be crushed but what was my other billion on talk to people all the time particularly high school students you know in some college students who are like I want to go into law and not only law I wanNA go into public interest law and I will tell you this is my own take. Public Interest Law is like the marine biology of law. You know at some point. I think every fourteen-year-old particularly fourteen. Year old girl wants to marine biologist hype possible and And so you get all these people who WANNA go into. Why because they envisioned them themselves? I Dunno on some Greenpeace wailing mission or something with a law degree and they'd and which is great and but the vast majority isn't that your slogging in law libraries researching obscure points In cases that will never see the light of day. And if you love that if you love the mission and you're willing to stick with it when it sucks This might be your calling right. No that's it bites it like look if you want to be and architect be an architect but it is a labor of love like it is it is often not fine But but do it. If that's what you're calling is but there has to be more more behind it than just. ooh that sounds fun. I had a fantastic I'm so grateful. My dreams got crushed. This one time. I there was an organization here in town They were hiring for this sales position. And I knew the women who worked there in that set I really liked them. And they liked me the editor it was A. It's a publication here in town the editor and I met the guy was in charge of this whole division and he loved me. I loved him. I was so excited. And he said you know this is just kind of a formality but We have everybody. Take this test to see You know just to make sure it's a good fit he's like you've seen fantastic. We were all like starry eyed over breach other and it was a Gallup poll test and it was the call me at home and I answered these lakes sixty questions or something remember at least three times times laughing and saying to the lady. Well I know what my answer is supposed to be. But I'm GONNA CHOOSE A and I remember one of the questions specifically said if you if you just made a big sale you it is your instinct to you know high five and pop the Champagne and celebrate with with your friends colleagues colleagues or does that make you want to pick up the phone and make the next call and I was like oops I know I know I was opposed to save. Pick up the phone but it doesn't. How's it that's not me and at the end of the call remember hanging up walking downstairs and my husband's like ago and I was like I'm not getting that job and I shouldn't get that job that is not the right the job for me and I I could feel it and he called me the next day? It's like I don't know what happened. Let me tell you what happened. I'm not the right person in your test is a good test with. That's the whole point. Yeah they are tasked to to vet people was a great move for them because you have these introducing the all star over each other especially because there's that that psychological phenomenon now you've both spent time you're invested in one side fulfilling a need the other side feeling that Nico retreat is I Mac. I am actually really early. Good at sales I sell really well. I'm a good sales person but I am not driven to sell like when I get a cell a Mike that's cool. I'm not not just driven to go to the next one so I do have a piece of it and I think that's what they saw but I don't have the other piece of it. No one I talked to people all the time who say I really really WanNa be a lawyer because I really love arguing out of it. And that's great but you like that intellectual exercise but we don't just travel from city to city and take on other teams only so yeah so so in your C.. You could have let off with that story because in your story the the vetting process really counteracted the Romantic Amanda Romantic cessation. If that's a word just keep adding syllables of of the industry and it. It separated people people who just kind of like the idea of the industry from the people who are willing to work in the industry even when it wasn't great yet and so just to kind of wrap wrap up on this and this may actually do a whole other episode on that on. This is the the aspect of if I were being hired by the cannabis industry as a whole. Aw to close this gap between eighty percent and the thirty percents and solve the sixty percent turnover thing. It would be very tempting to based based on this article you saw say. Oh it's because you need policies and procedures and I don't know like finding ways to diagnose what the root cause issues because it made simply be. They need a better vetting process. Maybe a huge portion of those people should never ever work in this industry or maybe they need better vetting process. I'm sorry maybe they need better our policies and procedures and structures. HR sorts of things. But you don't know until you find some way to get your finger on the pulse of which one of those things is true. I just he better people. So that's our story. The discussion doesn't have to end here. No it does not want it to know. We don't that that is why we actually have our private facebook group which we started to make sure that we could get your comments your rance your thoughts your stories we're stories you can find and links to that group as well as show notes and links to subscribe via email and how to find us just about anywhere you can possibly find podcasts at so here's my story dot Com and you you can also find us on facebook and twitter at S. H. MS podcast and since we know it takes a village we'd like to thank our village. MILLAGE are super talented. Incredibly patient team and occasionally snorkeling gap in the best of way the Way Sarkozy mockery so huge. Shout out to the people who actually held this producer show. I R sound engineer. Tom Hansen thanks to Christie. Schmear are brilliant show notes and all the other fantastic writing. She does us for us into Taylor. Math our for doing just a little bit of everything including wrangling US including rambling which is no small feat. This is Jodi Hume and you've been listening to. So here's my story.

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Phil Lord and Chris Miller

Maltin On Movies

1:12:29 hr | 2 years ago

Phil Lord and Chris Miller

"Hi, guys. We are so excited to tell you about our sponsor today mall. Finan movies is being brought to you by legion 'em. And it's the world's first fan owned entertainment company. We love working with them. There are some of the nicest people, and they do lots of really cool things like fan meet ups events all over the country. They really make it fun for anybody. Who's a part of the legion you can actually own a piece of a movie, and it doesn't cost a fortune to do it. Find out more at WWW dot legion m dot com. Your buddy. I'm Leonard Maltin. I'm Jesse Maltin. You're listening to Maltin on movies, and we have to count them two guests today, and they are kind of joined at the hip, so we couldn't get just one. No, they came as a set. That's at a matching batching in pepper. That's right. And their names are Phil Lord. And Chris Miller welcomed gentlemen, though. I had someone ask me, and I'm not kidding. If you were called Lord Miller, right? That is by design opposed to being like. Versus band. Well, are is called Lord Miller. Without any punctuation me, we want to masquerade as like an English Lord. Like like, Lord, Lew grade who produce the muppet show and other stuff we have wanted to sort of have people imagine a single entity. We build one person. America. These are the fellows behind the LEGO movie cloudy with a chance of meatballs most recently. They produced in you co wrote Spiderman into the spider verse, which I sent you an Email with his review because I okay, I spent December and from England spent December in England with our family and our friends, so I'm just getting emails from him with what he wants to post review is in income spider verse. And I said this is not a joke. You you want to? Okay. And I think the first line of it is something like, this is the greatest animated film. I've ever seen. But it and the whole thing, and when I did post it and people started responding going, but but Leonard, you know, a lot about animation. Are you? Sure you want to and he was going to get. Yeah. No. I'm in. I'm in for this, it blew my mind. And I said to my husband we have to go see the movie because holy crap. That's a big deal from him. You know, it's a lot. So good job. You guys. Thank you. I was scared to open it. I try not to read reviews these days, they require out. No, no. It's it is freaky. I only look for the one thing that might be interpreted as a negative at all. I'm scanning for and then if I don't find that and feel bad about myself. I it's useless. It's more relief than joy just going like where the bogies. Okay. We got away with. Now, I I'm a huge fan of clone high. Oh early days. I love that show. I don't think you and someone on the internet decided to let me know that there's a teeny like shot of it in spider verse. Yes, there's a billboard for clone. College time where in the movie takes place in an alternate dimension. And things are different in that dimension. So all the movies and athletes are different and one of the things is that Cohn. High was a huge long running show that then had movie called clone college and that happened in that alternate demento. It would be awesome. If it were to happen. This is a long con. This whole movie things just trying to get clone. High back hang on. Obviously, you guys didn't get the memo the memo about travelling straight down one path. Yes for your careers and. You know, maybe with enough success? You could indulge yourself now with a little little outside project. So. You come out of animation. And then you direct live action. Twenty one jump street, and it sequel, and you create TV shows and some that you right and some the produce and some that you jointly direct. And then you you launch an incredible show called last man on earth. Glad you like that. Oh, yeah. And it's like. It's like you doing it all wrong. We're doing it wrong. I should be like Jackson. Quarterback doing it. All it back or a man. No question. Yeah. I'm so glad we've had this intervention. You want to be like Jackson. Pollock you come up on this. You try bunch of stuff. You're great artist. You come up with this drip thing. It's awesome. And then you stick with that. Right. Right. To the end Jasper Johns and the flags and flag or flags. Yeah. I know. I know he diversified. He had the targets. That's true. He did eventually very confusing. Big mistake Bor, so so you guys met at Dartmouth. It's true, which university a college college knowledge that yes, it is a small college. But there are those who love it in the words of Daniel Webster. And is it there that you started making animated shorts? It's true. Yeah. We we met our freshman year and Filkin has taken automation class, and and no fell. Yeah. Not doing. And so we started make government. I I was a government here now. So that's right. International relations, major, you know, it's nice to know some things about other things. I guess. You don't have anything to make movies about. That's right. And and for a while, you're a computer science major. Yes. Nineteen months, exactly. But we made a bunch of student films and we helped each other on each other. What were they like long? I mean. Yeah, it was before the digital era. So you know, we were shooting on sixteen millimeter. And you didn't really know exactly what you were going to get till it all came through on the other side so tests. Yeah. But they were all hand-drawn we each hired assistance. Do you draw? Well, we draw we draw there. We draw the peeling. We have we have very specific tastes. And and we can at least communicate what we want in drawings. I would say that Chris is as as as great as anyone I've seen at very quickly stealing something down to its essence. It makes him a great cartoonist. He was four years the cartoonist in the in the Dartmouth paper, but we are lucky enough to work with really incredible artists who the best artists in the world. And and then remember that we are do little thumbnail drying that communicate ideas better. But there, but the artists that we get to work with now are, you know, of a whole different level of our more pencil miles. Cartoonist? Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. I I I like a magazine cartoon, and that was the thing. Yeah. Sure. It was a huge industry just hanging out with this guy. Peter just have in New York, they love New Yorker stuff in magazine cartoons, and he's an amazing amazing artist. But that whole industry really is kind of kind of. Yeah. If not except for the New Yorker, exactly Yorkers going strong. Yeah. Yes. Alex, Gregory, our buddy, he's a great opportunity. So what what was I'm trying to get a sense of what was the tone or the attitude of these early cartoons that you did. They were funny. Yeah. Christmas is really funny. They were already called my call easy goes to France. The wonder squirrel, which was the character of my comic strip that they had in the daily paper. Yeah. It was. It was a chain smoking squirrel that hosted a talk show, and they go and has there been knowing Thalji. I know well, if you would think that's what that's enough. That's enough. Charming? Yeah. The idea of that was that he had booked good dough to be his guests on his talk show, and you never showed up and instead of waiting around from I went to go. Find him. It was like the front foot. Don't be sitting on your heels. Exactly. So it can't possibly be true. That Michael Eisner read about you and decided that you simply had to work for Disney. This is a somewhat of a legend. But it is what it is a true legend. Are as we know it hasn't been debunked. Yes there. There was an article about me in the Dartmouth alumni thing that they would give out to try and drum up money. And one of Michael sons Winston Dartmouth. We didn't know him. So he would get this. And supposedly we were told later that he was flipping through it on the the the Disney jet, and it was like who's this guy, and you pass it on to an executive who pass it on drugs, etc. Who pass it on to write? It went from Charles Hirschhorn to dean Valentine to bury Bloomberg who are first boss who called me up in my off campus house while I was in college. And it said, hey, you wanna come out to Disney for meeting in college? And I said I can't because I have midterms. Was it? But my friend Phil and I were thinking of moving out to Los Angeles in the summer when we graduate. So I'll save you a flight, and and we'll meet then, and then we went in on this meeting and sent them our student films and and they hired us to make Saturday morning cartoons. It was so long ago that was when Saturday morning cartoons were thing that were on the air. And I think in the game of telephone from one executive to the next it went from being Hayes sick. These guys out to being like is new says to hire the. These guys direct from the top. So we got a really lucky break right at the top. And we were able to to make the most of it. But it's sort of not very rip replicate. -able terrible should tell young people. To make someone from Disney that call you when to put cartoons into your college paper goes home with a fellow student, and then he gives it to his dad. It's great system. Very lucky very lucky. Well. That I think luck is underrated are under recognized that perhaps the word luck plays a big part in anyone's life and Korea's. I've been I've been the Scipion of many lucky happened stances. And so I can watch for it. But nothing went exactly according to plan. Oh, no. Because you made clone high and they didn't like it. Well, I would say one small segment of of the population, which I guess would be a billion a billion people as in the nation of India got upset they didn't actually see the show, but they heard that Gandhi was a character on the show is that shows go clone exit. They about clones of famous historical figures that go to high school together and date stuff and Gandhi was one of the characters, and they thought that that was inappropriate toward and and so they had a hunger strike, and Viacom realizing that there's a billion people did not want to lose their broadcasting licence in India. So they took the show off the, but that's because it didn't wind up at Disney at wound up with MTV. That's correct. Yeah. Yeah. It kind of bounced around. Yeah. And and another lucky stroke have a thing that never happens. I mean, the show was we made a pilot in the show died and then a year later. Someone just calls us up and says, we're hi, we're. My name is MTV. To put the show on the air. We're like, okay. And we got to make this thing that was you know, a big part of our learning. Is there two years we spent making a show that we loved now. What did you what kind of things did you learn practical stuff as well? As big picture that show. You know, we we we were working on it from soup to nuts. So we had been in a couple of writers rooms on sitcoms. But this was the first time we would run one. So we so we ran the room. Meanwhile, we're. Recording actors, do, you know, cutting the dialogue, and and then we re cut every animatronic and did the story board revisions on every board. So we would mean learn how to use a final cut up to edit the the show together. And then and then we have to we couldn't afford sorry division. So we we learned to do them ourselves because it was an MTV budgets. They were paying an MTV dollars redeemable MTV stores. So we got a lot of t shirts. You get to be the TRL on. Exactly, I was telling you last week. Ultimately, it's all about tote bags. That's my. The beam for everything totally house. Full of tote bag literal. Good. And then if you go to the grocery. I've got a LEGO. That's it. It's mugs. One of my favorite. Things is opening up a are covered of mugs and finding all the TV shows that are now defunct. Oh, yeah. That's all right. Because he's he's been on. I feel like you've been on almost everything. That's now gone which things like, yes. Wayne Brady show mug. Thank. Yeah. Yeah. That's a good election. Solid one. So. How and at what point did you get involved with the sitcoms writing sitcoms? We started on a show called Zoe Duncan, Jack. And Jane that was the first one we did. Yep. It was on a network that doesn't exist anymore. The WB Selma. Blair. Michael rosenbaum? Yeah. And and that was our first our first writing job on something that we didn't make up ourselves. And we learned a lot about about writing and etiquette and sort of being creative in a group, which was really useful. Yeah. Well, that's what I was getting at was a collaborative process where you were not the bosses. Yes. Yeah. And it's just the best. I have to say, yeah. Being being like mid level and having some influence on the show. But then when you go home, you're not worrying about it. Interesting. But we did learn you know, that was show was run by Peter Aaronson and Mike Lang were they and they we we were all very young. They they hired talented people who were inexperienced, which is a good way to go. And they said, listen, here's how the room works, and they had certain rules. And and the ones that stuck for us where you don't pitch problems you pitch solutions. So many read the script. It doesn't do anybody. Any good to sit there and this page stinks. What how are we going to get out of this one? This whole story is broken. It's so depressing. If instead, you're the person going, you know, what might make this even better is this thing. Right. And they said, no, stinky cheese face that. Yeah. If you have if you don't like somebody's pitch. You can't go like you can't make face or, you know, grow sound. It's like you needed to be a safe place where if a joke doesn't laugh. Land. It's okay, right. Otherwise, you're not gonna have a creative you move on. Yes. Everyone will just be silent. And not laugh that will be. Messaging. Yeah. And so it was really it was really informative about how to have a positive creative environment. Because in the end of the day, all of these things are massive collaborations. No TV show. No movie. No anything is made by yourself. It is a big big undertaking. And would sooner you realize that that you're making with artists and filmmakers, and they all have great ideas and opinions themselves, the sooner that you're you can open yourself up to making something even better. Teach you humility. Oh. It's about this job. I tell people if you want to become a director because you want to be in charge of everything and everybody just do what you say you're in the wrong business. This is all about humility. And and and no greater time than when you show something to an audience, and you hear them they are they laugh or they don't they're into it. Or are they going to go to the bathroom checking their and they're not? They don't care. They're not being nice to you. And and that's ultimately, that's that's who we serve. Uh-huh. Of so chronologically. Yes, how do cloudy with a chance of meatballs come about? And there was an existing book. There's an favorite book from going. Winston we had a very similar childhoods on opposite corners of America. Why don't you grow up? Where did you grew up in the Seattle area? And Phil grew I grew up in Miami. So I mean, that's about as far very different places. They're both port cities true mid-size ports. Yeah. But we just had similar upbringings. We both loved that booklet with a chance of meatballs. We went in on a meeting with at Sony. Pictures enemy Shen who we just made into the spider versus and they and they had this property. Oh, going gosh. That's my favorite kids because my favorite Kaz book. That's crazy. They were were meeting with them about a different project. We weren't very excited about that project. And so when they called us a day later say, hey, what do you think we said? Yeah. You know, we had a lot more ideas about cloudy with a chance of meatballs, and they said, oh, really that'd be great. You wanna come in and pitch it to us tomorrow? And then we said how about the day after tomorrow because we didn't have any actually. So we just stayed up all night. Yeah. And coming up with the the basic take which was Armageddon, but funny on purpose and his Astra movie. Let's make it a disaster movie with food and shake it treat it like. It's very high stakes and no pun, no pun intended. In ten all puns intended, my friend their intended by God. Exactly. But in any case, we came up with this. The character set that basically was the the final movie twenty. The story was a hundred percent different of the story that we originally wrote. And that we wrote we were writing the movie and not directing it. We wrote a script that was really really funny but lacking in much in the way of motion and had a number of significant story problems. But other than that, it was a delight it was, but it totally was a lot of fun. And it was like, oh it felt like airplane or something. It was just like zany and silly and funny. And but it just was not a good movie. There wasn't a sweet although airplane is a great movie, by the way. Yeah. It didn't have any heart to it whatsoever. And you know, you it had like. Hovering working in sitcoms in twenty two minute episodes. You can get away with just like a little bit of heart. That's undercut and you're like that's enough. That's enough for twenty two minutes. But your engagement for ninety minutes, you really need to care about these people, and you need to be rooting for something, and you need to like you need your heart needs to melt in a in a sincere way. And that just wasn't. So we got we got fired hand. About a year. And then the director of that film took our script and took out all the jokes and just left the story problems. And so they got fired. And then the weird thing happened, which was they called us back and said, hey, would you want to direct this movie or they want to come back to the movie because they liked the tone of the original v? And we said, oh, I don't really want to get fired again. We could do without the fiery. And then we were on the shortest contract ever for director, which is like every three months, they could fire us, I think on the contract. And so we just went to work. And because we knew the script was not had a lot of problems. We came in sat down with this crew that we inherited and just said. And they're like what's your idea for how to fix the movie? And we said, well, what's your idea? What do you think? Which was the best was mostly stalling technique because. But it was the best way. Take best foot to get off of with the with the crew and the best way to make the movie good because they've been working on it. And they knew the problems better than anybody because they've been working on it for a year. And so everybody got to download and and say what they thought. And and we were able to come back and go like, okay. Well, these thing a lot of these ideas are contradictory. But, but this was a really cool thing. And this is great. And then we were like, okay. Well, let's see if we can't figure out a path forward. And and then over several years, we ended up making the most collaborative type of way of making movie, and that movie ended up starting with a credit film by a lot of people on it. Because it really was a real group effort making that thing. And and our Java felt like we need to put it all through our own lens. And like picks ideas that we think are are are great. But really every. Body contributed to that movie. A lot of that that that directing processes about empowering the crew and creating that safe space of you were talking about in that writer's room. So that they had the freedom of fail, and we would sit in animation reviews and look at, you know, sixty five people's work at that time that was a record for animation crew members Snyder verse was a hundred and eighty p. Because it was so we beat our personal record. Any case such a such a slow and laborious process to make a frame of that movie required. A preposterous number of animators, but we would sit in animation reviews. And we said, I, you know, I wanna see the idea that you're scared to show anyone else and you can rough it out, it's fine. And then when we started laughing at the stuff that seemed weird too weird. Yes. And encouraged the other artists, and so then they became this one upsmanship, right? And it'll be a thing where like, okay, here's the joke. One like, that's great. Let's put it in. And then everyone got excited we wouldn't put them all in obviously. Because it would it would been insane. But it's no different than working with an actor you want to engage in St. tippety. Sure. And and and and provide a goal, right? That's an keep people's I on the story. And I think that certainly as a as an actor when you are you feel a lot of trust with the director, and you know, that you can fail on screen, and they're not gonna put it in the. Movie because they haven't of enough taste to know when something is good or it's bad, then they can feel open and try things that may not work. And then you can get things that are really spontaneous and interesting, and and then and they not just sorta like better. Do it exactly. The way that I practiced it. So I ended up making everybody do their best work. Well, that sounds guys. It's not efficient. Well, it is a fishing because the end product is worthwhile. Efficiencies is inefficient if someone else's picking up the tab. Exactly. Yes. That's right, right. I wish that we could all be geniuses on the first go, but not now works for. I've always wondered why. And I've asked this question numerous times to people who had experience with it. Why do you think it's so difficult to nail down a story for an animated feature? If you're writing a live action feature you write a script. You've look at over you show it to friends than you show it to your boss paying for it. And all that and either they like it, they don't or they make notes giving notes you incorporate and then you go and shoot it. Right. And you've got a movie right dimple, and that and that can happen sometimes within a year, it's true to finish. But with animated features. There's a history of yes, they're very aware. All the way back to Walt Disney's earliest work. Throughout six months of Pinocchio. Threw it out started all over again. So that's how far back. I think the the number two reasons, but to me the boring and probably most true answer is that in an animated movie you have to edit it. I if you going to shoot, let's say twenty two jump street, which we did in a year you wind up with a four hour assembly. That's unwatchable. Right. We exactly did not watch it. We would only watch one real at a time as we wanted, you know to stay not take our own lives. The so so then you call it down. And you have all this. You have like a million feet of footage to mess around with to try to like make something any good. And when you're animating you have to do that head of time. Right. So you wind up having to throw out half the movie like you would in the edit bay. My also think that you know, it's a visual, and especially visual medium, and you also have a situation where? You have to look at the movie in its Anna, Matic, former storyboards in this light show. Right. And in its office just checking up linger for a moment. Yes. Playing for the. So when you're when you're putting you write the script, then the story board artist draws the story board. And then the next step is you have people from around the office record voices of, you know, just they're not professional actors, but it's fine. And then you put up the the the storyboards in sequence like, it's like a slide show of the movie timed to what the movie would be, and then you can watch that note in black and white it's scratchy drains, you're trying to interpret what it is. And then you hear these not the world's best actor voices. And if you watch that scene in it works, then you know, that when real actual performances come in and real animation and beautiful color, and you see it altogether. It's going to be amazing and dazzling and it may end, but. Normally you look at it go, this is not working at all. And so you have to healing it in general, right? But there's a lot of situations where it if you even if it was like, you feel like it's not working if you went through that process by the end like okay that does work. But because it really you get afraid that it's not good enough you go back into it into it. And then make it work, and when it works in that that area, then and then I think that's part of why I think a lot of animated films turn out so good. I think the percentage of enemy and movies that are well reviewed as higher than other live action movies because people get a chance to go back in over and over and over again until his they know it they only get one shot at it. And thinking about this a lot the last couple of days like the stories that that stick with us. Many of them have been told and retold for a really long time even the stories in our lives. We've retold the same story at the dinner table with at a family reunion for like for years and years and years, so they get home. And in that process, and the reason like like, you know, the the the tale of discus exactly is honed by like, you know, on's of retailing it. And and and so just to have a story that like just flops onto the page in a coffee shop by Phil. Having a good time by himself and expect to that to be done, and at the level of this other things just isn't reasonable than so the grinding that happens in the edit suite and between with all these storytellers having to pitch out this this story board. You know, it hones it. And I think I mean look at the way the marvel movies are made. Now, they they build in several months of reshoot. So that in like the movie put together, I got okay now. Let's go back and do it again. Right. Or is the thing. Right. Right. Right. Isn't then that movie famously they had to stop because of a strike, and then John carpenter's like editing it and goes now, not good. And so I think that the the movies that can afford to do it do. So and I think then it ends up being quite nice for them the movies turn out pretty well. Now, I want to ask you about the flip side. Tell us about your experience, directing your first live action movie that was twenty one jump street was our first live action moving and we were is this by the third day. We had spent more time on a movie set than ever in our live fourth day. We were shooting an eleven person shootout in a penthouse with Johnny Depp. So. That defense. Attic knows with the nose flown in from England. That got caught up in customs gosh. And we were definitely jumped into the deep end of the pool on that thing. But it was a similar situation where you know, we had Joan and Channing two of the most talented people of their generation, and and you could tell just from this screen tests that these guys next to each other. There was some sort of magical chemistry that they had like it's going to be fine. We just got to get them in situations where they can have a dynamic in showcase their relationship at how audit is that these two people like each other. But but do I remember the day that we sort of one over the crew arrive felt like okay, we can do this. Which was it was we were blocking out that shootout. Yes. And it was the week before. And there's you know hundred crew members watching us because they got to know where to put the Squibb's for the bullet. We have a blueprint of the thing. And it was like oh this penny. Is jona. And this little LEGO brick is Shanti. Okay. We had some cockamamie idea that they were going to hide in this corner behind me up potted potted plant and on the page. It's fine. You've just bumped right over and you'd get into the space. You're like that's not gonna work. There's no way they're going to be dead in two seconds and stunt coordinator. Is there? Nobody's buying it. And now, everyone just watching you end the thing you've planned for months is falling apart right in front of everyone. And I think it was you Chris like we started you know, with help from the stunt coordinator, and the and we just started re thinking, well what if they went by this couch? Oh, and if we did that then the chemical here, it, wouldn't it be neat? And so we were being creative in the group again, and it was a really important day for our crew to see that. That's that. We were certainly willing to take a note. But also that we could think on our feet and weren't going to wilt, and I remember Johnny Watson pulled aside at the end of that day as we were scared to death and was like this. Is a very important day for you guys. And I'll never forget it. I do know why you thought they could hide behind a tree though. I know. Great. Disappear. Everyone knows that how that works. Logic. That argument didn't hold on these. Pity now to seek and did you get any great piece of advice, I work with ice cube? That's. We did we saw it in a lot of advisory. Very we felt very unprepared. We were we've visited I mean, we've been you know, on a bunch of sitcoms sets for many many years, but I it's a different type of scale and a in a whole different thing. So we would like hang out on the sets of other friends movies and things to see how they do. It one crazy thing about directing is that you never really get to watch. How anyone else does it unless you like really go and seek it out. It's a very isolating job. You know as an actor. You get to see a different directors in the way, they do things differently. And and sometimes fun to ask actors like I was this director work person. And and gets into like, oh, they run the set and and seeing different ways. Like, oh, I wanna do that. Everyone's different everyone is right. Like, I remember we watched Stoler work, which is like Nick Stoler was really valuable for us. We're similar way. And he would just shout out lines. Maybe bad habit. Try this. What I remember about Nicosia was like like less concerned with like, oh, I'm gonna finally craft this line. I wrote right. And I'm gonna make sure you say it just the way I hear it in my head. Instead he was like, and that's not working to try this. And it was so spontaneous. And it was so not precious for a writer director. And so that that was really valuable, but he works so differently than like, Greta gerwig, who literally she puts it on the page. And you say exactly how she wrote it, and it just out, and I'm like, that's I mean, I don't know. It sounds and feels spontaneous. I wish I was that great. I try. So what would you say is the biggest lesson you took away from from that that experience man, always work with ice cube? I made that clear always work with ice cube. I think the the the lesson we keep having to learn at every writer keeps having to learn is that. Harmony on screen is actually more spectacular than argument watching Joan and Channing those two characters fall in love and be together. And love each other in Channing idea was I'm gonna play every scene like I'm trying to get Joan it a fall in love with me. Join. I mean, it's going to be just like this. The what's his romantic comedy that? He did magic Mike negative. Yes. But I love it. I love it. That year the vowel came out jump street came out and magic might came out. Crazy ear and he's like, I'm gonna do it just like the vowel 'cause I'm trying to get her to fall for me. Again. I'm going to try to get Joanna fall in love with me. And that was so much more interesting than like two guys fighting, right? It was just it's because I think we know what fighting is like and watching people get along is so unique well that gives audiences wish. Fulfillment. Throw stuff at them and they have conflict with the the environment around them. And they you know, obviously will have some conflict there. But everything doesn't have to be. So so harsh all the time. I don't know. I mean because you sit there and say I wish I had a friend like that. Yeah. Would it be great to have you know, that kind of relationship, and what would it take for me to have that with people in my life at some level? We are used we are. We are looking to these stories to suggest something more some kind of knowledge, right? That's why we go to church. That's why when we were cave people. They would take you into the cave and show. You the drawings and stuff we're hoping for some kind of enlightenment and so watching people model, right? A friendship is messed up as theirs is it stays. So something like LEGO movie, which I actually don't know how many times I've seen it at this point either. There's a lot whenever it is. It's many and. That's another one same kind of thing where it's joyous. And that is something that I want to watch over and over and over again, you know, sometimes you watch a movie, and it ends, and you say that was really interesting, and I never need to see it again. And that's something against it important, especially with some of the the heavy dramas and things like that you go that was really great. And now, I never wanna watch it again. But the stuff that makes you happy and the stuff that brings you up LEGO movie became the movie that my husband, and I put on before we went to sleep every night. She co it was one that we knew every single word for. So we could listen without listening. Like, a fast paced. Brahms? As me because every time I watched it. I found something else. A lot of detail, and they're very much because I went from being you looked like that girl. Oh, right wild. Look like you look like the what is it her name eternal, sunshine? It went from. To the what's the Edgar right movie that oh Ramona flower flowers, but then it went to wild style. And I was like, yes, I'll be a LEGO that day. But every time we interested in Liga movie too. I think. Larry, correct. The no spoilers. But there are some here. Here's happening motion. Picture tease teaser for you. So sorry. So how I was going to how does one how did you guys come up with the idea of doing a LEGO movie, and then executing it I mean? I'm thinking of the ideas is genius, right? They're executing it. The the Amon brothers had were and written a treatment for LEGO movie. We can't take credit for that and our producer. Dan Lin was trying to put something together. And then we met them. They were they were at Sony animation. What we're thinking cloudy, and they mentioned this thing. And we both said like that's pretty great idea. And they had the notion of you know, there would be a meta universe of some kind. And we like that's really clever, and we got really inspired by by the way, people use LEGO. As a filmmaking tool. Right. You can make a whole little set. And now it's on on you can literally make stop motion movie, and you're like garage at the time, you know, people were, you know, shooting them on film. And and you can they were just really the there was so many of them, and they were so clever with how they use different LEGO bricks to solve you know, what? Does a flower pot. Look like that. So we were really inspired by that. And we thought a what a neat thing you could use this big corporate enterprise. It's Warner Brothers and LEGO and they're going to work together to make a big summer movie. And what if we use that to talk about the democratization of storytelling? And and that was the thing that got us up in the morning. How do we make it look like a kid with infinite funding made the movie? Themselves. You know, we like to feel the fingerprints on the on the picture. So it was a really neat way to do that. And part of it was inspired by I my sister asked me to help my nephew make a pinewood derby car for the little progress. Thing. And I remember doing it with my dad, and we were like we had made the most era dynamic one possible. And they brought she was like just don't let them drill or saw anything or you. And just let them do what he wants to do. And he was like, okay. I see it as twenty about twenty inches tall with feathers and a helicopter blade and then at rocket front, and then googly eyes, and then a bunch of pipe cleaners go every direction, and I was like this is going to be a very slow very you're not gonna win the race. And he's like I don't care about that. And I was like why do I care about if he wants to make the craziest looking pinewood derby car ever, then I'm just going to help him do it. But for men I was like why why am I being a stick in the mud about this? And he made this thing that was absurd in an amazing. He was so proud of it, and it was like glitter, and and feathers, and it was the silliest looking thing you've ever sailed the wind tunnel tests. It was. But does he want to hang out with me? It's like we can always good. I think you would we named character. The movie after him fan, and and sort of like, oh, you know, in you know, there's a point in your life. When you when you are slowdown, your love of creativity and just expressing joy, and you start getting really practical and filled with shame and all this stuff. And we wanted to figure out a way to make movie that would would get people to leave the theater feeling more creative than when they when they went in it succeeds in that way. The key question keeps burning in my brain is how did you do it? Sure anything. But I watch it. And I say don't they do that? It was I mean, we took a while. Do you? Remember, we went to bow take Louis, and and and had like a big long lunch and just tried to plot out like all right one is it about. Cr- creativity. Like if you had to teach it like, how would you break it down? And then we even talked to psychologists, right buddy Seligman and asked him what he thought we. So we had this underpinning of these ideas, which were were totally useless when you're actually making the movie, but they were underneath it. And then we just started trying to build out the character set. And you know, we walk by block. How do you eat an elephant one bite at a time. Very we had a very very start. Yeah. For just one. Jokes. Remember, we very strong opinions about what the look of the movie should be. We felt like this needs to feel like stop motion brick film, someone made everybody's been we know that like needs to have that tactile quality, and we want everything to be made of LEGO even the water, even the effects everything needs to be made like and every step of the way people are like this at that's not gonna work because of this reason, that's I can remember that reason and we'd be like look at this crazy little movie that somebody made and look at what they did for the little wave affects here. And isn't that neat? And can we do that on a much larger scale, and I have a being credible? They see hokusai is wave but made out of bricks and immagination. And and and our enthusiasm for it, and our belief that it would work even though we didn't know that actually woodwork. What got everybody else to go? Like, oh, yeah. You know, what else you could do? And it's the same thing that's happening again. And again, and again is that when people are on a common goal, and they get excited than they bring a lot of cool ideas. And when you say yes to those ideas or some of them, anyway, then everyone feels empowered and everyone feels like they're in it together. And it's not just some sort of decree that some people are executing and that's been the lesson again. And again and again for us. It's like listen to people, and we're in a creative medium and a lot creativity from anywhere and a good idea. Ed vest idea wins. It's what was not easy remade that movie twenty times terribly before we made it one time. How how so you you make you know every? Sequence you're looking at it in the edit Sweden. It's just a bunch of yucky drawings. The first version movie Emmett was saving his mom who was the world's most powerful master. And there it just as a stray lane. It was weird. There's not there's not the sort of elemental connection of a child saving their mother. You know, a parent saving a child or a friend saving a friend or person saving a loved one is one thing. But a child saving apparent was a weird. It was something that didn't it was hard to get people to connect to it. Yeah. And and we always wondered if it's because you L you've in your at the cellular level. You know, it's supposed to go the other right? Imagine like a young person like carrying their mom out of a burning building. Like, that's a weird image that it doesn't that doesn't connect an elemental level. So we struggled at the, you know, just make it play. Brand. There was all this zany stuff. And it didn't all connect. And so we just you know, you really do it shot by shot, and and it's a grind, and you and a lot of blood all over the walls, like great ideas that didn't make it an all this effort. Beautiful drawings and beautiful performances and beautiful animation. That just doesn't make the cut because you look at it and go, I don't know. I don't feel anything. I don't know what to tell you. And that's the problem of these things is that it's not about putting my idea in front of you. It's about getting you to bring your idea to the screen, and we're just trying to create a kind of the magic golden conditions for that to take place for you to tell the story of what those people on screen are doing, and that's a kind of alchemy that you can try to get that. But it either happens or doesn't it when it doesn't you have to go back to the drawing. Anytime we've been really precious about things that doesn't work and every in this part of why it took five years to make the sequel to that movies because. You know, we have invested up if you. Times. I wish we knew right away from the beginning again. And we output the most perfect script. But you look at it and go like this is not I'm not engaged as much as I I need to be in. So we just are willing to keep working and changing it until it is engaging is exciting. And you've just wrapped on Ligo two. Yes. I actually called LEGO the LEGO movie to the second part. Yes, we just absolutely necessary subtitle. We're just doing our last full day of the sound makes yesterday. Wow. Well, congratulations for that ANC you it was the late night. I I do hope, you know, with the first one that all of that effort is seen that the craziness that you put in its why the movie is so good. And it's why every time you, and I have friends were we'll discuss it at times just going. I keep finding more. I don't know how I don't know how I keep findings or I'll hear something and it's different. And of course, the voice actors are great and getting Jona, you know, and Channing to do it is so funny. But but to think about how much I'm always fascinated by pop culture and think about how much of it. How much of that film is what I hear people say, you know, black or very dark grey like there's some things you darkness. No. No, I hear this stuff all the time. And it makes me laugh and we've sought treatment or it's awkward. I feel like people we we believe that people recognize or appreciate when they go to a movie that some all effort has put a new really you see moving like, wow. That must have been really hard to do, you know part when you see the revenue and you hear the stories about how difficult inside of you. Guy. Like, you feel like you've earned my my money to for the ticket. Right. I just threw together. Well, is this the ethical experience for me? So I feel like when you see it. And you say oh my gosh. I can't believe how much energy they put into this. And that was sort of it feels crafted. Yes. It's like being in a cathedral. It's like, you know, that it took a lot of people to make this thing, and they made every detail carefully on spider verse that was like even more. So that the amount of energy, well, and well, spiders, I was exhausted on your behalf. Is just overwhelming. I think that's the first word that comes to my mind overwhelming because it's there's so much going on visually and conceptually. And it's it's just a remarkable piece of work. Glad you guys and it like it comes out of a seemingly simple idea. Let's make an animated film that looks like a comic book come to life. Right. Go do that. Fifty by exactly so four years and eight hundred people later, this is what what happens, but I find it. Both interesting in somewhat ironic that if I understand correctly at the end of the day, you decided the only way they would really work is with some hand drawn animation with having artists who still know how to use old-fashioned implements to do a, you know, kind of an overlay or I don't know what you'd call it on all this high tech, computer imagery, am I right? That's exactly right. And it was a it was a technique that took about a year and a half to develop about how do we? How do we get this thing to look and feel like you're immersed in a world like in a living painting or a comic book? And and ultimately ended up being a combination of CG in hand-drawn, techniques and new software and shading and rendering and and texturing that made lights light sources as half tone. Ben day, dots shadows as as hatching and shading and painter Italy textures on everybody, and then on top of that and various different levels e an artist drawing line work by hand. And and also, you know, text boxes and all that other stuff. It was it was a lot of trial and error to figure out how to make it feel seamless and integrated and not just doodling some jazz on top of CG thing. It had a feel like it came out of an artist's hand. And it turned out that the best way to do that was. For to actually come out. That's how you know sequential art and graphic novels speak to us your it's not it's not machine it's not colored forms. It's you know, each one is different. There's a different artists that those things are crazy collaboration because some guys doing the pencils in someone else's doing the inks and another guy's doing color, and they all have to communicate or the look like a mess. And so we wanted it to feel like you're holding one of those things up to your face and was picking up your whole field of view, and you were under the covers with a flashlight, and and and I always felt as a kid that an artist was communicating directly to me. I could see and I was looking for the, you know, the scratch lines of the pen tool on the paper, that's splatter of the ink. You know, that's that's the personality. That's the the idea that there's a guy there trying to tell you something. I mean wanted that feeling. How do you decide? Obviously. You're you're great multi-taskers. How do you decide which films you want a direct and which films your content to either write or produce where you're still hands on? But someone else is doing the heavy lifting. The good and tricky question. I mean, the situation here was that we had these two movies happening at the same time. And so it just wasn't practical on and the undertaking of spider verse is so massive it needed all the help we could get and we started with Bob or security, then we brought in Peter Ramsey. And then we need we need. I mean, then we brought in Rodney I on on script. And then we like you want to join the club. It's a party over here doesn't movie is so massive, you know, someone needs to be overseeing the animation and someone needs to be over here recording actors and someone needs to be in the edit room someone needs to be here, and we're all going to just run back and forth with each other and communicate. And and that was the situation for that movie. It was this project needed everybody. Yeah. It was really clear we have a bunch of producing partners to and they were unbelievably valuable, and it just was a massive undertaking. Right. And you and you can see it on screen. It looks like a massive undertaking. A story that's so complex, but needs to be told simply and cleanly for people die deal with it. If you never seen a superior moving your life, and you don't know anything about comic books at all. You're watching a movie about a kid and his parents and a new set of friends and trying to find his place in the world, and how to house the person be their best self, and and you had a slowly lead the audience to this idea of multiple dimensions and various versions of characters and different animation styles. And it could have been very jumbled in insane. But the end of the day the same way it was on our other movies when we had everybody was knew what the goal was everyone knew what the tone was you know, if it had five different voices of what of what Phil wanted. I wanted. Bob, Peter, Rodney, any of the other people involved were life. Oh, I wanted to be a gritty coal miner drama. I want to be. Zili wackadoo thing we all knew this is miles. Morales story. This is we want to know what the tone is like, it's funny. It's action. It's hard, first and foremost. And so we all wanted the same thing. And we don't want the same. Look we all wanted to push boundaries and every step of the way. And so it ended up being not a committee, but a collaboration it makes me tear up because I think about when I watched the movie, I think about all of these individual voices and artists who come from who all have similar stories. Like, I was the one weird kid on my block the one kid in my town. And then I went like verbiage I went to a comic book shop, and I was like, oh my gosh. There's other people that are into the same stuff as me, and I feel seen. And then you bring eight hundred of those people together, and they go and make a collective work of art. And it's so beautiful. And I see each person who did that shot. I see like Bob's animation. I see Peter's cameras Rodney's humanity and writing and and I get so moved because it also reflects the story that we told absolutely he's people who have an affinity. They does not even their fault. They get bit by something. Right. You know, that's one of the reasons we made miles and artists you get bit. And I've told people this before is like young people like I'm really sorry. But you're an artist, and you're never gonna be able to shake it. And you might try to be an accountant, and you're going to wake up at forty and you're gonna throw it all away and go and be a painter on the sidewalk. So you might as. You might as well admit it to yourself and get going because it's not an easy job at it is super necessary. And so I I get you know for clipped when I think about that. I think about miles and how he found other people like him who are talented like him that can help him lead the way and the the job they have to do save the universe, by the way, they have to do collectively. And and if you make if I can be super corny for a moment, I do think that that is the that is one of the dimensions of the artwork is that of making art is that your can be on the vanguard of big important ideas because you have the freedom to do that. You're not a politician. You're not you're not about the art of the possible, you're about imagining what could be and that makes me really proud. You know, this movie does some of that. You've got a really diverse Cass. We've got you know, a Spiderman who's Puerto Rican and African American I mean that is like a really special thing to us, and it has been a very special thing to a lot of people. That's. Hype is a terrible thing ruin so much. And so that's always really hard. But it was a very interesting week. When everyone I knew started seeing the film because all of a sudden, I was getting just constant. Oh my God. It's me. This is the most amazing thing I've ever seen. Look, I can see myself, and you can see yourself and an absolutely when you're a weirdo, which I think most of us most of us Sinophile or animation nerds like, yeah. Super weirdo. Definitely did not fit in definitely struggled like when you see something like that. And you go. Oh my God. It's me. And that's why we all need that. We all need those moments. But it is been really exciting. I didn't make your movie and I'm excited. Are reacting and how you know how happy it's making them. And that's a lot of amazing seeing people. That's the part that makes me the get the most choked up shared people like I feel seen only. Yeah. It's we're my kid. Oh, yes. Learn to me and said he looks like me, I know I know that's how I felt. It is really funny that I it it can seem simple to one person. And then it can mean the world is someone else. And anytime you do that. And it even part of why I love clone. High is I'm like weirdos made that because only someone is weird is me would be like this the genius idea. Guys. Let's see what happens rock opera about raisins. And it was brilliant. That kind of thing it's exciting, and it's fun. And that's a big deal. And as you say, you you do have to focus as complex as the visuals are the story has to just be simple enough to make everybody universally enjoy. And I love I'm a creep in a movie theater because I like to watch people because I like this. We're now I, and I'm also the one that will cost you coming out of the theater and be like, what did you think? Just because I like to know I like to know how you reacted. And so the fact that I was sitting there, and there were families, of course, because Spiderman so even if they no nothing they know Spiderman it's Christmas time take kid, and I punched my microphone. But the same time you've got like there's me and my husband, and then there's a whole bunch of teenage like it. It was such a range from Lisa told me this morning that she took everyone in her family. But if kids up to someone was in her late seventies. And they went twelve of them took up a whole row. And she's like, I couldn't believe it felt like they all they all liked it. They all loved it. I can't believe that. I got an Email from a female friend who said when I when when I wrote in my review that even my wife light. That we can give you a no interest in comic book, movies or superhero movies, but she really liked the so that convince her amazing. Thank you. Thank you watch a one cussed ak-. I got on the phone from my mother is I said, I said you liked it because she doesn't like marvel she doesn't like any of that. She's not a superhero person doesn't really like SCI fi not her thing. And she goes, you know, me, I think these terrible, and I really loved it. I'm like, I really hope that becomes a pull quote. I think things are terrible. But yeah, it says a lot I always tell people at fascinates me. When my parents, and I see a movie together. And now husband because this four very different opinions. And so we all come out of something. And we liked it. That says something whatever it is. Right. Wasn't. There's a there's a real universal core about that. And it's really about love and family and feeling like, you're not alone. All these really, really simple, universal elemental themes. I think. Thinking about movie from the beginning. We like that's the bedrock of what we've tried to build things off oven. That was what was great about Spiderman when Stanley and Steve Dicko creator in the early sixties. Yeah. It was like, oh, this is the this this superhero that could be you. It was a regular. Yeah. Kid wasn't a a billionaire wasn't an alien wasn't a God. It was like like a nerdy teenager in like queens in the lower middle class family. And and for a lot of people. It was like that could be me. And this movie was sort of taking that idea and expanding on an I'm and saying like in two thousand eighteen nineteen what what is that now? And and so the the idea that wanted to be as inclusive as possible and say anybody watching his movie young old, whatever walk of life. You came from you watch this thing like I could be a hero. And I. People are counting on me. And and and so that was the goal, and and it's really you hope that that message gets out there and to see people to really really respond to it in a really emotional level. So much of that there's like this movement of people making their own spider Sonos where they make versions of themselves as that what what they're Spiderman would look like. And there's thousands of them and seeing that is been really like a very joyful. I feel really lucky because you make the movie and you go I'm I'm proud of this. And I'm proud of everything we did. And I don't know anyone's gonna get it. And you the rest is a bonus you have to be satisfied with having made the work. You got a lot of gravy on this. When we did we got a lot of. I mean, we're just it's just like moved that people are putting your stand tribute. Oh, lovely. Cryer? You know, the the first and then the last I was just definitely sitting there going. Yeah. I mean, he would he meant a lot to us, obviously. Oh, yeah. We're talking about standing those. Yeah. Yeah. And we were we were. We. We were lucky enough to many years ago, we accosted him at a Comecon whom you know, back in our very early days. And then we got to meet him again a few years later in a professional situation, and he was just such a positive guy and his whole attitude and his editor on this movie was like doing great keep going. That was the that was. His whole visiting by urging. Yeah, right. It's neat and the movies encouraging. That's everything. I have a couple of quick wrap up question. Yeah. I is it true. Is it a rumor or is a true, you're doing an etch a sketch move. My god. That is false. Okay. However, I can tell you that we were pitched and it just get many many years ago. So there is it's not let's so cruelly unfounded. I I've heard of that. Let me shook up moved on too bad too bad too bad about. I like the speed round. That's right doing. All. Right. Do you feel any ownership of the solo movie? Oh, my well. I'll say that. When we were making that movie, we were making movie about a maverick about about a person who has an a person breaks the rules. And that's what we try to do with every movie, and that's what we were doing with spider versus trying to make a movie that they take something that you're familiar with and turns it on its head. And and so I feel like everything that we've done on every movie has been that. And and that movie was different. Okay. Supposed to say as we did all the stuff. You liked. Oh, I see. I can only say that. We're really proud of what everybody did. And we had an awesome crew on that and amazing Canada. And we're proud of the work that we did. And I'm and I'm happy through everybody. Good good. Okay. Last last question Wiley Coyote or not I mean that another is there. Oh, let's break news. Just we haven't heard about it. But so it's another. Well, I read about it where I get all my reliable information internet, of course, everybody is true. That's for sure that's what it'd be cool, though, if like Russian Botts, we're trying to get that out there to divide the nation. Russian Bazzi, meet my dad. Wiley Coyote here. Learn. Like a good idea. I can confirm that may have nothing like that on the Dr. Sketch film. No, we're talking we're talking to mash. Like a challenge. That one would be well, you met you met so many challenges and you've exceeded. Anyone's dreams of what these films could be and should be like, and you've you know, you've given us just a tremendous gift of entertainment and wonder and just sheer pleasure. Well for that. We say thank you you. We're returning the favor. You know, we're the generation that grew up watching you on TV. You have to fast forward through him to watch Star Wars is the real question though, it had to fast forward through whatever else. They were talking about on editor Damon tonight just to get to this man who was in the pre internet era. The only way that if you're in Miami. This is the only way you can hear somebody talk about movies is watching television. And we grew up reading your book, and and reading in watching you every night, and I just appreciate you. And it's a thrill for us to sit here and talk about movies with you. It's like my dream, come true. Well, come back and do it again sometime. Have you anytime that door that has literally open? Evidently open as well. There is always. Nice great sublet designer. Now. I if if people want to follow you fellows, how do they do that? Yes, you're on Twitter and end, the Graham, occasionally, Instagram. I were the same on both mine is just the worst because turns out criminal or common name. So it's H R. I Z M. I L L R. That's Miller was no e. Honestly. And I'm at Philip Lord, that's one Ellen Phillips the proper way. And that's it. Thank you guys. Thank you. And and where did they find us? Honey, you are littered with z. Leonard Leonard Smoltz, you are at Leonard Maltin. I am at Jesse Maltin on Twitter and Instagram, and you can go to Leonard Maltin dot com for movie reviews and book round ups and all kinds of good stuff. And and and we just made our announcement about Multan fest. What is Malton? Miller. Hatching our own film festival fun to take place right here in Hollywood where it off to take play off film festivals onto me. That's right. Except the ones that aren't right and. So may tenth through twelve market in ink on your calendar. If you still have income may tend to and. The we will reveal more as Moore's to be revealed. Exciting ingrate. Oh, I'm intrigued are right. Thanks so much for being here. Thank you folks for listening, and we'll see next time. Today's episode of Maltin on movies is brought to you by legion m the world's first fan owned entertainment company. If you love movies as much as we do why not own a piece of them. Find out more at WWW dot legion m dot com.

Phil Lord Chris Miller director Channing MTV England Dartmouth Jackson America Walt Disney writer Disney Leonard Maltin Peter Joan Jesse Maltin Sony India Bob
NPR News: 12-30-2020 3AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 2 weeks ago

NPR News: 12-30-2020 3AM ET

"Live from npr news. I'm dale willman. California health officials say hospitals in los angeles county are bracing for the corona virus search to become even worse in the new year and that's bad news for region already hard hit. with cases. christina galley is the director of the los angeles county health services. She says there are seventy hospitals in the county and many of those are really at a breaking point. They have way too many patients coming in. They have patients stacked up in the emergency department. Waiting for beds upstairs. Those beds upstairs are full And they're not going to open any time soon. Just because of the high number of covid patients that are continuing to come into the door and the continuing to need care on top of already the baseline number of patients. That don't have covid that need hospital. Level services the first case in the us meanwhile the covid nineteen variant that appears to be more infectious has been reported in colorado. The strain was found a man in his twenty s who has travel history another case of the covid nineteen variant. I found in. Britain has emerged in canada. Dan carpenter reports since the weekend. Individual cases of the covid nineteen variant have surfaced and four canadian provinces. British columbia. Al burda on and now quebec health officials in quebec. Say a person had been in contact with a family member who had returned from britain officials in other provinces have suggested there's no evidence of further spread of the more infectious variant of the corona virus. Ottawa already imposed a ban on travel with britain until next week the variant is also shown up in several european countries. Despite similar travel bans the philippines issued a ban on travelers coming from britain that prohibition has been extended to mid january and now includes nineteen other countries including canada for npr news. I'm dan carpenter. Can toronto president elect joe biden's incoming national security adviser says the trump administration is not fully cooperating with the biden transition team. Jake sullivan tells. Npr's scott detro- that it's been eleven days since the transition team was granted. A meeting with defense department defense secretary. Chris miller has insisted the pentagon is fully cooperating at levels beyond previous transitions but solve and says he and other biden. Officials have a number of unanswered questions about the massive government computer hack. That's been linked to russia. What if any systems whether classified or unclassified whether directly connected to the department of defense where connected to major contractors Have been compromised. What the extent of those compromises and breaches have been and what steps are being taken to remediate. That sullivan says other departments have provided that sort of information but not the pentagon scott detro- npr news washington argentina became the first major country in latin america to legalize abortion on wednesday. The country senate voted thirty. Eight to twenty nine in favor of the measure. The bill allows the procedure through the fourteen. Th week of and buxton traditionally strong influence of the catholic church. There you're listening to. Npr news a major winter storm is making its way across the upper midwest tonight on tuesday morning snow was so heavy in western nebraska that both interstate eighty and seventy six were closed in both directions for several hours. The national weather service has issued storm warnings for parts of nebraska iowa. Kansas missouri. South dakota wisconsin. And illinois the boeing seven thirty-seven. Max is carrying passengers again for the first time in nearly two years. Npr's emma peasley has more on the troubled planes returned to the skies. American airlines flight went from miami to new york this morning and will make the return trip this afternoon. It's a big first step for going after a pair of fatal crashes grounded the max in two thousand nineteen. The company got clearance from the federal aviation administration last month to flying the jet but some families of crash victims are concerned and so are some lawmakers senate. Investigators issued a report last week where they found quote significant examples of lapses in safety oversight and failed leadership in the faa. The faa says. They're confident the safety issues. That played a role in the accident. Have been addressed ama- peasley. Npr news state. Lawmakers massachusetts have overridden a veto of a measure that expands abortion coverage in that state. The law codifies abortion rights into state. Law it also allows abortions after twenty four weeks of pregnancy in cases where the child will not survive after childbirth republican governor charlie baker had vetoed the measure. I'm deal woman npr news.

npr news Dan carpenter dale willman scott detro christina galley los angeles county health serv Al burda britain quebec Jake sullivan department of defense biden los angeles county pentagon canada Chris miller Npr news joe biden British columbia Npr
One Year Anniversary Livestream!

Pod 4 Good

1:22:27 hr | 3 months ago

One Year Anniversary Livestream!

"All right, welcome everyone to pod for goods birthday anniversary live stream. I am as always your cheerful anthropology Ulrich and I am your vice-admiral philanthropy Chris Miller except for that one time when I was demoted for something. I don't remember what I did you missed a recording date. I believe that doesn't sound like me. It sounds more like me actually cuz that did happen but wage. So if for some reason this is the first part for good you are watching slash listening to pod for good is a podcast that explores the change agents that are trying to make Tulsa a more inclusive fiber in place and vibrant and inclusive. I like to mix it up Chris. Okay, we're doing this live here on the rules. So we are going to bring on our very first guest almost every guest tonight. We'll have already been on the podcast except for a couple but we're going to bring on right now the highest download episode in the past 3 months Tommy from the Tulsa voter van Tommy. Hello. Hello, Tommy highest download you didn't tell me that. I just looked it up. So you're actually tied with our city councillor, bye-bye by what like ninety-three and ninety 2ish, but oh that's an honor. I want to tell you I want to tell our listeners or viewers about the honor that Chris and I feel after what happened after your last episode. Can you tell us what happened in the weeks off after your episode? So after the up during the episode I mentioned that we needed to raise money for a wheelchair accessible van so that people who are Mobility impaired could still get rides to the polls and after this episode. We have a goal we have it rented in everything. That is great. I mean Chris and I have been working on this podcast for a year and a little over a year a little over a year. Thank you. Thank you Chris the and we don't actually get a lot of feedback about whether this is doing any good whatsoever. And so that was definitely something we needed. And is she one? I'm happy for you. I'm also happy for us so but I want people to know about what you were doing with between now and election day. Can you run down like the series of events you have? Oh boy So currently I am working on my computer like eight hours a day trying to get everything in order that's on my own end, but when it comes to what we're doing as an organization, we're going to be doing early rides, uh, sorry free rides to the polls for early voting and on Election Day and then on the Saturday of early voting we're hosting an event actually to just you know, get costume to have a chance to show up your Halloween costume and we're going back down to Drillers Stadium to go early vote together that that is great. I'm I'm kind of sad that I had to send in my absentee ballot cuz I kind of want to go vote early life at the baseball stadium, but I can't do that now or Kenneth, but you can still come and join us in for a costume stroll. Yes true. Remember, you know what they say. Jesse vote early and vote often wage. We live in the dark reality. So you've got you've got your your van. How else can people help what else do you need between now and and and the election day. So right now we've like I said, we've successfully got the van is rented. It's everything will be wheelchair accessible on Election Day. We've already had a couple people sign up for it, which is phenomenal. I think that that was an amazing experience in and of itself between now and then we're raising money for the cleaning supplies. So we have covid-19 has obviously we're in the time of covid-19. So people want to if people want to ride, how do they connect? How do they how do they get in contact with you? So they can go to our website Tulsa voter van, and they'll be a little tab that says rides. They can click on that they can sign up for early voting or election day. It's available and Spanish and English or they can call our hotline which is 918-200-9153, which is also available in English and Spanish actually almost all of our resources are available in both languages. That's another thing we've been able to successfully do with some of the funds that were brought in through fundraising like after this after the episode with you all I think by the end of you talking we're both going to have sore shoulders from patting ourselves on the back for doing you should you should definitely should I should I am not been really working. I have been really working to get funds raised and then I did drove episode and we hit our Mark. That is awesome. I joke, but it is something that that you know, we are excited. The whole point of this was to give people like you a platform people who are doing amazing things that most people in Tulsa don't know about so it's always really exciting when you know, it works the way it's supposed to age. Yeah. Honestly, I was both like happy and surprised. So, how are you doing on on the fundraising for the the cleaning materials? Like how much do you need? So our current goal is 250 with some creative buying and returning than buying them returning of materials. That's come down to about 200 so far. It's been out of our pocket. We have some leftover money from when we raised for the van. So I'd say we're still raising for that 200 goal since we have also then expand wage. With Spanish language Services, which took up some of that money from the ban fundraising. Um, but yeah 200 is our current goal with the for Lysol and Clorox wipes. Well all of our viewers out there. Let's see how much of that we can get by the end of our stream today at 8:30, you know, even if we don't hit all 200, let's see what we can get. You know, we're greedy wage to keep having to help like everyone just run to Costco tomorrow and get that like 12 pack of Clorox wipes that they only have two of them started give them to you. I mean at this point if someone has a Costco membership and they have them in stock. I'll happily go with them to pick it up. Yeah. I know you don't need to give rides of things that aren't voting but if someone was saying hey, I want to buy you some Clorox wipes at Costco. Would you drive them? Oh my god get my car right now. Okay to know getting my car. Well, we'll drive there. Yep. One important question that we haven't asked yet. And that is what are you going to dress as for Halloween for early voting? So do you all remember the game show Supermarket Sweep? Yes. Yes. Yes. I'm going as one of the contestants and my husband is going to be one of the bonuses in the shopping cart. That is awesome. But we're doing a it was a suggestion by councillor McKee she cuz we're we're partnering with her for the tick or treat and she said what if we did Six Degrees of spook Croatian, you know, where you show off your best social distancing costume. So combined we're going to be six feet long that is both impressive. And so Awesome. Well tell me I'm so glad like I'm so glad that something that Chris and I to Knuckleheads did helped you in some way and I'm glad that it was the podcast that did it off for actually something good. Yeah for actual good. So I'm just happy that it wasn't another pod for sad. Yeah, that's true. This is a puffer said the province that's coming off. But for now for now we can enjoy that good people did good things and will continue to do good things. So it's right and thank you everyone who listened and donated I should I should have checked it out from the beginning. But thank you all so much. Yes, I guess think that people actually donate as well as taking us. We did all the hard work credits. I did all the hard work really, so thank you so much. Yep. Well it kind of off for you think it's a nice abrupt cut. Sorry Tommy. All right. Love you Tommy. Yeah, so next we have the incredible special honor of birth on both. I would say the Fairy Godmother of this podcast end of projects all over Tulsa, but more importantly that person's incredible very easy going and soon-to-be Empress of the world daughter. I now bring in Marcia Bruno Todd and her daughter Amelia only Empress of the I mean you mean Empress of the Galaxy, right? Yeah go off. So, all right. I know you got to think so small. I know. Well, you know, that's that's why I'm not Empress of the Galaxy but back to our guests now Chris. So for anyone who's ever been to a leadership Tulsa program, you have probably run into a eleven-year-old Dynamo name Amelia and wondered what is she doing? Here for one and why she's so good at talking to adults. So I made a promise a long time ago to have her on the podcast. So to make it doubly embarrassing doing it on video. So so Amelia first question for you. We as adults are all curious. What is school? Like right now. Okay. So school is very as you know for me, it's a virtual I wake up in the morning depending on what time my classes are because they have different starting times each day. I get to wake up I get to go to the bathroom whenever I want them all day and There we get to learn but at the same time relaxed like I can be in my pajamas. I don't have to be embarrassed. I don't know if I mentioned that I can I can be on mute and they won't hear me doing whatever I'm doing. You won't be in trouble for talking in class or anything well in the chat page, but I think that it gives me the time. I mean it gives it gives me the opportunity to manage my own schedule by myself and I really life. I'm trying to imagine a school where Chris and I weren't getting in trouble for talking all the time. It's reality I care about is whether those giant hall passes that you had to get if you wanted to get the bathroom. Yeah in class, it would be like attached to a log you had to drag behind you or something. I think we forget that like think about your first day in college and you're like, well, I don't have to a Thursday. Permission to go to the bathroom in the middle. So it's a big deal. You know, she's the biggest thing. She say that she used to go to the bathroom whenever she knew I was surprised to they like I at first I thought privately in the chat. I was like, may I go to the bathroom? She said, yes, he may go to the very much but you can just turn off your camera next time and you don't have you know, life life skills. Yeah. I I mean, I imagine your teacher was just happy you asked so so again, like I'm making assumptions which is something that took their toll taught us not to do but I'm making the assumption that you as a young person is more hopeful and less cynical than your mother Chris and I thought what what gives you hope at this particular moment? It is hard to have hope but what gives me hope is knowing that we're always going to be a protected in that everybody has our backs like my family has my back and that gives me hope really because when I'm down even if they're dumb they're going to tell me something to lift me up because it wouldn't make sense choice. They told me well, that's how life is. So that's fair. What what would you say is the the biggest problem in the world right now going from happy to sad why not dead and the biggest problem to me to fit into all one category would be all the isms. And by the ism's I mean racism ableism sexism. All that all the isms. There's too much is there such a business? I don't like that because not one human not anybody. It doesn't matter if you're human or Not Dead. Nobody is is worth more than somebody else and I don't like that. It's always like that saying that someone's worth something else know the the yourself worth doesn't isn't determined on what you look like what you're able to do what your skin color is what your background is. It's determined on Thursday. Everybody has a safe, you know, like it's not determined by anything. Everybody has the same software that was like just thinking of wage, you know, even if I'd never met you before after hearing you say that I would know you were Marcia's daughter. So I'm I'm always interested and the things that you are either drag to or decide to go to that. Your mom is putting on and I'm wondering like What is what the can you remember like one specific thing that you saw or learned from any of these, you know conglomerate of leadership training things that have stuck with you cause I think that I don't know if it's actually called drag too because like it's family. So I don't know if you could call it that but my family but I would not bad but I've learned that when Mom teaches a class it's kind of its she's teaching but at the same time she's really not teaching. She's just giving that student a boost in life basically saying like letting them helping them realize what their purpose is helping them realize how to get through helping them realize that helping them realize their rights so they can stand up to those people that were putting them down in the first place so dead. I believe she's teaching other people how to lead also also just like an extra is that I think she's observed to me at a very early age to always bring extra deodorant and exercise because what I call Sweat is more like passion leaving the body than preventing them. I have no idea what that's like and it's really not happening right now. Yeah, I don't I don't have a sweat rag sitting behind a camera in case I need it off. Yeah. That's right my passion rag, you know, I think I think we should keep working shop. We're only Workshop that are now the most important question for you. If you had to guess who you think is your mom's favorite me or Chris. Who would it be? Okay first not to be what's your question is that I don't know who came up with act Yes. Sounds very self-centered. Yeah. Okay, I would say that Mom only does one impression and it's like I believe it's the only right impression that she does of people and that is Jesse should have got to see this Jesse impression. Yeah. I didn't know you did impression of me. So now I'm very curious but you're practicing we were practicing and she was like introducing me exactly how she would think and you're like and she was like here is Madison you introduced her a surfing Way and then here's like and then she said exactly how you said it. There's her daughter and India Empress of the world. So on purpose of the world to her some day off. Well, take that Chris. I will try not to cry myself to sleep. Yeah in Iraq. Everyone is my favorite my favorite. I did not realize you call me out like that. That was this is why yeah, magic of live internet things out of all I know is the next year. It's just going to be a live stream of people doing Jesse Impressions. That's my goal right now. And next year. That would be amazing. I would that make it so happy. I mean, it depends on what the impression sound like, I guess. All right. Well, thank you both Amelia. I hope you enjoyed yourself. I hope you enjoyed the thing you went to earlier and wage. You are welcome to stay on for the next bit as well. But first I have to drop you off though. Okay, thank you. Thank you both. All right now it is officially dead. Yeah adult our oh, that's true. Of course, of course. Amelia can still see us so She gave us a thumbs-up. It's fine. Okay. Okay. I'm pouring my drink. All right, I'm drinking out of my giving spirit glass. Very nice. Let me not break this glass here. All right, some nice PD Scotch. Nothing says pod for sad like a a nice bull fighting Smoky Scotch. That's true. I really that goes for many things. All right for our next segment. We have so many people off I'm with them all at once but then save we have a surprise guest that I'm very excited to bring on. I'm going to save this person for last. So first joining us now is is Laura bed mat Gleason Ariel Davis and City councilor, Karen McKee one two buttons clicking. Look at all of us. Oh, hey, these people off is not until she's back. What if she's just invisible. She was there a second ago. She had she had had phone number. I was very excited invisibility cloak. That's right. It should have invisibility cloak. I know someone else dropped off anyway, so before we start getting any questions, I want to bring in our special guest who I asked to be on last night and I assume she would say no, but you said yes like to bring on the one and the only Devon Douglas Georgia. I totally predicted that this was who was going to be I was like, it's Deepak Chris and I both have a professional crush on her and her her energy. And yes, you know, I just like I want to put her I had a professional and the personal crush on her, but I guess I feel like going to get like hashtag me too. So I understand why you suck. Oh and a certain city councilor is now back in their desk chair so I can bring it back on. Hello. Hey, I'm back together. Thank you. Thank you, Jessie and Crips good players. So, all right so long these panels are always chaotic. So we are going to try to ask ask questions and try it again answer from everybody before we start I want to give a special thank you to one person who is on this panel is now actually a guest apart for good but it's more just a friend of mine in the podcast world. And that is Matt Gleason from the Mental Health Association of the mental health download. I just want to thank him and also I'm amazed he's still alive cuz they've been putting out an episode every day for who-knows-how-long and I I would be doing this a lot more often if I was mad so I could use some of that PD Scott's you guys were talking about Earlier. Yeah you go. Cheers to your met. We are not the only people drinking this entire time Chris, but we'll see. All right, so I'm sort of first question for the panel what something that's happened this year that has that made you happy but that gives you hope for the future and I'm going to ask Laura Bell's to go first. Cuz the first person there my little know I'm not ready that's happened this year. That's made me happy. Oh my gosh, could you define the bandwidth of what this year qualifies as cuz there's contains a multitude. You just give me like an era or an epic. Sorry. I'm not here. Yeah, I would say maybe since the pandemic started since the pandemic started off. I think to me isn't that makes me incredibly hopeful is how specifically engaged people have gotten right? Like people know their reps. They know how to contact people. They're like not afraid to tweet and call and do all those things. Been cool to see people ramp up with Civic engagement. And what was the second question? It was slaves you hope. Yeah, that was the hopeful part. That was it. So that gives me hope that was the whole thing to breaking up video games like I'm twelve again. So that's that was a remember the Australian wildfires. I don't that was Junior thought it was a decade ago. I was also a long time ago when you're when you're impeachment sure which I love I haven't changed shirts and months. This is so for all your for all your Facebook post. You just put on that shirt for the picture and then take it off and put them back on. Yeah, or you know with zoom filters anything is possible now strange the Wardrobe with a click just yeah. It's like the Sims. Yep. Is like the aerial what made you happy and or given you hope for the future? I think since the pandemic started. I've probably had a lot more time to just be really introspective and figure out what makes me happy. So I've been trying to do both of those things and what gives me hope. It's interesting because it's sort of came out of a sad event. So when Greg Robinson lost the mayoral election this year I was not happy, but when I went to his page like in all of the comments on his Facebook, there were so many names that I did not recognize in that really made me feel like wage are a lot of good people here, but I just I don't know and so it gave me hope that you know, we can move where we need to be at the city. There were a lot of profiles of like older white people whose friends request as a look at and I was like, how do they find me and it was like the other Greg Robinson paid like they're all right. That's all you can eat. That's the only filter ID the most like I can let them in. How about you Matt? Well, okay. So it's what made me happy what gives me hope. I think without a doubt what makes me happy as you Jessie one because you you make me feel not alone in the podcasting world. We both clinched our fists and that's why was it our broadcast more popular? Yeah checking. This one is every day. But also you've been a wonderful Shepherd through this whole podcasting World. You've you've taught me so much and I've enjoyed your podcast so much and you have God bless you have helped raise awareness about mental illness. You've had like rose my dearest and wonderful friend who I am. Are so much on your podcast. So I appreciate you guys doing everything to make the world a better place. So and if I'm going to you know, I'm with Mental Health Association, Oklahoma, so I gotta say if anything has given me hope it's that during the time of pandemic people have been more open to talking about mental health and reaching out for help and not feeling that package, that so often keeps people from reaching out. So man. I hope after the pandemic people can keep that going and improve it and five people like Karen joined the key have been so amazing and this cause thank you so much. So, yeah, so many award for most complimentary of me guess so far. So I just tried to get the Scotch after we're going to have pets guys out. I'm actually the one with the scotch so you may Be careful to be getting some Evan Williams. Anyway, you know sponsor that's right. Mrs. Douglas. Yes things that have made me happy and like things that inspire me. Is this the question sure. Sure. Yes. Okay so long. Oh, I think the thing that makes me happy is right now a little Davis. Yeah, no, honestly, the thing that that makes me happiest right now is my dog. I can't let get my screen black dog makes me really happy. He's so much fun. He's so lovable Ariel's going to try to talk shit about him, but he's wrong he's grown so much since then, we have lots of faith. Okay, he's been to school. I mean that inspire me honestly are the relationships that I have with women. But um, I cash in my lowest of lows and my my highest of highs or whatever and everything in between the thing that's been consistent and constant and just if so woven into the fabric of my life is, you know, women and non-binary folks birth. But people who are always there for me, you know people who like like Ariel who I can call it may take seven times to get in touch, but call her and when she you know, she responds to me when I was starting out an okay policy. KJ was you know that person for me and Laura has been with them. I think I may have no need a longer then I think maybe KJ's me a little bit longer, but Laura we've been in it in the mud for for a minute. So I all of these thoughts on this call have been Really important in my life and getting to see the things that they're doing this year. It inspires me. I know that these women women and non-binary votes are going to save the world because we know what men have done up until this point so sorry, I apologize. So yeah, we're about to worry about you know, not as a meal now as a mule but come through and fix all of this that's that's what inspires off today and I'll ramble because I am not sober be drunk for this off. This is why I cannot figure out how to beat in the room where I'm going to try this if that's no my Brady Bunch song. Right. Well, I know I get so confused. I'm like, oh this side is messed up. No zip Zoom. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. This is this for you. And apparently none of Life stream companies are like, oh people like that. I should include that so we all just think well, I'm okay with looking weird, but I just want people to know I don't look weird because it's just how I am. Look, I look weird because well to make you feel better Jesse and I always look weird. That's true. We are to weird-looking white dudes. So but you've got great voices great voice. Yeah at great hair guys. Really I figure out how to jacket off is your phone like an Android that has the the camera like to the left Or is that Brian Brian the middle to the right? Yeah. See, I don't think they did any testing on that as far as like the live streaming of yourself angle part, right? Cuz I'm like I have two months. That's pretty wait. That's good. That's good. Good for you don't know if people can put in the comments when they see her in the middle of her frame off. All right now everything just every time I was dead center. Those are you deserve you committed perjury to our to our third time guests the same question our city councilor, Karen McKee. Yeah. I'm glad that you all brought like a deep humanistic perspective cuz I'm just like today. I want to put the blinders on and hide from people, but my my my loving spouse is like get in there be with these people that you love. Ye Ye It makes me happy in addition to being here with y'all. I had a bumper crop of beans in my garden this year. The one crop the one that works Steve. Are you remember where you got those kind of seeds from the Cherokee Nation? Yeah. Yeah Shiloh turned us on to that. We've got these Trail of Tears beams and the long greasy beans that women literally sewed into the skirt off, but they were wearing as they came on the trail to Oklahoma and Cherokee Nation has has harvested and planted these four years and every year we get we get some cuz my my husband's a a citizen of the Cherokee Nation and I I had I tried so much to Garden cuz I'm like, okay. I can't I can't see people but I can play in the dirt. I can get my hands in the dirt. I know it's good for my mental health. So we have a lot of beans I mean like I've been picking beans every day if I'm in a meeting and I turn off my camera. It's probably cuz I'm out in the garden picking like literally my phone picking beans and in addition to just the the connection with nature and making myself get off. sunshine I have taken that produce and shared it with my neighbors trying to connect to the people who literally live next door to me and get to know them and their own know like really happy about the Beans really, you know town down on these beans talking to me talking to the baby about it and and it you know, it connects it connects. Well with something else that has been inspiring me. I am I am inspired by some of the deconstruction of our society that has happened this year while I would never have wished for things to go down the way that they have I feel like we're being pushed to do some things differently like go outside figure out how to go outside figure out how to live outside this winter. I've been thinking about that a whole lot and I'm inspired to try to find more ways to connect with people even though I can't do it the way that I usually would I can't run up and hug. I can't be right in someone's face the way I usually would so I am feeling inspired to be creative and it does make me happy to be outside and especially when I can I can share the abundance of em out in nature with other people around me. That's a big deal. Those are those are all good answers and again, no one gives you hope Jesse. I would sort of piggyback off the earlier point that seeing how people have gotten civically engaged when they were stuck at home has really been amazing. It's almost like there was a whole large part of the American population who was like if I only had a little more free time, I could totally get involved in politics because it's not it's important to me but not that important to me and when they finally got stuck at home, they're finding like suck. The world sucks. I should work on this. So I'm glad they're on board and we're like, well the team yeah, welcome I guess. And someone who's been politically engaged since they were eight like I guess better late than never. I mean I am discovered I've ever said anyway, I was going to say I think people discovered how actually similar to Parks and Recreation our City Council meetings are no offense, but you realize how glad that is tells us so I don't mind at all it is is are sometimes thank you for being there. But I know there to witness when things get real weird. I don't think Carlos everything that happened and it doesn't matter. What is on the docket. Yeah, sweetheart. He's gotta come up and bless it off. Every time it was like Parks and Rec know I make a bingo card of stuff I think is going to happen. It sounds of things like what city council's going to wear their Ronald Reagan socks Who's Gonna Roll their eyes who has to Cotton birth? We during this conversation like you know what they're going to do. It's amazing. Listen. I watched that that mask city council meeting and I'm still angry about it. I made a couple of good points in the in the comments fighting a troll. They should have engaged within the first place but I do I do not understand how you sit through this month straight guy schedule. I really just you know part of it is exhaustion exhaustion really helps because I'm out of facial expressions by 5 p.m. Because sometimes those meetings on Wednesday start at 8 a.m. And then they took like it's like we've got 15 minutes. Do you want to pump the breast milk supply to go to the bathroom? You can't do all three of these things. But which one are you going to pick? I'm so yeah my 5 p.m. I'm so tired of just like going home and it's like yeah, that's the tired detached from reality face. That's good. I mean, I'm trying to fix that. I'm trying to fix. I'm trying to move one of our committee meetings to a different day off. To choose days. So the constituents actually have time to hear what we said in committee before voting, right? Yeah. So of the six people wage are currently visible, even though burial is still there via audio. I want to talk to Laura Bell's for a second because you have a full-time job and which is the the head of the take control initiative which because it's nice profit is probably one point five jobs anyway, but you've also been running this Save Our State Facebook group that has been incredible to watch and you're constantly doing Facebook life is in putting out data and how like at this point you've been doing this for I don't know six months now like at this point like has has a sort of like as a schedule sort of income about finally like have you have you finally sort of figured out how to like interact with the people in the group like just tell us about how the group's do it? Yeah. Well just so you know, it takes about 8 to 12 people to run off. Um, someone put like which most of us have never met in person. We met digitally or across the state and yeah it is it's it's down to a schedule situate. I do have a full-time job that I swear. I do if anyone home so I know drop it is like watching them that worked totally happened actually was really exciting is contraceptive access and pulse of the clinics we work with is back to pre pandemic levels may have court which is really exciting cuz that's not the case across the country. But okay with I'm Save Our State. Yeah, I get most of my info from OSU put zombies Echo Cove and culture medical professionals once a week. On those I get a solid amount of data from dr. Jennifer Clark who is my like covid-19 gemuk like goddess. Just like, dr. Clark breaks everything down and it's super just like transparent an authentic and fairly objective. So she's just like here's here's the facts. It's not a good situation and then once a week, I then take that crunch it down further and make a video breakdown for people and then otherwise it's waking up wage. Checking what's going on with the latest covid-19 etcetera and then all of us moderators, we just check in and out with each other throughout the day to see okay, you know, how do we want to moderate this? Do we want to like, you know, let the foam strip from covid-19 SE to some of these other intersectional spaces. We do a lot of unemployment support Health actually since that's like the second biggest thing people are you know, there's been making navigating testing and Healthcare all things but then the other big piece is just people dealing with figuring out unemployment and navigating benefits and pay rent. So we do a lot of that support well trying to ensure that the group name is in itself very, you know across the political Spectrum, but we want to keep it productive and so trying to constantly steer people towards what can we do here on a local level. What can we focus on and just a lot of people with those tools and resources. So, I mean there's a certain schedule to it. We're always modifying kind of like the guidelines to help keep people on track and focused and getting supports that they need at the same time. Become a more fine-tuned and refined science over time. But also it's real quick and exciting thing. That'll make a quick plug for and then I will stop this monologue is next week Tuesday morning at 8 a.m. We're going to have a live within save our state with the whole Q&A on covid-19 seat with Abby Broyles and then Thursday at 6:30 p.m. We're going to do the same thing with Kendra horn, which we've of course reached out to the other people running in those elections. They just haven't gotten back to it. And if you're watching this, why won't you answer us wage? They're they're too busy enjoying those weird mailers that are being sent out by Oklahoma Maga. Yeah, those mailers make me want to vote for the people there railing against much more than I went to get more enthusiastic. You're just annoying me now and that makes me angry. So yeah, so that helped in my race. I'm really help hoping that helps in all of the other races that people are like you are not only a liar, but yep. Edit photo shop and I'm not going to vote for you. I didn't get that mailer and I'm still mad that I could be anti ke Gmail. I wanted to see it. I actually got off three people in your race right cage a total including myself. But yeah three opponents. I got a mailer here in my Houston address for Catherine line. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I got one address like did my actual address here. So I don't know why that happened. You know, that's who was putting my Houston boat. Apparently, you know, you are an influencer. Maybe they're like, we took the juggling jobs where you just like not with that font Catherine. Sorry that I put a little science students one day. We'll discuss the Douglas vote wage. Okay. Oh, yes. I'm a black. I'm assuming I'm on some sort of list that the Oklahoma Oklahoma Republican can committee Council whatever they're called has of like liberal Jews not to mail things to know. How do I get on that list? Cuz we just if we just call ourselves enough on say live streams potentially eventually click. Yeah, when they decide to hate watch this for some reason, I'm I'm sorry. Well speaking of Oklahoma Maga, I I want to take the phrase back. So what do we need to do to actually make America great. But before anyone answering going to bring on another guess he was joined us. Oh, he allows people to call himself q, but I can pronounce his name Crush Lang Sana. How how long did you have to practice that Jessica? I purchased it at least twice in my head first month. So Q. How you doing? What's up fam? What's up? Family? Good good to see all these places. So the the question for the panel is how how do we take back Trump's election phrase? How do we make America great. So I will ask you since he's new. Oh, you just still be able to swap home and I just saw a cute you think on that wage. I'm going to put another white person on the spot Mash. Thanks. Thanks, Jesse, you know I work for a non-profit. So, you know, this is my everyday I am concerned about the most marginalized of our society thousand people experiencing homelessness people who have mental illness people who have substance abuse problems, um who are vilified because they have an addiction and it's a disease. And so I think if we can, you know, it's it's I think this words have been thrown out too much during the pandemic but compassion, you know, if I took a meditation class with uh, sister Ellie here in town who offers a meditation class and at the beginning of the Class 8 part class, she said, okay, if you stay with me at the end of this class, I'm going to tell you the secret of life and we got through all eight hours of the class all eight days and at the end she says, okay. I'm going to stick to my word. I'm going to share the secret of life. And she says compassion. So I that's it seems like police a cliched word. But goodness at this time in our nation and our thoughts if we can just show The Compassion that you all show if that if we can take that on a global scale, you know real peace. That sounds pretty good wage. That's a good answer for being put on the spot. No. I feel like I need to hear from Devon next. Yeah. Or make any kind of the way out of frame now, owners are not keeping us I can I can like yeah wage usually all we can all just sort of like yeah, I'm just going to do a spin off headphones you can spin and you're just like in real quick. If Devon said you should be coming back in a frame and I'll just say one. I think the phrase that were like answering like the make America great again praised by the end of whatever this area is has to go the way of saying like Zig he'll like it shouldn't do it. I like yours and Nazi salute, but to me, it's just like when I think about like voting and ensuring people are in power who are trying to make policies that make people dead. Is better to me that's what that is like cuz that's to me what the battle is too and we're looking at okay who's for what or who's against what when we look at the delineation between like two political parties or just general policymakers decision-makers were holding positions of power. It's are they willing to acquiesce a certain amount of power to benefit others and allow other people to have those seats and then also are the people making decisions trying to make policies that actually work to make people's lives better off like give them Basics like health care and food without punishing them for not being able to have money to do it themselves cuz we're just towards we just torture people for like needing help. I don't know that that's just my like I I don't like hot pot take I would just say real quick as my here's what I would do all the back out a framework just spin now like mm. Yeah I listen to Spin is great. I'm all right Q. Are you ready to answer the question now? Although I'm fascinated by lower Spin and and the Vons or rocket in this moment. So we all it's amazing. So the question is about praise make America great again, right? Well, actually I say just make it great. Yeah, so maybe just not mad that but man right choice on who you are America may not have ever been great for you. There has to be better Advocates. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, I don't know what we could come up with a better. Yeah, cuz I can't say that make America better make America less fucked up. Thank God this point. I'll take that m a f i don't know if that'll fit. You know, it might be too much. You can fit a lot of hats and gloves football jerseys now like a fedora and it goes like all the way around we could make my doors great against. Oh, yeah. I was told you that I am proud of it took 50 minutes for this to go off the go off the rails wage more about a new podcast idea fedoras for good. Yeah. No, no save that for later something we should leave in twenty twenty four doors four doors of that ice cream. Yeah. All right. Yeah, sorry. I don't know. I think that what can make this country better is respect Thursday, I believe right that fear equals ignorance ignorance equals lack of knowledge like the knowledge equals lack of respect lack of respect home of hate and what we what we are in the midst of right now is that entire equation right off that in this very polarized world and country that we don't want to listen to one another we don't and if we don't like what you have to say, then we don't like you therefore we don't respect once you're about or who you are. So we're going to have to apply to kidnap you from the capitol take you into the woods and try put you on trial job. Cute you write, you know about that Gretchen Whitmer self. Yeah, great swimmers. I mean and those folks aren't being terrorists, right? So, yeah and what if they were smart what if they were smart they were dumb like what smart people tried to kidnap a governor? I mean, hey if it's part of an emotional better, I mean, there aren't a lot of small box braids militias, but it's not to stereotype not hashtag. Not all militias, you know. All right. I just don't want them to, she seems very it's so scary is bad kind of funny. Yeah. I mean I yeah, I have more Security on my house than I ever thought. I would have to get. Oh, yeah, but there were people that stand on it's not Chris and I who have gone like threats from the work they do like no one know. I mean, maybe occasionally I'll get a weird e-mail in our email box about how liberal I am or a kingdom again to a birth. A former mayoral candidate young and me on Twitter not on Reddit, but I Chris and I don't get death threats. We don't get but that sort of level of hate. So I apologize for joking about it. But no actually I have tagged but King helps. Yeah, I mean, I'm Chris and I are the same philosophy like humor humor is how we deal. And yeah. I just I'm again. I just want this election to be over with so we can then see what happens and then go from there. I am both hopeful and Incredibly not hopeful because 2016's really ruined house elections for everybody. So I can't I can't trust my my statisticians anymore. Can't trust him and that makes me sad wish I could trust Nate silver again. I know man nice suburbs really quiet for four years. Like I want him to get another hundred percent and this come roaring back and be like, I'm back guys. So but it won't be the to the New York Times if you suck Watching which they are not do not do the weird in the camera that weird indicator thing of who's winning that drove me that almost gave like that almost killed me in 2016. I was stressful job again. Almost killed me the amount of drinking I did after the election. Yeah, it's still it's still hurting me. So okay. Here's here's a more like local question. Since we are a podcast about local issues. Is it time for pot for said? Yes. Yes, it's time for Piper said and hold on first this comment cuz this is a great one fact. It was so spot-on and then not on us it just okay? No, I'm not I'm not going to go on this tangent. I'm going to rain myself in okay pot person at a time and I really wish I had dropped for this bout. How Chris you want to ask this question since it's yours sure sure. Okay. So this is something that has been weighing on me and I'm just a white person so I can't imagine how it's affecting a large population of Tulsa. So to me it's it's how how do we rationalize as a city that we're putting so many resources into finding the mass Graves of of the victims of the page Massacre the same time that we're also putting a bunch of resources to erase black lives matter from every street and every sidewalk that ends up on so I am like I said, this is the Pod for sad question. So I wanted to throw that out there and I had one component to that the same time that we're doing that and actively using tax dollars to not settle the Crutcher case off and not like pay reparations or again also pay reparations or have True Justice for a Joshua Joshua like oh sorry, Joshua bar Eric Harris Joshua birth Like there's all I just think we're doing for your point. We're just doing these simultaneous things. Yeah, which I don't think it has to be an either or either it's where do we put resources? Yeah, right. Yeah, is it like a is it a spectrum of racism sort of thing where like if someone's only kind of raised their okay putting funds in to find the mass Graves but also willing to take down black lives matter cuz someone on Facebook told them there are Marxist organization which by the way Facebook. I'm looking at the camera if you say the black lives matters a Marxist organization uncommon for you in that that comment because your dad. All right, boss. I think they're I think you're right. I think there is a Fifty Shades of racism in Tulsa. You know, I think it was a hot steamy, you know bad bad novel turned into a really bad movie Sears to call Fifty Shades of racism here and I agree that What you know, we I think we all can probably safely agree that there will be more bodies exhumed from the Diggs and there will be no reparations paid right? So what what what what is buying them do now now that what most of us have already known or suspected who's you know, been said this stuff for a while or paid attention for a while know that there were Mass Graves at Oaklawn, but now that they've been found and more will come up watch what your mayor does and how he responds to what demario's doing with the lawsuit and The Descendants that this is going to be a very interesting shuck and Jive not too far removed and my in my opinion from the second drive that that destroyed Greenwood in the first place. Any very interesting to watch and I think it's not by accident that after buying them one of the re-election that he decided that he was going to be a republican again somehow like even more Republican than you know, he was prior to and to see how all this plays out over the next year is going to be a really fascinating and probably disturbing thing. Yeah. I mean if if if you have been following our podcast with Chris and I have accidentally just like brought on a series of critics of our current mayor. So our chances of getting them are on the podcast are zero and will be zero. So what's his Communications office is not answering my emails. I think maybe that is an answer. Yeah and Q didn't you just have either have a book about To come out or just came out. I have a a children's book about Greenwood coming out in February, but we we did the reveal of the cover reveal. Mm. Yeah, it's called Opals Greenwood Oasis. That's about eight year old girl growing up in the in Greenwood the weekend essentially the day before the massacre, but really celebrating the the extra Excellence, you know, the black Excellence of Greenwood and life there before it was destroyed literally the day before it was destroyed. I'm very curious about how they'll get you a copy. Yeah, and I copy and donate to the telephone. Oh man. I'm very like I feel like the amount of time that the mascara shown in a visual medium has been incredibly helpful to both its awareness and people conversations about it. We've already gotten to as far as I know we had we had Watchmen and we've had loved cross-country. I'm wondering how many more of those were going to get and what effect that's going to have cuz they are hard as more and more come in. We know we know there's more coming. Have you seen the Lovecraft country? Well, I haven't seen it yet cuz I'm only like three episodes in but that's that show is really good. I expect it will be excellent episode, you know the so I feel like I should say something to all of this right? I'm all up in it. I The week before the mural on Greenwood was was removed with the mill and overlay. I was on a call with with with several individuals including the mayor and and cows for Lincoln and one of the the things that Kelso Lincoln pointed out, which is absolutely my experience as well was the vast majority of the people who were calling on Thursday to allow the mayor to choose to just endorse that he go ahead and let the the street work happen and we don't find a way to keep it there the vast majority of those people were saying this wasn't a proper process we would be okay with it. Otherwise now some of those people I think were absolutely lying. And I know I don't see them anywhere else calling on anything else. They want to call graffiti and like making the city like hey do this right now. You need to clean this up right now. Like there's there's some hypocrisy happening there in some some misunderstanding of their own motives, but I think even even more than that and this is what I said to counselor Lincoln that those procedures and systems have been where racism and verify these high for a long time. And that anyone who does it feel that they are being biased and saying you need to get rid of this right now, even though we we were the first of the major cities to remove this first and only to my knowledge at this point those people live very segregated lives, and I said that and and you know, the authors they didn't have anything he didn't have a response and I expect and I you know, and I get along well with with my colleagues but I expect that that hit home because I think so many young constituents are living these extremely segregated lives and they have no idea what it feels like it doesn't even feel significant to them and some of them I I do it does seem like wage. I mean I came from the messages. I'm getting I have a lot of people who really feel that we should be we should be looking for the mass Graves, but who hated that there was a mural their birth They they they they don't feel the significance of it in the same way and and I feel the significance of it and I'm not the only one on Council who does but but for them that way it was just too far outside their their lived experience with the people in their lives and with their lived experience with what is proper to do and some of that is whiteness and some of that it's way other nests and some of that is Tulsa is a lot packed into that. I mean I what's Most Fascinating and sort of teaching about the race Massacre teaching about the Holocaust wage is there's a large group of people who don't understand there's a difference between something that's morally right and sometimes legally right and how they are not always the same thing and so in certain cases laws don't mean shit, right? I don't care that the people who painted it didn't follow the proper procedures those procedures used to be racist. So that doesn't make them rights to be it might still be racist dead. To me. I it's it's a fascinating dichotomy and I feel like this has come up on a couple of our podcasts podcast, but Tulsa wants to be a quote unquote world-class City and you can't be a world-class City. When you are leaving large portions of the population behind you just can't you'll never be that and talk to me. It's incredibly frustrating cuz I see amazing things happening in Tulsa and frankly, it breaks my heart that at the same time as doing horrible things to our groups of people in this in the city part here. I would like to thank the 14 people who have stayed on even when the presidential debate is going on, even though I have no desire or definitely one that wash it. I'll just read the highlights tomorrow, but I mean Chris and I should stop talking we are the host. Our job is ask questions but wage We've had we've had drinks now so we should join you. May I want to add I want to piggyback on something and that is where I was a part of the original team of old folks who actually went to the city to get a permit to paint it on and we were planning to to paint it on down right outside of right outside of the BOK was our original plan, which may have been why part of why I got shut down but councillor you may know more about this, but I guess the what we were told initially was that first we were told that our contract for the permit or whatever the paperwork wasn't correct. Then we were told that there wasn't a check off connected to it and it was just all you know was all just move us away from it from doing it actually the proper way and then and then you know, and then we know what happy Brianna and folks and others who did it without the permit but we were set down by somebody at the city at city government about know we're just essentially not going to let you do this. So, you know, I guess I'm saying that we tried to go the right way. It makes me think of I just watched the new Aaron Sorkin movie on Netflix trial the Chicago seven were there like, hey, we tried it a permit for this park people are going to come and gather any way we can do this like legally or people are going to show up. This has to be expressed somehow and like such a good point to raise. We're like, hey when you deny someone a legal Avenues to express something this critical it's going to come out somewhere. Yeah, well in this really highlighted for me the the challenge that many of my predecessors and Council have had in in trying to get off even far less controversial things painted on the pavement that that has been a sticking point to the point where you know, we have had members of the same legal team literally say it's against the the federal laws but it is not against the laws. It's against the guidelines and the guidelines as we are seeing even in Enid this week in Kansas City Life and like every city in North Carolina from the research. I'm doing like there's so many cities have said I see that that's your guideline new research has come out and shows that this actually is traffic calming and make things safer. It's not worth making it more dangerous and we're going to allow this and we're going to have a street art program. We didn't have anything like that in place. We were also told that nothing like this has ever happened because we don't have that in place now off. If you were and I know the council meetings can be boring. But if you watch ticking you for last counselor Patrick discovered right before the meeting it was calling all of us saying wait a minute to you has been painting on their streets for years and the council's always approve that and when we asked legal we were told this has never happened and I mean I asked I asked David Amelia in the meeting like why were we told this and he said well, I know nothing about it. So there's there's this other issue going on here where we as the counselors are being lied to and I thought I can't explain all of why that is the way it is, but I know that when I first learned about the effort to get a permit, it was the night before Council meetings, and I did not see that there was any way that I could rush through something. I didn't I didn't I have regret now wishing that I had realized what was happening what was going to happen and maybe there's a way I could have got on the horn got something done that night that I didn't didn't do. I mean in that in that horrible week when the president decided he was just going to come drop a bomb on us basically and show up and push us around and shove his way into Greenwood would which Bless the people who decided to cover up our monuments and not let him down there, you know, it was it was a rough week and I don't feel like I said, I did not feel then like I could have done something in hindsight. I'm sure I could have pulled out all the stops and done something would it have ended up the same way? I I'm not sure if she wouldn't have ended up the same way because we've seen how much opposition there has been how much effort to just be oblivious to what this means and how it feels In removing it I will say and I almost use this as the thing that makes me happy earlier that I have been really encouraged by all of the clergy who have come out just so solid. Same thing. We are going to paint this on our streets. We're going to we're going to put this in our parking lots. I know that there are more on the way and that's you know, that's something I was saying to Brianna the other day Greenwood by its very existence says black lives matter every day, but the rest of Tulsa really needs to say it say it in another way and I encouraged her to call every congregation all over town and say would like to step to this because we really need it loud and proud from the whole city. Yeah. If not say that we're at the city level. I'm not advocating that responsibility at all painted along Highway 169 is what we should do, but I want to ask I wanted to throw one thing cuz I realized I never said what gives me hope. Oh, yeah back to talking about The the Trump rally one thing that gave me hope was how few people actually showed up and the fact that a bunch of Jin's ears were able to use the power of the internet to you know, not I'll say it ruin that that rally so that was something that gave me hope for the future that that there's a bunch of little activists out there on the internet to keep things going when all of us are too old and cynical to care anymore like little activist and fans of South Korean music. That's right. So let's just bless them bless them. They are incredible. So they understand tiktok, which I do not know and Miss Douglas we have not heard from you in a while. Yeah. Hey, how's it going? Life is good. Life is good. I'm just love listening to you know, I mean wage Yeah, I I do not understand like the people can hide behind protocols and laws when they need to and then dismiss them when it is Handy for them. And that is a problem that I think it's just following orders. Hey, I can make those jokes. No one is frozen. Oh, no, I was breathing. I will say though when City legal was referenced which I will say I think is one of the biggest barriers to progress within our city wage and space is giving me life cuz I know she felt that So KJ did that did the law passed that the the City lawyer now has to be approved by the city council that happen often. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes it did cuz I remember we got confused about that the last people entered we did it make sure I answered greatly. Thank you Laura. Yeah inside inside baseball. We had no record that answer cuz we we learn things I guess again. That was that was an incredibly confusing confusing lie Rin like question where I was like, I don't understand what they're asking me to vote. Yay or nay for ya and always whether it's city or state questions. They're always written in that way and people are really really angry right now about the state questions some of them what we're dealing with here in what Thirteen Days and and some of that is because they're just super confused by what is on those valid. I just do whatever your husband tells me to do. So it's not a bad plan. He's going to he's done the research. I trust him. Yeah, I get to narrow trusting another nerd. I'm like he's done. He's done the work. So for the tens of people listening, that's just a question doesn't Define what a violent crime is just so you know, it's not something that's going to suddenly make a bunch of violent crimes not violent. I'm just throwing that out there. You don't have to be afraid of it. Yes. Can I can I get a Shameless plug here Jesse? So on the mental health download podcast today Thursday, we interviewed Sarah Edwards who's the president of the yes on 805 campaign and she walked us through all of those, you know, misconceptions that people have about that and so I would definitely highly recommend with everybody check that out in potential misinformation. Thanks Jesse misconceptions. But yeah, some people are spending a lot of time. Money on that some people do have too much power want to hang on to their power weird that's never happened before so, you know them again. I'm always amazed when people stay on these live streams when you know, they've been going for an hour and 13 minutes and I imagine all ten of those people know me personally. So thank you 10 people some of the main me all of the same people. It's just your relatives to my dad. Hello who's watching on YouTube the one person watching on YouTube and I assume like pain watching too of course. Yeah my hands. I'm just hoping the fly from Mike Pence's head is true. Listen again, every vice presidential debate like always gives us something good and I was happy it was the fly. So, you know something comes out that causes a new Twitter feed to be born and I'm happy. It was the fly vs. Binders full of women from home. Which bind us all the women still Tweeting? So well done. Whoever's doing that. So, all right. I think I think we should start wrapping up cuz people want to go yell at the T off in my case have a wine bottle fall on their head cuz they're jumping up and down too much in anger. So thank you Sarah Palin for that one. So I remember Halen I know right remember when she was the worst thing. Just even the way for the other one's right kind of those times just be Lookout bar keeps dropping. Yeah. Yeah like animals mate for Donald June 2024. Nineteen Lord. All right. So let's try to let's try to not end on a pot for a sad note if possible. We already asked a hopeful question. So, let me ask you this when President Trump loses. How you going to celebrate? I'll start with Laura. Why do you keep starting with me know? I reject your drink start with you. Yeah, he's got a big smile on his face. Well, I will tell you this that on the night on Election night. The Admiral Twin from 7 to 10. I'm producing a tragedy Collective along with atomic culture ESP TV from New York were producing event called staging. Artists and so we're going to have a cipher of comedians rappers journalists live music live performance at the Admiral Twin and that's going to have live streaming from folks from different cities across the country that will be able to put up on the big screen with what's happening in their different cities on Election night. And it's free if you want to come out and send your car and watch this thing happen from 7 to 10 on Election 9 and bring some snacks and and in join us as we watch the country go whatever happens cuz I'm concerned about what whatever is going to happen that night more so than I am about the night after right more than I am about the 4th. I'm worried about the third choice, but to to your question, what was your question question was how you going to celebrate? I don't know that I'm going wage. To celebrate I know that as I mentioned I'm going to be working that event that night help making that happen, but I don't you know, I just don't know that we're going to know who really won this election for weeks to months after this election. And then there's going to be you know, fighting about whose whose balance get counted and and so on and so forth and so am I don't I don't know that I'm going to celebrate I'll tell you that I will be drinking. I don't know how we celebrate so we still busy. Yeah, that's right. Like you good fam. We drink either way. Yeah and word this year for sure. Yeah one that touches game. Anyway. Yeah, I remember so clearly the night that I went. I went to sleep after my passing my first ballot for president. I went to sleep sleep confident that how gorgeous Our next president at like 2 in the morning. My boyfriend's waking me up saying saying hanging Chads. Oh my gosh. I don't like what we all learned in with Iraq. We all learn so yeah. No, I'm right there with you and that I don't know. I don't know that I will celebrate build it now now that you have seated that idea. I'm going to think on a little bit. You know, my daughter is twenty months old and this is a really significant historical time that she's living through and I do want to find ways to commemorate things that I can tell her about when this happened with this is where we were this is how we were handling it. I mean, she's always going to know mama was ready to jump right back in The Fray and try to try to work on the stuff that there are so many issues that I feel like are getting sidelong because of the elections that's always the case but more so this year so definitely some of what I'm going to do is if you're ready. Okay, let's get back to work. Let's let's get these things done lets, you know take off. Energy back and put it where it can actually, you know make a difference in people's lives in the ways that the Laura and others were mentioning earlier. So that's definitely part of it for me. But yeah that Then hanging, you know not knowing when we're going to know and and and so we're not supposed to call it for said here. But I am concerned about what people will do off with either outcome. So I'm going to enjoy nature some I think I'm going to be camping like just go out of the city for a minute. I'll be back in a hurry. I'm going to celebrate the way Boston celebrates both victories and defeats which is I'm going to toss some cars over and like I'm on fire so We lose Hummers get flipped over you should address your daughter as a hanging chad and then take pictures and that way she's really confused when she's old enough to know what's going on. I just like how Jesse is plan is worth what I'm from Philly. That's what like really sports fans do when we win. I love how we sports fans like no batteries at Santa Claus or something. They buttered the life pulse so they couldn't and Philly figured it out. We still client. Yeah. Oh my gosh. Okay. So my you know, I have been like wavering between like right that cautious optimism in the same feeling of like, you know, there could be continued uncertainty and one of my biggest thoughts has been like what really changes like, you know the next day or in the weeks after like well, I think it's just more of that like cautious optimism that you know, if and when Biden wins that will just like start to see better policies enacted like kind of what I was referring to earlier, they make people's lives better, but the other thing and now I know as far as a celebratory song Will be participating in the Tri-City Collective event. Sounds awesome on December 3rd is also my wedding anniversary because two years ago my husband and I thought a midterm theme election was like a really Stellar like fun get-out-the-vote activity and we didn't really think through the part where that would be Election Day 2020. So I'll be considering we need to like to celebrate on a different day for that. Yeah, you might well, I feel like if you collectively decide to move the date, I feel like that's acceptable so we might need to yeah, November 5th or you know, someone who has been just very kind to stay on this thing this entire time while maybe saying two minutes worth of things one minute of that complimenting me when it too long if you ask me shut it off fix it. Yeah. I'm going to meet Chris Matt won't you talk more about how amazing I am. No. Well, you know there I'm going to after this after this is over. I'm going to go and practice my Jesse impression cuz yesterday around so bring it home. So like try to imagine someone who was raised by Bernie Sanders, but in Oklahoma so figured that speech cans out and by the way to that I would like to post this comment from my dad who says hi Mom. I love you very much. So, you know besides Like Larry David doing an impression of true of Bernie Sanders wage history lesson, they all went to same high school. So. Something or other so I feel like all right. I feel like we all answer that question, right? I miss anybody. Well, I was going to say that for years ago. I remember my wife got angry drunk on champagne. So my goal is to get her happy drunk on champagne instead. So we'll see how that goes off. Yeah, if listen my experiences champagne is there is no happy drunk on champagne, but that's just me. I must say of the bubbly so or maybe just not cheap, bubbly. I don't know. I've never willing to test that theory out. Well, I would like to thank all of our guests who have put up with this wonderful chaos that we had on our part for good one year anniversary celebration. So I want to thank Laura Bell. I want to thank our city council KJ. I want to thank you. Thank Matt. I want to thank Q. I want to thank Ariel Davis who actually got cut off and asked if she needed to come back on I said, it's okay to walk on Douglas. Thank you all and to our viewers listeners as I say at the end of every episode. Get it done. And for god sakes wear a mask. Thank you. All good-night. Good-night congrats congrats on the anniversary. Thank you. Also, for my dad. Bernie Sanders light. I love him, too. I'm glad he watched. Thank you all let's go. Yell the T. Okay. Bye. interesting facts

Deepak Chris Tulsa Jesse Impressions Karen McKee Facebook Laura Bell Ariel Davis van Tommy Oklahoma America Chris Miller Amelia Marcia Bruno Todd Jessie Matt Gleason Mental Health Association Costco Drillers Stadium
Spoilers: Lego Movie 2

Slate's Culture Gabfest

48:58 min | 2 years ago

Spoilers: Lego Movie 2

"Before we get started. We haven't important favor to ask we want to hear from you. We've put together a survey. So we can learn more about our listeners make your favorite podcasts, even better. So tell us what you like tell us. What you don't like? Just visit slate dot com slash podcast survey to participate again, slate dot com slash podcast survey. Thanks and enjoy the show. You my secret. Now, I see. What's? Hi, this is Dana Stevens -letes movie critic, and we are here with us late spoiler special on LEGO movie to the second part, the new film from Phil Lord. And Chris Miller creators of the LEGO franchise, I am joined today by forest Whitman's, lights, culture editor. Hey forrest. Who'd in a nice to see you. And joining us from San Francisco the bay area via phone is in gang culture writer. Hey, Ingvar you. Hey, dana. Alright. So we have all seen like a movie to force you, and I saw it together. A couple nights ago. We were careful not to say anything about our response to it afterwards coming out. So let's just go around real quick and have a thumbnail response. Yes. No force you. I if it's yes or no or thumbs up with down. I be thumb up somewhat unenthusiastically. I mean, it's not as strong as the first one. I think that's pretty clear. The first one was a movie that no one thought could possibly be good. But Phil Lord. And Chris Miller, the directors and writers of that movie. And just the writers of this movie are like masters at working miracles on projects. It seem like they couldn't possibly be good. So, you know, twenty one jump street the movies seems like it couldn't possibly have been good either. And then they made it great. But they only wrote this one, and I feel like this is going to sound like one of those groan worthy puns of which there are many in this movie, but the the pleasure of the regional legal movie so much of it was in the world building. And there's not as much world building left to do in this movie. And so right the gang together kind of element. I one there's right. There's not that. And there's not the freshness of having all these characters together for the first time. But there's also just like they've already done so many of the jokes about how their hands can actually grip anything except for cylinders all of that type of stuff just like fun with the silliness of making a movie of Legos is kind of they've done. They've used up those jokes. Right. They do good. If you knew places, which we can get to I think in the frame story. But Inga what about you? I also want to know about your response to the first one because I don't know if I ever talked to you about it. I would say that more or less it tracks exactly with for response. Yeah. I think I was a little bit shocked by Howell impressed by the animation. I was just because I've seen to other LEGO movies at this point, of course, because there's been LEGO Batman as well. And there's also been the LEGO in Jugo movie did not see Lord and Miller projects. Correct. No. Although yeah, LEGO Batman movies is pretty good. I think I think his name is Chris McKay. I think he's a robot chicken guy did that movie. What do you mean a robot chicken guy? Cartoon network. Adults went robot chicken was a show on Cartoon Network. Maybe I have no idea whether it's still running, but it was popular in the mid like when I was in college, and those didn't have the same spirit. You don't think is these two LEGO movies? They were they were outside the bloop somewhat. Well, LEGO Batman movie, it ends like it, doesn't it can't make all of the sort of LEGO jokes that LEGO movie made. But instead it just had all of this fun with the character of Batman and batmans whole history. And I don't think it's as good as Lega movie. But I I liked like Batman movie quite a bit. And I think can go you too. I love. I love the LEGO Batman, they think it was like my top ten of that year. Just because it's so hard to make something fresh out of an eighty year old character, and they managed to do that. Yeah. This movie. I I think the big weakness of like the first LEGO movie was the live action. Father son, bonding stuff just didn't to work for me at all. And this time I thought they would just get rid of like, what was widely agreed to be the weakest element of that movie. And they really decided to double down on it. And I was surprised by how much I ended up being into it. We can get into this. But yeah, I think overall I was pretty bored like for the first hour, and then when they actually figured an when they actually review revealed, what the emotional stakes of the movie was that I got more involved. But it really took you like a pretty long time for the movie to reveal its hand that way. And so for that. I our I was like, okay movie pastiche movie pastiche. What else am I getting here? Completely agree. The last act of this movie is by far the strongest. Part. I think I think there's a the credit sequence. Which may be part of maybe the best of all. And I think there's maybe just kind of a fundamental stakes problem where like the stakes what end up being the stakes of this movie are total are totally at odds with what they appear to be for the first half two thirds of the movie, or whatever, and you can kind of tell where it's going, and and and so you just like one can sense pretty early on that the person who appears to be the villain is like not actually the villain. And and you know, all of the main characters shouldn't be so sort of macho in tough and trying so hard to be adult. So you like don't actually feel the danger that the characters are feeling for the fritzy thirds of the movie, and as soon as we finally acknowledges that and the live action part of the movie and the LEGO part of the movie come in line like works a lot better than I mean, if I can just play out that's pretty unusual trajectory for mainstream action type movie, insofar as you want to call this kid's movie and action movie that it gets better toward the end. And that's that's something. I sort of liked about movie. I mean, it doesn't fall apart in the third acted. Reveals its hand as you say in the third act and gets stronger, you could argue that it has a week beginning. But you see a lot more movies with strong beginnings weekending ings than the reverse the thing I wanted to observe about the frame story in which if you haven't seen the first LEGO movie, you know, you you cut from this animated world of all LEGO creatures interacting to the kind of meta world of the live action humans playing with them is handled really differently than it wasn't the first movie in the first movie, as I think kind of suggested it's very top heavy, you think that you're in the LEGO world, the entire beginning of the movie, there's not really even any hints about what's happening out in the human world that would that would make these stories appear to be happening to the LEGO characters until suddenly will Farrell and his son just get plunked down at the end of the movie in this maybe ten minute long frame story. And I I actually is true that there is a big jolt. There's a kind of a perceptual shift that you have to make in order to accept how those two worlds relate together. But I sort of was impressed by the emission of that first movie in. Tempting to super pose a human story about dad and son playing together and learning to play together rather than you know, the dad being this obsessive LEGO collector, but actually opening up his world to play with his son. The fact that that was appended was a little bit awkward in terms of storytelling. But in terms of the Embiid of the project, I thought it opened up a lot, and this movie does it is is much more typical of frame story. And then it's interspersed somewhat throughout the movie. So as things are happening in our all plastic all LEGO brick world, you'll suddenly get almost dreamlike glimpses of these real life children fighting playing, you know, dealing with the toys and their own suburban house. And so when the reveal happens at the end, which will get to about what's really going on in the human world, that drives these LEGO conflicts, you're a little bit more prepared for it. And you have a little more of a sense of who those characters are. And there's less of a tonal flash between the live action scenes and the animated scenes in this movie. I think they handled that a lot better. And I think that's one of the reasons why does work better here. Yeah. I agree. I agree. I like the frame story better in this one. Although I missed the presence of welfare who you only here as an audio offscreen. He was somehow wasn't able to show up. But he phoned in literally phoned in his his voice performance. You do get a great little glimpse of my Rudolph is the mom, which is a great surprise. And also Brooklyn prince as the sister, did you guys recognize her this little girl from the Florida project is now one of the two LEGO kids, I sort of wish she'd gotten a chance to show her acting chops a bit more. But but it was nice to see that. She's still getting jobs, or it's let's go let's get into the specifics of what's happening in bricks Burg as it used to be called the LEGO world of the first movie, which is now become known in the intervening years as a Pakalitha Berg because of because of the thing that we see at the very end of the previous movie. I mean, this movie picks up like literally the exact moment that the first movie ends, which is when the little sister shows up for the first time with the larger do blow. Bricks, and at least in the eyes of of our boy and of our hero. The the LEGO character voiced by Chris Pratt, kind of just starts destroying everything. And so that's what leads to apocalypse Berg, which is essentially just like a spoof of a Mad Max fury road type distort, you just kind of like a barren wasteland where everything is serious and gritty, and they kind of just like. Laugh at the seriousness of those to stop us. But with the difference, of course, that the invading monsters are these cute duplicate box with little babies voices, though, you know, the monsters that they're all running from. And that are destroying their skylines are things like big floating pink hearts that say I love you is they flowed in this guy. I m it believes in the cuteness of those things leading to one of the best better jokes where he liked tries to approach them with a a heart, and they cut to the TV news and bricks Berg, and the Chiron just says insane man approaches mom. The movie is really full of those clear like quick little cut away. You've got to pay attention for for the joke. So we've got pretty much the same characters with a couple exceptions as as the gang from the first movie, Chris Pratt as Emmett the attorney Chipper construction worker who doesn't seem to mind that he's living in apocalypse land and just happily waves to all the mutated monsters. He passes every morning Lucy AK wild style as she was originally known the Elizabeth banks character who was really sort of the main action hero of the first movie. Right. And and is now I guess more of a typical Mad Max kind of gritty brooding character who has not maintained the eternal cheerfulness of Emmett who else is in there. Charlie day is still voicing Benny the spaceship guy, who's only line is spaceship utter joyfully over and over whenever he gets to ride in the spaceship. We're missing Morgan Freeman's hilarious character. One that kind of wise Gandalf like character. I think he appears in one dream memory sequence. But otherwise he's gone who else who else is in. Lego Batman, of course, and will Arnett is like oh Batman exploring new depths of of batmans narcissism. And that that is your I've got to see the LEGO Batman movie. I haven't seen it, but will Arnett voice characterization about man is definitely one of the highpoints of this series. Ingo? Can you give us a sense of how the action gets initiated in this movie? So. There's a really wonderful scene where Emmett wants to show wild sil-, his best friend that he has this unrelenting hope at sunniness about him still, and he tries to show her this through this house that he has to spelt, and essentially she's really put off by his vision of cheerful divest Asli and just want them to brew alongside her. And then she gives him like a series of brooding lessons where Beth banks. Does these wonderful voice performances where she just gets darker and more dramatic and images can't keep up. And so she of the thing really disappointed that he isn't as dark as she is. And then very quickly after that out wild style and several of 'em. It's friends mostly a main character from the first movie. Are all suddenly kidnapped by these alien invaders? The intergalactic naval commander of the star system. Right. And this is kind of an ongoing. This is an ongoing joke in the movie to right, which is that perfectly banal things in the real human suburban world, get turned into these pseudo science fiction sounding right like the bin of Stora frayed of the Ben of store off, and we'll get there. But the most horrible place you could end up is is under the dry are. I forget how they how did they frame? The dry are. Yeah. And actually sorry. I have it here the dust planet under the drive. Which is where a few people get exiled later on. But yeah. So once this this spaceship from the star system takes away, the some of these figures we start to blend the human world and the toy world more because there's a portal, which is in fact of the door up from the basement leading into the family's house. And once you this. Yes, this dare gate and once you pass through this portal. No one knows what can happen. You could end up in all kinds of places which was what we end up exploring over the course of the movie. Yeah. And from here that like the movie, basically splits into two storylines where are two main protagonists who in this movie are Emmett because Pat character in wild style banks character are separated and m it meets this character named Rex. Who is kind of just a danger Beth? Yeah. Last name Rex danger fest, also voiced by Chris Pratt. Right. And I think that name is like a triple pun. It's Rex it turns out to stand for something later, which I don't remember also I think it's on like, he he wrecks thing. So he's like this tough sort of Chris Pratt action hero spoof where there's like a reference to Christmas characteristic world, who's constantly training velociraptor. So he's introduced as raptor trainer. Can't like starship commander in a sort of guardians of the galaxy type way, but they're all like a little boys. Vision of a tough action hero, Indiana Jones. Steve Irwin kind of elements. And the dinosaur touches kind of nice Jurassic Park reference because all of the dinosaurs that he works with are, in fact, sort of bureaucratic middlemen who are just sitting years trying to get business done. And there is all subtitled, which is very pleasing. We hear them roaring at each other. But you know, it turns out they're just kind of, you know, having water cooler conversation like Mondays, I'm all right? And so that's the line ends up being about basically Emmett wants to learn to be more like Rex because he thinks that's what wild style wants of him is for him to be tough, and and brooding, and that's pretty much. I mean, the there's sort of two thousand one A Space Odyssey kind of spoof of the like Jupiter and beyond the infinite sequence from the end of two thousand one and they mess around with raptors, but mostly they're just trying to intervene and save wild style. And the rest of the crew from evil Queen in history, we see this little bar Barbie, blonde doll. That's sitting on like this weird. I don't even know like a big mess blocks. And you think that the blonde Barbie is going to be the Princess especially because she has a crown on our head. And then it turns out like the Barbie is just eight. A handmade. I guess to the actual Queen who is voiced by Tiffany haddish and the four a movie that's trying very hard to sort of bus out of leg. What Boina says in what girl messes it would actually like a thought of effective reveal? Yes. I mean, there's that red herring. Right. That the little Princess doll is actually just a servant of the Queen. And then there's the revelation the Queen is this kind of crazy shave shape, shifting brightly colored monster whose name as indicates that she can turn into whatever she wants to be and she's also morally ambiguous. I mean, she's things this long. Really funny song about how she's completely uneven, and certainly not plotting the destruction of the known universe and ends it with this insistence that she wants to marry the man of bats, right? Isn't it? Isn't that the moment that she goes about Matt I think so. Yeah. I mean, I think right away. Like there's a little bit of time before we reveal they keep talking about the matrimony ceremony or something like in some slightly round. About way. We're not sure who it is at first, but eventually becomes clear that she is wing that man the man of bats. I don't really know why she's calling him that. But. And then I mean, the next twenty minutes or so of that storyline is is essentially her and her crew of people, I guess we could spoil who some of them are. So there's like a twilight spoof like an Edward type who's like a vampire who wants to love you. But couldn't possibly actually be in love with you. And that only makes it more romantic or something they're just like constantly putting glitter on everyone. And it's framed through the eyes of wild style. It's framed as everybody getting brainwashed, basically. And so we should say another aspect of this part of the universe. The like the star system is that it's just full of songs like this movie is it's kind of kind of a musical universe. There's sort of compulsory participation in every musical number that takes place and so to resist the brainwashing is to refuse to be one of the people happily singing the songs that crop up in everything including the song. Now have stuck in. My head which is basically called this song going to get stuck in your head. Do you guys still have its second year minute. I walked out of the theater, I wish they had up for the credits. Closing sequence song stuck in my head. Instead. But this. Yeah. This movie's equivalent of everything is awesome. Although that also has several reprises including a sad reprieves toward the end of the movie. But this song's new equivalent is is that this is gonna get stuck inside your head, which we are led to believe is a brainwashing song like once you've you've joined to the singing of that song you've become one of the sparkley happy diluted residents of this of this evil Cestari universe. So this is what this is where we get into. What I think is the problem with the first like, whatever it is half or two thirds of this movie. Which is did you guys actually where you guys actually had all worried about Queen whatever a wannabe or and and her plan to throw glitter on everyone and get them singing pop songs and stuff? Like we're supposed to understand that. It's ridiculous. But in order for this part of the movie to have any stakes. We also have to care and think that. They might actually be something devious going on. And I just didn't think there was until I was just waiting to the reveal of the sister. Like, if you're actually like a pretty sexist person. I think you might be worried during this part. But for me, it was just like get get to the reveal. Yeah. Honestly worried because the world of the whatever one wanna be is. So over the top girly. And so whoever goes in there like superman is sort of like very divorced from his entire past analogy. There's like this running joke about how superman hates green lantern. But in this reality, they're like next door neighbors and best friends, and they both have glitter covered all over their bodies. And so I really wasn't sure going into the movie whether this movie was going to be like a send up of girly nece or a. Send up of people hating girly nece. Like, I really wasn't sure at I think based on a lot of the deserve sexist deserved. Criticisms of the first movie like several sexism, I have to say like I wasn't really sure what to expect. Yeah. I mean, I should say that like I had heard from Ugo and also slate editor and writer same Adams that the villain in this movie was Hoxha masculinity. So I was kind of tipped off to some of this. And I think that's part of why the stakes didn't work for me during this part of the movie, right? I knew where it was going right because the movie as it's been set up makes it seem very fun to be coated in sprinkles. And join a musical right is not particularly effective at setting that up as an evil outcome since I know in go, you you are gonna write something for Slater. Maybe already have about about toxic masculinity and also gender gender toys in this movie and kind of the different ways that gender. Plays out whether between the two versions of of heroism in Rex dangerous and the Emmett character or the different gender. Toy styles of the younger sister and older brother who in the frame story are playing with their actual toys do either of you have anywhere to go with that. Because I think is something that's quite important to this movie. I mean, I would say insofar as this movie has a message besides just, you know, friendship, and let's work together. It has to do with questioning notions of what you thought your particular gender role was. Yeah. I mean, I think we should just like briefly spoil what the ending and what the reveal because it's hard to discuss the themes otherwise. So basically this all the way that our two main storylines Amit storyline in the wild style Sewri line and up coming back together is that LEGO Batman is going to get married to Queen whatever wanna be in. And this is this is like this kind of what's coated as girly style of playing where you want to have characters get married to each other. And then and Rex come in because they are viewing this as some horrible scenario to basically destroy the wedding and that whole universe. And that's when we finally pull back the curtain on what's really going on in our sort of meat space. IRL live action part of the story, which may be you can talk about Ango. So basically eight in the quote, unquote, real world, what has been happening is that? The little girl in the house took her older brother's favorite toys and took them into her room. And so she is arranging a wedding for her brother's characters her character's to before together in this wedding. And you get this like really great scene of Batman realizing that he actually wants a wife, and if you've seen the LEGO Batman movie, it's doubly funny because that entire movie is really all about how that man wants to be alone. What makes him in his head? Batman is his pathetic solitude that he thinks is like very macho. And so here, we have the leg twists on the character where he realizes that thing that he wanted most of all was actually a wife, and then it turns out that because whatever wanna be is also the through slightly lonely. Royal. They actually have a lot in common. And both of them are also kind of like self involved idiots, and they also connect on that level. And so it looks to be this extremely happy wedding. And then the brother comes in in real life, and essentially destroys the entire infrastructure that the wedding supposed to take place on which is gigantic cake. And so the mom comes in because the kids are yelling the mamas played by Maya Rudolph by route office, very Maya Rudolph in this and tells the kids if you can't play without fighting than you're not going to be able to play at all. And so she ordered for all of the LEGO blocks than all of the DuPont blocks to be put into the bin of ause. Which is something that the characters within their world referred to his Armageddon. As one of the more effective in the script. Yeah. Well, I mean, I couldn't for a lot of the movie. I was like I don't really get this pun because it's like unclear like it's so clear that it's gonna be something to do with the mom, and it's clear why the characters think anyway, eventually you realize it's a much more elaborate on where it's our momma gets in. Yeah. But I don't think the characters is posted. No, that's sort of part of the beauty of the break between the human world and their world to them. It's just the name like Armageddon. Right. I don't think that they're they're aware of these these people that are manipulating them. There's not really ever any sense that I mean now now we're kind of getting into like character psychology of the toys, but there's not any sense that they realized that they are toys that are being played with by larger beings. They attribute everything that's happening out in the human world to cosmic forces like the the stair gate, but we're wanted to get to though was talking about this fight club style relationship that develops between. Chris Pratt's two characters that voice is there's and there's a lot of this toward the end of the movie because essentially the two of them are now alone on their mission to destroy the wedding cake on which the party is about to take place. And they're not able to see kind of that. There might not be any reason to destroy. They have now just become fixated on, you know, giving this mega punch to the wedding cake that is going to going to destroy everything. And so what happens in the relationship between the two of them dangerous. And and Emmett what did we learn about them in that last bit of the move. Yes. So basically, we we learned that and this is very convoluted as the characters themselves aknowledging, I, and they basically acknowledged that doesn't really make sense. And I'm pretty sure it doesn't actually make sense. But you guys can try to explain it. If you think do does make sense, basically, Rex it turns out is a future version of Emmett who has been set sent back from the future sort of like, Terminator style. And he is the older hard end more, quote unquote, adults version of m I have to say, I really related to this as somebody who gave up many of the things in this movie that are coated as sort of childish and feminine because I did think that they were like not like what it reminded me of is when I was eight and my mom really wanted to go see The Lion King with me. But I was convinced that I was too. Old and Manley apparently to go see The Lion King. And so I like cried on the car in the car on the way to The Lion King, and I really regret that I missed out on so many great things because some combination of my family, and my older brothers and society like taught me that I shouldn't like things like The Lion King now lying in incredible movie, actually, make it to the Lanqing. Or did you watch this in resistant -ly with your your Magill and stoic jaw said, I think I probably liked it. Okay. But I definitely didn't watch it over and over again because I had older brothers. So I was just convinced that like I was I was way past The Lion King. And I was more of a Terminator two kind of kid. Liking also has like essentially, no important female characters. Yeah. That's. It's dead. Right. Yeah. Right. So he's like both these code coded as both older and more masculine, and then Emmett's sort of great realization to some extent wild styles to which I liked it's it's more nuance that like it. It's not as if the only macho character is a guy. There's also a kind of macho female character and wild side who who's like also commenced that guys need to be tough in broody and stuff. And so they both like wild style realizes that he that she doesn't like, you know, super broody Amit, and then they find kind of natural balance where he's a little bit more adult, but not. But he's also okay to like enjoy pop songs, glitter and stuff reason, why all happens is because as the wedding cake is breaking apart has this opportunity to save wild style. And his other friends and wreck stained or bus is like no whether you doing like, you don't need friends. So why would you save them? Which was of course, like entire mission in the first place, and so one is faced with what? I mean, the for lack of about a word what toxic masculinity actually is. It's not just like drawing Lenka bunch of stumbles on this face with a marker. It's actually disliked being a dick and being alone unhappily than he realizes like the full extent of like who wrecks actually is. And so we got this very long story about like how Rex came to be which is basically that Emmett was thrown under the dryer. Or however, the yes, and basically no one came to rescue him and therefore for years or months or who knows he was stuck there and contemplating how no one came to save him. Therefore, he was alone in the universe. And that's how he was going to live his life. And essentially when Emmitt says I don't want to be come like you Rex than. Rex gets very angry and throws Emmett under the dryer once again, so that I guess Rex can truly exist. Because if the if Emmett doesn't harden than the wrecks will never exist, right? And in this comes out, of course, in the disappearance of wrecks, which was kind of heartbreaking moment that under the dryer. There's a whole reconciliation scene eventually under the dry are where Rex danger vest, the older version of Emmett Emmett himself who has been stuck under there for all this time. And while style who finds her way there after this kind of superhuman attempt to emerge from the the of store is with the help of her friends. They all have this this confrontation there in which it's essentially affirmed that image daddy as he is that his unspoiled. You know, joyous unmask Lynn or untraditional masculine self. Should should stay exactly as it is. And when he has that real. Nation than Rex has to start disappearing back to the future style as he says as he's disappearing and the little kid next to us if you remember Forrest was very confused and concerned about what was happening to Rex dangerous, and where he was going because he can no longer exist. Having not had the past that created him. And and he fades away before our eyes. It was very much like the first scene of Looper, and it was very creepy. I thought four this movie. I guess sure. I'm very curious. How much of this movie will play for kids versus us as adults? I mean, one thing that I can help couldn't help but wonder as an adult that maybe will not be a problem for for any children as I could not figure out like what the relationship is between everything that is now happening in the legal world, and what's happening in the meet space world like it becomes a sort of metaphorical reenactment of everything that's going on in the soul of this child. Whereas my understanding of how of what the relationship between those two worlds is from the first movie. Was that like it's literally just the fantasy that the kid is playing out using his Legos? Right. But the kid wouldn't invent some elaborate fantasy about being an adult and how he needed to learn to be a child again. I think there is actually a reciprocity joint exchange of of realities and developments between the two world. And that maybe you see that more clearly in the second leg of movie than in the first. But if you want to say that there is a reality, right? It may not be one of the kids can experience. But there is a reality where that confrontation into the dry are taking place, and Chris Pratt is having this revelation of his double nece, and how he could remain the person that he is that that in a sense is metabolising allegories ING, maybe even influencing what's happening in the human world, which is essentially we haven't gotten to this. But the resolution in the human world ends up being that after my Rudolph creates Armageddon and walks into the room and furiously says, you know, you've got all put your Legos away in bins hilariously stepping on a few bricks along the way. The voice starts to feel bad. They both pack up their Legos. They're both sad about it. And there's a moment that the boy encounters some of the dupe low Bloch and his box. And and remembers that how this all started is that you know, he his sister was allowed to invade his toys and that they were supposed to play together. I think there's even something. The sister says as the mom is banishing them to their things away where she says I just wanted to play with you, and it's kind of pathetic. And and I think that might be the boy's own version of the revelation that was that was headed to the dry are by the two toys, which is that you know, he can let go of some of this need to be the tough kid who has the cool toys who is not gonna play with the pink girl toys of his sister. And he can kind of move into her world as well and make something for her. So he ends up creating a little heart out of dupe lows for her which harks back to the very first scene of the invasion of the the queue duplicate Hart's, destroying the Legos world and goes and presents it to her. I mean, isn't that kind of a real world algae? Of finding you're more sensitive side into jacked with what I thought was like the best line in the movie, which is that. The girl. That's just say I just wanted to play with you. She says something along the lines of like, the only reason why I decided to invade your LEGO world is because it was like the only way you would play with me. And it was the slack. Very thought self-aware line about how the only way that a lot of girls or female characters are allowed to invade male spaces is if they sort of deseminate himselves an act exactly like a boy or man, which I thought was like actually the mazing line of criticism about like hell Hollywood action movies about female characters work. Right. And we get that character general mayhem who changes her voice? Like she wears this helmet and mix self into more of an actress action star who has like a intimidating voice than being her. We eventually like her helmet comes off. And we see her as a more kind of. I don't know fun lemming more stereotypically feminine self almost kind of Japan nation style care, right? She has like pastel colored hair and stuff. Yeah. I mean, I don't want. I don't want to sit here and make diagrams with straws about the exact relationship between the LEGO world and the meet space world. I I just basically I found it more unclear and and a little more confusing in this one. Like. It was just hard for me to picture like the the kid actually coming up with this elaborate time travel plot. And so on in order to make everything that happens in the LEGO world happened. But I think it may be make sense. If you just accept this premise that the LEGO characters also have wills of their own, and so they can make all sorts of things happen that the boy wouldn't make happen. As an engineer. I feel like the first movie is well there are plenty of individual interactions happening. Among the LEGO characters that aren't being engineered by the boy from abroad, they might be broadly influenced by the fact that he's, you know, moving them in certain ways or whatever, but they have their own independent free standing culture in which they interact. I've gone way down the rabbit hole metaphysics we've gone too far into the metaphysics over. So I think we should get pullback one less thing. I will say though, is that besides the the boy versus girl. There's. Also, the older kid versus younger kids scenario, and there's a certain moment when one of the characters I can't remember who it might be. Rex says something about how an adolescent brain is starting to lose the magic of childhood, right? And and what's going on is that we're seeing a boy growing up as actually and the actual actor plays a little boy has grown up and is now a tween as opposed to the little boy he was in the first movie. And so I think you also see, you know, his style of play diverging from her style of play and then having to find some way to reach across those tracks. Yeah, I think the line is this isn't even happening. It's all just an expression for the death of imagination in Adelaide scence. And who says that you remember remember, that's the thing. I don't know how that's going to play for little kids. Exactly these movies have wide audiences. So it's always hard to play to all ages at once. I mean, I have to say just in a in a Broadway. I appreciate that this movie tries to be fun for adults and kids without throwing a lot of cynical kind of bones at adult, it doesn't do that DreamWorks thing of just you know. Talking about old movies that only grownups are going to get the references or care about. I feel like it weaves those two worlds together in a way that you could watch this with a kid, and you could both enjoy it and have things to say about it afterwards that you had both experienced. I guess my only question than is our kids who are always trying to be adults more grownup actually going to be convinced that what they have currently is the flight wonderful, beautiful childlike wonder thing like, can you really have a sense of like having that. When you're experiencing it. I think you have to be a certain age. I know what that age exactly is. But I do think that a lot of kids do connect with that. I mean, there are a lot of classic stories. So what what your question reminds me of in go is like the Peter Pan stories, which are always about preserving innocence against the corrupting influence of adulthood, I mean as somebody who was as a millennial generation hook and loved that movie about the importance of preserving the purity of childhood imagination. I think I think some percentage of kids. Once they've certain I don't know about three year olds. But like once they've reached. When like hook like seven. Then they do appreciate that kind of story. I mean, my daughter is twelve and she just loved Mary Poppins returns, which has a lot of this material in it about sort of refining, your childhood and the three kids refinding the ability to play imagine after their mother has died and they've had to grow up kind of prematurely. I think it's exactly that age of kid actually, who's a tween who's the most fascinated by the idea of what is it to be a bigger kid or a younger kid, and in the end, there's something sweet and heartwarming if you know simple, and you know, familiar about the the vision of the two kids playing together and find some kind of common space where they can each play in their in their own way and enjoy their Lagos. Yeah. Where you guys moved. I was moved. I thought it typed tapped into something like pretty primal there. Yeah. I have to say, and that's what it again, I think it is a strength that this movie gets gets better toward the end. And that it the the substance that you might feel missing some of those middle segments where you might think this really is just about, you know, a world of cute toys kind of singing songs, and then occasionally whaling on each other that when it does. Open out into a larger concept about play. And what toys mean to us? There were moments that reminded me of toys story, and Andy, you know, and the character of the kid who owns the toys who becomes just as important as them over the course of the three movies. Say I have like dislike grudging resentment usually against movies where the moral of a movie is like you should embrace a kid because it's so much better than being in the dealt. I think that that kind of sentiment is a thing thought up by animators who had good childhoods and. I remember distinctly really hating kid. And I am. So like, I feel like usually when a movie tells me that being a kid mazing, and there's no better thing because you still have the your sense of innocence. I tend to really not like those movies. But I think with the swan the for me it worked because of that gender element. Because so much of it was about how this boy realize there's more than one way to grow up if he's going to grow up. With all of that. I think it's the gender element that makes this more fresh and also I think just like more true to a broader slice of human experience, perhaps the one other level I will say on which this movie resonated with me a little bit. And I'm curious whether it did for you guys to is. There's this whole recurring theme of is everything. Awesome. Basically like at the beginning. They keep insisting that nothing is awesome anymore and all hope is lost than where they end up. Lanting is everything is not awesome. But that doesn't mean everything's hopeless and bleak, and I just feel like as an American in eight thousand in nineteen all of those lines about how nothing is awesome anymore. And also. Specifically. I mean, if you I don't know if you guys have gone back and rewatch the original LEGO movie since the two thousand sixteen election, but it plays quite differently given that it is about a dystopia n- corporate society in which an orange Herod, man. President business business. So it it like, I think it is working oddly well in parallel with our of all Ving political situation over the last few years, you son that they all thing when they're in the bin of Dhiraj. Everything's not awesome. Obviously, a parody of everything. Awesome. Everything. Awesome. And I initially thought like this is like, I don't know the two millionth callback that we're doing in this movie. And then when they have this leg grant realization that like if they work together, they can get themselves out of this terrible mess. They're in. I also thought of the Trump administration and how I guess maybe there is. I don't know. I don't know like how much of that like Lauren Miller intended. But that really worked for me. Again, that's all part of the of the end getting better. Can we talk about the credit song because we just have to? I mean, the best part of the movie, it was one of the best things I've seen in a movie this year, and yet it's really hard to describe without actually playing it for one thing the animation changes lightly, and it becomes this this purely LEGO and sort of toy like is almost like a cylinder. Right. There's like a big LEGO cylinder that turns on each time. It turns there's a different sort of scenario from the movie being being acted out in these very simple, LEGO blocks. But meanwhile, the song that's going along on the on the outside. How would you describe it? I mean, it's basically it's it's so most of the songs we should say this is full of songs. Most of them are written by a guy named John legit. Lajoie? It's spelled like the French for he's he's from Quebec. So right. Okay. And they're like, they're uneven. I would say I mean, the first one only has the one song, I think in that one song became a huge hit and was like widely beloved, and I think they're more uneven in this one that Liz is is sort of a internet comedian ironic white guy rapper in the lonely island mold and so in that sense make sense higher. But I feel like his lungs were a little more uneven and then in the closing credits. You get a lonely island song, or at least it features lonely island. And it's basically just them rapping extremely toughly enthusiastically about how awesome closing credits sequences are. And they like it just keeps evolving. So there's a part where Beck suddenly the musician Beck suddenly interrupts to sing about like to sing very profoundly about how the stereo stopping. Supervisor was Chris Cuttington? I've. I believe the line was I can't believe Chris Cuttington the stereoscopic supervisor. It's just one of those really silly medicines. That makes you look at the credits in a different way. I think there's very specific lyrics about you know, whose name is scrolling up right then and whether you can keep up with the scroll, and anyway, it's impossible to leave the credits for this movie for a refreshing reason, not because you're waiting for a stinger necessarily. But just because the credits themselves are full of fun and playfulness enjoy. Did you love the credits as much as they and I did. I felt it like it was beautiful convergence of like the entire comic tone that they were going for because the obvious counterpart or or whatever you wanna call it to Lord Miller under sensibility in the league of movies is obviously Andy Sandberg and the lonely island and to like that kind of like like wholesomeness that they bring to pop culture that isn't Fickling for some reason and. I appreciate that. They wrought them in to sort of create this like ultra wholesomeness that is somehow appealing very very quickly. Speaking of the meta aspects of the movie, I will say there's one specific moment, this movie one other specific moment that I do not understand it all and I wonder if I made any sense to you guys, which is the part where you very briefly get an intermission. And like they flicker the classic. Let's go to the lobby song. I didn't get either. I did not get it made me wonder whether the movie was going to suddenly become kind of a meta movie. And there was going to be some even more fourth wall breaking aspect of it. And then it just went nowhere in retrospect, I thought of that after the movie, and what was that? Yeah. Yeah. I scribbled a big question Mark in my notes when that came along. I don't know quite what is doing that it was incorporating some of the characters including that Butler guy into the let's all go to the lobby song. But it didn't really tie into any larger way of blowing out the movie. And making it a meta movie. I mean, this movie was so full of little imagine of inserts weirdnesses that they were going to be a few that just kind of over your head. But that was definitely one of like, we haven't talked about the cameos, which are like kinda hit mess to think like randomly WNBA superstar Cheryl swoops is in this movie, which was like fine. I guess one of the more inspired cameos was win wild style. Ends up in some air ducts, and then Bruce Willis is there, and he's just like I spent a lot of time in. The real Bruce Willis assume, but I didn't. We could PDA. Yes. And also it's like the kind of cameo that he even he could overcome laziness to do. I mean, I guess as we after we talk about it. Now, I'm feeling a lot of sweetness toward this movie. It doesn't have the surprise and the kind of pure the purity of the first one, but it also doesn't ruin the spirit of it at all. And it doesn't make you dread. The idea of third LEGO movie, which isn't explicitly teased is there. There's not really a stinger at the end that implies that they'll be third LEGO movie for sure I guess they're waiting just to see how this one does. So I don't know if that's in the works or not. But if there is one I hope that you will come in and talk about it with me, some more. As long as there. I am there. Also. Okay. Our engineer today was merit. Jacob our producer and editor will be Daniel Hewitt. And if you have any ideas for future movies or TV shows you would like to hear spoilt on slate. You can write us an Email at spoilers at slate dot com. Force Whitman king. I'm Dana Stevens. Join us again soon for another sleet spoiler special.

Emmett Emmett Rex Chris Pratt editor Dana Stevens Beth banks Whitman forrest commander Cartoon Network Chris Miller San Francisco Andy Sandberg engineer Lauren Miller Phil Lord Chris McKay writer Inga
SN 770: Zoom's E2EE Debacle

Security Now

1:48:16 hr | 7 months ago

SN 770: Zoom's E2EE Debacle

"It's time for security. Now. Steve Gibson is here. We'll talk about the D.. O., H., D. O. S.. Also talk about IBM abandoning face recognition technologies, and the weird story about zooms encryption. Is it or isn't it? Steve Parcels the statements next? Security now comes to you from twits. Last past studios stay in control when it comes to your company's access points authentication last bass makes enterprise level security simple for your remote workforce checkout last past dot com slash twit to learn more. PODCASTS, you love from people, you trust. This is tweet. This is security now Steve Gibson Episode Seven Hundred Seventy Record Tuesday June ninth twenty twenty zooms e two ee tobacco. This episode of security now is brought to you by I.. T. Pro TV learn the INS and outs of it careers and get the most up to date training with it. Pro TV visit it pro dot, TV, slash security now for an additional thirty percent off all consumer subscriptions for the lifetime of your active subscription. Use The code S. N. thirty at checkout. and. Buy Extra extra helps you. Keep Your Business Secure and available with SAS based Cloud, native network detection and Response get tips, unsecure and supporting remote access or check out the full product demo. It's cool at extra hop dot com slash security now. Cybersecurity now the show we talked about the latest news insecurity. We get your use help from this guy right here. He's a security grew the King Steve Gibson. Steve Yolo Leo Wow, seven hundred and seventy episodes no. I have seven forty. You're right I got to fix this. US. Thank, you. Note of that. Proper lower third down there is that a magic is twenty twenty by the Way Leo? We have a good. Night. Twenty twenty dates right just the episode run. We went from last week's PODCAST zooms e to e design. Now to zooms easy to e debacle. Yeah, that was quick taking a victory in the. Stress, snatching defeat from the jaws of victory side cannot wait to get to the end of the podcast. Because what happened last week. You just gotTa scratch your head and say. Who who? anyway we'll see why. But before that we're GONNA. Take a an interesting new look at some new problems that might be a rising with dio H, making it much more like dough than We thought something happened last week with fire. Fox when it unleashed. Do H Onto A. Ds that wasn't happy, we. We're also going to look at IBM's new stance on and I'm happy about this facial recognition research. We're GONNA. Look at two recently disclosed flaws in zooms client, which is separate from the debacle. You can have a mistake and you can have a policy we. Are careful to separate those We're going to check on the severity of the latest US once again. We're back to UPNP WAY LAW. Yeah and the. Tech presses hype. Is Beiber ventilating again We're also going to update on Microsoft's new version of edge. It's roll out We've got some miscellany just a couple GRC. DOT SC shortcuts I wanNA. Share relating to the covid stuff and where we are. we also have terrific feedback from our listeners I'm GonNa touch on the recent progress since last week on, spin right project and then. Going, GonNa. Look at last week's truly confusing. Zoom encryption reports. That give the term mixed messaging a bad rap. Oh Man. Yeah and we do have a fun picture of the week so. That the great podcast. Seventy yes, I fixed the number, right? It looks good. Okay, okay agreement now on the episode number I'm glad you mentioned that. Her show. I'll tell you what else we're in agreement on IT PRO TV. So many people this show. Are you know it besides being Steve Gibson fans? I PRO TV fans, many mighty pro TV customers. If you love tech, obviously, you must the Geeky show we do by far you must. 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Setting your goals, your coach will then implement an IT training program to help you reach them, and they have a a really fantastic. It career path library. That can help you learn more about the different kinds of it. Careers available help you pick the one that's right for you whether it's you know entry level it in fixing computers that a plus. Or maybe you WANNA learn about cybersecurity security, plus and all of the you know the certified ethical hacker shirts in that you can learn the INS and outs of every career. Get an idea of what it would be like to work in them. So that you know you know what the job would be what the compensation looks like and and can, you can make an informed decision about you know I'm going to study. This I think this will be just right for me, and then once you're training complete it pro TV takes it a step further. They will help you. Find the career of your dreams and believe me. There are no layoffs in the IT World The it? 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The tests change the technologies change the numbers change, and so all of those four thousand hours are up to date it training there, also the official video training partner for you, so they have all the. Certifications all twelve of them on demand courses, a plus network plus security plus certificates. It's a great place to get your company a training in for many people. That's the the key cert- that they need to get. This is a great time. To either get a job in it to perfect your job in it to maximize the potential of your team. Get them new cert-, so they can expand their horizons. Make them more successful. That's always a win. Win It pro TV. Guide you into the IT best for you go to it. Pro Dot TV slash security now. Binge Worthy Content, really enjoyable host true experts in their field. They know their stuff. You will learn it because you can watch it. On TV, you can listen to it in the car. You can look do it on mobile. You can do it on your Roku Apple TV everywhere. They have APPS for every platform, so you always be learning eating breakfast. You're learning eating lunch and learn playing video games. You learn it. That's what you want. By the way right now if you use the offer code S., N. thirty. S N three zero. You'll get thirty percent off your consumer subscription as long as you stay active thirty percent off. That's a huge discount. It PRO DOT TV slash security now it pro TV build or expand your it career and enjoy every step of the journey it pro dot TV slash security now. And now Steve. So Our picture of the week is not about security directly act even really not at all I just liked it. It was just fun it. It came to me and I wanted to share with our listeners story of your life. Yeah, exactly. So I gave it the caption. It's been a weird year. And this is a this is a a time graph. Of that labels itself relative importance in two thousand and twenty so far. And there are a number of items. Goes January February march and April and and at so one of the items is coffee, and that's a straight line across the top. We needed area for all this craziness. Still need it now. Yeah, the La the the curve for car has of course dropped off dramatically we were. Using our cars a lot at the beginning, not so much now Internet goes up from where it was up. Like right up near the top. Around, the beginning of March, the line for shaving, which was a straight line across drops down. Don't need to do that so much. The the real funny one actually is alcohol which is moving along a straight line until March then not only does it go up, but it goes off the top of the chart. Pass through the title and off the screen so and then of course there was that weirdness about toilet paper, so it represents that with A. With A. Slightly trending upward line that suddenly jumps up to the top for a while, then comes back down where it was before. sweatpants is the final parameter that is tracked, and it shows a mild increase to sort of going up over time to where we are now so anyway just got a Wacky, a little bit of as I said. It's been a weird year in our lives and. Scott overhit either no, it's not over yet. So. We start this week with a bit of Browser News. The odd case of MOZILLA XXX DO H. Dos. The Brazil team was busy last week Tuesday they released their brand new shiny next fought fire seventy seven. When we were talking last week, we were on seventy six, and that was brand new and shiny, but no now we're have. We had seventy seven that was of course the for the Matt for the desktop versions windows Mac os in Lennox. It fixed several security issues. Five vulnerabilities received a high severity score with three of them, allowing bad actors to run Arbitrary Code on vulnerable installations. Not What you want in your browser, so those are gone. as Mozilla puts it. A flaw classified as high in severity. Quote can be used to gather sensitive data from sites in other windows or inject data or code into sites, requiring no more than normal browsing activities. So? Those got fixed. Seventy seven also further rolled out Mozilla. Render Project which we've not spoken of before web render. Is there new and emerging rust written two d? Graphic web poorer for their browser, which can be used on any NVIDIA at quipped windows, ten machines, currently laptops, having screens of any size for while there were you it was it was size limited. It was less less coverage. You know they're they're thinking. Hey, you know we're. Are doing lots of two D. stuff. Now GP's are just present so and I think they're targeting laptops because they're also Power sensitive and so you might as well use an application specific I, see namely a gpu to do this stuff. And now we've talked about the insane rendering that browsers are now doing where I'm and we sort of take it for granted, but there's like fading effects and things are I mean I'm seeing stuff where you as you scroll the page up things. Things kind of emerged from the mist, or they suddenly expand full-size made all. That's being done browser side, and then I'll require cycles if you if you're having to do that in a general purpose processor, it's having to work a lot harder than if you're. If you're able to use a a processor that for example, just automatically has the ability to do multi-layer. Own Passivity masking and mapping, and all that so that's what they're doing more of that now in seventy seven. It's it's looking like this. This project is going to be a success. However. Shortly after the release of Fire Fox seventy seven. Things quickly went sideways. Taking a piece of this week's listeners feedback out of sequence 'cause I originally had it down, because I thought was interesting down in listener feedback later in the podcast and I, though we this just pops to the front now Chris Miller. Who tweeted from at Mill Underscore F. I? He sent Hello Steve Longtime Listener of security now. Just want to let you know about something I work for a fairly large county government. We have internal We have all internal users. He says six thousand plus. Go through a proxy server for security good. Says well. Our proxy was overwhelmed yesterday with anything going through it. It turned out that do h was automatically enabled on just a few of those users who had upgraded to fire Fox seventy-seven. He says imprint fewer than ten, and it completely crippled us. He's as fire. Fox is not a browser that many in our environment us either. He says I also read the links below and saw that video. H basically overwhelmed next DNS. The secondary provider and Fire Fox now Mozilla appears to be slowing down its roll out tremendously. I. Guess The load is so much more on existing systems. Just thought you'd like to know I'm sure other enterprises will be experiencing a similar issue. Well enough, not only did other enterprises experience it. Next DNS was effectively dido cost by the roll out of Firefox, seventy, seven, which, for the first time fully enabled, do H. on that browser so indeed. Chris was right, were they? Or was class flare default? Who? Who was next I'm not sure if I like what the logic was, it may be. They were choosing them randomly, but next. DNS Is the second listed right provider and it buried them Oh wow! So they immediately stopped the seventy seven out and replaced it with seventy seven zero dot one, which is what anyone who is current will now have. Okay so what happened Interestingly. The exact details are surprisingly thin. I was really interested, so I dug around a lot over on bugs Zillah, which of course Mozilla bug tracking site only two. Incomplete and somewhat cryptic explanations are found. One is quote disabled automatic selection of DNS over https providers during a test to enable wider deployment in a more controlled way. And the second is, we need to be able to roll this out gradually so that we don't overload any providers. Even the dry run involves up to seven requests per client, which can be very significant when the entire release population updates. So. Here's one thing that may be going on. Web. Servers are not super happy. With long duration, persistent connections of the type the do h defines and requires for performance, which is intended to compete with traditional UDP, and of course, nobody wants less performance from their browser. If they switched to do h yeah, Hey, if the security and privacy is free I'll take it, but not if it slows down my pages. So turns out I ran across exactly this problem. If you years ago at one phase of the Squirrel Project We the sites we wanted a squirrel log in sites web page to auto magically update once the user had logged on either optically with their phone, which would see the unique qr code on the page or with a squirrel client installed into the same machine. They don't and that's what it does right during all the demos, a squirrel, just like. ooh, click and you're logged in. It's magic. We'll so there are two ways. This could be done from within the web page. Either Have Java script on that page. Bring up one persistent connection. Back to the website. By having the page, connect back to the server and wait for a signal to refresh the page or Sit in a loop periodically and continuously probing the website to ask whether that page should be updated. I initially took the first approach since that seemed much cleaner, write set up in out on one connection and wait for word from the server. Also it would be quicker, you wouldn't. You wouldn't be waiting for like the next ping to come back with an answer so I brought that solution online and the gang in the GRC squirrel newsgroup began playing with it. And I quickly became aware and came to appreciate just how much web servers are designed to be inherently transactional? They want to field many short lived connections return the data, and if there's nothing else, hang up the connection. Having many connections, all churning is no problem, but they should be coming and going rapidly. In this case, the long-term static connections were making GRC's web server very unhappy. Back in the early days of this podcast, we talked about the old style. DOS attack, not De dos, Jr US dos, and in that simple DOS denial of service attack, a single low bandwidth attacker could bring down a a beefy website simply by sending a stream of TCP. syn packets. Every incoming syn packet was a request to establish a new TCP connection. So the server would jump to action upon receiving. Each syn packet it would allocate some resources to manage that nascent connection. It would record the sequence number. That's what sin the sequence that that's what sin of Syn packets stands for because it's the. It's the client saying I'm say when I send you things. Let's start numbering. The bites with this sequence number, which is a thirty two bit value, so the server would record that sequence number provided by the remote client in its in its connect. It's nascent connection structure then it would generate its own sequence number, two number, its own replies or transmissions. And record any other connection. Specific details provided by the collar. Then it would finally generate and send back its own answering Sin Act packet, which was acknowledging the sin received and also sending its sequence number back to the client. And if no answering act was received, it would assume that the reply was lost, so it would retry that several times the point is. All of that effort and allocated resource. was forced to pawn the server side by someone simply and mischievous Lee sending a single syn packet, or practically a stream of short and simple syn packets. So in my case with Squirrel. Everyone, who was sitting at a squirrel log in page had established a persistent connection to my server, and it was ended up being seriously overburdened. So I changed the logging pages logic to instead issue the equivalent of T. C. P. Ping. A query for a named object that would immediately generate a reply and disconnect, and I. Never had another problem since because that's the way web servers are designed. So What's interesting? I mean no one's talking about this. I've looked everywhere. I haven't found anything further. But the potential trouble with dio H is that it to re inherently relies upon the maintenance of a persistent static T.. C. P. T. L., S. connection. Across which occasional DNS? Query flurries will transit. As our web browsers begin using do h every single browser. That's open. Will establish and maintain a static TCP T. L. S.. Connection back to its chosen do h provider. So I sure hope that this has been given due consideration by those who wished to move us to dns over TCP, because it's a a different ballgame, the traditional DNS as we know that we've always been using is the lightest weight query we know how to make a single isolated. No connection required UDP query packet and as a returning. Response So. No matter what we are heading toward a solution that is a great deal. More burdensome on DSP providers than UDP has ever been you know even though that connection still only transits the equivalent of UDP DNS queries. The fact that you have that connection? You know you're getting authentication. You're exchanging An identity certificate. You're verifying their certificate. You're bringing up encryption. There's there's a lot more, but you're also, but all of that means that for every single browser, open? There's a connection back to a do h provider, and that's a different ballgame I. Don't know about you Leo. I run with my one one or more browsers open just like Oh. Yeah, it's always a world. Yeah, exactly, machines. It's auto start. It's the loads the. BOOT yeah. It's really interesting, so and and and and there'll be a connection for each page. You go to as well right now. You have one hundred tabs just one persistent connection. Right okay, so be one connection and then, but and as we know you know when you open like a New York Times page, it's a it's a matter of DNS queries that that are going out for all of the different sources of content on that page. I mean it's hundreds of different domains that are involved. And that's fine. We do that now over you. DP, the problem is. You know something happened with fire. Fox that basically well. It melted down that one corporate proxy that I that I that I shared from one of our listeners, and it brought next DNS to it's knees. It dos them, so you know it wasn't from queries. It had to been from connections, and because that model is so different. I I don't know what they're gonNA do I mean they're going to need a you know back then when we were talking about sin, Sin, doses there was a there was something known as a sin. And actually Daniel Bernstein I- independently invented. He proceeded me by some years. I wasn't aware of it when I thought there's gotTa be a solution to this. And the idea was. You could do a stateless TCP connection, but it's stateless. Only until the far end, the client responds with a sin back. Or an act in response to your sin, thus finishing the three way handshake and establishing the connection at that point, you still need a. it's a resource. It's a resource consuming thing to maintain a TCP connection so again I just I. It may mean that the do h providers are going to have to come up with. Like much beefier servers that are able to. We're talking what? Millions of connections I mean. How many browsers are there? That could be open at the same time. Yeah, that's a lot. And so it's way different than just UDP, little UDP packets, whisking the in and out you know as as people change pages. So you, you still have that now over TCP, but that TCP is always up. And it has to be because you can't afford the connection setup every time you you refresh your page or change tabs or bring up a new page. The point is that you establish that static connection and it persists, and it looks like it's bringing down Ardito h providers. Maybe. This wasn't such a good plan. Right! Seem like a good idea at the time. Yeah, it it it. It always struck me as a little bit kind of homebrew like Oh. Yeah, yeah, like couldn't. Their auto have been a better way to encrypt the DNS? Queries rather than just you know basically set up a VPN, it says the equivalent what you're doing. Every browser now has a VPN connection because that's what it is, it's you know it's all. Yeah, of although even VPN's are smart enough to do that over you DP because you know. It's better right. So Anyway we. Have a nice bit of news from IBM CEO. Arvind Krishna he sent a letter to Congress via axios and CNBC. which was an odd path to take, but I guess he thought he'd get a little bit of pr for for IBM in the process. It stated that the company IBM has willfully exited its general purpose facial recognition business I've quoting the letter in the show notes. He said IBM no longer on. Purpose! IBM, facial recognition or analysis software IBM firmly opposes and will not condone uses of any technology including facial recognition technology offered by other vendors for mass surveillance, racial profiling violations of basic human rights and freedoms or any purpose, which is not consistent with our values and principles of trust and transparency. We believe now is the time to begin a national dialogue on whether and how facial recognition technology should be employed by domestic law enforcement agencies. He continues. Artificial intelligence is a powerful tool that can help law enforcement keep citizens safe, but vendors and users of AI systems have a shared responsibility to ensure that a I is tested for bias particularly when used in law enforcement and that such bias testing is audited and reported. Nash he says finally national. Policy also should encourage and. Uses of technology that bring greater transparency accountability to policing such as body cameras and modern data analytics techniques. So that's good. CNBC noted that it's relatively easy for IBM to back out when facial recognition wasn't a major contributor to its bottom line but you know certainly the media buzz may be as important as anything. IBM is still a major company. At frequently works with governments. So this could spur some providers to follow suit and might even get. Some would be customers to drop facial recognition entirely. We'll have to see how this goes. and of course while some facial recognition systems may only correlate faces with publicly available data. But that's what What's their face a I I'm blanking on the name now. Though the one we've been talking about all the time you know, they're all doing public scraping of stuff, but still we've seen that. That's not what people expect does not the sort of inherent sense of privacy from sharing a photo with friends on social media. You don't expect it to be hoover up into a database and cross reference to have all the people's faces in it identified and tagged and associated in creating a big Y. interlinked web of you know who knows who so. anyway I'm delighted with the attention that this topic is generating a we do need. To talk about this as we know, and we've said before just because we can do something. Doesn't always mean that we should. Meanwhile I'm always amazed at companies that are like looking at each other's products and I'm glad for it. I'm glad that that security companies are taking it upon themselves to to poke into other things, and then responsibly disclose them in this case, CISCO's Talos group found to critical flaws in the zoom client. And that's interesting to me. Because Cisco is a big Web wig web APP ex web ex. Provider I. You know anytime. I'm seeing video talking heads on CNN. They have got some sort of deal. With Cisco's Webex because it advertises. It brands all of their videoconferences as CISCO, webex Anyway We'll be talking as we know later about last week's Megan, zoom policy issues at the end of the podcast, but the meantime there was a problem with the latest zoom client such that you're going to be wanting to make sure you're running the latest one. the researchers in Cisco's Talos. Group revealed last Wednesday that they had discovered to critical vulnerabilities in zooms software that could have allowed attackers, and could still if you haven't updated to remotely hack into the computers, being used by group, chat, participants, or an individual recipient both flaws are. Wait for it. Passed the traverse vulnerabilities. The others again. Can you say? Backlash Dot Dot backslash dot dot, and even forward slash as we learned a couple of weeks ago. yes, Patrick versus owner abilities that could be exploited to write or plant arbitrary files on the systems, running vulnerable versions of Zoom videoconferencing, allowing it to execute militias code according to the researchers, successful exploitation of either of the two flaws requires either none or very little interaction. With targeted chat participants, and can be executed simply by sending a specially crafted message through the chat feature to an individual or a group so essentially it was a built-in remote nuke. the first vulnerability CV twenty, twenty, sixty, one, zero, nine resided in the ways zoom leverage is the Jiffy service which was recently acquired by facebook to allow its users to search an exchange animated. Jeff's wild chatting. Researchers found that zoom was not checking whether or not a shared. Jif was loaded from the Jiffy service. This allowed an attacker to embed shifts from third party attacker controlled server. which are then cached stored on the recipient system in a specific folder assigned with the application, but since the zoom APP was not sanitizing the file names, attackers could perform directory reversal to save the militias files disguised as gifts to any location on the victim system for example in the startup folder where they would then get executed next time. The person started up their machines. So wow, good thing that's fixed. The second remote. Code execution the second remote X, usual vulnerability, and that's sixty one tan. Resided in the way, vulnerable versions of the zoom application process code snippets shared through chat. Cisco wrote. This is interesting zooms chat functionality is built on top of the X.. MPP standard with additional extensions to support the rich user experience. Unfortunately, it was a little richer than they had intended. What those extensions supports a feature of including source code snippets that have full syntax highlighting. The feature to send code snippets requires the installation of an additional plugin, but receiving them does not. This features implemented as an extension of file. Sharing Support wrote Cisco. So this feature creates a zip archive of the shared code snippet before sending. And then automatically UNZIP, On the recipients system. And according to the researchers zooms ZIP file extractor does not validate the contents of the ZIP archive before extracting it. This allows the attacker to plant arbitrary binary onto targeted computers. Cisco wrote additionally a partial path. traversable issue allows the specially crafted zip file to write files outside of the intended randomly generated directory, thus bypassing a mitigation that zoom had put into place. In, in effective, the researchers tested both flaws on version, four point six point ten of the zoom client, APP, and responsibly reported it to the company last month, zoom patched both critical vulnerabilities with their release of version four point six point twelve. for windows, Mac, Os and Lennox and as we of have observed before anyone can make a mistake. Those. Were that you know. They quickly fix them upon being notified while we might wish for perfect software, no one is willing to pay what perfect software would cost so instead we muddle through with software that mostly works and fix problems as they come to light. It's not a perfect system, but it's the one we have. So yesterday on June eighth, the Internet's tech press blew up over the disclosure of yet another newly discovered vulnerability in UPNP big surprise. Headlines took the form. for example Zd, net call stranger vulnerability. Let's attackers bypass Security Systems bleeping computer's Headline Call Stranger UPNP bug allows data theft de. Dos attacks and land scans and tenable had the longest headline universal plug and play UPNP. A ubiquitous protocol used by billions of devices may be vulnerable to data exfiltration and reflected amplified TCP distributed denial of service attacks. WHOA since our listeners may be encountering these dire and breathless warnings in coming days, I wanted to take a moment to explain what's going on. And what isn't especially, because most of the coverage is as unclear as the vulnerabilities website, which naturally and predictably makes quite a big deal about it. It's call stranger DOT com. So. Remember. That the early problems with UPNP. Arose from the fact that a sample implementation. Code. Made available by Intel back in the year two thousand twenty years ago two decades ago. which was quite clearly marked sample? was never intended to be implemented in the field, but Intel posted a sample of. Here's how you do UPNP. So many if not all of the vendors course act then grabbed that source code compiled itself when you could just. Right just you could. Just you know you didn't even have to comment out sample because it was already commented. They. Compiled for their chipsets added to their routers, and then added a UPNP compatible bullet point to their routers feature checklist, and so during the twenty years since we've had many problems that are directly attributable to that original publication of never claimed to be ready for use code. I, in fact, our own episode three eighty nine. I think it was twenty sixty, no or maybe earlier that. It resulted in me adding a public UPNP exposure test to GRC's shields up facility, and since then I checked this morning. Fifty, four, thousand, nine, hundred and fifty four tests have comeback positive for public up in P. Exposure. Okay, now remember it's never supposed to be publicly exposed. The idea was that it was. It was a way for. Things that wanted to be discoverable on your land like famously an xbox. To solve the problem well such as it is a problem of nat routers, being wonderful firewalls. Their wonderful firewalls, they will not accept incoming unsolicited traffic. except. Unless you have an xbox and you want. Do you need to be able to sell to accept incoming unsolicited traffic in order to participate in whatever it is that Xbox gamers participate in some network of some kind, so in that case. The NAT router is a problem. We're going to solve that by. Creating a new protocol that runs on everybody's router called universal plug and play. It's got nothing to do with plug and play, which allowed you to plug in a you a USB into your windows machine and be recognized or other plug up other things and be like Oh. Look there it is something just appeared. Let's talk to it. No, they call it UPNP for Doue. Currently critical shortages of imagination when they were trying to name this thing, so this is a landside server. That Allows anything on your land. To say send basically defeat the firewall that which you're not router is inherently to allow incoming unsolicited stuff on some port to go to that device that has said. Send me your unwashed packets. To this other arrive at this port and I. Want Him so the problem is. There's no security because you can't have any security. Because then it wouldn't be automatic. It wouldn't be universal plug and play. It'd be oh one more thing. I have to configure, and how do I tell that my light switch? Had A receive packets from China well. You may not want it to now it can where which I of course the standing vic- on this podcast has long been turned off. Everybody just say no to universal plug and play to make matters worse. Some really ill begotten UPNP services on routers decide. Let's not just restrict us to the land. Let's open it up to the WHAM. Let's let everybody have this service from. This Ip, oh Lord, and as I noted fifty, four, thousand, nine, hundred and fifty four people who thought I wonder if I'm doing that. They went to shields up. They clicked the instant UPNP test. Oh, yes, sure enough the there. They've got an open port one thousand, nine hundred on their Ip. Oh well. This is the world we're in today, so. Okay so! The good news! Is this current call stranger bug? Is Not. Maybe not a public exposure problem, except maybe it is, it's an it's nothing is clear, and so maybe you know UPNP is not supposed to be publicly exposed, and we also know that there are not just our router that that offers upnp lots of printers do and other thing like cameras anything that wants to offer a service. This is sort of the universal. Hi, I'm here to serve stuff so. This is the you know. Remember SDP is simple service discovery protocol. SDP is what UPNP offers simple service discovery protocol so. This call stranger thing. Is a problem which has been discovered in most current UPNP implementations. Windows, ten has the problem. and that means almost certainly all windows versions including all a windows servers. that's the UPNP host dot de l. l., xbox one has the problem devices from a sous Belkin broadcom cannon Cisco de-link on HP Weiwei, Neck Philip Samsun, T, link, trend, net and Zych cell. And those are just the ones that have been tested so far. there are doubtless others. The good news is there is one at least one known UPNP. Stack many UPNP which after twenty eleven has not been vulnerable. So, not absolutely everything is. But. Apparently lots are search title for this is probably the most sane. They said universal plug and play UPNP. Subscribe in all caps the verb. Used can be abused to send traffic to arbitrary destinations their their disclosure, or they're vulnerable disclosures as a vulnerability in the UPNP subscribed. Capability permits an attacker to send large amounts of data to arbitrary destinations accessible over the internet which could lead to a distributed denial of service. Data exfiltration and other unexpected network behavior. The Oh cf is the organization that maintains the UPNP's back the OH. CF has updated the UPNP specification to address this issue. This vulnerability has been assigned. CV Twenty Twenty, twelve, thousand, six, hundred, ninety, five, because that's just how the year's gone so far twelve, thousand, six, hundred and ninety five CV's and we're not halfway through. And it's I. This is also known as call stranger. Okay. So there are two problems. By far the largest problem because it affects potentially all UPNP, hosting devices on a land, and remember as I, said bats that will include our routers and printers and probably anything. Similar that offers services so perhaps even land attached Ip cameras, and so on. Is that to do their job. They're exposing lamb facing servers. UPNP's servers and it's this server in which a highly prevalent problem has been found. I decide I. Don't mean to minimize that I'm all I'm I'm not at all. I'm hoping that they're not also publicly exposed. None should be. But, so it's important that this is all land facing in other words an attacker. Need? To already have some foothold inside the network to be able to abuse this internal landside land, facing aspect of UPNP. I think it is widespread, but you bought. It's it's an internal issue. And so that's why you know in all this coverage we do see references to LP data loss prevention. Because now one of the things that enterprises are doing is they have this. L. P. Data loss prevention technology, which is explicitly there to catch inadvertent exfiltration of. The corporate. Golden Goodies What happens is. This problem. This subscribe flaw allows these UPNP devices, and there may be many in a corporate environment to be turned into a proxy and used to route an attacker's exfiltration traffic out from the intranet onto the Internet. So that's bad, but again it's only happens with an attacker who's already behind the firewall on the other hand? Remember those problems that we ran across where people on the Internet external outside were able to print something on a printer. Well, that meant that from the outside they were able to get onto a printer and our printers on the land, and a printer is almost certainly a universal plug and play hosting device, so there's that. So the related question is what about the when facing interface of UPNP, devices you know that's what I enhanced shields up back then to detect but that was only one specific vulnerable aspect of universal plug and play what no one has been made has made clear is whether this subscribe vulnerability exists on the when facing side of UPNP devices, and if it does what would that allow attackers to do, the best case attacks would be limited to using exposed UPNP device for various forms of reflection attacks. In the worst case, it would allow a remote attacker to probe through the device and into the land behind it. But at this point, there's no clarity about that. Among the potential problems created by this, the researcher does state. He says quote. Scanning internal ports from Internet facing UPNP devices, so that's certainly not good and show Dan is still showing lots of Internet facing UPNP devices, and as I mentioned. Shields up if you if you are a a user of Shields Up, you could take the instant UPNP test. Won't tell you about this, but it will tell you about the problem before and if I weren't really busy with spin right, I would enhance the test, but I'm sure that will happen without me elsewhere soon if I didn't even know that this is an a big problem. But the land vulnerability side is clearly a problem for it departments. No end users maybe not so much again. Something bad has to already be in in order for for that to take advantage of the land facing side. But to help with determining that the researcher who found the problem has posted a python based vulnerability scanner. Hub I've got the link in the show notes. He explains that the script performs a series of actions. Finds all UPNP devices on the land. Fines all UPNP's services being offered by those devices. Finds all subscription and points on those services. Then sends these end points encrypted. To a verification server via the UPNP call back. And then he says servers can't see the end points because all encryption is done on the client side. Ben. This gets the encrypted service list from the Verification Server and decrypt on the client side. Compares the found UPNP services with verified ones. So to me, it's this is a little bit unclear. but I was a bit disturbed. By the line sends these end points encrypted to a verification server via UPNP callback and. Server can't see the end points because all encryption is done on client side. That may be true, but assuming that the server is on the Public Internet it's certainly does see the public I P that sending it those queries. since this was somewhat disturbing I decided to fire the script up on my own network this morning to see what was going on upon running it I received. An I have it in the show notes I at posts, stranger host. Colon H. T. T., P. Colon slash slash. Twenty dot, forty two dot, one five dot, forty five, which is certainly not my ip or any of mine, so that is an Ip out on the public Internet Stranger Port Eighty, so he set up a an H.. T. T. P. Web server. Apparently to feel. The. Results. The encrypted results of this client this python client. Then he says no UPNP device found possible reasons. You just connected to network. No. UPNP stack is too slow. Restart the script and probably not. UPNP is disabled on Os. Very likely UPNP is disabled on devices at very likely. There is no UPNP supported service. Okay? Euro S works on. VM, with NAT configuration No, my Os is directly connected. so as I, said the stranger host line does indeed appear to indicate that anyone running the script will be sending stuff to that public Ip. But even so my results appear to be negative since I was a assembling this podcast, I didn't WanNA spend too much time digging into this, but I was skeptical skeptical that my network had zero UPNP devices so I enabled the UPNP service on my free bs debased PF sense firewall. And Iran a different UPNP scanner. It found the UPNP service there on f sense, and provided a DECI- truly disturbing amount of information about what it could see, but again it's on the internal side. Among that information was the happy news that PF sense does use the mini UPNP implementation that as I said earlier is known to be unaffected by this flaw, but as I noted I always had that UPNP server turned off anyway I then re ran the python script, and it still found nothing. So I'm kind unimpressed so far, but given the whole truly horrifying example. This guy has has posted on get hub of what his script might put out for somebody in a corporate environment. It might still be worth running or maybe it'll turn out that it's possible to do all this locally. as I strongly suspect is probably the case. So, maybe we should just wait for an update of the script that runs on. You know that sets up a local server and does it locally so because people are not gonna like sending this off to some random. I pee on the Internet basically of the volmer ability report of their internal network. Maybe not, he says it's all encrypted, okay? What that means, but anyway it's in python so that the the the sources there I just you know I did this morning and I won't take too much time on it. So where where does this leave us? Elisa's where we always find ourselves after something like this are networks have connected devices many of which will likely never be fixed. None of the known problems are critical enough to forces to disconnect them from the net. But. We're left with a mild discomfort that things are not as secure as we would like them to be. This the lesson this continues to reinforce. Is that anything that connects needs to have a means for being updated? As problems in it are discovered. Everything. Should have some sort of home and everything should periodically phone that home to connect for any important updates. In other words, updating is every bit as important as connecting one should not happen without the other were not there today. But that's where we need to aim. So. the the. Disowns like a protocol level problem. The protocol is being updated. you know the common? Wisdom, here would be to look for updates to your router firmware and Microsoft apparently. This is a problem in windows ten, so they'll be fixing that and. Every other router on earth apparently is currently affected. PF since isn't that's nice anything that is many UPNP based isn't I noted the W D W RT isn't there. Maybe they're also using many UPNP I. Don't know but I'm sure. More. Information will be emerging over time. I'll keep recent informed. And speaking, being informed you, let's inform them our second sponsor indeed and I will sip on something. All of our smart listeners of as you pointed out for a long time turned off UPNP if they're. router configuration if the router doesn't support, does it matter if windows ten supports it? Apparently it matters internally that is. An Enterprise. All the wind ten computers would have it I. Don't know what it means I don't. It's bad apparently. Don't want it. So it doesn't expose. I just turn it off. Yeah it's dumb. Something you know what apparently it allows mostly, the biggest concern seems to be that it turns a UPNP thing like a windows, ten machine into a proxy right that allows exfiltration data and enterprises are really getting twitchy about stuff being you know set outside well since most enterprises are not running. xbox servers I think it's probably okay to turn off UPNP. To say Sam thing yes. Well, the problem is all windows ten systems on which is so weird. Yeah, I blame Microsoft. are showed it brought to you by extra hop. You have stuff in the cloud. You have cloud services. You need to know about extra. Hop The new it reality. Is. As you know remote access on a massive scale. Rapid Cloud and multi cloud adoption, a steady increase in internet of things, devices all on top of rising cybercrime. That is bad now it's more important than ever that organizations, because he everything going on in their environment from the cloud of the data center all the way to the customer, but in order to protect scale your business, you need more than unified visibility. You also need context so when you get those detections, those warnings you have you know what that means and you have an intelligent response workflow. You can trigger. It helps teams collaborate. It helps them get the job done fast, and as you know when you detect a problem fast is very very important. 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Even even if you don't need the extra hub, it's just a really cool thing to say extra hop dot com slash security now and by the way while you're there, you'll see a lot of information tips on securing and supporting remote access stuff you could really use. Extra hop. It's good name to no extra dot. com slash security now cloud, native network, detection and response. Extra hop dot com slash security now. Back to you Steve. If one hop is good, extra hops. We'll. You hops to little extra through ups. So. Microsoft has started to replace the old edge with the new edge. We've been waiting for like for that to be happening. For quite a while I have edge on my win seven machine and I go I I do think it's an houser. Yeah? Yeah I mean chromium it's. Nice implementation and they really Microsoft really does seem to be focused on adding lots of features I've got it because I can't wait for the for the vertical tabs to happen in which case I will play with those. so everyone using windows ten eighteen. Oh three, or later will be seeing this appear. It's being rolled out as a under their knowledge base number, four, five, five, nine, three Oh nine, and it will replace the original edge Blau Browser on when ten. Twenty four nineteen o nine nineteen o three eighteen o nine eighteen o three. As I was looking at this I was aching, and isn't it unifying that we only have one windows ten now say. Right so interestingly whereas the original edge could be removed, Microsoft says quote the new Microsoft Edge does not support will. And they seem to be getting a little more strict about this the current version of Microsoft Edge. They said we'll be hidden from you X.. In the Os the current version, so for some reason, they don't want to be showing. Maybe they were. The numbers are getting too big You know because they're tracking chromium version Ning. Eighty, four, eighty, five, like okay, and were they said this includes settings, applications, and any file or protocol support dialog boxes and attempts to start the current version of Microsoft edge will redirect to the new Microsoft Edge, so they're just really pushing it aside the old one of course, all previous user data from earlier Microsoft Edge versions that passwords bookmarks open tabs center will be moved over into the new. New Edge, so you know people may notice Oh. Look for sort of feels a little more crisp than the old one did, but anyway an also separately there was also some reporting that I saw, but didn't rise to the level of a bullet point here that the wind ten start menu had begun advertising the new edge whenever anyone appeared to be searching for information about any other web browser. I very much like the idea of chromium based edge and I suppose it's Microsoft's right to push whatever they wished to. Since they own the platform, but a certain doesn't give me or any. who were reporting on this warm fuzzies. so but speaking of warm fuzzies. We have some listener feedback. Lewis or Louis Cruise? He tweeted. Barring the ability to transfer your consciousness. To a new vessel. Do you plan? Do you have a plan for spin? Right and your other work? After you are incapable of maintaining, it will go open source. Are you mentoring Gibson two point Oh behind the scenes to pick it up question. It is a good question and no I will give it to the world I will. What I'll do, post a you know. Create a get hub account. Actually I have one I just never by then there'll be no one who knows how to write in Assembly Code. So that's true. That's well. It'll be a curio. It'll be like that it'll be like the Apollo eleven. Exactly look how much he did. So few live instruction talks yeah. So anyway I do I have thought about it I once. I am no longer in a in a mode where I am maintaining the codes like why not? I mean some of it embarrasses me. Some of it is like lots, evolution and stuff, but you know yeah, when you get older Leo. I think that's one of the things that happen. GRAMPS is kind of hard to embarrass now so. That'll be okay. Sky Net posting. He's at Fairlane thirty two is his twitter handle? He says hi Steve In episode seven sixty, nine those last week with automatic downloads in chrome, you had the option of choosing ask every time under crumbs settings within that prevent the drive by downloads on sites and I, said yes, good point, but it turns out. It's not the default, and it's a bit buried. You GotTa go to privacy and security, and it's not there then. He got to go to advanced, because yes, turning off drive by downloads is advanced security, but there's a toggle there. I did it and sure enough. My chrome is no longer you know surreptitiously downloading things. It now prompts me, but it's a little jarring. Actually what Oh yeah I did. Why did tell it I? Wanted to ask me so I'm happy for that. And Right Sky added, is there. Chris Rhodus tweeted hi Steve over the years. I've heard you say that there is no reason to limit the maximum size of a password. Yes. I was just ranting about it last week. I'm currently reviewing a vendor design document that has the Password Max limit set to thirty two characters. Are there any case studies or other documents you can point me to that can be used to justify the removal of the thirty two character limit I. Don't think the vendor will be happy about removing the Max limit I will need to justify the removal of the imposed limit if any opposition is encountered, thanks. So Chris, know there I know of no studies and frankly thirty two characters. You know unless they're all lower case, a It's probably pretty good, and in fact, even if they are all lower case a well, no I guess somebody could probe. To see that there was a thirty two character limit, and then try thirty two as the first thing, but. But the point is you know? And that's a good point. If there is a limit, then it is a probable limit. And that does help somebody. Bring Force guessing so. There's something any password rules help in that regard. Yes, that is exactly right. You know maybe that's Maybe that's why you don't complain. Until they submit one that breaks a rule. Then you tell them the rule, but on the other hand that allows it to be pro bright so i. don't know I. Mean this is a mess. You know part of my squirrels. Spiel is that you know loser, names and passwords is the way I logged in to a hazeltine terminal. What I was at Berkeley in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy three, and we're still doing it now. What is wrong, but yeah? So Chris I wouldn't upset them. You want them to like you There's nothing wrong with thirty two characters. That's a lot of entropy. If you actually use thirty two characters of entropy, that's more than the two hundred, and that is more than the two hundred and fifty six bit hash. That you will reduce that too right so that that allows as much entropy as Will it actually actually at the same, isn't it? Thirty two bytes is two hundred fifty six pits, so it's the same it is that same amount of entropy as if you were to use all bites in thirty two bits. Is it thirty two? Yeah, it is so yeah. That's a lot of entropy. It's enough so anyway. Ones where? You gotTa really start to worry about. Yeah, and there are those. There are twelve not not good now they're you suspect there's still running. May maybe they purchased the mainframe from? And you know that's that's. That's not good. ED McIvor says Steve Just passing a note to add to other comments. You might be getting. My. Dell Laptop updated to win ten release twenty Oh four. Ever since my computer has been running extremely slow all caps. And sometimes clicking on windows, items or right clicking menu. Takes minutes to come up. Went into settings to check for updates and the settings window crashed during the check before finishing. Second Attempt completed okay, but other items like view update. History is taking forever to display. Click and wait and wait and wait is the order of the day now he says I have one hundred fifty gigabytes of free space on my hard drive. By laptop tends to slow down when I get under a hundred gigabytes left. Okay now it's a stop there. What is wrong with this picture? Anyway, but it's always worked normally with at least a hundred Gig of free space, good to know. Thought I'd put in my two cents for stopping all this major relief stuff to Windows. If they are constantly going to be breaking stuff, he says Oh settings window just crashed again as it was just trying to view, update history. He says I can't even roll back at this point if why I. In redlands and spin right owners since version one. So Ed. Thank you and I think you can probably do. Can't you intercept the boot with F. Six and like? Get it there maybe to roll you back. What a mess anyway! I'm. Speaking of a mess Leo. I have to GRC dot. SC shortcuts to share these are. These will take users to end corona virus dot org slash dates and slash countries respectively, and in case people forget that GRC dot. SC SLASH STATES GRC DOT SC. Slash countries. I really like these two pages because they are. All in one place thumbnails. In fact what you put on the screen right now is really kind of cool. It's a map of the US where inst- where the the shape of each state is filled with a tiny chart of known corona virus. infections for that state and the red when they're not doing so well green when they've got it under control but you also scroll down and get a divided by. It's the show yellow. They show green, yellow and red with Larger historical graphs, and it's just cool because it's A. It's a very quick at a glance style. You know where do stand by state. And then the GRC died SC. Countries is where do we stand by relative countries, and in fact you can see down here. They are in the red. Now there are some real problems Arizona has had a really precipitous spike so as Alabama. It's necessary also to take a look at their absolute number, because these are all scaled relative to themselves and not based on the absolute number. So in some cases you know when you get some crazy liftoff, it's a yeah. It went from one to five so whoa five times, but yeah not not that big a problem in absolute terms, but it is just sort of a neat site. I just wanted to share it with our listeners. I don't have a lot of exciting news to share. Spin right project. probably have more next week. we found a few remaining problems with the fat partitions I was creating a in the size of their root directories. I had to tweak that since my own, I wrote my own partition format from scratch, so that I would have ultimate flexibility for the future, and there was a little bit of a little debris to shake loose. We'd had some people who have created batch files to create uniquely named files until it crashes in order to torture test these politicians that I've created, and they're now passing with flying colors so I. Thank those listeners in our newsgroup. And then without that's all fixed and has been torture tested it was suggested that we needed to further failsafe or add fail-safe means for selecting the drive whose contents we are about to permanently wipe out and destroy through. A destructive reformatting so I, added the technology with the utility I'm creating as called init- disk. And it watches all of the systems. Drives asks the user to confirm the drive. They wished to blow away by physically removing and replacing it and that worked quite well, but it worked so well that then wanted to see how it would be if we use that as the only means for specifying the drive, we want to reformat and use because there were some problems. If you put a stick in a USB. USB drive that for example, had been over on a MAC and only had a GP. T. Format a partition that wasn't recognized by windows. It wouldn't assign a drive letter, so you weren't able to use a drive letter to point to the drive. You ought to reformat anyway. I'm currently working on on using pure physical insertion as the means of specifying the drive you'll then it'll tell you all about the drive. And Manual confirmed that that's the one you ought to reformat. So. and it also turns out that there are some drives for a while Microsoft was requiring USB. Drive vendors to have their drive declare itself fixed rather than removable in order to be certified under Windows Eight Sandisk was apparently the one defender immediately jumped on that, and so there's a period of time when they were making USB drives. That would you stuck them in? They said they fixed well. I had a I had a prevention of only allowing removable drives, so 'cause I. I didn't want like there to be no possibility that a user could inadvertently reformat one of the fixed drives they had computer will turns out. That wasn't reliably useful. Because of this weird windows eight certification issue that went by so now. We're just GONNA use joe prove to me by inserting it that this is the one you want. Use with then follow on verification so. That'll be done probably tomorrow, and then we'll be moving forward again so anyway. working on this project and We're getting a lot done there. Okay! zooms end to end encryption, debacle. Yes just when everything appeared to be going so well. The day after our podcast last week, which as we all know, celebrated the quite rational and well-supervised planned evolution of zooms security architecture. During a call. With financial analysts to discuss zooms latest financial results. CEO Eric Wan confirmed. That zoom won't. Be offering end to end encryption on free accounts. What. So Eric was widely reported to have said and I quote from multiple sources. Quote Free Users for sure. We don't want to give that end to end encryption. because. We also want to work together with FBI and local law enforcement. In case, some people use zoom forbade purpose. Boy. So not surprisingly. My twitter feed lit up with our listeners, asking whether I had seen this latest from zoom and many saying that no way. Are they going to be using it from now on? to give everyone a sense for the industry's reaction to this revelation, the verge headline Zoom says free users won't get end to end encryption so FBI and police can access calls the Guardian Zoom to exclude free calls from end to end encryption to allow be I, cooperation and Gadget Zoom explains why free users won't get end to end encrypted video calls USA Today, so it's even out of the tech press zoom CEO no end to end encryption for free users, so company can work with law enforcement. The next web zoom won't encrypt free calls because it wants to comply with law enforcement tech crunch zoom faces criticism for denying free users end to end encryption. And I could keep going, but you get the idea. The problem of course is that this is seen as purely a prophet moded. Motivated policy since strong end to end encryption is desirable, and only paying customers can get it. And the argument about compliance with law enforcement, if all of what so you want to allow zoom to comply with law enforcement, except if people pay for the service, in which case zooms newer and better end, Dand encryption will explicitly not allow for any compliance with law enforcement. Okay so. You're making money by marketing your hostility to law enforcement. Of course we've seen that before, that's the stance that apple has explicitly and loudly taken, but apple's encryption is ubiquitous. Apple doesn't allow anyone to not have full end to end encryption on any of their person to person connections, text, voice or video. So of course I was as stunned as anyone by this news, especially given the mature supervision that Zoom was apparently now receiving. But the CEO had spoken and on this, he seemed quite unambiguous. So I thought I'd reach out to Alex Stamos to see what he might know. I brought him up in tweet deck and discovered that he follows me on twitter. So that I could DM him directly and hopefully not be lost in the noise. I shot ALEX DM to make sure that he was aware of this mess. And then I continued poking around and quickly discovered that he was quite well aware indeed, he had posted a series of tweets. Tuesday the previous day that attempted to repair the damage, but frankly they only further complicated things I have a link in the show notes to his twitter stream, which is not too long, so I'm going to share it because it just demonstrates what. So. Here's what he said Alex Demos tweeted. Some facts on zooms current plans for E to e encryption. which are complicated by the product requirements for an enterprise conferencing product and some legitimate safety issues. Next tweet all users free and paid. have their meeting content encrypted using a per meeting es to fifty six key. Content is encrypted by the sending client and decrypted by receiving clients or by zooms connector, servers. To bridge into the phone network or other services? Okay so so far that sounds like everything's encrypted, says all users free and paid. Then he says zoom does not proactively monitor content in meetings, and will not in the future zoom doesn't record meeting silently. Neither of these will change. Our, goal is to offer an end to end encrypted solution that provides a stronger guarantee. Zoom is dealing with some safety issues when people disrupt meetings sometimes with hate speech, cs am whatever that is exposure to children. And other illegal behaviors. that can be reported by the host. Beret because they're in the meeting. Zoom is working with law enforcement on the worst repeat offenders good. Making. It possible for hosts to report people disrupting their meetings, even under end to end encryption is solvable yet. We've talked about that. The likely solution will be a content ring buffer of the last x seconds on the host system that can be submitted zoom for triage and action. That's entirely reasonable. The host does that from within the cone of silence. The other safety issue. He tweets as related to hosts creating meetings that are meant to facilitate really horrible abuse. These hosts mostly come in from VPN's using throwaway email addresses create self service or eggs and host a handful of meetings before creating new identity. zooms trust and safety team can if they have a strong belief that the meeting is abusive, enter the meeting visibly and report it if necessary. Okay, that's new. says as you see from the E. TO E. design. There is a big focus on authenticating. Both the people and the devices involved an end to end meetings. If properly implemented, this would prevent zooms employees from entering a meeting. Even, okay, wait as you see from the E. D. design. He says there's a big focus on authenticating. Both the people and the devices involved an end to end meetings. If properly implemented, this would prevent zooms employees from entering a meeting even visibly. There will not be a back door to allow this. Okay so it sounds like we're talking about straddling technology currently, or until this is properly implemented. Zoom can do this. They won't be able to in the future. With proper implementation. He, says zooms e e implementation will need to be opt in. For the foreseeable future, a large portion of zooms meetings used features that are fundamentally incompatible with end to end encryption. Telephones SIP phones room systems cloud recordings cloud transcription streaming to youtube etc.. So we have to design the system to securely allow hosts to opt into an end to end meeting and carefully communicate. The security guarantees to hosts an attendees. We are looking at ways to upgrade end to end up I'm sorry to upgrade to e to e once a meeting has started, but there will be no downgrades. So this creates a difficult balancing act for zoom, which is trying to both improve the privacy guarantees it can provide while reducing the human impact of the abuse of its product. Lots of. He says are facing this balancing act, but as it paid enterprise product that has to offer end to end encryption as an option. Due to legitimate product needs zoom has a slightly different calculus. The current design by zooms management is to offer end to end encryption to the business an enterprise tears. But not to the limited self service free tier says that's the current decision by zooms into end. I mean by zooms. Management is business and enterprise. Tears enter- enterprise tears, but not to the limited. Self Service Free Tier. He says a key point organizations that are on a business plan, but are not paying due to zoom offer like schools will also have free end to end encryption. We'll this eliminate all abuse. He asks in his tweet. No, but since the vast majority of harm comes from self service users with fake identities, this will create friction and reduce harm. This he see tweets is a hard balance. Zoom has been actively seeking input from civil liberties, groups, academics, child, safety, advocates and law enforcement zoom hopes to find a common ground between these equities that does the most good for the most people. Good luck with that. He finishes with three final points one most of the people I interact with no this, but I've been working with zoom as a consultant and helped with the e design. To. None of the major players offer e to e by default Google. Meet Microsoft. Teams Cisco Webex Blue Jeans, he says. Webex has an. Option for enterprise users only, and it requires you to run the PKI Public Key in interface and won't work with outsiders. Any E E shipping with zoom will be groundbreaking. Three. At no time does zoom turnover encryption keys to law enforcement. The issue here is whether Zoom's own employees can enter spaces. Host. Wait Day employees host. Zoom host I. Don't know who. Has the keys in other words. Well I mean. He also he elsewhere. He also said they don't. A law enforcement if they didn't have him. He says at no time to zoom turnover encryption keys to law enforcement. Oh meaning, they have the, but they have. They don't more, and that's why employees could. Listen to any meetings zoom hosts, so he says the issue here is whether Zoom's own employees can enter spaces. Day He doesn't say who they host is. He's as they host, so is that yeah, so because zooms hosting all zoom meanings right? Okay. Employees don't host meetings. Right well right, but but we had this notion earlier that the host of the meeting. Could report. Bad Activities Association. With zoom employees meetings can or can't do that's. Really the issue. Okay, so he posted all that on the second two days later on Thursday. The fourth it was contradicted by Zoom spokesperson who confirmed that free users will be covered by zooms, a es to fifty six PM encryption, but chats will not be covered by additional and an protections. So. The officials zoom spokesperson said zooms AES TO FIFTY-SIX GM encryption is turned on for all zoom users, free and paid zoom does not proactively monitor meeting content, and we do not share information with law enforcement except in circumstances, life child sex abuse. We do not have back doors where participants can enter meetings without being visible to others. None of this will change. zooms end to end. Encryption Plan Balances The privacy of its users with the safety of vulnerable groups, including children and potential victims of hate crimes in. They just said two completely incompatible things. I know exactly. Okay we plan to provide end to end encryption to users for whom we can verify identity, thereby limiting harm to these vulnerable groups. Free users sign up with an email address, which does not provide enough information to verify identity that's. The thing but I the current decision by zooms. Management is to offer end to end encryption to business and enterprise tears. We are determining the best path forward for providing end to end encryption to are pro users. Zoom has engaged with child. Safety advocates, civil liberties, organisations, encryption, experts and law enforcement to incorporate their feedback into our plan. Finding the perfect balance is challenging. We always strive to do the right thing. My show notes here I, said Okay Wow so today. We still have no idea what they intend. They headlines. They wanted though, didn't they? They, did they are clearly asked over and over, do you? Or do you not encrypt all zoom video and they answer right? Good, one? Yeah. That's right. You. Don't you right? You've been listening carefully. Yes. Yes what Ya! So. Leo I have no idea. Whatsoever. It's unclear and stay most didn't clear it up. No his as bad as the official spokesperson, and they end with the this is hard, yeah! Okay. I don't think you know. I didn't have the same reaction. A lot of people did to this idea of. encrypt for paid users but dot for unpaid users because it's pretty clear. Paid user can use an account without proof of owner. You know without out personality so. It would have been better, had they? Said will encrypt, but only for people who proved that identity. You know, give a density so that we can chase down malefactors because that's been a problem in our platform, but they're not even saying that. It's completely unclear basically. It sounds like they can give law enforcement anything. Because they have the keys. And they're saying it's in I. Mean Alex said it at the spokesperson, said it. Encryption is turned on free and paid and then, but but that's so much and what so maybe everything's encrypted, but in unless you pay, they hold the key is i? Don't sounds like they have the key to everything. That's what it sounds like. Yeah in which case whole thing was was fun of Eric. You want saying well. We Wanna be able to have law. Enforcement a tap the unpaid members well, they can tap all of them. Because if Zuma has the keys. Just give you a warrant. Maybe they aren't gonNA. Ask for a warrant on the. That's it. It's just not clear what they're saying. That's a mess so. Thank you for clearing that up. Yeah and. Leads me it kind of this is more to me of the same. OBFUSCATION! Hand waving. They've been doing since for years. And it really liking them less and less, they they. They bought the best names in security, but it doesn't sound like they did much with. No. But that's his. Opinion because we don't know yeah. I mean and that if the design the we discussed last week. Is actually implemented. Then that would be good, but now it looks like no one is sure they even Alex said if it's implemented correctly right, you know he. He gave himself kind of Oh, so wait. It might not be. He's not doing the implementation. Nobody, none of these big names they hired is implementing. They wrote that nice paper. And then they said here's deliver this to you. You go to your Chinese programmers and make it so. That's am we're done. We're done here. I'm sure they all got a ton of money. I honestly. This does not reassure and that's why Alex or you can read saying I hope you understand I'm just a consultant here. Yeah, you know point number one at the end was he said most of the people I interact with no this, but I've been working with zoom as a consultant in health was the. design. He's like saying you know. Yeah Yeah you know. I'm also going to downgrade. Alex Stamos a little bit here. There was always a little weird that he left Yahoo. Because they because he said they never told me about. The billion person breach goes to facebook. They never told me about the Cambridge Analytica. Goes to zoom well. It's not my implementation so. Downgrade you, too. Little Bit Alex. You expect a little better than that. Well. So I felt it was important I'm glad. To. You know. Join me in flood. Like I I. Don't know what I mean. Nothing could be less clear this they'll. I I have no idea what they're doing. I think it's intentionally obfuscated and don't forget the most important part of that statement. Well, no one else does it either. Right right well. What do you want? No one else has to. Be groundbreaking, but you know maybe we won't. Oh, we have to do it in accordance with. Law Enforcement and good Pratt. They don't WANNA get in trouble with bill bar. Honestly. How important is it that you have end to end encrypted videoconferences? If you're doing I. Guess if you're doing. Your psychiatrist having sessions with the client that would be pretty important. It's got to be hippo compliant in order to to do that and now here's the problem. If you're an enterprise user and you are, you're you're doing? You know trans-national videoconferencing discussing trade secrets there. Are you going to zoom? I'm not going to trust zoom now. No, no, we're going to use. Some sort of Lord knows what how do you do truly? Unions faced, too, isn't it? It's hard to do point to point yeah. Than Than, distributed. Yeah! Fast I'm so glad you brought this up and You've actually clarified my thinking. 'cause I I. I didn't see this actual statement from them. Which is bonkers? BONKERS! Okay Steve gives the see this why we really got. You gotta give him a medal. Put some sort of a a major award because without him. I don't you know this stuff would go by? you certainly don't see any discussion of it than mainstream media. GRC DOT COM that's where Steve hangs his hat. Gibson Research Corporation where Spin right? The world's best hard drive recovering maintenance utility is currently under construction, the new version over and available by it now you'll get in on the Beta the next version. he, of course puts the podcast there. He does a couple of things. No one else does I don't sixteen kilobits versions. which sent a little like Thomas Edison on his? You know. Fono discs, but They're very small, and that's their benefit for the band with impaired. There's also transcripts the smallest yet, and he pays good money to Elaine Farris to to listen to our blather and write it all down perfectly, so those are really useful they're also searchable, which makes it even more. That's the really the best reason for it He also has sixty four kilobytes audio. That's all at GRC dot com along with all sorts of other freebies like spin right. No. That's not free. shields up. That is now with a built-in testing for universal plug and play flaws. you could also get all sorts of other stuff there. It's fun. It's A. It's a rabbit hole. You go into, and you never come in. All sorts of fun things to read. You can also catch this show on demand on our website. Dot TV slash S, and it's on. Youtube you can ask Your Voice Assistant to play the security now. PODCAST will play the most recent episode. if you WANNA, Watch live, we do at Tuesday's round about one thirty in the afternoon. That's four, thirty, thirty, EASTERN OR THIRTY PACIFIC FOR THIRTY Eastern. Twenty thirty ut see. The live streams and they were a little glitch each day I apologize. People asked us to rewind the show, but we can't do that. the livestream are twit DOT TV. Slash live, but beauty part is. We got an on demand, so you can see the whole thing you missed. It's just a matter few hours. If you subscribe, you'll get it automatic pilot. Find, your favorite podcasts apple kitchen, Steve, stay well. Stay healthy and. Stay on top of things for us because we'll need you next week unsecured. I'm ready the next week buddy back. Hey, folks! I am Mica Sergeant Co host of Tech. News weekly right here on the twit network. Yes, tech newsweekly is a show. We do every week. Jason Howland myself where we talked to people who are making a break in the Tech News. That's right. It's journalists. It's inventors. It's at makers. It's everybody who's bringing the Tech News in a given week. It's all the stuff you want to know about in bite sized. In fantastic package, so be sure to subscribe his twit dot TV Slash W.. Secure.

CISCO IBM researcher Steve Gibson Fox Microsoft US Mozilla Steve Chris Miller Steve Yolo Leo Wow DOT Twenty twenty
Episode 23: Nehemiah Frank and the Black Wall Street Times

Pod 4 Good

43:53 min | 6 months ago

Episode 23: Nehemiah Frank and the Black Wall Street Times

"Welcome to another episode of Pot for good podcast. We're here from the change. Agents making tell in the world, a more vibrant and inclusive place I'm your chief Philanthropy Jesse orch. Vice Admiral Flint the pot Chris Miller and today our guesses Niemeyer Frank Founder, executive editor and director of the Black Wall Street Times. Who tagline is access is the new civil right. We talked to Nehemiah about the June teeth weekend. That blew up Tulsa. What access really means and why? He started the Black Wall Street Times. We are very excited to have Niemeyer frank. The founder executive editor and director of the Black Wall Street time on the podcast today Nehemiah. Hello Hello Hello everyone that's listening. Yes hello to our listeners. Don't ever see hello to our listeners. We should. I would like to say to our to Australian listeners. Good Day, so wow! Yeah! There probably bought, but just in case they're not. Listening. So Am I. It's been a very eventful. Say Six weeks for you, so we're recording this on July six. They'll probably come out near the end of July but. We're GONNA take our listeners back to June. Temp when it was announced that president trump was. Resort restart campaigning publicly in Tulsa. Oklahoma originally on June eighteenth itself and he announced that on June. Tenth I thought maybe late. May I didn't realize it was really. Less than two weeks before that rally was going to happen, yeah, three days after that he announced he was moving into June twentieth out of quote. Unquote respect. But From my understanding at that moment when he announced it, June teen celebration wasn't actually scheduled. It had been canceled because of the pandemic. We're living in. And then. I guess I'm wondering from you. What was the decision to be like we? We need to do this now. So I think it probably happened. I would say over the night I kind of thought about it, and then a friend of mine's in in Lebanon. Called like I. Don't know it was the earliest I had ever received a call from him. I think it was probably like I. don't even know if it was seven o'clock in the morning yet, it was like yeah. We gotta do something and I'm like Oh. Yes, we have to absolutely do something and so we just kind of like started brainstorming and then I called. A friend of mine stock, TIFFANY CRUTCHER! And I said Hey. This is happening. We need to do something. This is what can is staying. What do you think and she's like Oh yeah, we need to. We need to get something planned. So previous. To the June team celebrating just planning it, we have been protesting in the streets amid covert right, which is just insane. But we were able to get basks in PAT people out there trying to. Encourage people to social distance, but yeah. Jenner has been. June was probably the hardest month I've ever worked. In my entire life. While street times and just period as an adult. With the hard I've ever worked and I think June eighteenth week itself. I I don't even know how much I got a I. Don't know how much sleep I got that week. It was very very stressful. I mean I could say just following you on facebook was exhausting. Just like wow, I mean, that was a very stressful week. I think for anyone who sort of. Pays attention to thanks. on the planning everything else. You also came out with your first paper copy of black. Yes, so having to work with the logistics of that on top of everything else had to be a lot, too. Yeah I would say I'm thankful bad. Our love someone with a lot of experience. Oh. Wow, there, it is. A Guy My studio eight hundred frame. But yeah, a person. I had never met who had been vetted by some of my friends. Famous Ryan. It's given. He came from new. York and he owned a magazine company that was pretty successful there in so he came and offered his health, and the rest of that story is history so. He helped not allow people together. They cooled material that we had already. Printed in the times, some new things to to go that special edition or dinty. So. Why don't you think it was important to to come out with the physical copy rather than continuing just with the digital? Well so our slogan is access is the new civil right and we wanted to really folks who don't have access to of course, the able to attain a free of free paper, but also we wanted to create a tool that would be an artifact for the time that we're living in, but also there was a poster in their black lives matter poster that people were able to mount to their windows, or wherever they wanted to put it just to be as loud as possible. That was the other point of having that they were here and we're spreading out more information about is nonsense. That's going on in the United States in twenty twenty. So the the Tagline, for the Black, Wall Street Times as accesses the new civil rights and I want you to elaborate on that just because I wanNA make sure that I'm covering all the things that access could mean when I think about this yet. I mean so. To education access to black culture. What we're actually thinking and not what someone is thinking that we're thinking about access to information that is probably I. would say normally would cost many African Americans make less than just about every other ethnic group in this nation, and so to charge someone access to paper. It was just doesn't seem. Is I. Don't think it's right. I just that's me. I know that we live in a capitalistic society. And of course you have to have some sort of funding model be of Alexa purchase open pay your employees. But I feel like it's kind of asking a lot, even if it's a dollar, fifty or three dollars, it's asking a lot of people who come from a flight. That's been oppressed. Or sentries in this country. During this band dynamic, the unemployment rate jumped shirt trump as wanna hear this for blacks soared. As is fifty two percent. Which is just insane, and then they wonder why. Oh, they're solid. These shootings arising in these inner cities in. This so-called black on black crime. That's taking place it's. They don't have a job and it's hot outside so. There tensions are I. I was I was literally arguing with someone on facebook last night and I was trying to do it as rationally as possible, but they were giving me the. Matter thing to do and I was just like all right like and this is something new from high school. I'm not really friends with anymore, but I was like okay like I'm going to try to have the conversation with a person that you have to have to get them to understand like yeah. All lives matter, and if that was true, we wouldn't have to have black lives matter in the first place, right? But he also mentioned black on black. Crime Mike. Why is it only white people who ever mention that and if you're going to mention that like you have to talk about? Like you have to talk about over policing. You have to talk about how cities are designed. You have to talk about. Chris will love this. The federal highway system all the things that all the things that make one one group of citizens be more overly watched than another right I think someone said. If you want to know what a police list society would like, you just go to the richest part of town. It's so true though absolutely. Access of the new civil right access to everything access to to news access to education access to capital access to the Internet they access to having the means to happier voice amplified quickly. If you have a message of right, that's worthy of being published, and then we're able to mobile access to be able to mobilize people around your cause, which is something that we did not have for the longest time in Tulsa for for Black Americans and I think it I, don't want to say it's because the Eagle wasn't aggressive enough, but I want to say that they probably weren't regressive. Enough, right the word. Make it out a message and say hey, everybody. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA crowd this space at City Hall and we did. We did it tons of times, and we got policy changes for our community also like the the moratorium on dollar stores. I noticed that you have a lot of guest pieces, guests riders come into. Do Pieces in. Obviously you have a you write. Pieces in the new have would seems to be some more regular columnists, so do you have like a pool of people that you work with for a lot of the articles and then for the other pieces? How do you? How do you choose who I guess to as you said amplify. So I have a few people that are like regular writers I would say Dionne Osborne in autumn. Brown probably licensed to. The two people that write the most besides myself. Then my friend Erika Burnett. She says she drops. It eats every now and then, and then of course Calvin, J Ross? The was probably pretty. Most people are pretty familiar with him in this in the community, so but yeah, those are those are pretty much the main the main writers contributors by The Times I would even probably throw tyrants into that makes him and so another thing that we do that. I would say probably no other latte. Publisher does in this country Mrs we actually make space for white people. And we make space for them to be able to tell their story. They're coming to conscious racial consciousness. And I think that that's really really important for the nation. Mostly for the fragile white white. Ego has learned. Also because it's part of the conversation that needs to happen to. Write I've always told people like there's a reason why if you're going to do, say Holocaust education, you want necessarily Jewish person to teach it, and that's only for that personal connection to it, so if why people want to have a conversation about truly understanding. Understands the wrong word, but. Coming to terms with what they they can't understand. Yeah, it's you kind of have to hear from someone that looks like you yeah. We talked a little bit about June, but with everything that had been going on. I mean one of the big things that I mean. Frankly unfortunately, it got lost. A little bit in June was pride felt like because everything was happening with trump in the rally with Cova. With all the protests related to black lives matter i. mean that felt like something that. Not necessarily fell by the wayside, but didn't didn't have as much space as it normally does. In pride month, and so I was just curious about your thoughts on that, because as we know that intersection -ality is such a big part of of what social justice is really about. Yeah for sure I I definitely felt that it kind of. I don't even know what the word is to describe it, but it did kind of flounder the radar this year because of all of the protest, and of course the covert, so we didn't have our prize. People worn out down on downtown bike. We would only be a megan places like New York Stadium Atlanta like we didn't see the big high turn outs that we would normally see. On television. But yes, so the the intersection. Of being black and gay do want to kind of touch on that. It's a it's a tight spot. Some people would say that Oh will likely for more homophobic, then other. Other racial groups spent I. Don't even think that's. True I think it's it just depends really where you are in the country of urine, a place that's conservative in awe like Oklahoma and you're gonNA. Have a lot of black people that are gonna not necessarily agree with the the LGBTQ. Ideas entities in so, but as it relates to like myself in this in this time in American history. It's it's difficult to explain because identify as a gay person as a gay man. But at the same time before I even opened my mouth or before anyone. Axes Mu with my dentist he is, are they find out through getting to know me I'm a black person of black man, and so some people get confused when I say Oh, I'm black before I'm gay, and why can't you just be the same thing? And I'm like well? In reality on the same thing but socially. First thing that people see. Is this black skin in? Depending on how they were raised. They're gonNA. WanNa know Obama Threat or This if I'm okay, so. It's a hard spot to walk ones. We're talking about multiple identities that people have. There's usually one that is visible and one that is invisible and. They have they have similar effects, but you as a person. Realize what people see. I were part of the first and that that. That affects how you end up in defining yourself. So. Let's let's go back a little bit, too. Why you want to found the Black Wall Street Times. What I was like early on what what what I likes now as you've been setting milestones on on page hits and putting out your first print edition. Gives me the quick history of. Of how and why? You founded so by while three times? Yes, so I started. The Black Wall Street Times started building the site in two thousand sixteen late. Two Thousand Sixteen and then I published my first horrible written articles. The day that trump was inaugurated. The first the first I've out in bits on. My didn't know it was just going to be of Lago was gonNA turn into what it is today in I, feel like it. There were times where I kind of ran away from me because it just seemed like it was so overwhelming that people were wanted to know what I was thinking in those types of things. I didn't have a journalism. I don't have a journalism degree. I went to school for Political Science. And so it's been weird like I. Feel Like I've had imposter syndrome for like the longest time and I feel like. Maybe I would say probably since last summer is when I just started. That's from two thousand, seventeen to two thousand and nineteen. That I'm just now getting over that were I'm feeling confident and comfortable in the decisions that I'm making it. It's quite a while. While for sure. But I'd start also because there was this void there was this this empty space where. Black people were being received a certain way in the local media. And it just seemed like kind of the way. The media portrayed was that we were just ranting about nonsensical stuff that. Probably should just get over and. Right move to the suburbs for better school like we have ops right. But yeah, there were was a lot of. There's tons of reasons I could. I can name tons of reasons, but I would say. The biggest thing was like. I saw the for power. Behind owning a media company. And what? We could do if we had. We had such influence. So while it certainly seems like you. You tapped into a need in a niche. It's been there for a long time. Have have you seen any of the local media shifted all having seen group of people. Come to you seeing that and thinking Oh will. Maybe we need to try to get some of those readers back. and so like as far as like the readers felt like they kind of like. There's enough people to go around for everybody and I think people like to repulse over like wall, street times they liked to read Tulsa people and I think that's great, but it's good to be able to have choice and to be able to go between different places as far as like the main like the the the news stations to television news station. I have seen a shift in how they report, and probably they know that. I an April of Ogden are reaching a lot of people. I've caught out. That's also world. A few times, and they invited me to sit on their word so. Which is like? Hey, this is probably not ideal or maybe should like bit when they're pretty good about it. They'll reach out and the editors will get me up and they'll say when you think about this town of He. That were. Race Yeah Maiden. Look at the end. And and even when it comes to so when it comes to like the television news stations they they're different because they're not krant. But. You call them out to I think it was like a few weeks ago, just before June teams and did a video. Live stream with courageous and aerial. Davis from Focus Black Oklahoma in autumn, Brown, who writes for the Wall Street Times scoreless smart. She's working on her PhD. She's going to probably get it at the end of the summer and we were just talking about. The highest bike, the third the racism that we see in the local media, and that thing I don't know it probably has over ten thousand views now, and a lot of people were were a lot of people in the media. We're talking about it and some even reached out and said. Thank you for this, do you? Do you see that as a avenue? Expand doing more video. Putting out more videos Oh Yeah. Street Times, absolutely, absolutely, we strained June team. celebration on our side kind of got behind it. But when we actually partner would be G News, which is insane like I'm like you guys WanNA partner with us. You are. But yeah. So it was great. Yeah I remember when I when I clicked on the live link and I saw that as like. Oh, they're working bt news, saying bear, little watermark, or whatever up on the up on the screen alongside years was pretty cool. Yeah since you believe that happened. I mean I. Think like that's a good. I think a microcosm. Microcosm for what the next year is going to be here until says we lead up to the hundredth year anniversary of the Tulsa. Race massacre I feel like tells a handled itself very well that week, but I mentioned. This is going to be a big year for the Black Wall Street Times, and no not that I. Want you to spoil any surprises. You have for people by like what's going into three hundred sixty five days now, obviously now less to the anniversary. Like what's what's the black whilst you times thinking about doing to sort of? Sort of remind, Tessa of it's sort of Hinz one of the tin since I should say. Yes, so we're definitely going to do more video series around just like conciliation reconciliation if that's all it and just having conversations I, don't if you've seen Jada Pinkett Smith's Red Table talker little. As, so conversations like that so Suzanne is using Schreiber in our Lantis to sit down, and we're going to do our own little video of I. Don't I don't know it might be like twenty minutes long. But it'll just be a a bunch of it'll just be a conversation. We'll probably have to have different clips and stuff and make it short, and we're just going to tell our story of. From trying to get the name change lean full to council oats. And what we went through as human beings, and how we both had our own thoughts, and how we grew from that into that our people in with the hopes of hundreds and thousands of people, seeing it and being able to have conversations with other folks. Gathering how hard you had to work to get the school's name change. What do you think about this moment? Where N, where a lot of things that had been wrong since the beginning our quickly changing like getting rid of mine uncle, Ben and the redskins are going to change their name like Eskimo. Pie What do you think happened? Is Job GonNa Change Her name yet. I don't know no okay. There are next target, but coming. We're coming for you. ESKIMO JOE's but I. We ask this of Aerial Davis and Kobe Webster yesterday another podcast recording. But what do you think is different about this moment? Why? Why is something like changing the school's name to council? Folks take years and it took it took. A couple of weeks of protests for for people to remember that Inter mine was kind of racist. Change it so I think that. Is being into its into a period of racial pontious Nece, which is, we've been eating it forever, but the. The reason why they're stepping into why we're moving into this era is because of you. Just let back to history and you think about what took place on bloody Sunday. People were visually able to see. The police. Like. Brutalizing people and letting these dogs on them in the water hoses and the. They saw that they saw children's suffering people jumping off a bridge to to save their own lives. and. Now we're able to to to to see it again and so I want I want to phrase it like this because it's really important, so there was bloody Sunday in there was a tons of other other events ever recorded in taking place, and then we just kind of had this gap. In the needle where people were, we've got civil rights as in fact, this a under March. Okay, every everybody's. Going black kids can go to any schools. They want like all of that. And of course there still. Racism that's taking place in systemically. Think about what happened. Just. Just before the mass protests all over the world. Is You, have the death of Ahmed offering which is. On Camera! You have the death of Brianna Taylor. which like? A week later as far as seeing during about what's going on in then the very next week. We have George Floyd being murdered on elevation by police officer. It happened so close together. that. The top just blew off. And I think everything kind of came out. And, so blackie aren't just protesting a will, which is stop because police are brutalizing our communities, we have a four hundred years of injustice that America has yet to really deal with, and so it's it's bigger than just police officers slamming two little black boys on the ground in North Tulsa for Jaywalking. It's four Hundred Years of receipts that have not invade. I mean it's kind of sad that had had to take like those three things happening in such quick succession for for I. Guess Parts of White. America to understand the frustration of. Black Americans, but what we do with this moment. How do we not lose it? How do we not create that gap that that happened in the sixties after the protests, and after the civil rights movement. Not to put you on the spot. Speak for all black Americans for all Americans really. Yeah. That's true so I. Think it's a it's important for. The white Americans who want to. Want to see racial unity in this country to really step forward in. They have been doing that. These you is I've never seen so many white people at a June TNT celebration in my entire life when I was just thinking like man. This is America is hosted. We like we should be celebrating everybody's history because everybody where the whole the world amalgamated into this dish. A social project right. So I think that that's what we have to do. We have to listen to each other. Given a digital digital people say we don't want you to come to the fucking black ills. because. This what you stand for and Uruba you're protecting. Andrew Jackson, and this is what he actually did to our people. You have to respect that in the current administration has shown time and time again that they do not respect. Vulnerable able that are indigenous people or black people or people from the Middle East Asian people like is just insane. The stuff that comes out of his mouth. I can't even believe sometimes. But yeah, I gotTA STAND UP FOR PEOPLE AND Not, just look the other way you have to get uncomfortable. One of the things I think Jesse. You've talked about this before. Is it does seem like that. Many of the marginalized groups allies are more united around the different issues where it's less separate issues. It's not just were. Locking up children in cages, and so there's a group over here finding that there's issues related to police brutality, so the black lives matter movement is helping with that and so forth it seems like there is more uniting of the different groups fighting for overall social justice, instead of picking one movement and just focusing on that. Absolutely I agree one hundred percent with what he said, and so people that are in positions of leadership I, think it's very important that they. Publicly show that they are for all lies, right? and that's what I've done like I. wrote a letter to enter Langford. For stepping up and saying hey, we probably need to get rid of love his day and we need to have June eighteenth, and we should, but our six hundred million dollars behind that, and then it's like Oh. Wait a second. Won't be indigenous. People actually celebrate indigenous peoples. Day or Columbus. Day, so this is probably what you should do I know you're to. INSERTIVE you want one. It's been one point two billion dollars on all of this stuff, but you kinda need to do that because their receipts very long and they have yet to do. They've been paid so. We already have Columbus now, so we're already losing that money so like it's not real. It's not real to me. It's one of the things we're like. Yeah, I, I! Get what he was saying. That's not an argument. That's not a hill yuan die on. This particular arguments. Off In their language otherwise, they're not going to understand. True Somehow I think this question really began with the lead up to the. Anniversary of the race massacre. I mean there are GonNa have to be alive uncomfortable conversations in this next year for those who have read the Commission report that came out in over a decade ago. Now I think. Like that I have problems like driving through town now because I'm like Oh, yeah vic. People get people gathered guns here and they picked up people here and the two people over here. Yeah, and I'm angry. Because one it happened to because it was covered up and three, because we still haven't really truly dealt with it right in the conversation that we are going to have people in this next year. How do we get people past the well? I I didn't do it. I didn't do it. My family was wasn't here at the time so like it doesn't affect me or I shouldn't have to change anything about me to do it. Like how do we? How we convince people that like even if this has nothing, do with you or your family or your family's history like it's important that Tulsa as a whole collectively talks about this, so I was thinking about that the other day so gt find more to come up to me and say well. I wasn't a part of this and that and I. Think so. First of all is I. believe is his name is is is made in French or something like that right like he comes from her French line and so were is people. People were probably in the Louisiana and they migrated here, and so of course his family come from well well. Let's look at. What was his family doing that WHO? My grandmother's side of the family. They own sugar cane plantations. Tons of them and then they were just passing. Black folks all over the place whenever they would have kids like this so sick and deep, and we can really educate people than we would probably decide tomorrow to just go ahead and pass hr forty or something. And I remember like just driving down in Louisiana, and seeing all of these sugar plantations in these big sugar company companies, and it's like Oh, well, why do I even okay my college right now like they should be paying reparations for that? And I'm sorry to off on, but these are like the little rabbit hole that I go down. We Love Tangents. For as far as like wholesome. I mean it feels like there are I mean. Tulsa is just made up of different bubbles it's. You've we've as a city become? I mean become. Yeah, very. It's a very segregated city. It just is not that that's massively different than a lot of other cities, but it is very segregated in not just by race, but it seems like by. Ideology is well that you. You're in one part of the city. You have a very different conversation than another city not seems to be what the hardest thing is is that people surround themselves with people who think in talk like themselves? Yeah I mean that's I think that's kind of what people do though right like we kind of bump into our own little groups, but like so she's thinking. I just finally remembered. That went down that Tangent I. was like I gotTa get back to this this faith, but I'm just thinking about buying him and his family. That during the massacre. Are before the massacre I saw a, he had posted a photo of his family for generations back. In this, humongous house. And you could just tell that they came from wealth like they've had wealth in their in their family for generations before for generations though. And thinking about my own family history. As, it relates the Black Wall Street and we were I believe we were like the third or fourth wealthiest lack family and Black Wall Street and we had. We had big houses and we have property. In an means, right? But then in nineteen twenty one. It all got destroyed. And it's like well if that would have never happened. Perhaps we would be as well off as you are today. And Your family? Perhaps we would have arts named after after our people had there not been a massacre in so that's the privilege that they live with, and they don't even think about those things in here a lot of this. About it all the time. That kind of set so well, let's just continue with our. Yeah the effects of generational wealth really hard to explain to people, but it's kind of clear once they get it like. There are things that people don't have to deal with because they're great grandfather. Bought land, and what ended up being? A fancy neighborhood and so that that house became worth a lot more, and then the the money from that covered the cost of other things it's. All builds on each other, so it does well. You know when when people say like we. Just get over it I'm like well. You get over your general national wealth, then just give that all the way then because it. It has it has a has a similar effect in the opposite direction. I want to mention slow my grandfather. Very. Unique. Will be at a at a college. Commencement speech or something. You'll hear. Oh, well if you're a first generation graduate college student, why don't you stand up? And then, of course, there's going to be a disproportionate number of people of color that are going to stand up right well. That's different for me. Because my dad went to college. Is. Dad went to college. and. That's just not even really heard of when it comes the black. People right and I think that that was probably making into us being able to rebuild our lives so quickly in to where I've even landed where I am, today is because. Before the massacre, they were getting educated at Langston University and They they saw the importance of it whereas most. People they don't have that. That unique experience of being a third or fourth college graduate Indian black of the same time. Since some people's parents and our grandparents weren't allowed into the majority of colleges so yeah. Well and that brings up kind of an interesting point, because one of the things that has been seemingly come out of this moment is obviously there's been a lot of discussions around privilege in bias for years now, but what's been interesting is seeing. Various groups come to terms with their. Their vice is obviously white. Folks have a lot of work to do, but seeing a lot of different minority groups come to terms with biases in privileges they may have had that have been hidden in how that has been part of this overall overall discussion. I think that's been fascinating as well. For listeners our to Australian listeners. What Again like I. Don't I don't WanNa put you in the position where you have to like, speak for your entire race or identity. But what do you think is the best use of say a middle class white person's time during this moment? If they're like okay, they're obviously things I don't understand and I want I want to. I want to educate myself. Where should they go other than the back Wall Street time? Goethe. Books over, or you can even go to magic city books because they've got some great stuff there, too, and just start educating yourself about black history. I always recommend the but stamp from the beginning, which is extremely in his A. Book so you don't WanNa. Ingest all of that you can do the the abridged version which is stamped, so recommend starting Rabat and then. You've got some issues with just the word black. Or the word racism than properly. You need to delve into white fragility. And re read up on that so. Yeah! There's tons of books out there but I would say those two are probably starting points, and then once you get past that I would say that third book you should read is how to be Anti anti-racist I would say that's the third look. In that order. I downloaded that one so maybe. I'll save that when go back and come back to. So what about specifically with the the black? Wall Street time because we always like to give our our listeners, the opportunity to not only be able to connect with our our guests, but also how they can help how they can. Whether it's magnify, donate whatever so how how can they connect with you on Wall Street Wall Street Times in. How can they help? Yes. We have a go fund me now and I think we twenty, five thousand, which is awesome, never really raise money, but I think everyone's kind of waking up and saying Oh gosh, we really didn't to. At our feet. But our feet on the ground and start helping out so that's one way, and of course used to share like. If you don't have the means that is perfectly fine I know, the economy is is A. You know swimming for its life right now, so if you don't have the means to donate, then you can just share or just like. Just leave a comment like those things are really really impactful, and even to me sometimes I'll just get an email from some random person's somewhere in the country, some random white person. Though they'll say something to the extent of like. I'm so happy. I found Jer your page I've been learning a lot and my family's extremely conservative, and sometimes I feel isolated and I can't even have a conversation with them. There are so many white people out there. That are like that they're coming into their racial consciousness. Were they understand their whiteness in relation to every other person alert in the country, and they feel like they're by by by themselves like they reach out an old man. I want to help them so at the same time. It's like and they're. They're trying to help me, and it's like well. You probably need help to. Get you some resources. Here's somebody to fall so. That gives me hope like. Really do what we're better than than. What appears to be flashed on television right now. So as Facebook, the best way for them to connect directly with Black Wall Street Times. Yeah, they I would say probably facebook and. We're on instagram were on twitter. As well, so you can connect those I don't know how to use take yet. I'm really trying. Over hardly needs to be. For the for those video based ones like you should be able to make one and like another program sends it to both Tiktok and snapchat 'cause like. I. Don't have time to make two separate video type things out. I'm not teenager just kind of time. So other than not counting June when you're super busy doing amazing things during this pandemic. What have you been doing when you're not working during down? What's been your sort of pop? Culture Comfort? Food. Orioles without a doubt. Actual Comfort food. and. Even know what comfort food is I know it or Honest. Work all the time like fry not to work, and then something comes up and. I feel like this is like my life ministry or my life's work is. Supposed to be conscious of what's going on in the world and. When the moment in like immediate like it's a twenty four hour turnaround, so you've got to like. It hard right there or if you're going to miss the the window of making the impact. Do. You have any like movies or TV shows or books that you've been reading when you when you Kinda need to clear out your head space a little bit, or just no time for that right now. Here's all right when I say it's like my life's work. It totally is so I'm not I don't like. Joy Joy. Like I'm always reading in, that's GONNA. Be Able to make me think critically into some sort of record. Apply whatever I'm reading to what I'm writing about what I'm talking about with Group of folks, but that is I would say probably before what was the show that I was watching that everybody else was watching last year, so the one with the girl with the dragons gema thrown. The. Hell out of that. My house out dark and stuff and they. Make it super cold and I was. I think that tells us a little bit about how twenty twenty is going with with game of thrones being the last show you were able to can. Time to. WHO. Long ago now and like watch the movies since all of the protests broken I've been busy sense, yeah! that. No yeah, but the longest thing I've watched since then has been Hamilton pretty much so everything else have been like a TV show here and there, but not I. Haven't myself down for two to three hours to come like well. There's probably things to do. Well, the last thing I'll just say is. Is there anything else that we haven't talked about the you'd like to to plug before we wrap up either events or or programming that you're putting out that you really WanNa. Get get plugged in. We can promote for you. Know I don't know like probably. Anything about it. Office, OFF MY, head They can subscribe to the black. Wall, Street time goes on E. Bulletin. No one called the APPLETON's anymore. What am I seventy? Newsletter Yeah Afterward Eagleton Wow all right. Yeah, that's www dot e w s times dot. COM AND In there, you can get a free subscription. Did, you think about having the full name as the L.. One point, and then you're like that might be too long Oh. Yes, for sure actually where we do happen, but. It's like you can make redirects to. Your redirects yeah. Yeah, I've always like oh the. Organization didn't realize how long that name was going to be an URL for. You gotta think about the things ESPEC-, especially emails. He didn't want. Have to type at black. Wall Street Times. Fifteen Times a day. Both Chris and I know how busy are and I wanNA. Thank you for taking time to talk to us and get back to doing actual useful. Talking about. Thank. You offer listen to our conversation with Niemeyer frank to. If. You are too tired to Google the black wall. Street. 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Clone High Reunion

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

1:01:27 hr | 1 year ago

Clone High Reunion

"This is a head gum podcast. Support for the show's brought to you by the new audible ridgeville heads will roll from Saturday lives, Kate McKinnon and co-creator, Emily Lynn. It's royally raunchy. Scripted audio comedy. Listen free with thirty trial. Just go to dot com slash vulture heads. That's audible dot com slash full -ture head. Hello. I am volt senior editor Jesse David FOX. And welcome to good one eight podcast about this is another book up up up bonus episode while we put the finishing touches on the next season. Good one. We assume this week that is very near and very you. Guessed it, the or to my heart. My role is host of this podcast. I helped produce voltron festival and with the power bestowed upon me in November two thousand seventeen I organize a reunion of one of my absolute favorite thing that ever just clone. High. The short lived two thousand two MTV animated show about high school made up of clones of famous store figures created by Phil Lord, and Chris Miller who would go on to make the LEGO movie and the Twenty-one Drumcree movies as well as produce the last man on earth and Spiderman into the verse along the scrubs creator Bill Lawrence. It's our will forte as ABRAHAM LINCOLN cul. Solvent is Joan of our Michael McDonald's has Gandhi Christa Miller is patra as well as Chris Miller JFK and Phil Laura's principal Scud word, and it was so funny and good and completely seminal in the form of my sense of humor. Cancelled after protests in India complain about portrayal Gandhi cone, heist cheap cult status in the nearly two decades since and the cult was definitely in the house that day November as we send with all the major players. I listened before I ever union of the show. And now for the first time ever, I am presenting the audio from that panel. I should note the conversation wasn't ten for people already familiar with the show. So if you haven't watched Mesa tissue, I check out the episodes for the first and only season which available whenever on YouTube, and he'd like it for those familiar with show. I'm sure you'll love this conversation. So without further ado, I present the reunion of loan high. Nice t-shirt under that enough. So let's talk about clone high. You know, we're all together have seen each other. Have you talked much since it's been fifteen years. I mean other than the one that worked together, but as a cast all tip and touch anyone. Onto Cole is in an airport. We were trying to figure out which airport we hung around. And it was fine. Yeah. Really? I'm disappointed that he showed up. I am too. Waiter looked. Call anybody can see it in a call. It a waiter Dale you're seven three my purse, the seventy waiter. Waiter so much like Phil that she thought horrible bosses happening. Cover. I saw it. And I'm still not sure it wasn't me. I did not enjoy my Chinese chickens. Nearly the way I wanted to because I was. We'll say. We cross pass a little because one of the ideas behind the show that was from these guys to to work with friends, and I'm married to her down there, and Nicole and Mike are super old friends of mine. I've never met will. And. He's older. Now for crystal will for all of us. I think and the other voices, and the writers you guys worked with these guys put together with people that would spend time with each other anyways. So I wanna start a little bit at the beginning. So I've read that sure of the idea I started sort of clone college when you guys are in college, and then sort of more from today idea going high school, how did it become this clone high school the one that we're pointing to the name of the show, but how come the Konae that is? Well, we made we had this weird idea for a show, and and and Bill wanted to develop younger writers, and he himself was like had just turned thirty. I think so we were the only writers young enough for him to mentor. So we were stuck together. And and we made this we made this pilot for the FOX network, and then the person that bought the pilot stopped working there. The he got quit. And and so, and so we all did other stuff, and then some crazy people at MTV. Wanted to put it on the air, which is like a crazy thing that doesn't ever have like things just die, and they just die forever guys. Sorry to say this and this resurrected and then like thirteen months of legal wrangling later. With the Walt Disney company and somehow magically we were able to start working on it. How did you narrow down to the sort of the five main close clones, and you start with clones you wanted to work with or art types of types of high school people? It was both at the same time. You know, we were like a list of people and certain ones were just not very funny wasn't gonna be great to do Hitler. For example. Wears thin. Were wouldn't. No, no. We're also very limited to. Historical figures that people know about. Yeah. Which is about about five. Yeah. And viewers. Learn a lot of middle school, boys. So I liked the Elvis twins the best. That's right Alvis. Really, nice polite. Clean, cut Elvis and the overweight. One tranquilize. So then what was sort of what are you remember from the casting or audition process and for the act? There's no. The process was our friend will is a comedy writer and also performs for the grind links. How about in and bills go white friends over here? Trivia sake. That all the guests start voices are most of them are people from scrubs because these guys did the show in that hospital. That's what the right and where the recording was it was. And so it wouldn't we be like, hey, Donald you go downstairs and be talking. You gave us a great place to work. It was in the psych ward of the abandoned hospitals. Place that they were too afraid to work at two creepy in here, we got and so it was free for us the doors locked from the from the outside. We got the food was great catering and had the thing down the basement where the morgue where you would like go into one of the lockers lay in there for five minutes. And if you could make it for five minutes and not think that no one had abandoned you down abandoned hospital in the dark in the basement. Yeah. Now, you wanna pry version of trustfall building exercise nor up as soon as someone gets in its big fun. Well, there's no leads on the inside. So remember, the guest voice in the pilot, Michael J? Fox's God these other kidney. Record glee recorded on his cellphone or something. And then recorded New York. That's correct. We're not like broadcast quality. How was how was Michael J FOX even house? He told of this thing through screw. It's been a yes. Been city Bill read and the TV show wreck before it took over the newest star. Whereas this show. We call Mike up and he's like that sounds insane. What do I have to do is do it? But I won't go anywhere. Part of other kids. Great. Real ratings booth. I'd love to hear. He is all kind of landed on your voices for your respective. Clones. Go ahead guys. You also did a stock. Stuck doing the worst? Boston accent? Mostly a rip off of mayor Quimby. I think. Impression of an impression. Exactly. And then and then what it sound like though. Don't remember. And then also terrible bridge. Good bad access for Mr. Butler Tron, originally, Mr. Bill vitrine, but then they go. Sean. Gotta do that one too. Whereas. Performance there. Typer bunch of other. Oh, yeah. Scud words, screaming voice. Would get really upset. And then the way I could get myself to remember how it sounded was to pretend I was Jamaican. Say like did teen is. And then it'd be like stay. That's how I got into. You did some research on aid Lincoln for yours. Right. I did I looked up all the audio recording. It was very like I kept asking these guys. I was like are you sure you want me to do this? Because I was just writing at the time. I was at the groundlings and all these guys. I looked up do so much like, oh, do I even deserve to be in here. And then I was like what voice do you want me to do? It was basically just kind of made normal. Boring, and I didn't realize how kind of. Weird. My voice is. So it was basically was just kind of doing my own voice. Wallis? It was just my. Shot. Michael. I don't have any recollection of getting the job board. All in new from the running of it. He was just kind of like a fun loving thing. So I thought I've just be. I think it was also because our carriages were like best friends, and it just felt like you were kind of somber man who was shot a pass. Maybe I would be somebody sort of fun loving. And that's really all of it. That's all. Was your brain for Joan? So some money. So much money. The wing wing house. Clone highway doing sketch run the same time on on DVD cold pretty white people with problem pretty white pretty white kids with problems and that I played a blonde. I'm a brunette this high school, not change, my voice entirely. That was just would meet everything they do. It's. Watch it. Now, kind of sounds like how I mock my teenage daughter. Memory were there. And like mom, I don't really even talk. How did you nail the edgy standoffish sti- don't know? Call the one thing. This is what the Bill orange does beautifully in with his co-creators Bill will always right for people. He knows and and hopefully likes and respects, he writes, you exactly the way he sees you. When you're doing guest, OEM Bech crazy. He did. That's what that's what he cones in on through. I have to say though, that I love online social media taking credit for anything involved in this show. I didn't write shit these guys killed. So if anybody ever comes up to me and says the show's well written. I mean, I'd say thank you. But in your mind say I can do any of the right? Very talented writing staff. Of five or six other humans were excellent and super awesome and ahead of their time. Nameless. Here today guys. Tell me Walter. Drink. Outstanding still I was gonna tell me they love how much theme song is. Of course, say thank you. Zere? What was inspiration of theme song shout? Guys. But he wrote it on the tour bus on your computer, right? Actually, it sounds like. Ross. So we're gonna play a couple clips throughout that feeling Chris chose. So we'll play clip number wine now, and you're in charge. So can anybody over me? And so. What are you doing here? I come out here to think sometimes me too right now can think about is not thinking about you over there on your thinking thinking about what you did. I was only trying to help you don't know what you're getting into what she's getting you into what you're getting into. And that's out of my friendship. You know, what hurts the most Joan this nail. I just stepped on. But there's a metaphorical nail in my other foot that hurts the second most. And it's from you backstabbing me. So maybe instead of the nail metaphor. I should've used a stabbing metaphor. But it's too late for that. Now, isn't it? Where you're wrong Joan because I'm going to win that election with the most dangerous campaigns since two caucus jump. The snake river canyon goodbye, Joe. Good. Bye. Joe? Television. I wanted to ask you about parody where you all watching highschool shows at the time this out of love or sort of total lung. It was the air of it was the end of nine hundred zero and the beginning of Dawson's creek and the OC had not yet come on making it, but they were taking exact sources that we were. But yeah, so we we love those shows, and they were amazing basically ripped off parts of all of them. Sometimes just using dialogue from those shows guys. Remember fighting in the pilot didn't get it the way they got it. And do you remember fighting about the Dawson's creek moment? The pilot Jude to delivered a reference for me now. Evolve back. I busy Phillips is going to come out show. Those shows I hate them on these guys in the pilot really wanted that Dawson's creek song and wanted Gandhi to be abra Gandhi to be. Go vote in the ground pool. That song. Very sophisticated reference. Everything up. Seventy percent of it holds up. Thirty percent of is is. Delightful. Yeah. But somebody had ponts. Image. Yeah. On Sian has a de Leon image. That was definitely ripped up. Dos. Episode. We're Dawson's dad dies. Very beautiful episode. My favorite thing in that was that you said this week unkown high regular character. Put him in the opening credits. Neil Flynn's character as Julius Caesar not as the dad said, oh, your regular character. You guys. Good Neil Flynn trivia that have no yet. I've never said this out loud. These guys named the janitor on scrubs because when Neil had to clean in a parcel end. They had to throw up. Yeah. They name they called him Glenn. And that's when we decided the jams. Name was Glenn on scrawl. Anybody who's been watching all that stuff? It's when Neil, and I said he felt that his gender had already been named on their show. Interesting character crossover in retrospect shared universe. You mentioned that writing that specifically based on the creek. But in general, our episodes ready to start with the thing that he wanted to Patty, you're like, oh, we're going to make over episode and then face off that or it was always like, oh, we're gonna do the election. Do the very important PSA story or whatever. And and then and then everybody just went crazy. I think there was one of that was just based on a drawing of Scud were wearing a cravat. Somebody and it was really funny. So we just tried to work backwards. Somebody board. And everyone loves inspired. Oh, my. Thing about the cast. And I don't know if you guys stories like this. But my wife would come home she'd be organ scrubs than she record stuff. You guys, I guess and they'll be like what's going on? Because I think it's Marilyn Manson and the food pyramid. Litters? Felt like you guys never really recorded stuff together. Did you guys didn't would do it? I did it was fun. I remember we had one time that we all wear their four microphones in that big base. Each other. Yeah. That was fun. Did you did you never idea? Idea. Anyone understands the fuck we're doing here. On. I'm like, I didn't get I watched it. Deliberate on our part. It was our first professional drifting experience. So. So we were we were fantastic again setting the scene. How are you? Talking to actors terrible soup. We've learned a lot since those days. Yes. But these guys are awesome. Because they, you know, they're they're they come from comedy come from sketch comedy where you can do. Everyone was doing multiple parts. And and everyone was up for the craziest stuff, even if it didn't make any sense at all. Very game and very patient with a lock cut out. Like, would you have them record ESPN? Nice things. We know the radio place where like thirty five minutes a lot of the times. It's not unlike scrubs actually starts out really long. And then and then we would we would slowly wittily staking Lee at twenty one thirty. We also used each other shows as a way to procrastinate. So our writer's room would screen rough cut sometimes of your stuff to see what should go and Caisley guys would watch stuff that we were doing, and it was just a great way for a lot of highly paid people to do nothing. Periods of time. The even that clip they're making fun of those shows you do get to have the advantage of still getting having a motion moment. I mean for all you guys we also prize at the shows like more sensitive Giffen, you expect is definitely I mean, obviously as a parody. But it was there's a actual motion between the characters that somewhat accident. You think we started out like with the premise of like, oh feelings are really funny. And then and then it seemed to really help when when we played the relationships. Took them at least a little bit seriously. And it was even though like one episode is an ADD episode and the next one film festival episode. The next one was like. Inspirational sports drama, the fact that they had like a continuing serialized relationships sort of held it together and not to toot all their horns, but I think a lot of stuff really worked. But because these guys are so good. I actually believed in this friendship. I mean, I believed. I believe in the unrequited love thing. I believed in you know, just all kind of worked for me emotionally too. But I thought that was all of those and none of these. I mean, as you said, there's there's sort of two great love stories in this. There's the love quadrilateral, I guess, you would say and also the love story between principals cut words, and Mr. Shah Butler's, but what do you think these characters selling each other? Oh, wow. Dies. You guys. Yeah. There you got Abe. Why did you? Why did you miss Joan? And why did you like Cleopatra? Someone these guys wrote it in a script. Greg Fabi's lines. Basically. I do. No. Yeah. I don't know. Two-thirds away through. We realized that we were just making Archie comics or like. Like, a is Archie Joan is Betty Veronica is Cleo jug. Oh. No, we're just making Arctic comet popular Riverdale. Yes. Rates. I think it's some kind of murder mystery now. Sure. Natural to the weird turn. The shows already very high concept at what point did you realize? You can literally also do anything. I mean, like watching it to musical raisins episode. Like, oh, this is now this type of show. But did you guys realize literally you can throw anything at this thing where their rules of what the parameters rules rules nother? Certainly no rules. Definitely like oh. We should do like a s- cookie cartoons. For no reason, it did seem like the Renault in minding the store like, well, let's just get away with no supervision. Yeah. Get a bunch of notes and stuff from MTV. No, only if we had. Historical figure they were like our audience is really dumb. Like you have to say who Sigmund Freud and say the father of psychology area. I think part of the part of reason was so fun creative. Was they didn't have a lot of restraints. And sometimes specifically network TV. It's it's often hard. I think it'd be impossible to show like this. You know, and. Trying to appeal to massive audiences, and everybody's noting. You every step of the way, it's why it's amazing to what wills been able to do on net vision. I really dig a show. Watching them up rate with these riots that restraints is one of the things that made the show work. Remember anything that got cut that you still think or at or you try type in the man there's one scene the only I remember the one that at the end of the basketball episode where Joan is undercover as a boy John dark. Convincing. Making very low. What you're? That is. And Andrew didn't have time to do this. But she won homecoming Queen and homecoming king, and then had a dance with herself. We didn't have the money for including the storyline. Remember, just like an animation. It was like a really long dance. Sorry. You. That's a shame. Yeah. Regret. Yes. There's an antibiotic of that online for. Any nurse Nadia, probably. But you could use the internet Miley cut regret, cause I got to be in on it more than these guys was I thought Mr. Belva Tron. Mr. bell Metron named after the character of Mr. Belvedere because of how much you love the book. It was so funny that they made these guys take that out. Really bums me out to this day. So. Get sued by Mr. Belvedere fucking. Somebody cares. So the show had a lot of guests very talking about Michael J, FOX, what was sort of the non scribes ones the process of explaining what the hell was happening like to tell many more or Marilyn Manson do completely different people was explaining what are they? Oh boy. They're totally different people. Do not. Scrappy crazy. Big news breaks. With Mandy at the times. Now. Kicking butt on a popular television programs. It was crazy because she was so nice. And we were like you have to get extra mad and yell and be super angry and just be be jerk had asked angry into and she she was so sweet like she would yell, but like so nicely. Really come on. Has never been mean to you, not really, no. Pretty good. Yeah. Marilyn Manson part was he got he got the bit. My favorite because I know who it was was actually angel. Because of the sheer amount of people said, it's. He was really game. So we ran out of money. I don't know. How many of you guys? You definitely recorded in this weird house. Yes. In Playa vista. Which now there's a bunch of buildings at the time. It was just like a swamp with this one guy's house in it. And he had a closet that he had turned into a recording booth. And so and Ashley was the nicest most game person ever like yet. Came down to this weird house. You're so lucky to be guest. Thank you so much getting the closet. It's very professional show. Don't worry about it. This just in little mouse. They want her to just kicked to shirts over and you you recorded in that closet and Jack black accorded in. All been paid. MTV brooks. Do you remember paychecks and residuals and stuff? Sure. Residuals? This day today is our payments. I wanted to ask about the music in the show beyond the theme song. There's a lot of sort of third wave EMA music without also said toner that just sort of your music. It was it was there's two main reasons for that one was because it was sort of free rein rich super free. And because we could get the the music for. Absolutely. So that was we had no money dashboard. Confessional songs. Somebody made like weird weird deal label label had a million Email. TV if you get your music on MTV without having to be related to music video somehow, and I think it was and we made the show like a year and a half before it was released. So by the time it was on the air, the band's had all gotten successful it worked out great for us. Also because of the show is supposed to be super over the top emotional, Email music seems like it was hitting the nail round that so extra lucky that it was extra free. Support for this show is brought to you by the new audible original heads will roll from Senator lights Kate McKinnon and co creator Emily Lynn enter the night room where evil Queen March wanna enter dizzy ravens sidekick must put down a peasant rebellion and save the throne will their friendship survive sensitive generals chatty sex slaves. Whiny behemoths prince's with bird fetishes, and the notion of democracy. This audio setire also features the wicked towns of barrel Streep, Tim Gunn. Peter did queer is fat five eighty bride and so many more. It's a scripted audio comedy TV for your ears. Listen free with thirty day trials. Just go to audible dot com slash Volker heads. That's audible dot com slash filter heads. This show came out fifteen years ago before they're like the websites like went to cover it. So there's like lots of moments that there have not been celebrated enough. So we're gonna play a clamp. But then I wanna talk about more moments. But there's another clip that you guys picked. I think you guys will remember it. This is Clinton number two and it on the screen. This blows. I don't know how Will Smith and Bill Gates. Do this come on Gandhi? Two hours will have paid for them all parking need of all always with utensils. Every time I q trips work knife. Jeez. Every. We need pretty threaten turn these snowflakes. Braille that glut. Glut. What a jerk the police got some sort of a complex. I don't know what it is. But maine. We eat them stakes here. Knits Abe, but I dropped a glass either. The norc. That's how the narc was. What was the inspiration of the Noah awkward that might have met? Might have met the sport. But to to build an episode or. Of the norc. We wanted to get rich cooks guys. Remember, the origin of the norc? No. Doc, you have a real norc, right? Yeah. But now they do now they do after the show and then made hundreds of dollars. We should I'll be getting some of those residuals. I can't remember how the north came to be. I know that we wanted to do a Ghandi a get rich quick scheme bit. Freeze that was the one that game. I wish I remember whose idea that we were trying to think of an idea that seems good. From the practical point would be very disastrous. Right TGI Chili's. On that yet Betty that world restaurant. If you wanna go business with me right now. Do you? Remember, according to the northeast, honestly, it's like watching these things. But once getting in the closet. I remember having to make kissing sounds like you're kissing the air, and it's like I've never done any kind of the kissing scene so belt, so. That's it like it was but the kissing the air, and these guys are all watching and they're like, no, it's not quite theory doing this for like five minutes, and I'm like. Then he started out. It was it was very nerve nerve-wracking. And that's that's about it. I remember a couple table reads. I love the show too. Do you remember, Michael I literally watching this clip? What happens next? Like, I remember going into scrubs. 'cause ever one season. I was doing drew Carey scrubs and clone high and just had a first baby. And I didn't even know what day it was when I pan then record. I had no zero idea what was going on. So I wanted to talk about Eddie moments. But so this will be time. If he wanted politely wanted to time shout out of thing and see. So I yell out of thing from the show that you'd like to see if they remember to. It's like a quiz and. Did you see the pool flip the bit? Hitting at a college. Bill watches the show. Aka Gingas gun favorite characters. We do for me, Genghis Khan. When aids student film starts just right after action. So hard because as directs and produces and stuff, and you often fires up in a position that the people you're not these guys people that you work with have done. Maybe we'll have so hard because really against carbon preps. He's ready. He's the lead of the movie and then aids going you're going to be there, you'd be mostly ready and action. Very sophisticated. Are you buy versus? I did. Was this do show once on tell the person, but we did an episode based on groundhog day and the joke was that all persons friends? That we until this person got the correct solution to a problem situation. They put that character through groundhog day everyday till they got it. Right. And you know, how not these actors and actresses, but sometimes actors and actresses might not read the whole scripts, and they'll just be prepped on what's going on that day. So I was one of the people on day four of shooting that came up to me and said, hey, I've never criticized the writing. I feel in this crown hog day up. So that you guys are doing the same joke over and over. Maybe it's my favorite that. And nothing bad ever happens to the. Because it's true. About my favorites. Always for supper. I wanna. Yeah. Due member. Do you? Remember it? That we did that together. You remember that where where I'm trying to teach you how to talk cool. Awesome. You might. Thank God is. Yeah. We it was JFK training teaching Gandhi. How to talk cool and sophisticated and so he's trying to tell them how to say full wa Sepah. I wanna party plaid. Very much try saying for supper, I wanna party planner. You're to work out it worked out pretty well. Were gonna show. I wanna know long time ago, you guys the scrubs writers thought was the best joke on your show. And he has the. Incorrect, but tell me it was. I watched the first two-thirds MC hammer time the music, there's anything I learned. It's the money never stops. Writer's room? Sick David because if you had watched the Marta. Even realize completely close. Yeah. I don't that one. I don't remember thinking. It was very modest Chris. From. Don't can't can't very top. Now. Lawyer in Florida. You guys remember jokes of your characters? We worked on the show for like two straight years and didn't sleep. They literally came in. We're giving some confusing directly. Very polite about the whole. Did any of them ever fight with you? Never. In the green room was the most difficult Miller. And Lord this is. No different Miller. He's he's a Miller to their names are Chris Miller. Difficulties. Looked at me. So hoping like delicious. Any last moment that you guys want to hear the? Dolphin came from someone who worked in our office who got a dolphin tattoo on her ankles. Just wanted to make fun of that person that regrets that tattoo now, I think so I can seize what great television episode came out of Israel. That's right for art sake. That people really got that tattoo for real. Up to really sit. This. Come on come to light. Four or five humans in ten gun dolphin tattoo. That says it was. Choice. You do not regret. Get involved, right? Always idead with your submarine sandwich. Shop pre getting your car and everything. Yeah. I feel that person. So there's it's very personal. There's an episode where it turns out that that's principle. Scud arch rival from high school is John stamos who if you've ever had chance to meet him is the most magnanimous friendly talented person. He's a drummer with the beach, boys. Good, and he's really handsome any never ages. So we were like, oh, that'd be really great. If you if the user you had to measure yourself against. And so then and so there's like a rant where he's just like complaining about how have stamos like it's just every time. He gets there first. And then I started to just riff on like things that are really bothering me and my real life, and I'm not joking. I get a little too. When. But it's a lot of like disorganise. Go to the submarine sandwich. I forget my summary value every. Really? I know no. That's funny. So I want to talk about the sort of unbelievable way the show amid its demise. What if you reaction, especially I mean, you guys have talked about? But do you remember we were you were when you heard that? How are you where? People in India were protesting the show. And as a result made the show get off the remember. Oh, I remember. Remember Bill or you the office phone color? I've ever got in my career to this day. It was told that there is a symbolic hunger-strike think forty five m peace or something that symbolic hunger. Strike, you don't really have my. Oh, my. Members of parliament that were not going to ninety times. They're just gonna take today that they don't eat to protest. Yeah. My memory of it was either on MSNBC or some new show, and it was. You know, it was a quick of somebody explaining logically. Wyatt bothered people in India. And then it was a quick by believe you guys or someone associated with this show sing, it's true. Saying that was satire, and we weren't thinking that way historical figures, we're trying to have fun. And that was a a cut of Gandhi characters saying I like my humping like Martinez. All this shows. Never gonna be on again. Very. As gone to remember. I heard about I I couldn't believe it. I was I was travelling in Mumbai the time. I mean since making sink about how you decided to portray Gandhi. And if you would have done it differently. Give props so interesting climate, and I've been doing this for so long the climate changes every couple years the approach to this was even that was literally just let's take him some dead historical figures that everyone knows and it didn't go beyond that. So. And by the way, how close you guys were to having. Jesus Christ slash. Hey, sues Christo, be a regular count. We were playing with fire. In the show being a bit character that. Christa? That's right. I think you'd have to approach it differently today. But it was I can speak as someone watched. It happened that it was just with utmost comedic and innocent tensions of three young idiots. I really liked Gandhi too. He was like a fun guy sweet trying to vulnerable. He's lovable you guy. He mostly gets making yearning to get laid and get drunker hot. Well, the idea was he was like under so much pressure. Like, how do you live up to? Go the other way, and every friends in high school that if they had like, Dr parents, and and a lot of questions like, you know, what I'm just going to be a party guy in. But I remember I MTV say, maybe if we can just send them episode where Gandhi doesn't do anything in Barras. We can show them. It's not so bad. What about this? No make it in that one. But what no-shows in that one? Does he not choose about will the no the prison rape one? And every confined one we can find episode. And so then we tried to do it where the second season. Learn he wasn't going Gandhi that he was a cone of Gary Coleman. They got. Gary and no one would ever speak about. That was very elegant. But. It didn't work either. Part much. Title. The title. Believing are pretty sophisticated not that complex melody. The most embarrassing thing for me was in not having to be offered as a comedy writer when we first looked at the scrubs writer's room. I did not get the joke. I didn't get the didn't even understand what the fuck and G spot was about. Give him three children. This. So on cliffhanger. Do you have a sense of what would have happened sort of right after that? Or in the second season to explain that cliffhanger or explain sort of what? Not wrong. The we're gonna Keats junior year high school now than they were gonna do senior year, and then do a wormhole and repeat this. I wanted to say that the deck season. The idea was heard to start exactly like the first season, and they were like slowly realizing that all of this stuff it happened and they had all been head had their memories white slowly came back and horrifying nightmares. Start the walking into school like in the pilot, and they were going. How is your Subir? Remember? Well, it's the ultimate giving for writers. We're going to do the same thirteen episodes every year. Save so much. So fifteen years has passed the safe in years past also in the universe. What what happened to these characters? The last year's college like do as people play. Where are they? Now. Are they now? Yeah. I feel like they must have colonized some some country. I'd never honest about some in a huge fan. Never really understood. What's what? All the dead famous. People is far as got he has flinton Clooney islands amusement. What was the shadowy figures plan with a clone? No questions. Serious. We it's like lost doesn't know exploration. Now, we can't tell you. It was like. We have it figured out. We're going to make the RAND Corporation used to bother me. As the only character. I'm horrible voices. The character you guys let me do a voice for and I never understood what his motivation was one of the reasons I saw. That's on the directors. The other reasons you sucked. This is a lot of people here that can keep testament defect. Excellent actor performer. Stellar. So on a practical level, what would have to happen too. There be any sort of reunion TV show or movie say these guys Lancer more than any my shows. We get inquiries on if they come your way to getting Crees oddly about getting tuten. Everybody's horns that worked on the show so much is I see a big mouse, which I really like and Bo Jackson who like an arch. Really like, I think that the show that these guys all did is not only the in a lot of ways the cursor to those shows, but is a show that could certainly hang with those shows now, and we often get inquiries as to whether or not we'd be interested in doing again. But. Complicated. We always wanted to do something with it, and and kind of complicated because of Bill has a TV deal at one studio, we have a TV deal studio. And so and it's owned by TV's hawks on by Disney Warner Brothers and on by. We can just get four. Weird. In Canada, tried to get them on the deal and called the number one guy would answer. Yes. But otherwise. Ars? Characters. Now that you've watched clips of them. Look like gunny ideas like a pitch for like a bible. Do you think Aymen's up with season two? I didn't realize we'd be getting like quite questions faith. Faith. I think that we'd have to like. Yeah. Start start down. Watched. I think it was the peanut. And I was like. Down that I've went and then once more like, oh that was that was the weird. That was only weird the only it was that. But that's I saw this is on the. I felt I got that feeling when I forget what is. Unzipped that mascot and all. Yes. My favorite part of that. Is why all years so funny is first of all as a mascot with guts and stuff. But why would he have zipper? For ease of acting the DNA. Much like the clone plan. It doesn't make. If you're like, an evil scientist, you need access to all the experiments. We do this again, it's going to have to have a little more. Say that that is one of the reasons I would be so into it is to not have to answer questions. Because I know that these guys just been so fun for me listening to them talk about this. Because a lot of these are are kind of memories that I I kind of catch up with like. Oh, yeah. That did happen. I mean, obviously, everyone in the room can tell what brilliant minds these guys have. And it's so fun to just get into a room open up the script and go holy shit. So, you know. The best feeling in the world doesn't happen with every shows to get that experience. Again, man, I think I speak for all of us that the dream job. So we have one last clip that you guys wanted to play that. And then we'll end on it. But can you play this clip? Yeah. That could use him setup. Doing explain narrow blade. Okay. So that was a clip that in from the film fest episode where? Gandhi and George Washington. Kerr was a ribbon. On was making a movie called black and tan, and he's trying to teach cover how to say say what cool. And for some reason. Maybe ten years ago that clip that you could've that bit where they go back and forth say. Became a thing. Where people started making weird music videos out of like that that don't make any sense hundreds of them hundreds of them where people are doing them. They didn't backwards and upside down and and had no idea why. And I didn't even know about it until years later. It was like have you seen these hundreds of weird videos? That's the most successful the show. More experienced most people experience the show. Yeah. That's the show's peak. Right, right. Say what? What? Why one and ask because it shows made fifteen years ago is watching people didn't finish it front MTV. And now, you have a room of people that have all come to see talk about it. Why do you think it has connected to the people that has had a run considering that? It didn't necessarily even finished. And it was so long ago. What do you think it is connecting what brought all these people out since we don't ask each of them. I'm always shocked that anybody remembers it because ended. Ended flames, but I can say that it was made with a lot of love and. Performed with a lot of intelligence and in Greek comedy, and these guys are so smart. They don't great actors. They don't put extra spin on the ball. And they just like they gave great performances, and and it's and it's real it's great luck. Because Bill was like, these are my friends they should be in the show. Great. And so. Yeah. I don't know. We just got really lucky any connects to anybody. It's not says it's not about me. I can it's not self aggrandizing. What's the what's aggrandizing? These guys were making TV before that era. And so one of the things I noticed early on about the show even back in a cool way. When it was on the people that liked it liked it so hard. You know what I mean? And I think if you're able to do that on any level, it's what TV Kuwait become so that's why it's still we are responsible for television. Thank you. You guys. That's it for another good one. Good one is produced by Mike comedy. Justin derided. Our theme song writer viewing rate to show an apple podcasts by stars. And, hey, if you know anyone who might like, the podcast may tell them what the heck you can Email any comments questions or lapping around suggestions. Good one podcasts at G, L dot com. I'm David FOX. And he'd follow me at Jesse David FOX will back with a new season and new joke soon have a good one. That was a Hickam podcast.

Gandhi Christa Miller Mr. Bill vitrine Archie Joan writer Jesse David FOX MTV Chris Miller Mike comedy Neil Flynn Marilyn Manson India Kate McKinnon FOX YouTube Walt Disney company Michael Abe Michael J ABRAHAM LINCOLN cul
Discover How This Rule of Music Can Help You Become A More Creative Soccer Player

The Soccer Specialist Podcast

12:29 min | 4 months ago

Discover How This Rule of Music Can Help You Become A More Creative Soccer Player

"Thank you Bella always appreciate the enthusiasm when back to another edition of the soccer specialist podcast and today before we get into the meat of this one, I just want to go over a few things that had mine one I found out. At you all know what we've been going through in this country in general and with soccer lose the entire spring season. Some people still don't have a fall season going get etc in my area high schools are going at least as of now they are going to be playing with their starting later. And I found out recently, this actually hurts us as club again after missing the spring because November is a big tournament month got enough you High School, age tournaments, including showcase tournament. But now because high school has started their season later it looks like the sectionals they're not even going to have state. So I don't know why they're having playoffs at all but the sections are going to look like right now they're going to conflict with November tournaments for club swallow know how that's GonNa work out I don't see how any clubs heist glades can even commit to playing because they don't know if they're players are going to be on varsity teams that go into the playoffs or not. So that's a whole big mess hopefully gets figured out and we get a chance to play as a club. Be instead of waiting all the way to March. But anyway next gotTA give shot out to Lena Miller who's now working hard as a freshman in college and they are not having a season but she's getting a chance to train with the team and we started preparing back in May when we were hoping there was a colleges and going through all of May and been working really hard she's been working really hard on what I've been taken or through when we started, she had a vertical of ten point seven, five inches ten and three quarters recently measured at nineteen and a quarter inches with is just thrilled an inch furniture two at his. Fantastic. She deserved with all the hard work she's put in at enormous for those. You don't know she's also a keeper. So obviously vertical verticals employed for everyone because it is an indication of speed in general in the amount of force, you can put into the ground, but we won't get into that. Now, I just wanted to give her a shot out the hard work. She's been putting it as paid off awesome results. She still working hard now I know she wishes she could just do soccer all day I told her she's going to have to go pro that'll be the next step. But congratulations to her that is awesome. If you are interested in working one on one with me online, go to soccer specialist dot com slash one and check that out fill that out or go message me on facebook at limited spots because that is time intensive another one dominate game day four, we conditioning program some people were very nice enough the other day and I won't mention names because I might forget someone because it was a few people who in response to someone asking about fitness and conditioning mentioned me mentioned my book. Thanks to them for doing that. An. Thank you. People actually bought it based on the recommendation because actually made a it sold enough copies at that particular time to become number one number one bestseller on Amazon in the soccer category. So now I can always say it probably fell off after a day, but I can always say number one bestseller bestselling author. Okay. So Abby Carly Alex Renaldo Dan, Abraham Tom Steer all you. Each a heart out I was ahead of all, you thank you everyone in the soccer parent life and soccer specialists groups for doing that I really. Really do appreciate. It is awesome and also recently the podcast a few weeks ago I got email from Amazon about Amazon music and they were gonNA start putting. Carrying podcast they asked me to submit mine I did hadn't heard anything about found out from one of the members in the soccer specialists facebook group Chris Miller that my podcast is now available on Amazon music. So if that's more convenient for you can check it out on their go Amazon music inserts the soccer specialists under podcast and now should come up for you. And as it now, we're GONNA get to it and we're GONNA. Talk a little bit today at music and how music and help you become a much better soccer player and no I'm not talking about your pre-game list or you work out list and I'm talking specifically about Jazz Music Allah myself don't know a lot about jazz I'm not a huge jazz fan of more of a blues guide myself but. One thing I do know about jazz is always talked about with it is an improvisational. Musical Genre and there's a lot of creativity in it. Some of the rules they talk about jazz jazz musicians never play the same tune twice they never play a tune the same way twice I should say, and of course, the way to do now that's creative. Right talking about creativity, which is important in soccer, and the way to do that is you have to know the basics inside and out you have to have them down absolutely cold. So it requires no thought whatsoever you cannot improvise you cannot create. You cannot be creative without knowing the basics without having them down cold. Okay. So Innovation is hugely important in soccer soccer of I've always causes a creative problem solving sport it's constantly changing. Yes. There are obviously there are patterns of play, but a lot of times you need unique solutions within those patterns of play to create opportunities for your team. Otherwise, you just become very, very predictable. It's easy for a defense to keep you in front of them and you're gonNA knock the ball back and around back in around kind of like Spain did against Russia in the two thousand, eighteen, World Cup without actually creating opportunities they were too predictable. They didn't have creative won't be one players that could that could cause trouble for Russia and take them out of their defensive shape. So, to improvise to be creative, you must be prepared. You must be prepared and being prepared means knowing the the fundamentals, knowing the basics having them down cold, and that's how you can improvise. Okay. All pro players have the basics down cold I know it may not seem it because they're all different levels but look in in in pro soccer a lot of the defenders they were attackers when they were younger, they were really good attackers when they were younger, it's it to us more quote Unquote American Sport Right Basketball all the players in the NBA at some level before the NBA. They were big time scorers. That's why players can come off the bench and light it up for thirty points. One night they can't do it on a consistent basis at level, but they all have it ended to to do it in the same with soccer players the pro level, they all have those foot skills. And that's why you see the creativity and that's why you see the the improvisation and sticking compared to basketball for a little bit because we've talked about a lot about the culture and the differences now basketball players, the courts are filled up. They're always out there playing. We don't get a lot of that free plight. and soccer. But here's the other thing you see basketball players whether it's free throw shooting rice guys and girls go out and they'll shoot one, hundred, two, hundred, three, four, five, hundred, free throws every day boom boom they're out there they don't become ninety percent free throw shooters binoche practicing the same thing over and over and over in their master in the fundamentals to the point where you can watch somebody like Jordan, who literally closes is before he shoots a free throw and make it because he has it down cold it's it's a memorize muscle action. He doesn't have to think about it. He just does it. And it same in other things whether it's a crossover, dribble jab step and going to the basket fadeaway jumper whatever it is. Basketball players do that over and over and over again you don't see the I know some listen we have your serious players and some of you do. But in general, we don't have enough soccer players that do that sort of thing, and what I'm talking about I'm not just talking about going out and dribbling and. Doing some foot patterns but do you see anyone go out and throw a double scissor with an outside touch work on the move to the breakaway dribble dribble stubble scissor outside touch and go you don't see a player take that one thing or the Matthews you know. I absolutely love and it's on Youtube Channel. I. Think it's one of the best moves rarely say it us with with youth players. It's just a little more of an advanced. Simple lunch fake but it's really not that difficult if you practice it. But I don't see a player going out to a field and doing five hundred matthews in a row RASC- that with basketball players in the fundamentals, you don't see that with soccer players but that's the kind of mastery of the fundamentals that it takes to be a high level and creative player where you can improvise when all sudden you're under pressure by one or two players you're not. Thinking about what you're doing with your feet, you're not thinking about what you're doing with the ball but you have the fundamentals down cold. You have that comfort level the you're able to get away from those players without thinking because you have that skill level. That's how you're able to be creative and those fundamentals understand this. It's not always confidence I. Those fundamentals mastering those fundamentals that creates confidence. Okay being knowing you have that ability with the ball creates confidence on the field which makes you that much better and also having that ability on the ball creates time and space and allows you for creativity. Okay. A couple of girls on my team that will play in this tournament I started seeing it last year. Obviously missed spring but saw in this. Torment recently, a couple of girls when they get out wide in that. Wide area in the attacking third, you know or someone like a tobin heath gets out outside of the box. But in the attacking third and you're able to to square up a defender, I have a couple of girls who are good enough with their with their change of direction speed and they're cuts that they can score up at defender who's not going to attack them with the ball which gives us what it gives us the opportunity to make those overlaps around them gives us the opportunity to. Make. Other creative runs to see good things happen. It gives them more time and space to connect with teammates who are able to make different different kinds of runs because that they they've mastered the ball enough and that defenders figure that out. Though when they get into that spot, they're taking that step or two back and just making sure they keep me in front of them otherwise they're going to go around and we're going to create a whole bunch of real trouble. Okay. So understand improvisation creativity. That's the fun part of the game, right? That's why they call it the beautiful game it's that type of stuff and you get that. By mastering the basics by mastering the fundamentals by mastering the ball. Just like a basketball player masters dribbling. So you're not thinking about the dribbling right you watch kids when they're young and they don't really have that dribbling down. So defender comes up they pant what do they do? They pick up the ball they actually turn away from the defenders of their face and their own end up in a lot of trouble, but as dribble dribble dribble. They get comfortable with the ball. They don't have to look at it anymore. They can switch from one hand to the other. They can turn spin what have you and and soccer players need to. Do, that same sort of thing. I want is going to get into something else I'm GonNa Stink. I'm going to save it for next time. Cut this one little short world eleven. Minutes already were something I found really interesting and I was talking about this with Jeff. Tackett. The crazy goalkeeper guy and the idea of working hard and competing and how. Those things can be considered a little different and how you can look at one over the other is an interesting conversation was something that he showed a video clip of the I. Think it was the women's Duke Basketball Coach talking about working hard and competing which I found really interesting. But I'M GONNA say that for the next one. As always I do appreciate you listening. If you do not have a copy, go check out dominate Game Day like five bucks for kindle ten bucks for the paperback Again, if you interested in one on one trading, go to the soccer special dot com slash one. I think that is it for now I really really do appreciate checking this out listening and go check out. On Amazon music as well if that's easier for you sheriff with your friends, share it with your club whatever you can do I really really do appreciate it subscribe leave a review what have you and I will leave it there for now and I will talk to you later.

soccer basketball Amazon High School Bella TA Lena Miller facebook Youtube NBA Abby Carly Alex Renaldo Dan Tackett Matthews Spain Jeff Russia tobin heath Chris Miller Jordan
Ben & Jerrys exec on the Facebook boycott

Pro Rata

11:09 min | 7 months ago

Ben & Jerrys exec on the Facebook boycott

"Hi I'm diplomat and welcome to access recap. Today is Monday June twenty nine. Boeing seven thirty-seven Max, planes or backup. Read. It pulls down. It's controversial the Donald Channel. And we're focused on facebook a big blue's. In the past week, the world's largest social network has lost a slew of big name. Big money advertisers companies like Verizon Levi's Patagonia. The North Face Coca Cola Ben and Jerry's and then Ben and Jerry's is parent company Unilever. Each of them signed onto a campaign called. Stop hate for profit, which is ask companies to not advertise on facebook this July in order to pressure the company into doing things like better protecting minority users, flagging hate speech and preventing misinformation related to the election. Remember it was just a few weeks ago, that twitter began putting warning labels on some of president. Trump's tweets causing mark Zuckerberg to say this I just believe strongly that facebook shouldn't be the arbiter of truth of everything. Everything that people say online, but then as the trickle of at boycotts turned into a flood facebook reversed course at least on labelling so-called newsworthy posts from public figures that otherwise would break the rules now why all of this matters is that? This could become the most significant business model challenge to facebook since we all went mobile. Yes, it is true that even the top one hundred advertisers on facebook combined only supply around six percent of facebook's revenue, but it's also true that big companies set advertising trends that the filter their way down to those mid size and smaller businesses, if facebook and social media peers don't nip this in the bud soon, it could become a destabilising crack in the dam. To better understand the thinking behind these boycotts, we talked to Chris Miller the head of activism, strategy for Ben and Jerry's which was one of the first national brands to pull its paid advertising on facebook Instagram, although it does continue to use the platform to push its social justice messaging that conversation in fifteen seconds. AXIOS chief technology correspondent in free shares, breaking news and analysis on the most consequential companies players intact from the valley to DC subscribe to get smarter faster at sign-up. Dot axios dot com, and now back to the program podcast. We're joined now by Chris Miller Global. Head of Activism Strategy at Ben and Jerry's. Let's go back a little bit prior to the call for boycott by color of change in the Ad L. and others had been Jerry's been considering cutting back on social media, ads or some other sort of facebook specific boycott. While we had watching it, I'll be honest. We hadn't come up with the idea ourselves. But when our friends and partners at color of change reached out on this, it was very clear to us that this was the right step to take when you say it's the right step to take. Take for Ben and Jerry's. Why is it the right step to take and I? Asked this in the context. The company continues to post on facebook. Just not advertise on facebook. That's correct. I think it is the right step to take because it is critically important that companies stand up and leverage the power that they have to get these social media channels to have some sort of moderation to ensure that the content that is being posted on those channels are additive to the conversations debates that we're having within society, and not undermining the it becomes dangerous for brands and companies to be placing. ADS Ads next to content that includes hate speech that includes content that is anti-science that includes content that is so divisive, and so this sends an incredibly powerful signal to the management team at Facebook, not that Ben and Jerry's did this, but that you are seeing a number of companies will big and small were willing to say. We're going to stop spending on the platform because these issues are that important us. The Stop Hate for profit campaign has a bunch of asks of facebook and other social media companies for Ben and Jerry's. What would it take facebook to do to get you guys to start? Start advertising with them again practical steps what we're not interested in negotiating with facebook on behalf of the advocates and campaigners that are promoting this work, so there are communities of color that feel threatened by the kind of content that is posted on social media channels in so I think we will not be looking to facebook to convince us that they're doing something we will be taking the lead of our partners and friends who are leading this war I. would encourage it what we would encourage. Facebook to do is to sit down with Rashad. Robinson color change to sit down with their Johnson. ACP and put into place. A civil rights infrastructure within facebook and these other social media channels to address these very critical. She's your parent company Unilever decided not only to pull advertising from facebook properties, but also from twitter Ben and Jerry's is only gone facebook. Why not twitter as well or other social media companies? For example Coca Cola's paused all social media advertising snapchat Youtube Etcetera. Yeah, I think we're open to. To it, I think we're incredibly proud of the position. That Unilever has taken on this, and we are reviewing our policy at the moment, but we are following the lead of our partners on this, and we are going to continue to support them. Stand with them to see this campaign. These issues through you say you're working with your partners following their lead. Does that mean you guys will be pulling your advertising? Advertising from those other platforms like Unilever has i. don't have an answer for you. At this time I think we will continue to be working with our partners to support their calls action on it as you know. The Stop Hate for profit, camping is focused on facebook. It's asking companies and brands to commit to pausing. They're paid advertising for the month of July. We are in regular ongoing conversations with the organizers. Organizers of this effort and we're going to continue to stand with them on this issue. Can you give sense how much money Ben Jerry spends on facebook properties. I can't do that. We don't discuss the amount of money. Put behind their stuff i. will tell you that it is significant. I can tell you that Unilever is obviously a very big spenders. It relates to advertising on these platforms and Ben and. And Jerry's is well the decision to continue posting, so you're not paying facebook to put Ben and Jerry's ads for Cherry Garcia is one thing, but the fact that you're continuing to post on both facebook and instagram. You guys probably credit to you in part create some pretty viral things on facebook. Some of the things you guys put on facebook then basically selling those posts, other people are advertising them so by. By continuing to put up new content on facebook, aren't you still enriching facebook? Walk? These are complicated issues. I think the point of this exercise is two things one to send a message to facebook that companies and brands care about this, and they're willing to take an action to encourage facebook to stop to I will speak only on behalf of Ben and Jerry's. We use these channels not only to promote chunky. chunky monkey in chocolate chip cookie dough. We have been actively engaged for two years in the need to reform the nation's criminal justice system. At this time at this moment. I don't believe that we can unilaterally disarm. WE'RE NOT GONNA pay facebook to seller ice cream, and we're not going to boost our campaign post on facebook. We are going to continue to organically promote the idea that we need to reform our. Our nation's approach to policing in the criminal justice system, and that's a message that more Americans need to hear, and we want to be a part of Dr. facebook obviously made some policy changes last week. At least vis-a-vis political advertising, the company's official statement and position on it is that the changes had nothing to do with this particular stock for profit campaign that these things had been in progress for awhile. Let me, turn that question around a you. Do you believe unusual timing right? Of course they are feeling the pressure. The fact that new have companies like Unilever like the north face is owned by the corporation Ben and Jerry's Rei got P. and G. Talking about this billions of dollars of advertising, and to think that that is having an impact on the leadership at facebook would be a Chris final question, which is an ice cream question. What is your favorite flavor of Jerry's ice cream? And what is the flavor? Most people probably don't know about. About, but they should favorite flavor changes all the time. The new flavor in partnership with Netflix's called happens is unbelievable. It has this altea. crunchy potato chips swirl I have no idea how people got this crunchy salty thing in there, so that's delicious. This is an unsung hero in Benesch flavor portfolio. It's called Vanilla Caramel Fudge. It is one of a handful flavors that have no chunks, smooth, rich vanilla flavor with a caramel. Swirl Fudge twirl. It is Kinda Unique Portfolio Chris Miller Globe activism strategy at Ben and Jerry's. Thank you so much for joining. Welcome back for watching today is Gilead. The maker of the RIM disappear drug that's become one of the leading therapeutics to treat those hospitalized with covid nineteen. Now Gilead has been providing the drug to US hospitals for free since getting emergency, FDA authorization to distribute it back in May, but beginning next month it'll charge an average of around thirty one hundred dollars per patient. That news sent Gilead. Gilead stock soaring this morning, although it then fell back down to Earth, after some criticism that the price might be too high now to be clear, not everyone getting severe will be charged thirty one hundred dollars. It depends on how long patients hospitalized, and also if they have private or government insurance, I asked axios healthcare reporter Caitlyn Owens. What will happen if somebody doesn't have insurance at all. This came up on a call today with HHS officials in what they said is there is cares act funding and a supposed to cover the cost for uninsured people how that works out courses. Anyone's guests killing at actually two different prices were one is for private insurance. One is for the government and the private insurance paying about thirty three percent more than the government is most patients in the united. States have health insurance. There will be some patients who do not have insurance show up. What is more relevant here I? Think is the cost to insured patients into the government. Of course, we're looking at people with insurance. Insurance at the end of the day. We all do paper out of our premiums. Finally we're also today watching beauty company cody, which shelled out around two hundred million dollars for a twenty percent stake in Kim. KARDASHIAN WEST MAKEUP LINE WHY IT matters. This comes just weeks after cody came under fire for its prior six hundred million dollar cosmetic deal with Kim sister. Kylie Jenner after Forbes alleged that Kylie wasn't telling the full truth to the magazine about her personal finances or the prospects for her makeup line, but today's news makes it sound like cody is not too worried about doing business with the Kardashian Jenner family. and. We're done big. Thanks for listening. It's producers. Tim Chauffeur's Naomi Shaven have a great national waffle Iron Day and we'll be back tomorrow with another axios recap.

facebook Ben Jerry Unilever Dr. facebook Chris Miller twitter Verizon Levi Donald Channel Boeing Coca Cola AXIOS The North Face Coca Cola US Netflix Kardashian Jenner
Episode 13: Mikeal Vaughn and the Urban Coders Guild

Pod 4 Good

50:49 min | 10 months ago

Episode 13: Mikeal Vaughn and the Urban Coders Guild

"Welcome to another episode of pod. Forget I'm your chief. Philanthropy Jesse Orage I'm your Vice Admiral. Philanthropy Chris Miller and puffer good of the podcast where where he talked to the change agents working to make Tulsa, more resilient and stronger place. Today. Our our guest is Kahlon. Executive Director of the urban coders Guild, which is a nonprofit organization that provides stem education, opportunities and underserved and underrepresented communities. We talked to Mikhail about urban coders guild where he's helping train the future workforce of Tulsa Tech Industry. We also talk about his love for Tokyo Ny. We should all go visit. And finally we talk about what's what brought him back to Tulsa and why? It means so much to him. Remember that you you need to subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcast, spotify or wherever podcasts are found, and we hope you enjoyed this episode. They? We are very excited. Have Michael Van on the today titled Right You did ASPREY. Thank you. You are the founder of the urban coder skilled. Aby. Yes, which I will summarise than you can correct me, which is a? A nonprofit organization that helps teach teenagers in schools how to Code. APPS for phones. Generally, yes, all right. The idea really started as that is at seed of an idea, but really blossomed twin whole a whole forest of ideas. The ideas to start and to build an ecosystem around stem for the underserved and underrepresented communities, so we're definitely have an an aspect route teaching kids how to make mobile APPS. We always want to teach kids how to make web APPs. We also want to provide them an opportunity to join a professional community and building a cohesive professional community, which folks who work in this industry can network can get the professional development they. They need to take themselves for the north. Korea so it's a lot more holistic than just the kids learning how to make apps well I. Think I. Read in one of the articles about this that you call it a again because you wanted the people to be able to then teach others exactly exactly so it really is really based on the old artists Gills the trade guilds of Europe in the old world. Having folks at the beginning as an apprentice, being able to learn something being able to transition into journeyman, there's a whole bunch of steps, but the idea is that as you progress in your skills and knowledge that you're actually teaching folks who are beginning their skills and knowledge. My only basis for some of that serve the guild. Latter knowledge is from like video games and DND and whatnot, who also seem to have the exact same code words for those things, yeah. I mean that's a that's a system. That doesn't really exist now right there. There are very few things where you can go and be an apprentice for. A year, three years five years and really. Learn the in and out of a skill and then be able to move up to then teach others while also having work for you to do right. It's not the rid of the way are not the way our society seems to work anymore exactly, and that's really unfortunate. We really need to be building skills for our young people. I know for for so many of us. We graduate from college and we apply for their first job and they're. They're asking for ten plus year. The provisional brings when you're twenty five Mike Hey. How do you get that? The reality is that we need to start a young kids younger learning how to learn how to Code. The idea really is that they can pick up some books. They can look at Youtube. They can mess on the computers of the phones, ipads, whatever and be able to learn some of these skills. The idea would we're doing with? Providing a mentor teacher that could guide them. Do some of that. Where did the idea come from I was living in Tokyo I was working hundred hour weeks like most Japanese salaryman I knew that at some point that I wanted to come back and the idea is. What would what would I do if I came back and I started thinking about all of the folks who'd guided me through. Science Fairs in summer camps. And what have you and I had just started trying to build out myself. I just knew I was going to be a million dollars or this crazy idea that didn't pan out so much, but it was a learning journey and decided hey, following into Gill model. Okay, this is something I can actually teach other folks how to do. And you're able to grow this program through One of the leadership tells programs as well set correct. That is correct so when I first moved back to Tulsa was. The fall of two thousand sixteen I joined leading north, which was a great program. It's under. The wasn't the flagship of Leadership Tulsa facilitator was Ash Ashton Phillips? She's one of the most amazing dynamic. Tulsen's in here in Tulsa. I had an amazing class. Brandon autumn. There's so many it was just an amazing, amazing experience and released sharing that seed them ideal at folks and getting their constructive feedback, starting to build some professional networks of reestablishing networks. That didn't haven't Tulsa really guiding me into some spaces. That allow this idea grow. I was just thinking that you know. I just think it's fascinating. The way so many people have started journeys through Leadership Tulsa this. podcast itself was born out of lead. North Sister Program Thrive Tulsa I remember that was a came to visit. Your class also had a pretty. Classes Yeah Yeah. Some celebrities looking at you a Mecca Yeah, it's the the the freedom to think about an idea about something that you want to do, and actually like have people give you feedback on it and sort of give you the space that most entrepreneurs don't get which is like the lead up time before you start using. The start this now. And allow the leadership programs. Give you time to sort of marinate with it a little bit, and so this. I, this idea of what this podcast was and what I was GONNA use my podcasting skills for change dramatically from when I started the program until when I ended it, so it seems like with the the coders guild. The participants get a sort of a similar experience where they. They get to have feedback from each other, and and when they're trying to develop something that that is the goal, these bank quite a bit of time getting our kids really comfortable with technology. Some of our kids for that I had never used a MAC before so this them to find the on button helping him to find the copy and paste which is different nearby. Yes, it is. Just, getting them comfortable with technology, teaching them how to type A lot of times and then diving into the code. We spent about six months doing that in the last three months. We let them make their own class project. If you will so the first cohort, their idea was to create a business directory out. For No Tulsa, they actually developed a prototype which were still working on this group. They're both much much further loan, no disrespect to my first cohort, but the second cohort is. lightyears beyond where we were last year there actually going to be able to do some of their own ideas, they'd be able to get some great feedback from myself. We have some folks coming in to talk about you I X my I. Kids had no idea that you can use brown letters on a red background. It looks Kinda, gross. They couldn't place there. Buttons anywhere able to have a U. X. expert. Come in house on come talk about Entrepreneurship Project Management Our kids are a little bit youngest knew about this, but not too young I. Think about it, but we had someone come in I. Two E oh a two year I got it right. You always struggle with that, but they Malachi Blake ship came in, and talked about Mitch and capitalism so in they had some crazy idea was going gonna make. The next billion dollars they we start here in Tulsa. It'd be an opportunity for them to get some of that knowledge and Rockwood that you you mentioned how like problems that occurred that you maybe didn't see coming one of them being like. Teaching kids how to use a Mac, also when you when you were talking about that, you mentioned typing and that was something that just occurred to me. Which is kids today? Grow using? Portable electronic devices more often and not necessarily keyboard so learning how to type on a keyboard would not be a skill they would. Naturally have come up with like I took a typing class in high school, which was a mentally helpful in my life. She took it though Oh yeah actually did well. I in and so. Great, like yeah, just like you know. where I I was already like pretty computer fluid that sounds like tenth grade but knowing exactly where to put my finger. Where my fingers were without even looking down. A mentally helpful I can't touch touch type or whatever. It's Oh, like you're pretty good when I think about it tight with my fingers, but there is a moment when I just know, which is the my fingers I didn't actually it didn't actually picked it in class. Yeah, just over twenty plus years. There's no way you know my p.. L. R. and like undermine. Yeah, it's. It's hard. Yeah, let me in the class was we were on word processors, so for for the kids listening a word processor was a thing that literally just printed out. The words that type trunk as an electric typewriter. Yeah, they did not last long. So, but so you're making me feel old. Thank you now. There's been comments are twenty Twenty you know graduation group lately that we've been talking about I know yours was last year. It was yes, it was. Going with that Chris I. Don't know I think he just wanted to brag about. How will you type listen I? Listen listeners typer so funny story. I lived in Japan for a long time. You know Jackie's. They use Chinese characters. Most of my. Colleagues are books. group can actually write the letters. Hand can't can't read the characters by hand. Really they're so used to. Them on their cell phones that you can always pick one out because the auto. Predict the actual character, but they can't right. Hands though I didn't feel so bad as Japanese Cayenne just GONNA use them my phone. Just type it in. Yeah, why I guess why I mean. Y- Japan has its own language Japanese. Like why were they were just Chinese? The language of the work they were doing so the it get all in the Japanese language. There are three different writing systems than you actually have all three of them, and so there are two native Japanese once, and then there is the Kanji and those actually originate from China. But I think about I think about that in relation to what? What I try to relate to kettles, and that is being able to use technology in such a way to make our lives better last year when they came up with the project for the Business Directory, the idea is really. There are lots of businesses in Tulsa. The don't have the marketing. Don't have the infrastructure to promote. Those businesses we think about the legacy of. Greenwood Bike Wall Street it was a community of businesses that were able to support each other, but that was because one they are all in the same physical community, and the law. They didn't have a choice but to. Keep the. Within that that neighborhood. These kids So the closing the gap in Capturing the legacy, the spirit agreement I thought it was a brilliant idea, but again as technology being used in such a way to solve modern day problems. If you're ends her of the mobile APP world, you probably have this conversation about how people use APPS and how many apps people use on a daily basis and the benefits of say I'm GonNa. Get real technical here like the. The HMO five web covers versus APPs right where you know from the research that I did and a pass job. The people might have one hundred APPs on their phone, and actually the only use like four of them on a daily basis and most of them sit there silently, not doing anything or silently collecting our data where we are and who were talking to and what we're watching exactly. So like is that why you expanded from sort of APPs to just programming in general because you want to give them access to the things, people might actually use more. No not not per se I definitely want the kids to have different skill sets, and so our first group of kids, the starting with I, O s and that's really only for apple products. This group kids also doing Iowa's, but going forward. We want a group of kids that also doing android meeting. Start there because it's a little bit harder to start. Kids struggling in type. I KINDA WANNA get them as for as far along into the programming as possible, but the idea is that we want them to be able to do. Enjoy ANDROID APPS. We also want them to be able to create web APPs. Just the whole skillset. Though all of the? All of the reasons that the kids let them make their own choice. I think one of the greatest injustices we do. Target young people is making them decide one thing when they're sixteen seventeen years. That they're GONNA do for the rest of the laws using air quotes because I think about you know how many of us actually have degrees that we paid tens hundreds of thousands of dollars for that. We I'm I'm staring at my Brandeis Masters degree. The had nothing to do with what I do now and then, and then we use them in our over the course of. Our Twenties and thirties. We've changed from one parade career track to another career track and then. In our forties. We're doing something completely different, so the ideas give them all the resources. Let them find out what works best for them where they WANNA go. Some of our kids are definitely definitely pursuing college educations. Some of them might WanNa go to vocational school a Community College our first cohort, one of our kids into the military, but the ideas. All at them provide all the programming options choices. Let them choose them, bess. Beyond the actually learning to use the computers in programs. What are some of the other skills that it helps them build? So. That's a great question learning how to Co. learning programming helps with our language skills. And it helps with our math skills, and so that's one of the things that we had started kind of midway to detract. But anecdotally, we saw our kids. Having better grades and in math class, having better grades in in their language skills classes as well. That is I mean that's huge especially, because when we look at Oklahoma in the state of education, we know that our Kiddos. oculus struggle with everything really, but Matt, not math and science and English are two areas that are the most on evaluated. And to the areas that we must struggle with. Also a practical application of a which is something I was one in school, and we never got which was using the skills. Are Teachers were teaching us in our real lives right like if we grow with cellphones? If my, if my if my math teacher in the eighth grade. Trying to concentrate on, something was like. Hey, we don't know how to do this. You won't be able to figure out how to program that game. I would have paid attention right, but she was like. No, you'll need this to like not forgetting the right change at the grocery store I. don't care about that. One one of the other things it's really important for me. Is the largest skills We talk about common sense, and how common sense isn't common When we step all the way back we have to. Have a certain way of thinking. Whether it's. See Java or any language it really comes down to the logic and once we get our Kiddos to. Think Logically Not only can they learn how to code, but they can also solve the roles problems logically as opposed to something else. Well I've just seen with. I think a lot of times. It gets pegged a certain younger generations, but just in general, the workforce today seems to have a struggle with critical thinking skills. Yeah, it's something that in school adjust. It's very difficult to develop, and it seems like this would help quite a bit with that giving them. The ability to think through a problem and figure out how to solve instead of it either you know. Here's a problem. Here's an answer memorized the answer it's. Here's something you know. Go find a problem and then go find the solution it exactly one of the trends and coating education and I know we have a great school. Just started here in Tulsa whole burden none. That's one of the things that they do is. Teach you enough to get you into the problem. But not necessarily give you the answers in. It's on you to to do the research in the bond, friends and two or problem out collaboratively. Same thing same thing that we're doing with these kids were teaching them. The skills guiding doesn't problems. Pointing them in some into some possible solutions, but letting them work out on their own. And programming. Blends into what is great about technology today, which is like if you have a problem right, if you you'll solve it, right. I love that. Well as I say. Yeah. I need as a drop. Mine Goes Ding. Ding Ding Ding Ding. Sorry. With starring this podcast and whatnot? I'd been playing with the myself and just figuring out problems by playing with the you know whatever programs using, but I started doing this professionally I was like okay. How do other people do this and the resources out there? For almost any problem? There are people out there, and I was one of them who share this better like via Youtube Videos Wicky House. Whatever sort of walk you through what they do and every time I learned something Nellie knew about the problem. Traffic's also learned something new about the about something else. I was I thought I already knew about and and Jesse. You'd have that. Is that is the birth of Urban Code is go? Yes, I learned something. Are, started, there was a body of knowledge out there and directed towards arcades are vice versa directing arcades towards in. There so many youtube videos that can teach you oughta cold are helping music are how edit a podcast there? So many At least with coding, there is a whole repositories. Get Hub I need a particular block code. Do this one thing I don't have to spend my hours. Mar, however long to get that done, and I can find it on a repository so. They're all the resources. They are this analogy. It is democratizing in so many ways after to do a lot of coding in in sequel at work deal with a lot of databases stuff like that and I don't know how to do something first thing I do is go to Google go to Youtube and find it and most of the time. Somebody is already written something that'll do query written code something that will do what I need i. just need to change it to fit what I need exactly but the. The best part is once. You have that little piece. Then you learn how to adapt it to do something else. And I think that's where you can really start to learn. The logic adapted adaptability Those are the skills. Our kids need absolutely I mean I. It's weird that into into the podcasting rom allowed the youtubers who videos are all Australian and I'm not sure why this is, but I'm always just like interesting. What was that where he said but I love Australian acting? It's actually achieved theory to in Australia. I had my Google Australian. Is. An Australian lady for a while so. Yeah, but there's always just like there are no Americans making these videos or are. The Australian one's more popular for some reason. It's interesting especially when you're. When you're dealing with something I've always used. A programmer wanted to learn because one. It always seemed to me. Know learning trying to learn different languages. My problem was always in the rules at languages. Break and computer programmer just can't do that, right? The rules have to make sense even if Do. They have to make sense I. Guess, yeah, so that's my question. Have you not seen the major? Yeah I mean? Of The I'm I've seen them I. have seen them like. It's they never once mentioned what language that might be. made one up, but I mean so, is it? I mean I'm thinking about you know Chris, and I, both volunteer for reading partners, and we're dealing a lot with kids who you know are raised in families where they're speaking two languages Ram and Spanish breaks a lot less of its rules than English does, and so English is hard to learn, and so I think about programming languages, and how in a way you're dealing with things where if something is wrong, right? It's not going to run, and so you have to find where the problem is like you can't. You can construct badly written code, but still has to work right so theory in theory. Yes, this analogy isn't going anywhere. I'm because I was totally going to refute that with well over a matrix referencing when he will learn something really well, you know where you can bend in where you can break and so a great program knows how to been some of the rules. They also know how to break some of the rules. I guess. Can you mean example when like what is a good example of bending programming? Roll off the top of my head I. Think about missing some of this tax and still getting a tour. Times just magic. Sometimes it's machine. But I also think about ties actually breaking it on our exploiting some flaw blunt some very low level flaw and the actual language itself, and I can access different areas. That's that's essentially what what hackers do in so many instances just burning his spot where they can break the cold and access whatever else said. That they want to get to. Do. You have a favorite programming language. They WANNA. Have a favorite. Let's. Go it swift. The easiest, and it's the one that I. teach my kids starting off it. It's really because it's apple. In because it's used for IOS. A lot of predictive I don't have to remember all of the different. The different language parts in the different methods in. Some of the some of the so much of excuse me is already there. By kids can really focus on the logic as the most to China, find the right word, it also helps when you struggle with typing. And our on indoor spelling. Guide you do that a little bit. And I think we. We talked about this a while. We're having coffee one day that. The, the way swift sort of. Sort of ads sort of a drag and drop aspect to it where you're not having a program, the box the box. Sir Boxes already exist right. Exactly, I love it, and so that's especially true with the user interface. That's how we really pull the kids in. They start by dropping in dragging elements to a blank canvas. If you will actually what you see in the APP, but then to actually make it do anything to make it work to make it cool. They actually have to dive into the code. And at that point, there's a certain investment because like. Hey, I built this thing. It looks pretty cool. Had Our make it work, and then we're at point you know. We're a couple of weeks in this stock. Learn Mike, Variables and And switch statements and The their code is at their point, and so that's that's the drum. As instead of starting from like a blink terminal box, right, you're starting from. They have the sort of shape of it. Then have to make a work from the inside which. Would give you more investment to instead of just trying to figure out what you're going to do from from nothing. Can you tell us a little bit about what brought you to Japan, a little bit multiple times right of all times a few times. I, actually spent my middle school, high school and college studying studying Spanish. And ironically I graduated in June of one year, and then in August of that same year I was in Japan. Starting all over It really wasn't invitations from a high school. Friends like hey, just come visit Nokia. He was doing the jet. Program SA- Japanese government. Where they have English speakers come and teach in their schools, so I just went on a whim. Totally totally Villanova Tokyo. Bureau. Tell everyone it'd be ever get a chance to go, it's. One of the most amazing places in the world and I the first time I stayed almost seven eight years ago. My NBA. NBA There as well. AH learn Japanese. A lot of Japanese Three versions of Japanese so actually you all three and so a learned AUMF. That's the to my own home pretty. With Japanese and then. Came back in two thousand ten the economy. Round, the world was pretty was pretty crappy at the time, and so came back also some family things going on, but I came back stayed for three years, I went back a second time. I wasn't ready to leave Tokyo. went back in the second time. Great live, great job, but working a Japanese salaryman. You're working hundred hour weeks easily. But still there's no place like Tokyo. The energy they S- thirty million people. There's very few things that you can imagine. The aren't there then. There's so many things that you never possibly could imagine that there again I tell everybody we ever getting has to go. It's highly recommended. Maybe not this year because the Olympics are GonNa, make everything Kinda crappy, and then there's the colonel virus which is making everything that part of the role kind of crappy right now. So what made you? What made you decide to finally leave the place that you seemingly love to come back to Oklahoma with all of its quirky problems, and and other things so it really it really was the hours and. An Amazing Place when you're twenty, five is one thing. We're living and an amazing place when you're thirty. Five is a different thing especially when you're starting to think about your legacy. The reality is that you can work a hundred hours a week anyway. The reality is I'm actually working hundred hour weeks year because I actually still have a regular day job of fulltime job, and then running or macos Gill as essentially another forty hour week day, job evening job as well so It's about Legacy Mike. Where can I make a difference? Being here in Tulsa, working with kids who come from neighborhoods like mine look like me That's the difference. I that I can make here live in Japan. Forever and could have Japanese kids, and they live there forever, but I would never be Japanese. I would never be able to have the legacy coming back to leadership Tulsa and lead northern thrive, being able to interact with such amazing people in half those connections with city, leaders and entrepreneurs and Philanthropies at this level is not something that you can really get. Any other place. So, so many so many great things in Anatolia. We want also. This is not total that I grew up in. This is a much cooler place. There's so many amazing people doing amazing things, so many people have moved back to participate in this this new. Thing that we're doing here. super excited actually would not want to be near the place right now. It's awesome I. Mean I think when people ask me sometimes why stayed in Tulsa? It's kind of similar idea you know. I feel like. One of its draws is it's it's still big enough that has. Plenty of awesome stuff going on and things like that, but it's small enough that you can make a real impact exactly. Exactly if we were in San Francisco or New York, city odds are whatever we do is not going to make a dent in anything here. You can really. Change lives exactly that's that's pretty meaningful. I felt the same way about Boston as you felt about Tokyo, which was like it was great in my twenty s by going to Grad School doing fun things, and then you hit your thirties and mid thirties, and you're like am I making any difference here like? This place this place will obviously survive without me Where could I have the impact? Where where do I care about having a legacy right? The you know. The Boston Jewish community especially didn't need me. They were happy to have me. They need me right, but Tulsa has all the things a great city has it also has the ability? It's small enough that you can find people you need to help work on a problem, but big enough that it has big city problems to work on right and that and you can get anywhere, even less nicotine. Yes, yeah, except for around here recently because. I'm like really you're blocking me off each different way. I go like eleventh and Louis. Fifteenth Lewis. Anyway but yes, the majority of the time. I was driving in downtown around five o'clock couple of days ago I saw the traffic trying to go out. I literally came back out of downtown thirty minutes later. All those cars were gone like. Tells the traffic so delightful? He Laugh and people complain about the traffic. Yes, I do. But. Right. Now, get frustrated. You know stuck in Tulsa traffic I'm doing air quotes. Again, Tulsa traffic. This is nothing. Taking an extra five minutes to get across town is nothing compared to you? Know thirty forty five our that it might take to get around bigger city I think I've heard. People say the toes the next. Austin my please God. It would be neat and it can't be because one of the reasons Austin has a terrible traffic as both of their highways run north south. They are parallel to each other, so there's no way to cross town. We literally have highways that cross town, so, but you know anyway. I when I was in Austin and I was trying to figure out the fake talk. Yeah, this is traffic talk. So when you're in Japan, did you? Did you have a car? Did you drive around a lot I did not. Let me back up a little bit. When I I I moved there I didn't live in the city proper I lived in what I call an expert. It's about three hours outside of the central. Central. and then I did have a car. You sort of need a car. It was a place called. Beautiful IT'S A. kind of a resort town for Tokyo, but then once I moved into the city. I did not have a car. I learned in the very first couple of months ago. I was there with the car that I needed. About eight hundred dollars a month, just department car on my own house, who and then there were all of the guys, then the tolls and then went awry went to wherever I was going also had to pay at least sixty eighty bucks to park. So very quickly. Hey, this is not the best idea when when you lived in expert did use one of those speed trains to get into town or so there there was a faster train, but not. Talking about the bulge. Fishing constant. There was not one from from where I live in. Tokyo but there was an express train which is pretty fast that she can comes in the blue train. pretty amazing again if you ever have A. To ride it. It's awesome I. Think a lot of times about star wars when they go into. Bomb hyper drive in Star Trek when the stars have blind behind them. That's exactly what it's like looking out of the windows, but you're cutting through hoods when I say couldn't do. Neighborhoods the distance from where you are to maybe where this blue partition is. That's the train lane. Yeah, though their houses on both sides and and fields on both sides, so it's It's an experience. Yeah, well, and I was reading an article about the bullet train system, and how it's even more amazing than we think it is. Because Japan is like the worst possible place to build this system like it is, it is very tight. It is not like geographically flat. Right they had to do a lot of engineering to make a work. Where like say in America between Tulsa and Dallas, it's literally almost flat most of the way right we can end. It's a crime that do not yes. Rapid his reign systems here the US. Quick quick runs between here and and Dallas are here in Oklahoma City. It's it's criminal. Yeah I mean I've been when I was doing research on the Tulsa race massacre, and looking at all these pictures, and I saw that there were streetcars in Greenwood and I was like wait. DID WE LOSE THE STREETCAR Technology and then, I did some research on Wall Street cars disappeared, and that's because of car company, lobbying and I'm like of course, so but like. Better technologies exist to allow us to like not have to drive everywhere, and you know the few train rides. I've taken like when I took a cruise once and. It was we got back to Florida like during Thanksgiving weekend, and it was super expensive flies. We took Amtrak all the way from Florida to Boston and yeah, it took like a day and a half, but it was delightful now having to drive or go through an airport just like sit there. Read a book napped. Great. That's one of my favorite things. I think about living in a big city with public transportation. I would love to not have a car novel love if I could live downtown Tulsa and did not need a car. If there was a grocery store, my job at an office downtown rocky just walked. I love the walkable community idea. I love the idea of being able to hop on a train Tokyo subway trains are notoriously crowded. people are actually being pushed into the trains of the doors can close jam packed. I I loved it. I love being able to. If I was lucky, I could get a seat And get forty five minutes on Monday back because I was sitting. There may be sleep, maybe reading a book magazine emails. Technically I should not be checking. Emails are reading. Books are even texting while driving, but being able to do that without. Having Time I love public. Transportation Absolutely. I mean Jesse knows this I. If I could go like a week without driving I'm happy idea if within you know four or five miles all all bike, you. And walking or biking to work for about. Your. Yeah? Okay, you're you're braver than. Drivers and Best it and a little bike lanes the not yet. It! It scares me times I, but you know it. With with practice I found. Know the best way to be a defensive cyclists. To avoid cars, but even still I mean I've been almost hit many times, but you know having having the ability to use a combination of walking cycling and public transportation would be would I mean that's that's the big thing that to me. Tulsa is missing to be able to make the next step. Because, there's a lot of people that that want exactly what you want. The ability to not have to have a car. And tells us a great. This would not be a hard system to put in place. like the the Boston transit system was a mess because the Boston streets were a massive. Don't go the same direction for five minutes. Sometimes they intersect with each other. Yes themselves. Yes, yes, they lily circle round now you're going the opposite direction but yeah the days when I get on the train and get a seat. I was like Guy Yes like I've made it. You know some days when it was like. was either broken down or whatever things that happen. I could walk home from downtown Boston. It was like four and a half miles, but you know nice days like that's fine. It was an hour an hour and a half. Listen to some podcast. It was great here. He tried to walk four and a half miles like. You're you're to? Over under a highway right right, which has its own concerns, areas of walks yet is the lots of very this neighborhood. Itself is inconsistent for its sidewalks, and of course scooters now which the new danger! But even with scooters. It's interesting in this you know one of my things is transportation equity I've been involved with some nonprofits that Tulsa hub that they do work in that area, but it amazes me how even the scooters are good example. If you look at the different scooter, companies have very specific areas where the scooters can go, and if you go outside and I go to the Hutcherson, Ymca just. Just north of downtown, great spot for me to go from work to either get a workout in or go for a swim. And I ran into one time. Where you know as I was taking, it took the bus out there. I just missed the bus going back to downtown. The next one wasn't going to be thirty for thirty minutes on. Like Oh, I'll just take a scooter right? No problem while turns out just north of downtown is apparently out of range. If you look, there's this sort of wall. Where the scooters aren't allowed, and it just so happens to be everything north of downtown and. Now I think the lime has expanded their at least a little bit into a North Elsa, but like the bird scooters. If you look, there's a hard stop at Osu Tulsa while yeah, same with the this machine rental bikes is that I tried to rent a bike one time from when I lived downtown to bike to research onto to Louis, which is the nearest grocery store well? That is out of range of this machine bikes. They were going to charge me. Seventy five dollars for taking the bike out of range, and I was like Whoa. WHOA WHOA WHOA WHOA. You're saying. This bike system, which is designed to allow people not to use cars to. I can't go to the one grocery store. That's close closest to down there. Yeah, we'll refund you. Like but what I mean. It's it's now. He's an equity. It's like where. You know you know their excuse was like you know. They have to be able to handle the area to go pick up the bike of problems and whatnot. Which I get, but like for the scooters like the scooters can go wherever right people them up the recharge like why don't why aren't they going into north? Hills, so that that really? Makes me, think about you know technology in homeys in college. So many times our biopsies get built into the technology. So that's one of the reasons why having diversity in stem is not just an aesthetic things like known as a black person in the room. No there there is an actual need to have a diverse. Workforce has a diversity of. INEXPERIENCE! Folks as I, Hey, you know what this community is historically underserved. There is no grocery store here. Are This community there? There is no access to public transportation. There might be a need for a bike or scooter to access. These these communities are folks in those communities to access the resources that they need the services. They need Enzo. Technology can solve problems, but it can also exacerbate are tag. Historical Pollen into the future again. That's one of the reasons why we need so desperately to have a more diverse workforce. especially in the area of technology absolutely made Jesse mentioned. We're about to hit our our twenty year graduation when I was in middle school in high school I, took programming classes from I took probably a total of. Four or five over the span of the last five or six years of school. And you know it it. It made a difference in mind, and this was in broken. Arrow which is you know predominantly white community and. It it allowed me to have access to a lot more stem training that helped prepare me for when I went to college, and even though I'm not I'm I work in for a bank, but I still use a lot of those same tools. Yeah, so giving more people. To those those type of skills will not only impact them, but also impact. You know these communities. I mean it feels like Tulsa is trying to develop a new technology industry for it to get away from dependence on oil and gas and everything else for sure, there is a concerted effort to make Tulsa a particular technology hub that is via you know. We started with coding Joe. WanNa say maybe. Maybe a decade ago, quite a while ago. Hope Bergen came to. Help build this ecosystem. Urban exists to help build that he goes as them Um. Venkov. Street are maybe a couple of streets. There's to you they have one of the best cyber security systems in the world. We have a lot of. Not Maybe, not a lot, but we have a couple of tech companies that are major players on the the the global, the global field, and being able to support them being able to have local talent As well as attract talent from around the world to Tulsa. That's one of the one of the goals of of our. Topics as well as our civically distant Tulsa the take-up, maybe not an Austin. Or San Francisco or Atlanta but definitely. A version that that suits us. So how can how can people help you and the urban core gold? That is a great question. I am always looking for support for the kids. Our kids need to know that there are pathways where they start to where they could be I think back to a quote from one of my childhood, mentors. He local heroes Marvin blades are found out later as an adult that he borrowed the quote. From someone else, but he's always as you can see, you can be and the ideas that we have these kids. They really need to see someone who is doing something different whether they be a coder banker podcast, so they can think about some other opportunities that they might want to pursue an addition. Community of folks who already worked are in this base able to support them. Those are our two concrete ways that I can think that on the books killing in and help. People also give you money. People can always. Give just want to make sure we got that in there so voice show. This is a nonprofit. All of the money that we that we get is has been given I. Give Them I give my own money. What money that I had but ultimately the idea is that all of this money is going into providing an opportunity for these kids and specifically we pay for teachers. We. Try to offer transportation assistance. We've talked about you know having the scooters are are the the bike, but our our transportation system is such that some of our kids in need transportation support. We have a program here. Motives, which is which was They came out of one of the leadership, Tulsa? Programs maybe was the marvel. No of mine is a leadership tells the, but it's a Tosa based idea. It's for kids. their offices are actually very close to here. Yes, yeah, yeah, but being able to offer transportation assistance as well as able to feed the kids I personally think it's unethical to have kids in Addis Group programs in our feed them It's even more true when one hundred percent of our kids this year qualify for free reduced lunch and so I, think about our kids, not eating. Between lunch at school and breakfast at school the next the next morning, so being able to support gives in that way these all resources financial resources. That come from come from our community. How can they connect with the voters guild You can email me and Michael M.. I k. e. l. at urban. Code is Gil Dot Org i. Am on Facebook as well. recode is Gill has a page There is a twitter. It's coders eight. In an instagram are color guild so there are a couple of different ways i. am usually at someone's community meeting for some. For something I'm super active knit community Tolson and want to do all the things. If you see me, come up and say hi. usually pretty approachable unless I haven't eaten. So if he looks, he looks like he's little Hungary just give them a snickers bar and. Conversation. And the else before our final thing Chris yet you just. Is there anything else that you'd like to plug either related to this or anything else you're passionate about. I'm just I'm super passionate about Tulsa this is this is a new place. I really want folks to to lean in. the I know they were all working. We'll have kids. We all have so many amendments, but. When we lean in. You. Everyone. Not No one of us has to do all of the work are do all of the things It lightens the load and then ultimately make our city a better place. Awesome well said so the last thing we always have our do is to look around the rat nine productions, nerd cave here and sort of find something that either calls to you or your so curious about you want you want to tell you what it is? I'm looking at. A star wars. Not Star Wars Star Trek. I totally killed that. Star Trek models when I was a kid I wanted to be an astronaut. that was my that was what I wanted to do. As a kid who was the national and so I think about Star Trek and Star Wars Ins. Then, also think you know. It's twenty twenty in there so many promises. They remained technology wise. Haven't yet. I mean I'm I'm still looking for my my flying car. And yet. Where are hovercrafts back to the future two? We were promised. Hovercrafts Hover Boards I. I did farm laceless shoe yet. Those now it's silhouettes changing something. There is a really cool shoe store downtown silhouettes. They actually do sell a Shoes the the need to be charged overnight with the US. Of course. They're beautiful. They're Nike end their six hundred bucks. Yes. We have a friend who owns one of those one of those pairs of shoes, so yeah, it's. He's obsessed with shoot here the. All right well, we'll, so we will. We will get a picture of you with one of your favorite star. Trek ships so. Many options here so they oh, yeah, all right well, thank you. Which which specific enterprise is that Where while there's a couple of their, so we've got the J.J Abrams two thousand nine enterprise. We've got the enterprise a from. Star Trek five and six, and we have the next Generations Enterprise D. Constitution Class I see the next generation. Yeah, and a prize I mean it makes me think about my favorite song card. Yup Yup the definitely the smartest captain. my real quickly. My favorite Patrick Stewart story is someone asked him in a fight between him and Kirk? Who would win and he said I believe Kevin. Burkhard would never get that far. Perfect perfect description of his character. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you. Palm. Offer, listening to our interview with Mikhail, von of the urban coders guild, don't forget to either give us a review on Apple podcasts or share this podcast on social media tell the urban quotas guilt. You can check out their website. WWW dot urban colours scale dot org. Thanks everyone. Forget to both. Wash your hands. Get done BELLSA.

Tulsa Japan Chris Miller Jesse Orage Tokyo Boston Youtube Leadership Tulsa Oklahoma urban coders guild Mike US apple China Mikhail spotify Gill Korea
Hour 1: 5/16/19

The Paul Finebaum Show

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Hour 1: 5/16/19

"The Paul finebaum show podcast is brought to you by Capital, One capital. One is reimagining banking offering account with no fees, or minimums, that can be opened in five minutes, Capital, One. What's in your wallet Capital, One NA member? FDIC. Cried passion, and patterns re of college football leaves here is the Paul finebaum show. Our one podcast man, we have a lot to deal with today. And we appreciate you dropping on by theorize. We are one hundred days to the beginning of the college football. I remember when it was two hundred. One hundred days in counting it. I mean, counting the way it's an earlier start this year, so may not be one hundred days to your favorite Team Stars, and maybe more like one hundred seven but. We don't care. A lot of questions still. And speaking of that paying players video games. What's next in the NCW image and likeness debate, that's the way, I wanna to spend a Thursday afternoon. Talking about. NCWA minutia. Don't worry. We won't spend much time on it. We just have to tell you because it's news. September Texas am and Clemson gets to thirty kickoff in the national spotlight. Who surprised by this September seventh two thirty in the afternoon. College station, Texas projected temperature. Hundred and fifty. Damn on Florida coach. Remember two weeks ago mouth was running. Now it's explaining. Calling the off the field issues, very disappointing. Okay. We get that we buy it. We'll talk a little bit about that today is Dan Mullen net with the media yesterday down in Florida. I'm my name's Paul finebaum. I'm the host of the show at least until I'm told I'm not, which was that Milwaukee in room, we go. We're going to talk to you at eight five five two four two seven two eight five phone number is the same eight five five to four to seven two eight five. I have a number of guests as well that will join us and good. And Chris Miller remember him? Great linebacker for Bama. He's now a panther. Craig, Howard usually see him on national signing day, both of them. He's here to tell the Florida Gators where they stand in relation to the BULLDOGS Gators, you might want to sit down for this one. Great little gray Lyman from all this. He's also a panther. We're just camped out at panther Ville today. Stewart Mandel is not a panther. He's a python. And carry Miller. From the Bleacher report. How about that lineup? Have we done a job today or what I mean it may be made but we're not we're not taking off that not yet at least eight five five to four to seven to eight five the PGA championship underway at Bethpage in New York, Tiger Woods. Two doubles and eagle bogies birdies. It was a mind numbing round will update you a little bit later with what's going on. But if you're watching last night, and someone here said Brooks kept guy, he's going to win and you may have made a couple of dollars from your local bookmaker. Let's get to the calls and beginning with Mike in making GE. Hello, mike. Hi, Paul L is just what I wanted to talk about it looks like your pick started out pretty good today. Hey, listen. It's only, it's only the first round of the PGA, but my friend, Jim tried to tell me that Tiger Woods was going to win. I tried to tell him that Brooks KEPCO was going to win. Wins this week. The PTA. Let's Mark that tape miles listening to him. But I drove all the way up to Augusta National this morning to buy me a ticket to watch the tournament. Nobody was there. Jim Jim said I'm going to run over to Augusta and watch tiger win. We tried to explain that was a month ago Jim, but Jim. Likes to live in the past. Well, I'll tell you. I know it's only the first day that as strong as he looks he looks like he could left the field. He really looked at present. Yeah. No, he I I'm not saying he's going to win, but he played a flawless round today. I mean, draining a thirty footer on the final hole. And I mean, he's, he's won three the last seven majors he came within a whisker of winning Gusta? This guy has just become the most consistent player in the majors that I have seen since tiger. Woods. Well, that's true. And that's an intimidating cores up there. I mean, that's a, that's a strong course. It's not a you know, something you can enroll over. So what he did was quite impressive. Now he was great. I can't wait for the weekend. I Paul thanks a lot, Mike. Thank you. Great to have you on Harry in New Orleans, Harry is up next. Good afternoon. Harry after Paul a real quick, multiple choice question for you. And, and then when you answer it, hopefully, a quick reason, why if you're saying, what set Clemson, the first game of the year, would you be surprised by surprise surprise, stop? And we'll let me let me explain the game. The game is in Clemson. It's the second week of the season, and I would be absolutely shocked. If am y this game were to be played in college station, maybe not, but not in Clemson. None little. Oh, clemson. Well, when I want me question, if I really had no idea where it was being played. So I guess that question was really not a good question. You think they'll be like a double digit underdog and that game right now? Yeah. I would think Clemson would go off. Okay. At least at least twelve to fifteen point favorite. That's just a wild. Guess we can probably double check that, but they'll be they will be once it will be a double digit favorite in every game this year. Right. To the show, and I mean, breaking news. Clemson is really good football. I know that's a shocker. Some people. Mad is next in Texas. Paul talking about the coastal sane in game. Yeah. Let's do things. Couldn't give you good answer. They yesterday about why things techy thing is going to be close in on the day. Paul. I'm not sold on questions defense. I mean I stand together really good quarterback or even know what's going to look like considering most of them, we'll be playing in the NFL this year. That's my fun. A lot of them with the NFL on that defensive mine in who the only team last year who gave a run for their money. Let's hear what he met you. Oh, you. You want apply the same the same rationale that to an that you did to Clemson. Yeah. I met today in 'em lose any players this year. Am Lockton players but I don't think Clinton's gonna better score will on Wayne Allyn think and gonna. Can be really brow game where would you where would you rank Kellen Monde among the nation's best quarterbacks ward? I ranking are making Mount Isa ten so maybe the tenth best quarterback in the country. Iran in east behind. New quarterback. Bama poll. Well, Clemson has got the best quarterback in the country, Matt. They have arguably one of the two or three best running backs and their wide. Receivers are deadly. Are you saying that? But my point here when thirty point is the same every day. The Clemson is not any good because they're playing AM. Matt, you need to get a reality check, my friend. Okay. Call. I'm all for being a fan. I'm also for being realistic. Dan is achieved me, Louisiana. Dan, new name. Thanks. What? How are your Louisiana? I'm, I'm okay doing better. Now, let's go questions about about some players from LSU, if that's okay. We'll try okay? Co Tracy, do you know they got picked up by anybody in the NFL. I will double check that. I do not know off the top of my head. Okay. And Emory the running back. It's coming in. Have you ever watched me? Bill monning. I have not. Okay. He reminds me of Charles Alexander. I thought I knew Charles Alexander and saw him play back in the late seventies early eighties. He he was a great great running back for LSU. And, and they legitimate Heisman candidate at one time. Well, you know, I. You know, I tried to. To determine who Amri look like in, and they just have to show some film on Charles Alexander later on. And, you know, I thought Amri was slow, and it's a host flow and stuff like that. But Iran ally Charles out of gender. Well, that's great. Listen. I if he's if he can play like that. Then he is really good. We'll talk to recruiting expert in the second hour or a little bit later on I'll get his opinion on that as well. Thanks for the call. Dave is in Baton Rouge. Hello, dave. Hey, how you doing quite well, thank you. The little running back. We got the man was asking before us is going to be on fire. He, he is probably wanted to pass run impact from what the locals are saying that she's recruited now's either. What has he committed or signed, he signed in, in the class? Thank you. Because I, I was reading about some player that LSU was recruiting that was of a similar reputation. But I'm I'm really yeah, I do I do remember this now that, that you reminded me of, of who he is. We had coop. We have to freshman that, that were high school for high school graduates, that that practiced in joined the school early were they could play spring ball. Okay. And he was one of them. But what I called you about Powell and not give you a hard time. When did you think you spend some time with coach? Oh and, and do interview like he did Whitney and Gus the other day with coach. Oh, if I did predict I would say two weeks from yesterday, we'll, we'll be in Destin where we'll be on the beach and we always try to get kosher onto come out. I mean coach was not in Birmingham. When we were there. That's one reason. We didn't interview him. But we will be with him down in indefinite, the SEC meeting. So I hope we'll be able to do the same thing. I do too. I'll tell you what the man is really doing some special here to LSU. And I'm excited about this coming season. I think the boy is going to be pretty good over here. Whether we'll get by Alabama or not. I don't know. But there've been that they should be on fire. Thank you day. Appreciate, and let me explain. I realize those who were watching Friday and maybe have have seen. We there were I'm trying to remember mel's Zong. I, I think there were four f the coaches at the region's golf tournament. We interviewed every one of them if coach had been there we were certainly interviewed him but we'll try to interview those, we didn't interview in Birmingham in Destin. We'll be there dafter Memorial Day on that Tuesday. And then on Wednesday we will have shows both days. Live from there. We'll take a break. More of your phone calls at eight five five to four to seven to eight five. Cried packing then patterns re of college football leaves here is the Paul finebaum show. Our one podcast, we're back a formal names only today. I know nicknames. You got it our man. Okay. Let's get back to the calls at eight five five two four to seven to eight five. Chase is up next. Good afternoon. Chase. How you doing? We are. Well, thank you. Good for question. I if it's. Okay. I just want to pay you back. Oh, the couple of previous callers. I've seen John Emily play. And that's a special kid. Definitely one of the top couple running backs in the country with. Well, I'm glad to hear that I I am very eager to see him play. He's very good and other ones. Other freshman guy that signed tower tower price Davis seen highlight seven. I haven't seen him play personally, but I have family in Baton Rouge, that know him very well. And there is no doubt the Parrella shoes is that not an all time high? But it's it's up there. I agree with that. I think they fans and. Probably other people alike. Do expect LSU to do well this year, and that's the question I wanted to ask you. I think LSU has a good chance to pull off a win against Texas a week to and should they do that. Their schedule sets up pretty favorably. And when the exception of Alabama think they can win way just about all their gaze. They've got the hardest games at home. Besides that one even if they lost Alabama. What do you think the odds are that the committee would consider them if it is a close loss to Alabama? I think they're pretty good. I, I mean, first of all, let's let's, let's take this story. Let's take the schedule and order, Texas is top ten team that is going to be the biggest game of the day, it will be in prime time in a win there in you're going to be looking at LSU the top five in the country. So, yeah, I you know, let's say L shoes right third or four. North goes down to bam. Which is ranked one or two loses a tough game or they may not even drop in the polls, so they would still be in a very good position. It's not a great position. They, they did that with Alabama here. Not too long ago lose lose a game late, but didn't drop because it was because it was such a close game. I think it could be the advantage where he advantage for other shoe. Let's say they lose its ad Alabama. You're you're not penalized. I mean losing it Alabama. I mean like. And you're like Alabama has lost a game in about three or four years. So that's a big deal. I appreciate you taking my call and have a good day. Thank you. Yeah. I tell you, I, I don't know anyone who's doubting the LSU Tigers. So let's continue with more phone calls and Tennyson is in Texas. Hello, tennyson. Hey, paul. How are you? Great. Thank you. They talking. So I'm a little bit more of a I guess, I could say realistic and take advantage here, the way I see as an is not gonna beat Alabama, Georgia LSU work when four losses, right there, an EMS probably gonna win all their non conference games and every SEC west game except for the two toss of games. Mississippi State, and Auburn, so the best case scenario, eight and four with a ballgame worst case scenario sticks and six. How does that kind of how you say it? Or what do you. Yeah. I'm more on the eight and four side. I, I like I like the program, but you can only do so much about the schedule. Yeah. I don't like to make the Sherman statements like they're they have no chance. I, I just give an opinion. I'm not I I don't like quivering. So if, if you're asking me do, I think there will be Clemson? No, georgia. No Alabama know LSU. No, so, right. You, you can't make it any simpler than that people that watch the show. No. No. The kind of things that drive me crazy. You get a guest. Well, how do you think LSU's going to do? Well, I think they could win. Seven eight nine ten it's got to be only one of those you can't you can't win seven eight nine or ten you, you can win one of those four. So those are that's my guess, in myth in mid-may that the lose four games. Twenty twenty though. Twenty twenty seems like a year. The schedule is pretty favorable in that could be a year. The day really take a boost. Yeah, listen. I have no doubt. I mean jimbo's our distilling the black. He's recruiting well, he's a great coach as good staff has a good program. It's the same problem that everyone else has in the SEC. I asked the question yesterday of, of a writer from Tennessee, which teams are you going to get ahead of? So if you're am you have got to start making a move. It's like a NASCAR you're out. You're out say you're going high to find the drafting partner. So let's leave Alabama album front can know it looks to me like am is battling LSU right now to catch up with Alabama. That's the way actually to restrict my because again, I'm sure I'll upset somebody, but I'm just giving opinions here. I'm not doing anything more. But, but I see. Auburn is, is right there, which ways Auburn going ole miss Mississippi State. Arkansas, they're all trying to, to find their way. And I, I think LSU and am have the trajectory at as of as of this moment. Thank you for the call. Do appreciate it. Let's check in next with Justin in Florida. Hello Justin, you're on the air. Go right ahead. Hey, how you doing today? We're doing great. Thank you. Great. I'm actually a big time Clinton fan. Sorry to bring them back up. I do love your show. My question is actually about Missouri to being a Clemson fan, obviously pooling for Kelly this year. Just wanted to know what are your thoughts on Kelly Bryant at Missouri? How do you think they're going to say, I think they're going to be great. I, I think he will have a really big year and to me, Missouri has a chance. I, sometimes you sound like a broken record and may that's why I was being more realistic about an ego. But I I've looked at Missouri schedule and I see them. I see them having a really good year. I see one. I'm trying to find the games that would really make me uncomfortable. And I don't see many. I think I think Missouri could win nine games with Kelly Bryant. That's awesome. Good deal. I think they sweep it on conference games and that puts them position where they, they, they need to navigate Kentucky, Georgia, Florida. That is a brutal stretch right there. I think that's where most of the damage could be done to them. But I, I like what I see there really good staff. They're very Odem. He's brought in Derek Dooley. And thank you for the call. Let's check in with Peyton next. Hey, Peyton found on how you doing. Hey there. Let's get your take our response to that. What do you think it's going to take out EA sports? Bring back the NCA football game. Can you tell me well they're talking about having to compensate players for the likeness? Well, I gotta easily around that. Okay. If you have an Auburn quarterback, he's number ten just change them in the game, number nine. Not the same lawyer isn't you think that's going to solve the legal issue? I mean if you're not using their number, and it's not that you're not the radio. Well, you remember what you said him into go. You talked about lightness, you think you think you think a uniform, it's going to matter if you. So how how are you identified in the game? Your by your position. You're, I guess you're attributes you know has how tall you are. Which wait? So they can they can just throw just all that off not gonna work. My. All right. We're up against the break, legal scholar, right there. Eight five five two four to seven Peyton will be argument case against these solicitor general next Monday. It's dream court. We are up against the break. More of your phone calls in Christian Miller. You do not want to miss this interview. But pride passion, and pageantry of college football leaves here is the Paul finebaum show. Our one podcast, what aback by your hair, and we look forward to chatting next with Chris Miller, the great linebacker from the university of Alabama who's now the Carolina Panthers. And we'll see how that's going as his NFL career about to take shape. We've talked to Christian many times over the years Christian, thanks for being here in congratulations. What's it like getting ready for your first year as a Carolina panther? Appreciate you have all, you know it was awesome. Just, you know, being able to reach this point, you know, still long ways to go and a lot of things I wanna compass, but it's nice to, you know, finally, you know, reach that dream of always playing NFL and then being with a team like Carolina. It's just a cursory I know it wasn't easy because you got hurt. You didn't you didn't play in the final game. And you, you battled some injuries, and I think many fo called experts thought that perhaps affected your your draft status. But you, you endured, you got through all that. And what was that experience like during the three days of the draft in Nashville? You know it was it was good. And he knows no waiting game. And the obviously pretty anxious you know, because you just don't know where you're going to end up. This is nice that when she finally here, name, call just let it all out and enjoy it. Then just get ready to go right back to work. Certainly, you have great familiarity with the NFL with your dad and just being a football player. But in, in terms of the Panthers, they, they have been closed the last couple of years they barely missed out on the playoffs. They were in the Super Bowl a couple of years ago. What's it like getting to know some of those players and in which the vibe around around camp after you showed up? Is really good. We have a great group of guys here and everybody's been so welcoming coach's player, great leadership on the team. You know, a lot of the guys that you have open arms and open ears. You know, they're letting us pick their brains. And, you know, they're, they're helping us out when we need it stuff. I it's been a blessing. You know, an awesome organization like I said, you know, everybody, you know hard working very determined. So I think fit in well, and, you know, he just seems to be going really well and I'm just I'm so happy. I saw where the rookies had shown is that is happening so far or have the, the OT started. We've, we've done some stuff where we're still safe to. So we joined the, the rest of the guys Monday, and we've been doing workout and, and things like that. But our fficials gave start next week but we've kinda got mixed in with older guys now during this week. And like I said everything can go on good. It just been going to work hitting the meetings, art and really. Just you know just preparing for the season. Certainly you're well prepared. I think everyone knows what happens at Alabama, especially on the on the defensive side that even getting a on a pro football roster. What's the difference, so far realize not a lot has happened? But, but I'm sure there is some separation between what you or maybe there, not in terms of what you've dealt with at Alabama now here with the Panthers. Yeah. Quite honest. You know, I think how did a really good job of preparing us for the pros. You know, only taught us how to K our selves, you know, the work low, we're gonna have and to be accountable and be responsible. You know, to get our job done to, you know, now, if the job and, you know, you need to be held accountable, and you know, and everybody doing it for you anymore. So I think Alabama prepared us for this because it's so far been smooth transition. And, you know, don't feel too much different again as he goes no job now. And, you know, you, you can't rely on everybody else, you gotta you gotta be responsible and do it yourself. Now, I think we talked once about the past season at Alabama Christian. In EMMY I, I was I was with coach saving the other day. And it's the strangest feeling in the world I here's Alabama they were fourteen in Ohio, and they lose one game and it almost seems like a complete nabbed, total abject failure. I is that just the way the process works that if you don't if you don't meet your goals? And if you. Do not play up to expectations then much of the good wool seems to go away. Yeah. You know that Alabama, you gotta standard set so high, you know that the that sometimes it does seem like that. But again, I do believe that, that's what makes Bama so great now the standard so high not just, you know, at the end of the year. But, you know, every single day every single practice every single meeting, you know, you have to really prepare like a champion and, again, you know, I think let's say always will tell you that, you know, you can tell the differences between seasons you know, whether you know we keep that going throughout the year. Sometimes I'm you'll see, we don't finish the right way, more less because we might get away from some of those tendency so you just the standard Alabama. But I think that's really what makes us so good. Krishna believe you three different defensive coordinators at Alabama. And I'm wondering as you as last year, ended there, there were, there was a lot of conversation about maybe the drop off between Kirby and Jerry. Romy and, and ultimately, what would Alabama had did you sense that? Did you feel that? Honestly, I feel that is the defensive coordinator, you know, at Alabama normally, you know, doesn't have the biggest role Methodism because as long as coach savings there, you know, we're going to run his defense, and he's always, you know, an ambulance word. So I'll be honest. I, I didn't sense, anything, I think that all three coordinators heck of a job, you know, I appreciate it. All three of them. You know they they all kind of had their slightly different styles. That today still was Alabama football, and that Alabama defense seen, you know, we were supposed to live up to the Alabama the Alabama, decentral standard and, you know, again, sometimes, you know, we, we might not have, and I think that's when you saw that we had issues. I don't think it had anything to do with the coaching. Yeah. I mean he, he, he, he explained it when we were talking to him Christian that Alabama had plenty of opportunities in the championship game in the red zone. They just did not convert and couple of, you know, the pick six a couple of big plays. And, and suddenly, it's a twenty eight point blow out at some fan. Just won't forget. Let's move on from that, though, because the NFL is where you are. I know growing up, you, you had a lot of interest in the NFL with, with your dad. What, what was it like growing up watching the NFL and, and did you? I'm sure you dreamed about it at times book to tell us what, what that experience was like being a young kid and being pretty heavily involved in the NFL. Yeah. You know, it was always a dream of mine. Then my fortunate to have the father who had played nine seasons and then fell. So I think it always, you know, it obviously gave me a little boot in being able to seek advice from father just being around the game. You're still coaching a little bit. And you know, doing some radio stuff I was always around the game. And I think that kinda helped with development and, you know, just again fast forward, and then this is just such a blessing to see, you know, I know, look to my dad and all his friends that have played in is this is crazy to believe that, you know, now here I am in no same shoes. You know fulfilling that dream of mine. So I, I do believe it was a blessing to having a father that played in again being around the game 'cause I gotta be around his teammates as well. So I got I got sick, their brains a lot. When I was growing up in, I got a lot of good knowledge going up. Listen, we've enjoyed chatting will be pulling for you. And we hope to see. You on Sundays wearing the Carolina Panthers uniform Christian best of luck. Thanks for joining us again. Yes, sir. Thank you all you'll have a good one. You got a great to have you on Chris Miller, who's now with the Carolina Panthers. A great linebacker from the university of Alabama. We're coming right back more to come. Pride packing then pageantry of college football leaves here. The Paul finebaum show. Our one podcast. Okay. We're back. Glad you're with us. So similar conversation was interesting. Let's get to the call today. Five to four to seven to eight five and Chris up next in Texas. Hello, chris. Fallout, you doing. We are great. Thank you. Tell you what, what's going on down there in gangs, VERA, I'm Florida fan, but it seemed like every time he got got a young kid, Chaz turn or another kid. He commits me, see, like the Dan's losing control down there or what's going on? God. I wouldn't say that I just think sometimes you're going to get attrition. Especially when you start recruiting better, and, and you take chances. I mean every case is different than giving you a bunch of cliches, but these things happen a lot of times they happen during the season or after right after the season, the fact they're happening right now. We're paying more attention to it because there really is nothing else happening in the sport. Got you got. It's just, you know, like every time we could he sounded created thing around leaving in Jones. But let's he pushing pushing put a starting job over planks or just I don't think so. Okay. I really don't. Okay. So he wouldn't. He was meth nerve. Alright. I gotcha. Okay. Chris, he's in the call. Really good to hear from you. Bo. Keam is in North Carolina, and you are next up. Hey, bo. Came housing. How's it going? About Louis at how do you feel about really sad at this, if you had to predict the number of wins on the season? How many how many wins, would you for day for I predict you'll be fired within two years. How about that for a prediction? Sounds good to me. He's, he's wrong coach for that program that coach needed a, a, a seminal figure one that could revive it. I'm still not exactly sure how it got so bad. And that's a question that JIMBO Fisher should answer, and probably never will. But willy taggered I think has lost it. I don't think he'll be able to turn it around. Okay. I wasn't really sold on the higher. I, I had all anyway. I was I was hoping that we will probably push for less miles, but we kind of, you know, didn't go that land ended up with willy t so listen. I, I. Willy Willey, had a good reputation, but you know, when you get off to that kind of start. And I've talked to people in that state they don't think he's going to turn it around. Great to have you on preciado. Mike is in Kentucky and you are next up. Hey, mike. Okay. Thank you. Yeah. Athlete Liu so bad. It's pathetic. But with Kentucky football in the past, we've always been rebuilding. And I think we're gradually but slowly turning a corner to maybe reloading and another question with eighteen playoff, I think there's a good chance you have four to six SEC teams in eighteen playoff and with that pass with, you know, people out west and all that. Yeah. Listen. I, I don't know how you could have. I mean, you, you could definitely get to you might be able to get three in with a special circumstances. How are you going to get more than that? They say, well, let's be listening trying to be realistic here. I know I know. I know sometimes people in this network, it's just a little carried away waving the banner. I hear it all the time. But I I'll throw it open to the audience. I mean you could in the best possible. Circumstance get for. And that would be pushing it last year, you could have gotten three you could have had Alabama, Georgia and maybe LSU, but I. Just because you're the SEC I know that will they object me from my seat here Randy for not saying that all h should be from the SEC. But I mean you got to be real. I mean there's some really good football leagues out there. You're not putting a third SEC team. And then before you put the big ten champion, I promise you that. Tony is in Birmingham. Your next up. Good afternoon. Hey, Tony good afternoon. How you doing? Okay. Thank you. Well, I got a coup park where one about this outside of see companies go, you had a guy in for you. I forgot his name. He was so, yes, I'm sorry. I'm notice him. He was so adamant about Tennessee being, you know, resurgent there's you and being better. But you know as I'm sitting here looking at it, Georgia still looks like they're, they're topdog vs. God lose like again, a little moment either. They had a little controversy and you know they against South Carolina. Kentucky blue light. They're getting better, Missouri. Got Kelly, Brian and everything going on. So I just kind of see what the see, you know, like how Tennessee is. So let me say this. I, I was in New York. I didn't hear the show but. Tony Tony knows a lot. But the one of the easiest things in the world to say is a team is going to be better. And by the way, they are going to be better. But what does that really mean? Does that mean they are going to compete for the no they're not? You can't. You're not gonna convince me that Tennessee competes for the SEC's. I mean, Florida fans thinks they are. But Florida's closer to its in Tennessee. Would you agree? Yes. Missouri is closer than Tennessee. A or may not be closer to Tennessee. I by the way, be prepared for it from now until the beginning of the season, you're going to hear that about every all of the fourteen schools. I mean sometimes we act like nobody's gonna lose. Well, you have your eight conference games. You have fourteen conference teams. Guess what someone's going to lose those games? Right. And real quick before you go. I was just wondering how this guy in clay hill and still have is job at the going five, and there's no because you haven't, I mean, you have a blithering idiot out there as an athletic director, you have a floor and list one. I mean, the guy I mean, Lynn Swann's no more qualified for that job. Maybe maybe you, you may be more qualified. I don't know. I don't know your resume, but I can tell you what you're equally qualified. Right. But I was thinking you know, since I held in is Arbor descent quarterback that you would think he will bring the SEC metality to seven cow. Like the guy from Oregon, you know, he's bringing that mentality where I mean, why not like the defense Domus physical office align bad? I mean it's just like the team is like a high school team out there, people don't realize Tony. We're talking about SE seats on the same level as Alabama. That's what I'm saying. And then this year, they're probably in twenty ranking recruitment in third in the Pac twelve. Happened. Well, thank you. I mean, the rumor is they're going to go after urban Meyer, whether he takes it or not is up for grabs. But, you know, sometimes sometimes you also have to be realistic if you're at SAT are you going to be able to find a suitable replacement? Thanks for the call. Appreciate it. Very, very much, Josh and South Carolina is up next. Hey, josh. Longtime listener I'm Clemson fan, but I have to listen to SEC network to get my news. I hear you. I'm glad you're here. Hey, listen. Did you hear that LSU has recruited or offered? Travis CTN's, brother out of the eighth grade from Louisiana so that they wouldn't lose chance to happen. Well, you know offering an eighth grader is great in principle, but it doesn't mean one thing about the time that eighth grader becomes a senior. Oh, yeah. I understand. He's running back and defensive end. But also, Alabama has started to go after Justin entire extended family by taking a person tickets from the hospital. Yeah. Jack, thank you for the call, and I run into Clemson fans. I ran into one of the one or two the other day in New York, and on the airplane and all these other. I mean, we, we, we, we, we have a tremendous amount of Clemson, fans watching and listening in. We understand why we'll be right back.

Alabama LSU Clemson football Paul finebaum Texas NFL SEC Chris Miller Florida Dan Mullen Mike georgia Bama Panthers Tiger Woods Kentucky Jim Jim university of Alabama Carolina Panthers
400 - Movies They Don't Make Anymore

Scriptnotes Podcast

1:14:08 hr | 1 year ago

400 - Movies They Don't Make Anymore

"I folks in today's episode there is some language, some salty language. So if you're in the car with your children, go ahead and stop playing it or put the muffs on them you talking about. Wow. Hello and welcome. My name is John August. My name is Craig Mazin. And this is upset four hundred of script notes. Wow, podcast about screenwriting and things that are interesting to screenwriters God today on this our quarter century, we are going to be talking about movie genres and sub genres that aren't getting made anymore and how we can fix. This tells us out we are joined by guests from exactly one hundred episodes ago. Kristie Corey is a writer director whose credits include usual suspects Vaccari, Jack Reacher, the last two mission impossible's the next two as well Kristie. Cory welcome back. Thank you very much. So the deal is every one hundred episodes. We have worked up enough tolerance to have mcquarry back. You know, Craig here, we go you were in here for the last you want. That's why wasn't very good. And. I missed that. Christopher querying. I have been engaged in a what fifteen year long argument about everything about everything literally think, it's even much. It's not so much an argument is it's a love story. This the dualist. Yes. I think that's describe wake up in the morning, you go to work fighting this man, you must. Three hundred. I was talking to you. We were both living in Paris because you were yet recognition mission impossible. It hadn't come out yet. You're in the middle of shooting, it it turned out. Really? Well, so congratulations on that. Amazing. You very much and two more to come to more to come. So the idea is you'll make these until they kill you. Meaning the movies are going to kill you. It's more likely that they will kill me than they will kill Tom. No, nothing kills Tom Cruise. See you've proven that by by the way, openly attempting to murder him through film. I mean, everyone knows I have been described as his enabler. He describes me as his name. I'm not actually trying to kill him. I'm just trying to could've fooled me. I'm trying to just know. He would he would be doing most of the let's drown him moving training plane tried to done. Let's drown him. Then let's make him hurdle from roof up broke up on too bad. Keep going. Yeah. That's true. Wow. You're you're killing him in front of us. I'm I'm wiggling him away. I here, but when you see him in top gun. Topgun younger topgun deuce topgun maverick maverick is he looks younger in topgun than he did in fallout, and I can tell you it's not surgical because there is absolutely no time in between for him to do that. So Madge is match of no eat owed. It is. It's it's incredible. It's it's diet and exercise I don't like God doesn't drink doesn't Trink booze. It's you know, what the ages are. Drink alcohol down smoke cigarettes. Love what you do love. What you doing exactly where? And there's a book you can read. Called a younger next year. And it's all about I'm not reading that shit. You should definitely read not gonna because guys our age we all have to read it. And essentially what the book says is once you start rounding the horn into your fifties. Right. You just start dying to not dying because there's it's decay, and this as we were you exercise can sweet the more you exercise, the more you hold off that decay. Tom has been on a regimen for three years. Now, that's gonna argue that none of us are going to do that bad. We will be here sitting you. It's right guy his table who don't work out, but recommended in one hour day chance days now. But you know, what we know words, we do know the words I mean, the vocabulary between the three of us a lot that all those all its words, Craig. Yes is episode is a milestone, not only in that it's four hundred. But it's also the first the recording after noble has which the air. Yes, christ. We're post-chernobyl. We are poster noble has it reached the air. Yes. Night. Night on Tuesday, Monday was the first night that I not wait to see. You don't have to wait. It's on the air. It's on demand. And now, I know I mean, I from where we're sitting rice now will run home and watch this evening. Big big backer of the show. I have deep personal feelings of resentment about. Yes this. I wanted to make the show. Here's what Chris said. And Chris said, I would like to direct her noble, and I said, but Chris you're making mission impossible, and he said, no problem. And I said, I think a problem, but actually before that though, I wasn't making mission. And then you were again. And then, but you kept saying in the window where I wasn't making. I went to HBO and said, I'll make it an HBO. They were very polite, but I could see in their eyes. They were thinking, well, if he wants to direct it who else can I don't think. So sure I think maybe what they were saying was so in post he's gonna be prepping a mission impossible movie, I would have been when it was is this why I can't get a job doing anything else is when nobody else will offer me movies. They all think I'm just going to be imposed on mission of. No, it's because I've gone around town, just killing you. So you're noble on the air at long last five years. I looked on in my little folder GS. Keep like a folder of all your Old Trafford. Yeah. Oh, yeah. In so the oldest document I have in my turnover folder was from like may twelfth two thousand fourteen almost exactly five years ago. And it was it was actually very comforting. Because it was the header was stuff to figure out. And it was it was just like what's this about who's in it? What would the episodes? It was just a bunch of questions that any idiot could ask I guess. I'll start that way. Don't they know I need to do that more often? I don't ask myself questions, which is probably why I get into that yet. I will say this. I the other thing I said, you remember you sent me the script. I was on the east coast getting on a plane. Yes, you read them on a plane. I need you. You texted them to me just before the plane took off so I had to scripts to read and I landed and I called you up. And I said I would cut one word I would change one word. That why did not get the job those? Yeah. Exactly. I got hired didn't cut that word or chain. Do not to do those things by the way. I tried to change. I word on many many times and could never do it. I couldn't come up with anything better. Just couldn't come up. They. No, yeah. No. I could've made suggests probably, but more importantly, that's that's a damn good script. Well, I read to so now, it's it's a show. And I don't know like what ratings are. But the response has been very positive part of the reason why you've been gone for some episodes as you were talking at the UN, you're at the Tribeca film festival. You guys do all these amazing things reported a whole other podcast series of Peter Sega startles into which is great. Yes. Yes. Yeah. So the idea there was that. Because so much of what the show is about is the cost of lies and narrative and the narrative distorts truth, I felt that it was important that we hold ourselves accountable for the ways we change things to be able to tell the story so Peter Sega l- of NPR's. Wait, wait, don't tell me. And I. Recorded a companion piece. Oh after each episode airs on HBO or on sky lantern over there in the UK. Then there's this little companion piece that comes along the you can download Thrum Stitcher or apple or any of those podcast places. I've learned by the way that stitchers had to learn that for this. And we just have a discussion about what we changed him. Why? And and and eliminate other various topics of interest. We did something like that on Valkyrie actually Nathan, and I did a second commentary track where we went through and said, here's all the things we changed. And what really do you think people? I think it was incredibly. I thought very satisfying to do it a felt honest and good, and I didn't sense that an in John you you listen to it. So I'm gonna ask you did you feel like maybe by learning that some things had been changed that I had in any way undermined the experience of watching the show. No in the first episode, you talk defect at Chernobyl didn't really happen places culture novel. It's it's all it's. All made up and fairyland, for example, that a key character actually had a family. You portray him. It's not having a family that is a big distinction in a characters life, but it doesn't change the fundamental data of the events that happened. Correct. And that kind of was the rule that we tried to follow. Which is I really do not want to change anything that would fundamentally make things more dramatic didn't want to cheat because the events surrounding Chernobyl need punching. Muck. Let's just let the truth. I just on. I remember calling you and saying, okay. What of this having done at update of what is true. What did you gin up, and we had a conversation very early on for started writing it? Yes. As you you were in London, we all went out to dinner. And then I think you were on a plane to Alaska or something like that. And I yes, I was going to the ice cap which didn't have has one does what that's going research, and I was on my way to the ice cap and the from London to get to the ice cap you have to fly from London to Las Vegas, Las Vegas to Seattle. Seattle to Alaska where you get off the plane and go across the airport to where the military C one thirty with skis on it. New is waiting to take you to this ice station us don't do this. I ever the ice cap. I got to Vegas and turn my phone on all these text messages saying the ice cap. Has breaking up they had to evacuate the ice station in you're not going this year, and I have never made it. So the very least it was a short flight from London to Las Vegas. Well, I got spend the night Vegas. Oh, hey, which is better than an ice cap. This podcast is absolutely out of control. John is I live must be twitching by now. Vaguely on the apple and still the ice. Diversion? But yes, I see on the outline. It says lose the plot clients quick to get back on plot. I wish also say that we actually have a live show coming up every year, we do a benefit for Hollywood heart, which degrade charity that provides services to homeless youth and youth with HIV. We always have great guests this year. We will have great guests our live show on June thirteenth, the big change. This time is we are trying to sell out the ace hotel, which is a much bigger venue. It's gonna be great big venue. It's a great venue. Definitely please come see us buy tickets. We will as we always deliver on the guests. Don't worry about that. But really aren't we enough which should be enough? But we should guests are really the topping on the ice cream sundae. Guests are the top. It's Thursday June thirteenth at the hotel. Tickets are available now and the building in the show notes for those charity for charity. This is a charity that our good friend could mutual friend. John Gayton is is on the board o love. This is all this is all part of Geoghegan's world, we love John Giddens. We also in celebration of four hundred episodes. We have new script note shirts. Oh, yes. I'm sure. These two Craig and Chris right now. So this is so great. The light version of the shirt. This is scripted four hundred has a sort of a blank VHS videotape was the field. I was going for you nailed it. You nailed it. That's amazing. I love it. The dark version of short dark as dark kind of gives me a little bit of an Atari vibe. Yeah. Yeah. Love it. That's a little bit breakout. I love it. This is a good shirt chirp. So in has always percentage of proceeds that go to me on our our non contained consistently zero episodes, still not make it any on any money. But at you don't have to pay money early on. I like fifty episodes like Craig would have to write a check to sort to run a shout for pain on hosting fees kind of stuff. So now, John drives a Rolls, Royce. That's tacked on top of a Maserati Asia. Is it sponsored the punt guest to ask is nothing. Now, we are free in every frigging way in every recommen- every frigging do this side of the goodness of your heart weird. This is the only thing I do first of all I don't have a heart as you know, or goodness. I was late. Fi stimulate humanity. Yes. So these shirts which credits no money for are available in black and white and navy. We also have hoodies this time. So I'm getting ready hoodie. You know, I love all hoodie. Now, we finally get back on outlined to talk about the feature topic. And so every once in a while on the show, we do this kind of movie where we took a look at a genre sub-genre of movie that is not currently popular. And we discuss how we make that movie in twenty nineteen really twenty twenty or twenty twenty one realistically as we're recording. This dizzy just put out a list of all their upcoming movies through twenty twenty three which are all Star Wars there. They're all Star Wars or Princess movies. But if we wanted to try to make one of these movies, what would we need to do to get those on the Disney schedule so onto under the Disney SCA schedule and graft at this point, so not true. Oh, I are we go. Well, okay. Oh, look, I'm having an argument with Christmas. Corey arguments argument would be. Be doing. But you're not enough. We're not having an argument. This is not an argument. Dare you please. That's good. See an argument would be you had an opinion. I had a, but you're not allowed to have an opinion anymore. Not introduce opinions if you just devoid opinions and stick to facts facts. Yes. New trouble. Listen, don't have an opinion. And that's why we are not arguing the truth matters. Because I'm let's get back. Right. It's turning into the morning zoo in previous installments of the segment we have saved romantic comedies. I mean. I think we can all agree there AMAN accommodates were dead. And then we brought them back alighted. We did we also did some work on westerns. So we're back now he pitches. A different I went on Twitter on aspirin for other genres or sub genres saving that have been sort of under served. So I have a long suffering script scripts and Findus sitting around for years and years news. I I don't own it. I was commissioned to write it by producer. You would put it in the category of you know, it's that it's it's a redemption. Story game personal drama put it in that kind of verdict sorta, but what is the genre? Genre drama just sort of just people. It is a female driven drama woman goes to prison. Okay. Prison comes out Noche, not she gets she beginning of the story. She goes to prison to scenes later. She gets out of prison fourteen years later in trying to reconnect with her sister who was four years old when she went into prison and has been lost in the system. Okay. Okay. So the kind of movie that in nineteen Seventy-three would have been released now only other weekly. Yes. And netflix. Close-knit mission impossible. Netflix said we wanna do this. We'd really what Netflix is after. Now, they're fairly genre. Agnostic really looking for a content just there frantically trying to that aligns every content floored. Disney. Fires up the. Yeah. Whatever they're doing. But also building relationships with talent. And they looked at this thing and said, this is imminently castle there is now I can't say who there is a great actress interested in the role, and Netflix is just standing by. And they're going to do it. That's awesome. But kind of movie that even two three years ago would have been inconceivable another project that I was briefly attached to I'm attached to it. Now's a producer was World War Two movie, but it World War Two drama. It's not a World War, Two shoot. Shoot isn't saving private Ryan. Right. It's a guy behind enemy lines. Personal drama BIA. Again, the kind of thing you hear World War Two, and it's already were explosions. It would be hard. So yes, it's dead in the water. And so you have with with that mechanism. If you can attach the right elements to a piece of material, you can get yourself on Netflix, Hulu, Amazon or HBO and each of these categories, I wanna talk about venue, basically, still big screen idea. Or is it something that is more designed for smaller screen bitstream may be at some other way to do it. But also, I wanna talk about what is the essence of this kind of movie. What's the biggest difference between making this movie now versus when I was originally popular who the characters and then with those characters who cast in this kind of movie who writes it who directs it, and what are the big obstacles getting away of making this kind of movie again? So all right. Let's start with sports comedy comedy. So this do shelter readily. Yeah. Incredibly popular so Ron Shelton had Bilger. I what you can't jump. But we also have things like dodgeball, happy. Gilmore major league Caddyshack bad news, bears a league of their own Craig start with you. What is the essence of sports comedy to you? Underdogs generally speaking, we have underdogs, and usually there's somebody struggling with a, you know, there's a term in baseball. I don't know. If carries other sports the. Yep. Oh, yeah. Actually in golf to the czar when you just psychologically are struggling with something. And so your game falls apart. So typically in these movies somebody with an eighth skill is struggling with something. And so in Cup. Tin Cup is the best example because it's literally about a therapist helping a guy with the hips older bowl Durham, I mean, all of them. I mean, all them. There's there's a a row a romance falling apart in white men can't jump in Caddyshack, which is like is probably the broadest of these. They're still a romance at the heart of it that goes bad and has to be put back together. So it's really about the essence of these things is an athlete's personal life is disrupting their game, and they have to fix the personal life to fix their game. I that that's a fair assessment. I I hate to say this Craig is right. All that pain is me. Put it me to say. But it on a look so interesting is that the sport itself is not is incredibly important for the marketing, and sort of what the visual language of the movie will be, but it's probably not very important for what the actual story will be at the sport rarely has a very direct connection to which the characters journey is the unique thing about that sport is probably not a big factor. I guess whether it's an individual sport for team sport. That's a big factor. But you know, it can't rely on the sport. Right. Somebody who doesn't know anything about the sport. Ideally would be able to absolutely which means generally teach them the rules of the sport in one of the stock characters in these movies is somebody that doesn't know the sport. So they're the people that are asking questions or just looking around going. Well, none of this matters. But that personal matters. Yes. So looking at the biggest Trajan doing it now versus doing it. Then one of the things as we list these movies is they're almost all male characters driving this. And so the next question. So I think honestly senators around a female character is gonna probably be. Best way in whether the whole team is women, or it's unusual for women to be in that sport, something about a female athlete. Feels more promising is that going to alienate the men as well, aren't you? Are you trying to make a four quadrant move? That's a great question. I mean, I think we always used to think about big screen comedies into be not four quieter than sort of broadly successful. But if you're making it for not for a big screen booby. Maybe it's even better that it's not kind of for everyone leaves their own was pretty much for quantum? Yeah. Without question this list. Yeah. Image for Tom Hanks is a yes, he's part of a hugely important character in the movie quite wisely. Not the dominant. Characterize also movie director by woman it is. And so you can obviously if you're if you're centering your new sports comedy on. Let's say a females Mike bend it like Beckham, which is a female sports comedy, which I think a lot of male footie fans enjoyed you will have male characters. But the the fascinating thing about this list to me is is how white it is. I mean, super wise sports are one of the areas in American culture where people have colored dominate in terms of numbers. They're they're far over represented and yet in this list. They're almost nowhere with the exception of white men. Can't jump there kind. I mean, it's crazy now that I'm looking at it pretty white. I'm racking my brain. It's it's kind of nuts. I mean, and and you and if you keep going you'll see it more and more and more you'll see it a lot. A baseball movies. Take place in the distant past when? Roy Hobbs out there in the natural. It's sort of like. They all the the the nine white guys. You know, I mean and dodge ball is is just sort of lily white. I mean, it's not lily white. That's not true. But Chris it, but but still it's it's it's these are largely white casts, and it seems like they're largely for white guys. So I think we're talking sort of women non white characters centering also, you know. Is a chance to be this sport. You're picking his not a sport that is currently popular in the US. So if you were to make an American cricket movie about a cricket team that it's sort of like you down that was party, absolutely overcomes. Like, they don't know what crooked is sort of. Right. That that aspect? So that's like the it's kind of like the what's the Jamaican bobsledding team cool running running so Americans try and go to cricket. But there are basically in India-Pakistan getting there s Adam sandlers working on this movie is yes, he's where. But now, so when you're when you're pinpointing these about women and diversity are you suggesting the way to make an outlier or to get it made? Because I have to imagine I'd go get it made on that one for me because I actually feel like I mean, it's not that you can't make a movie like this again in the same mould, but it will be in the same mould. There's something so familiar about it. And it's of course, and this list, barely even scrapes. The surface of what there is. So it seems like something new would be great in some way or another new is good. And I think in this category. So the bad news bears. But well, I mean, they tried to remake it, but they tried to remake it. They did they remade it. They they remade it. And then they remade it kind of in the same mould. But with none of the things you do. Well, that's the thing so fear it of it. This is one of those interesting areas where over time we've gotten less permissive, you could not make the actual bad. News bears was rated R. There was alcohol. There was smoking. There was racism, and they were children the that's not doable now in any way, shape or form. No because it Inouye reflected reality movies have to reflect reality sold on some let's wheel the soapbox in didn't use. No, no, hold on. What I read. This is what I got the this. But here's what I'll say, I feel like a sports comedy is still a movie, and it's more of a movie than it is a TV show. Yeah. In a series because I feel like a game of sport. Whatever sport you wanna pick. Yeah. I knew you're gonna laugh at a game sport you remember? There was a TV show your. Remember ball four. I do not remember about about based on what's his name. Jim Bowden's book about his book lasted for about. Yeah. Seven episodes. Yeah. Turns out that in sports. There is this built in ticking clock. Yeah. You're gonna win or not. I mean, there's a big game in the beginning. There's a big game at the end. There's big fight in the beginning. This big fight at the end. It's kinda like and Friday night lights is isn't exception. But it's not a comedy. It's on drama that Senator around football family life is about and the culture the culture and its high school. Oh, and it's, but it started as a movie started his. Next category ensemble drama days. So we used to make things like cinemas fire the big chill breakfast club. Wow. Fish terms of endearment. We used to make things that had big tasks, whereas a bunch of folks came together where characters did grow and change. But it was an unstoppable, it wasn't sort of one. Character story is that a thing we're going to be making on the big screen sooner. Or we'll start with what is the essence of that kind of start. What is the essence of an ensemble drama de? Let's make mcquarry ticket shot that one. It seems to me as I'm running through the list that you just nostalgia is a big part of it. I mean, it's my understanding that somebody did a breakdown of why people go to see movies, and the number one reason was to have a nostalgic experience an emotional nostalgic experience. I think that probably plays into sports as well. Especially plays into why a lot of sports movies seemed to go back in time act that the that at and you look at the big chill, the big chill is very much a nostalgic movie. It's a reunion of friends who has sought predator, right? Saito most fire while it wasn't an aesthetic movie. They were at a specific turning point in their life. That would come back to me. That's it. It's we have a group of people that represent some kind of contemporary arrangement. Whether we're catching them later, or they were contemporary or in their contemporary us like for instance, the breakfast club. But they are any moment where things are changing. And we watch that happen. That to me is the essence of these things. But the love of God, I cannot imagine anyone putting this on a screen anymore. It just doesn't seem like they will so bummer. That's challenging. I mean on a big screen. I think you can't stand these four streaming no question. But it is in so many ways though, the one hour series have taken even a short series of sort of taking the place of these where you can see those characters groceries this, and yeah, this is this is. As a family and interestingly, Dan, Fogelman, tried to movie sort of tried to do it as you tried. This is us as a movie and it didn't connect with audiences. But he's obviously incredibly good at it. Because tens of millions of people watch. This is us in doubt. It's all these awards. There is something. I don't know we used to be able to go and watch the sun. Maybe it's just that we used to expect less, you know, we would go to the movie theater, and we weren't asking to have our brains blown out the back of our skulls. I I went to see Hiller high water. Oh, which is fantastic. And which I loved and I was talking to Tim Talbot. Shortly thereafter, and you see how would I what I said. Yes. Which think about it? And he goes that was a great movie in nineteen eighty seven that would have been a good movie. And but he's right in that that sort of stuff I remember going to the movies every weekend. I did not. It was not an event right now. When when you ask when you ask anybody under the age of twenty five why they go to the movies, right? They they will say in one form or another because I have to go. They want to be part of a discussion. Right. I I tried to get to see avengers which I finally saw yesterday as quickly as I could because I was tired of right to self imposed media bubble. There were things that movie. I really didn't want ruined getting to that state. Whereas the stories that we're talking about what television does. So. Well, now, especially is there is a collective history. If you try to tune into game of thrones. Now, you don't understand it wouldn't the number of people who were saying three years in a madman gun. Yeah. I tried to get into that show. And I just couldn't flick, of course, not return middle of season three. None of this makes aren't at the beginning. That's true. But I do think that one of the the problems for like, I remember going to see Saint almost fire, and my expectation was that I was gonna see a group of people that were somewhat older than me. Dealing with problems. And I knew at some point somebody was going to like do I think Rob Lowe is going to light a torch on fire with some hair, spray or something and to me more was in a corner super dramatic. And and I thought okay, I'm gonna see some sort of human drama. Nobody would that would not do it anymore. Now, people go to the movie theater. It's like well. This is going to pin me back, and it's gonna blow my mind, and I'm gonna see stuff, and it's going to be an event and event an event, I just think people go to the movies for different reasons. But don't you think also what you can get from television is very different than what we can go television. Absolutely, no question. You could not make game of thrones. As feature film, any of the content game of thrones. Right. Would be NC seventeen nor could you have made it for television prior to this kind of strange change. Yes. You know, it is it's the it's the networks that as soon as basic cable met the British model. Of television, which wrench model you make a good television show when it stops being good. You've when it reaches the end, you stop isn't that. Nice. Yes. No this. This is gonna be accepts oath long great yet or six episodes this season instead of twenty two every season. Which is why I take my hat off to people like to cast who are still doing it not just on one show. But multiple shows. I mean, the amount of story that has to be generated by those guys is bananas. Yeah. But yes, the the format has become not just flexible, but there is no format. It doesn't matter. Yeah. Let's get back to movies. All right next. Let's say the legal thriller or the courtroom thriller momentous things together. So obviously, we have all the John Grisham based ones. The pelican brief the firm client a time to kill the rainmaker. If Michael Clayton, we have primal fear of primal fear presumed innocent disclosure, a few good men in the verdict. The verdict. How often do you all title in twelve angry men? Yes. The or courtroom drama, twelve angry men and. And Justice for all and Justice for all we can probably go on. Yes. I think we asked what is the essence of these kind of thrillers? So traditionally, I think you have an authority figure who's generally the prosecutor or could be working for the defense who is very smart at the law who has to intercede in specific situation. The generally did commit the situation there. They're to solve a problem in trying to solve the problem. They uncover something remarkable that puts themselves either in moral jeopardy or literal jeopardy. We don't make these we haven't made them for awhile. No, well, if you were talking it when we retired about twelve hundred men in the verdict. Those lumet movies twelve angry men is morality tale sort of study of and it feels like apply and yes, very much touched by the verdict is a redemptions. The verdict is in a lotta ways a boxing movie. It's the the Paluku who gets who comes back for an I think that that's that's a good distinction. Because some of these. Like a few good men. Also feels like a boxing movie where basically a guy whose dad was a great boxer and who's decided to throw fights. Instead for living is going to come back and take on the all time champ. Yes. And and go down dying. If he has to there are those. And then there are these movies that are they turn on grand questions of Justice. What is Justice that's injustice for all just for all or? What's a time to kill very much like that? Yeah. So those are two different. I mean, they always have fireworks. They always have the certain venues that we know. And there is a verdict that is like a little bit like the game in the sports movies verdict actually ended without the without the verdict ordering. But here's a distinction is that like like a sports movie, they want to be a single movie because it's not a thing that could continue well over time. And so like burder one was attempted to take one Kelly sink over the course of whole season. It just didn't work. It could wanted to be part of one thing. They don't wanna mystery now to last that long. It's it's, you know, first of all struggling television. They they referred to it for years as the twin peaks problem, you can only lose audience couldn't gain on this. And that moving when that show was on unless you videotaped it. Yes. You couldn't go. You couldn't catch up on Netflix couldn't bit exactly. And there was something fascinating about that. To think about it. Now. Television actually just spilled out into the universe. And that was it, and you either caught it with your hands or you missed it on the floor. Yes. It comes back to urgency. The urgency how and why one watches a television show or or a movie as very different I think people should write a legal thriller. I mean, I feel like the kind of movie that you could still imagine making today where I mean, what do you need to make a great deal thriller? So you need you need a star. I feel like it's actually a star vehicle that person who cast as the central lawyer is great. You look at you know, I think you could make primal fear at any point where you have also have a great supporting care, if you thriller in like that and jetted off course. Oh, yes. And if you watch it recently. Yeah, it's amazing. I've been going back and watching the it's also the innocent. Yes. And the other one I went back and watched recently, which was fascinating artifact is artifact place against. Oh, yeah. We're gonna get to sexual era. Thrillers. Do all right. Good. I think I think that there is some space for it. The problem is it is the most trod upon ground because we have four thousand episodes of law and order, and it will stop neither. We'll see us. I now will NCIS the the that arena as the courtroom procedural aspects of it have been just beaten to death. So the question is how can you do it? I think like it could go back all the way to twelve angry men and not yet have idea. If you ask what they all have in common as I'm sitting here. I'm internal is the the discovery. Yeah. There is some reveal there is there is a hidden secret to sort of turns the case those are hard to do. What's the the the Dershowitz one with classroom Bulow close? The reversal of fortune now one shook sunny, yes, that's my friend that what I love about. That is the reversal is the last line the reversal is the last line in the movie, you have no idea. And then weirdly, Alan Dershowitz has had his own fascinating reversal that. That's not that's for other podcasts. Absolutely. I think we can make a legal thriller. So did you make illegal thriller for the big screen, maybe and I really good legal thriller. You could also be an awards contender the same way that the post was journalism thriller. That's got. Got it has to be asked to be specifically crafted for the kademi awards. I would think you'd need to huge stars. I can see about who those huge stars are street. But regardless of our John of our narrow street versus Denzel Washington to lawyers going head to head over something that is actually legitimately relevant to our society. Now. Well, you'd be going after you'd be talking about abortion gun control, really hot topic issues, please tally at least pre-taliban and the trick of that making that movie is making a movie that is for both halves of the audience, not one. Now, I don't know the central issue. I don't need needed a marquee issue. So it was about sort of corporate control. Because. Yeah. Because you wanna thriller you still want to throw. The truth is the thing at the heart of a few good men is not a hot button issue. There's an interesting theme to it crew. But it isn't a hot button issue, and maybe actually be better without one. Maybe I just want to people, you know, and also talk Tom Cruise Tom Cruise can. Well, he's done. It though is that I can do it again. I think well, I would love to see Tom do aversion verdict. I'd love to see him do the broken down. You know, he's it's his Jerry Maguire is his addict German, we talk German guar forever and began I got huge love for that script. Talk about a weird. What's the pitch to Jerry? Maguire wanna make a movie about a sports agent is having an emotional crisis. I the on my pitch for German guar is imagine a man whose life is deeply flawed who has a moment of clarity where he describes exactly who should be. And that's the beginning of the movie. And then the entire movie is him trying to become that guy. But would you have picked a sports agent. No. But that's fun. That's what I mean. It's such a they are not works. There's scumbags. Well, that that helps yet finding a scumbag econo- job like sports agent. I don't know any sports agency. They're just blanket called them all comeback. But sorry, it's the whole agent to we go to the erotic thrillers. Fatal attraction basic status thriller need. What's the central elements of an erotic? I believe boobs are high on the list as color of night killing me, softly, American gigolo, gone girl. I would say it's an Rana thriller has aspects of that. Thriller. There's a sexual aspect to it gets an erotic as your Roddick through moronic pulpy in the way that we sort of you wanted to run it through to be. Yes. Yes. Yes. So sea of love. Nice. Nice poll. I got to go back and watch that one good so running tillers at the time, it was sexual content on screen that you just couldn't see other places. You certainly couldn't see it on TV. And now, you can't see it anywhere eaters. And there's nothing, but on television true, you can see it on your phone. It should be a list of myth fright website that has a list of perfectly reasonable civil Google searches. That will absolutely blow your mind with the images that come up. I just feel like old people are always, you know, like, there's there's no parental controls are like, I'm just searching for something normal. Yeah. And then look what just came up. Yes. Yeah. So what does thing which is an erotic thriller from just poem for porn or from just or from things that have sexual obsession obsession are factual obsession. So jagged edge, you the it's the it's the forbidden nature of the sexual relationship. There is an inappropriate boundary. That's being crossed. There is Michael Douglas is investigating Sharon Stone. So he should not be having sex with Sharon Stone, and Glenn Close is representing jeopardy. So she should not be having sex with. No, we left off. This list, though is fifty shades of grey, which really would fit underneath this general categories, those romance. But I mean, he actually has thriller elements. Okay. There's there's bad people doing bad stuff in a to her life is in danger. So so I think it would onto this general category. So clearly is our market for making that kind of movie, we just don't make it. Yeah. I mean, look this this kind of old school classic nineties or early nineties late eighties Roddick thrillers. Were weirdly in their own way, puritan Nistiuk because they would basically reinforce that transgressive sexual behavior would automatically lead to blood on the floor. It's all basically a lesson in staying monogamous and don't get out of your lane. And don't give into temptation and people who were overtly sexual are equated with evil, and you see come up over and over and over. I if there's any reason why we don't make these now beyond the obvious, which is that kind of market for them. It's probably that are sexual mores have kind of come further than anything else. Can I point out one common thread, there are these these erotic thrillers that are starring men as the protagonist and erotic thrillers? They're starting starring women is the protagonist. Yes. The ones starring men. The men are kind of bastards there if fatal attraction Michael Douglas is sort of perfect in that role. You have. A character who is violating the audiences trust. Yes. Julian has Tom Hanks was fatal attraction and made the decision that quickly to have sex with Glenn Close, you'd be like, what's Tom. Whereas Michael Douglas. You kinda believed it a little lizard. Yes. An I'm looking at Richard Gere who next career loved playing an abrasive bastard. There was almost something where he was in tag ising, the audience cruel intentions, Ryan Philipe in that movie is playing a version of Valmont tennis enjoying being a bastard out Pacino and sea of love he's that. That's like the verdict meets erotic thriller drunken messed up cop and an element that I'm seeing in. This is the casting in the writing of the male character there, they all seem to end, by the way Douglas comes back in Basic Instinct, it a little bit of it seems to be the audience enjoying watching this guy. Get his come up for having broken rules. Right. And morale has thing the right actor in. Morality play is. But they also in some way start to turn these men into passive movers. Right because these women come along and tempt them and turn their heads and confuse them. And you know, it's a little I don't know. I just think it's all there was nothing confused in Michael Douglas's performance in fatal attraction, they're out having a drink after having had a war and he makes a decision. Yes. In Chania sleep does. But then the movie basically says okay fine that happened. But look how crazy she is. No, have you watched it recently. No, go back and watch arm. It's really there's the whole thing that she's pregnant, and he all he's trying to do is shut it down. Right. She's definitely got issues. She won't be Lord. But Michael Douglas is not he handles it. The way a panicking male would not the way the hero of a movie would other great thing about that movie is in Archer Archer is this. Do remember her being like she was the ideal? Yes. And for Glenn Close, it's kind that's kind of an unconventional role for Glenn Close. Ed. It's interesting that she is in almost back tobacco thrillers. If you go back and watch look at the look at those two movies, which shot within a few years of each other. And by the way, the natural was right in there to see look at Glenn Close rights re this like luminous angel. She's yes, she's kind of she's the Madonna. Yes. She was this tough lawyer who literally corrupt kind of compromise making us, and then playing that woman in the traction sort of on. Yeah. J- mentally has erotic thriller is a big win closest pretty pretty good at her job. I mean, I mean, I can all agree on those were probably in the next Arado throat. I don't think we're we're going to be seeing the likes of those. I commissioned gonna head to something that, you know, especially well, spoofs and parodies spoofs and parodies, though, some parodies fluids like airplanes baseball. It's not another teen movie scary movie series. He has McGrew epoch. Episodes astronaut superhero movie tropic, thunder, Shaun of the dead vampires suck Austin powers blazing saddles a we're not making many of these movies. Now, I have a theory why? But I'm curious what your theory is by. We don't make these movies as David Zucker would repeatedly say spoof is dead. And he his thing was that he would say spoof is dead. He said it before spooked came back. Spoof was dead. I remember Jim Abrams saying that he was a mixing. He was mixing mafia Jane Austen movie, Jane Austen's, mafia, Jane Austen's, and he walked down the hall where they were mixing on another mixing stage. They were mixing there's something about Mary. And he just sort of watched a few minutes of it. And then went back and said, yeah, we're fucked. It was our art. Our time is over and it was over. And then the Wayne's brothers. Brought it back with scary movie. But following the success of scary movie and two and three and four. There was this sudden, suddenly they were everywhere. And they were all there were just a lot. The marketplace was flooded with a lot of cheap stuff. And honestly as one of the people that wrote scary movie three and four. I mean, the pressure that we were under from the Weinstein's to make those movies as quickly as possible was brutal. And we couldn't do them as well as we wanted to do them, and we did them with David Sukkur, and Pat proft and may rooms so by the time all that unraveled. It was mostly I think killed at the moment by just the marketplace being flooded. But also, you got the sense pretty quickly that the internet was essentially mooting the entire point of this guy. Now is my joke. I mean, it used we like, okay, you want to make fun of this movie. Well for five nights from now is going to do the joke. Well, now, they're doing the jokes while they're watching things there is no there's no more time. It's very trace over. Yeah. It's over everything is had the internet is down. Internet is essentially machine. There's no way the movie quick enough to to do it and even on YouTube. They can do the the crappy effects version of that joke anyway. So, but is blazing saddles is on this list. Yes, it is a spoof. But it's a spoof with a higher purpose. So it's not a spoof anyone movie, it's a spoof of sort of undertaking, John kitchen. And so I think you can still do Shauna. The job is is a great example of like taking the Johner conventions and up ending them in in a way. That's that's well, that's a mash up. Yeah. And graphic. It's still I would say really hard. Now. I mean airplane was a direct spoof of a movie called zero hour from nineteen fifty six or something and ninety five which scene that was sort of the oddity of of airplane that they just did this random thing. But somewhere along the line spoofs became connected to either genres as a whole or when it got really bad, pop culture. And that's when it just all to me. Yeah. Absolutely fell apart. There's. Room for somebody to make a spoof of some weird movie that has been forgotten, but an Austin powers is taking shots at movies along with bond, Matt helm Yana and some really flimsy here in like Flint the Butte that the little when the phone rings that's directly taken some in lake floods. You look at the ones of these that we feel like you've could still make is that this films actually have individualized characters who sort of haven't Arkan have appointed view, and the movie doesn't exist to just make fun of the movie that came before I like the character is existing within world and sort of is consistent within worlds. Austin powers is a spoof of another kind of character. But it's also character himself, Dr a character himself, so this and it's time travel comet. Yeah, they both. They both are at least two of the three are the people that kinda come the closest now to doing spoof and parody in their own ways. Chris Miller Lord Miller in a weird way to I mean, LEGO has certain spoof. Aspects to it. They're Spiderman also has aspects. Like, it's it's a an awareness of where this is fitting inside the culture, it's their their jump street movies are Powell jump street. I mean, they're like, it's a self spoof. Self spoof. And but it it's different. It's not like I mean, thank God, by the way, because honestly, nothing is harder than writing those things. I will never work harder in my life than I did writing scary movie. Three in scary movie four it was just it's one of the reasons. Chernobyl's not as fun it. Yeah. No. I know that took all the all the jokes on let's say the jokes out of biblical epics and or sword and sandals movies. Oh, so things like gladiator. Ben heard Noah passionate writing heaven Spartak his ten commandments Braveheart to some degree while Lawrence of Arabia. Like, we used to make these that was actually a staple of original. Hollywood is no we have the giant ranches here because we used to make these these epochs giant movies giant movies. We don't make them anymore. And so here's the thing. I don't win awards anymore. They don't awards anymore. Even though game of thrones being shown on smaller screens is that kind of stored in Santa writing. And so when we're making them, but we're just making us more team small screen. No question. But is TV I have a very large television not terribly expensive. Imagine a lot of people. Well, their credit cards, a large TV. You're you're comparing your large TV too. The TV you grew up with which was like the TV. I grew up with. Yes, we bet nine inch black and white thing in the kitchen with the with the single intentive letterbox, correct? But my kids only know those TV's, but those TV's are still not. Yeah. I mean, they're not movies. No, it's not a movie screen. No. But most people the way their viewing habits are now. We're making a mission impossible. We have an AmEx segmented it. Yep. And people are saying, well, why don't you just shoot the whole thing? And I max because no one's going to watch. It's never going to be seen again. It's this weird. You're making this balance in there are times all be framing shot and crows walk up to me and go, you know, when this is on the big screen, and I pull my phone out of my pocket, knowing your screen Nuff, not not that. It's not that it will only. Be watched on television. But for the life of the film for the life of prime minister, life's theatrical lifespan of a movie is twelve weeks. Whoa. Twelve what is this hit movie? You got talking like, but I mean, the Taibbi. It's in eighth theaters. Yes, I'm giving like I'm giving a really innovative. It's four weeks is what it is. They used to be months. Yes. It is now about four weeks. So what what is the essence of these biblical up ex were talking about so ever talking about a gladiator, Ben her it is a character in a long ago time, generally a Roman time who is coming up against thority system. He is leading. It's almost always it's always a he these movies is leading. It's a crush figur- against room trying to figure out what it is every single time. Christ figure against Rome doesn't matter. What you do? It's Rome or not. Rave art is. That's what ten commandments is. That's even when it's jus it's still it's the Christ figure gets Rome. Somebody's going to some hero will rise in any kind of faded destiny way out usually out of nothing and they have special powers special abilities. They are spat on tortured hurt their families killed. They are persecuted. And ultimately, they do some incredibly self-sacrificial thing. And the world is saved. And the last scene is people sitting around going God, he was less to man. He was a great, man. It's always a man. And it's always a man patriarch. As a matter of fact, there's a biblical epic with a woman Mary Magdalene is coming. Yes. Really Rooney Montinaro plays. It wasn't there. Already one of those that like, Mario bones company. Did didn't he do? Oh, I thought he didn't own it at art. Maybe that we're talking to the same. No. No. No. Yes. I saw trailer. Joaquin Phoenix is Jesus. Oh, yeah. So I'm down that is an interesting Jesus. Yeah. So I guess that's the question is is this hype of movie really about the setting or is it 'bout specifically that sort of Jesus against Rome kind of thing because even Braveheart you could look as Jesus against Rome just directly yet. And so, yeah, it's the same concept. No, pension, which what degree do they need to be big screen movies. I are in a weird way to defend time. So time and distance time when you wanna talk epoch scale Lawrence of Arabia is and giant events, but isn't a miniseries a better suited up for this kind of epic storytelling. I think it could have been kind of a fluke that the only thing we had were movies. And so we had to channel the ten commandments at very long movie, very long. I mean, the better horn for him would have been you know, as a series with you. I think that there is these things will generally work better live better series. It's probably where they're generally going to happen. But one of the few segments of audience that still reliable goes to movies are faith-based audience. Yes. And I'm not a faith-based person. I don't even really know what faith is the definition. I've just never felt it before. But regardless they will go to these things. And so you have this other weird segment of movie where every now, and then you look at like on deadline, the top five moves we can number four is wait what the what it's a prayer for for Jimmy. And what what is why they made that last make offend her. No, yes. Yes. Direct calculated aimed, you know, it was it was very much targeted at that. At that group. I mean, nothing. Passionate the Christ caught everybody. Yes, nobody expected and that was kind of the thing. And remember came at a weird time of years. Ask January January was a coal. That's a place where movies went to die on your February. Yes. By the way. Is there any month? Now, we're movies go to die. I don't think there is. Yes. Back to school week. That's the first week. Still somebody's going to do it. But that is actually great idea for just a a movie is week. Let's go see every month. One horrible movie all the junkets dumped. Yes. All right. Let's be wrap up with buddy cop, which was a frequent suggestion money. The money. Movies. Twenty one jump street. The other guys hot fuzz the heat bad boy's been black canine lethal weapon white chicks, Shanghai noon. That idea that you have to miss Nash people who often work together to solve a crime or just to do things. It's a classic paradigm Abbott and Costello we've always seen these to die at go through things. But we're not doing a lot of them now. So what's well? I think the too fast too furious. I give Derek has credit for that end. Let's also say RIP, John singleton, the director two thousand fears, but the fast and furious franchise is kind of a buddy cop writ large, a true with anger cross country is coming out with. Yeah. I think they still do these. I don't know that that's a comedy. Well, but he's got the Central Intelligence is better cop movie. That's right. Yep. That's buddy cop. And there was just one. There was just a movie. Listener moved Regina hall just out. And I think that they keep making the the Sandra Bullock. Oh, the geniality. Oh, that's way back. But then there's the handicap the heat most McCarthy in center. Yeah. I think they still make buddy cop movies. I think we made it to step away from the idea that of cop. So in response to people who are passed it in a professional job doing some kind of polic- thing with guns and a couple of gun with guns. That's pretty much what it is wheels down, and they they become each other's family. And so yes as long as you can make them for the big screen that you have to have a certain production value of certain size to the screen. They are weirdly don't see as many of them in TV shows any more. So I guess right now on the air. We have macgyver. We have magnum PI, which is top shows on TV are definitely more drawn seasonals. Well, because the essence of the buddy cop is that. They don't start his buddies in the end up his buddies. But. You can't end up as anything on a serialized show. You have to keep going. So it kind of has to be a movie. Yes. A lot of this conversation seems to be about how technology has disrupted. What we imagined that plaintiffs have been made there seems to be a really clear shift and just wait from no home-video to home video to home video again. Now, it's a theater now. It's home, it's content. That's where I think the line is boring. It's big screen small screen than the amount. That's available. Now is is and the resources that are being poured into it. I mean, better or worse. However, you wanna chop up the money. There was just way less money. I mean there were five studios and gave you some money in there were three networks, and they give you some money. But now, we've got just billions and billions rushing into make more and more stuff it is transforming things. And, but there aren't that many more screens fact, it'd probably argue there fewer screens in there used to be well does up more time there. There's not much time for people to view thing. So even though we have new people coming in and new distribution outlets. We have new money chasing new things time is a flat circle. Yes. And so we don't have the ability to watch more things swift choice. I'm looking at the two I skipped over some things. Or is this your John or there you want to catch? Let's talk about westerns westerns on this show. We've talked about unforgiven we've talked about three ten Huma. We've talked about sir westerns. But what is it about westerns that you think can be suited towards the big screen because also had Scott Franken talked about his grape defec- show. Yes. Godless, which was sort of exploding normal amend to be a movie we struggled with for years. Right. Trying to get it down to something movie size. And well, he does it with all his movies. But he was all I mean, look, it was movie size is just what he was struggling was to get somebody to pay for it as a movie because essentially people kept saying while the westerns dead, the western side, the westerns, and it which is the World War Two movies. Did you hear about this all the time in the number of times? I've seen a de John. Everything's dead until it's not done. Kirk was a really great example of a dead drowned or that people don't get to see my favorite example is nothing could have been a debtor genre than pirates movies. Yes. Movies. Hiring. Yes, god. But we had like by before they made pirates of the Caribbean. We had cutthroat island which had sank in entire like a head on. Carolco entire company was before careers careers Renny Harlin, and then an and the thought of making a pirates movie was considered almost obscene. Yes. And then I just then there was that. It didn't start a new genre. They weren't like other pirates news coming after that. It was just exact only the one pirate movie everybody. Let him have it. We're still having. We're still not making movies. Well, and and it's so specifically hinges around it kind of storytelling at a character on brand. Yeah. Brand I mean, just build it was also supernatural so that you have natural kind of vibe different stuff, but the western unforgiven represented a shift towards deconstructionist's from which the John Ryan never seemed like every three ten to Yuma was tone darker, western godless was what I miss what I'd love to see. She is Shane the magnificent seven, Shane Silverado the big country, you know, movies that they're more of an adventure and more of a morality tale as opposed to. I west you never going to happen. It's gone. It's over I think there's the the I will fight you. Well, look, I think as a country in the culture, we have lost the ability to go back to the kind of idealized west. We just know too much. I don't think it's idealized. I think you look at the big country. It's not idealized that the country is rough. But a man walks into it who refuses to play by those rules. And I think that if you take westerns there are two kinds. There's they're kind of western new ours where the west just choose you up and spits you out, and there's the place where one can prove oneself. Sure. And that's it's the it's it's this rough and lawless place where somebody, you know, maybe a book would do it a book my Jewett? I mean, I think it comes back to this had almost days with what is that? You know, we used to go to see those movies that didn't have a lot of high stakes in the because that was fine. Like, we did go see a movie. The hell else where you're going to do on a Saturday. And so is wonder that this non deconstructed western that it's just truly a western whether it's ashen and get people to go out to see it on a screen or daughter wanted to temporary. But it's a western told his type robbing the pickup truck western I loved it for what it was able to do. But that was not a breakout smash hit. It was a good performance. But it was not picketed. Okay. Financially nominated for best picture did absolute which is for movies of that size is kind of at your lifeblood to keep it in the theaters for John John Lee, Hancock kind of made a a western in a sense with the door. But again Netflix. I mean, it's and that's where John Li lives. Now, you know like he's made those movies. These can be making now because and here's a guy who made I don't know fourteen billion dollars for Warner Brothers and outcome with blindside which was an today. I don't think they make the blindside for for theatrical. That's that's what's happened. I just I fear that we have lost something. Kind of permanently in the economics of of making these moves in and may have made literally just come down to the cost of marketing because that's everything. Right. I mean, Netflix the way they market their movies. They don't it's just they're not Netflix. They're like, hey, do you wanna watch this Iraq absolute by every billboard in Los Angeles. But that's just for us. Here's the upside to that. Here's the less than dystopia way of looking at okay in the current culture, where the business is suddenly waking up to the fact that they have to diversify. This is something I experienced a lot on the movies that I get called in to come in who fix us on the the business was predicated on a male director makes a five million dollar movie that makes fifty million dollars. Let's give him two hundred million dollars in hopes that makes billion women were not afforded those same undeserved opportunities. Correct, which they are now and we're punished Andhra punished. Exactly if he didn't do the impossible where. As the way to look at Netflix is Netflix could be the farm system. Now, there's many more. Yes. Movies being made for lower budgets, creating an icy. Lots of women directing television now way Marla to the the director lists that are now being handed for the TV shows on working on our fifty fifty and you're actually looking at oh that person is being hired for the quality of their work in an which is very encouraging that is it possible that what we end up with his the, you know, how the Oscars have sort of divided into. Yes, there's Oscar movies in there's money making now could there be there's Netflix movies, and there's feature films and the feature films because of marketing requirements need to be bigger movies that make more money, and the Netflix becomes the farm system that teaches people how to do stuff you can you could make you could live within the next. Flick's bubble and make a fourteen twenty five at a sixty million dollar movie. I think we're there. That's where we are. Yeah. The the real question is is there any kind of not only while questionable. One is their mobility from net. Flicks type of movies or other TV movies to the big ones or due to be even wanna go. Because here's the thing. I think a lot of filmmakers, don't, you know, we were talking to Mari Heller about this Emaar made this incredible movie diary of teenage girls, amazing and people came to her in. They're like, here's this huge superhero movie. You wanna do it? And she was like, I feel like I'm supposed to because you know, we're trying to advance the cause of female directors, and we're trying to get into those big seats. I don't want to I want to do this. There's no point in making it if you look at you look at her in that dilemma knowing that having nothing to do with who's directing the movie how those movies get made scripts not ready. Movie is going in three week -rupt. You've never done anything like the is kind of in charge of the producer whose name is on a bunch of giant movies will not be there. And this is all going to be your fault. It is really want to do her fine. Correct. And I see and again, it takes a special kind of director. Yes. To get into that kind of trouble. And then accept the help when they bring it in right because you are essentially now, it's very embarrassing. You're at a point where you're in way over your head. You were an and not because this is not hubris their promised support. And then it's just not there. And so now, suddenly, you lose control of your movie, and you're being held by it takes a lot having never been through the process to know that it's all gonna be okay. At the in the end when the movie works, you'll still get credit. That's a lot to have faith in her. It's very wounding. Yeah. So I can see somebody looking at that and saying, no. But there's the other side of that is the grass is always greener. You're going to have people making big giant movies? Michael bay made painting gain because he really wanted to make. Yes, Michael bay some part of Michael bay. I don't care any any filmmaker you can name at that level. Some part of them wants to make their little will be about their their podium. Voting make your podium and the same thing. I would imagine is just you know, the the duffer brothers have some big feature. They wanna guess move as they got some big ass. You know, I get of brothers are a great example because stranger things had an effect on popular culture, which was terrific, you know, it because it was a really popular series. But if that had just been a one off movie, I don't think it would have had that effect on popular culture the way that Noah movie that's released on big screens. Could Ashley bend cultural window hendricken? Ben kung have proof of that. Because even though I admired it super eight is stranger things it is. And it just doesn't work as a movie the way stranger things weren't says a series. And that was a case where Abrahams wanted to make the smaller the. Well, what do you say we we wrap this up by heading into one cool thing Craig thing this week do have one cool thing. I hope for you. I will one call him to cool things. Well, it's called one cool thing Chris Klein with the four hundred to one of my cool things in the other cool thing. Okay. They they may neither of them. Maybe they're nested hanger. Who's my one thing this week is a recommendation from a grand crossword nerd trip pain, and it is an app called one clue crossword very clever, so you get a little it looks like vaguely across where it's not like a proper crossword? But there are no clues except for a picture and all the answers or things that are contained in that photo. Come on, you gotta figure out. What goes where in the interlocking genius starts off easy gets harder and harder nearby, by the way to everyone listening. This is the guy who does the New York Times crossword puzzle in two and a half minutes on every Monday. Yes. You are like Mr. crossword Notre pain. Could this dude literally was once the actual champion of all cross? He's amazing. But there's a whole issue and Megan Amraam, David Kwong Johnson, Christina. I like I was a fly on the wall. Watching you guys looking at my time. I can't type that now. I try to I can't if you gave me all the answers. I couldn't fill it in. If you were standing over my shoulder going just type this. I couldn't I couldn't do the Wednesday in two minutes. There was a great one of the great great crossword constructors while times Henry hook. He would make crosswords for the Boston Globe. I think and he was notoriously fast and one guy. Wants raced him with a crossword except the the twist was that the guy had written the crossword it was his cross Hugh loss. That's amazing. So don't you think there is some sort of physical hand? I come on. There's you'd get faster as you got. What say I. Well, I definitely because you're able to track it on the app. Yep. My times of improved, but I've hit a wall. There's no, yeah. I started too late, man. That's the problem. I gotta get any kid Russ steak. Right. Have done it. So I won't go thing. This winter. I had a cold inside my humidifier out humidifier worked. Great. And I found that I was still using the humidifier because I kind of liked the noise it may just like white noise. I'd always. But like, I don't need to be having to stay out my room and this fans spinning so I ended up finding a really good white noise machine. I went onto wire cutter pit their best white noise machine and your what they were right. It's a really good little white noise machine. It's called the electro fan high fidelity, white noise. Sound machine forty six bucks on Amazon? It's a small little hockey puck the mix really did sound. And the thing I learned is that some of these machines. They just have a sample that they're playing a sample. This one. Generated algorithmic late. So always completely random important because I use a use an app. Chat is a is on a loop. Yeah. And what will happen is if you're having a bad night here the loop you start hearing the loop. And now you're now you're apt. That's that's gotta be like delirium yet. No, it's super bad oracle. Yeah. Do you have trouble sleeping, not the way? I used to not the way I used to as I get older. I find it. Actually, I'm looking forward to going to sleep read it and now my with ninety eight to give up. Get to quit on life. And just unplug. I never realized that insomnia was just refusing to buy renter. Not for me in new was always just like to not die. In your sleep. And usually, what are your nested cool things might mystical things are I brought this computer bag. Back. It is a black. It's made by a company called banks conc-, there's one stretchers actually too. But this you can undo the tuck it in and it becomes a look brief like briefcase an usually the two in one kind of thing really turns me off. This is great internal all of its many pockets that had have my favorite one being this rather large pocket at the bottom or or well, it comes the case itself comes with a hard shell c- can store all of your cables. A hero. I took it out. And this is where I put my toiletries when I travel because you have to take all of your pull out that stupid clear bag. Yes. And this bag just please you right through security at great. You know, what it's a great back there. There's a topic by the way, traveling for writers that we're gonna have to cover when it goes God knows enough this. Oh, yes. And I got I got I got travel wired up. Yeah. Much better because I've done all the book tours. And so right, exactly. You just told this from this? So what does this you had a battery? This is not a battery. This is a laptop stand. Oh, because I writing flat on a desk when I travel, it'll screw your wrist it scripts. This is made by a company called. I hope I'm pronouncing it correctly, AVI. Av. I q that's just how one would spell naturally AVI in Q end for people. Not watching it. It looks like that's everyone. It looks like a ruler right while I'm talking. That's not you guys are here. I'm not looking and then and it's like, Oregon compatable unfold. Wow. That's great at okay can feel the weight of it. God I got it's it's like a few sheets of paper. And this. I assume is made to fit say a MAC book pro it'll I've had every laptop from a pro to air on my God on it. You don't even know what's in your bag. That's great. That's great, AVI. Avi. Everybody just go in looking at online because there's no way to describe it where it makes him by sense. I'm buying that. Nice. That's brilliant. Okay. Good. I'm glad you know. Worth the tubes. Spag this computer bag is like a hundred and thirty bucks. It's not that's not a hypocrite. But it's not cheap. But it's not made of a panda skin. Correct way. One would expect Chris MacQuarie to roll. And the thing is like twenty bucks. I like that on a while since I bought I hear artists ten thousand dollars. It's time across it. It's made of conflict medals from. Conflict metal. As we wrap up the show. We should remind people that they should buy t shirts the script runs. Four hundred episode t shirts are available. They should also buy tickets to our live show coming up at the ace hotel or hundred we'll have links to both of those like things eight years of podcasting. A lot of mastic God does I've encountered special episodes, of course. So the things that aren't part of the number sequence. Can't believe it. Yeah. Well, script houses produced by making a row is edited by Matthew slowly are after this week. It's beverage gestion Rothe even out show, you can send a link to ask John dot com. That's also the place where you can send log or questions for shorter questions on Twitter. Craig is at seal Mazen, I am at John August Christmas corner, you are cryptically enough at Chris MacQuarie at crystal Harari on you can find shed its midst of it Twitter moratorium. It's a good thing. Tweet atom anyway. Yeah. I answer questions in Indiana's. Now be disagreeable with him. He loves it. Yeah. I like being you can find the show or this episode in all upset that John SICOM. It's also find transcripts. We try to get them up about four days. After the episode airs some folks have started doing week hats in discussion on the screenwriting sub Reddit on infusing this Craig. No if that continues, that's great. But basically, there's recapping what happens on the show. I hope they recap this moment, you can find all the backups is the show at scripts dot net or download fifty episodes seasons at store John dot com. And if you're doing that, you should probably check out the script and listener's guide at Johnson com slash guide to find out which episodes, our listeners recommend most. You are an absurd three hundred we already penciled intrepid five hundred. Yes. No question. I'm there. No. I mean, that's our diamond jubilee. Okay. Great. Oh, yeah. They're all right. Thank you very much. What john? Thank you. Thank you. Or hundred episodes, the nice, thanks, man. From.

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Lindsey Jordan and Write on Fundraising

Pod 4 Good

47:33 min | 4 d ago

Lindsey Jordan and Write on Fundraising

"Welcome to another episode potter. Good i am the chief anthropologist. The orch vice admiral philanthropy. Chris miller we are very excited to have lindsey jordan on the podcast today. Hi lindsay are you. I'm good how was how is both of your christmases so low key and relaxing. I stayed in my pajamas further entire week. And i'm going to go ahead and admit this now. I think i only showered like three times a week which is not a lot for me so it was. It was glorious. Lots of baking in lots of laziness in playing with my kids toys in acting like i was twelve so great other than the baking part. That sounds like my wife's favorite version of christmas. Just hanging out doing nothing and wearing pyjamas That every christmas for me but that's not celebrate christmas. I can do whatever i want. We did tex-mex christmasy lead. So that's one of the traditions that came my husband's family. It's interesting to see which tradition from where and they do tex-mex we like a mess of nachos like a little mess and it was fabulous. And we'll get. Chris start on nachos his very detailed thoughts on. How nacho should be made and baked in such what i have baked nacho cheese our strategies chris so i actually like to do both but i won't get too far into it but it depends for my wife. She likes very basic. So it's gotta be shredded because she doesn't want anything on it they can make the chips sake right. You're white sounds like my kind of people out. I mean yes. This is a brief description. Yes i know. I tend to go overboard. So i end up making the other ingredients that i like on my nachos on the side so just make base nachos that are just like beings cheese in maybe meat. That's it and then. I have all my other stuff my jalapenos and pico guacamole. So this is actually A pod for nachos. Now we're good. Oh goodness i wish i could find a fun transition to go from nachos to fundraising but when exists lindsay. You are the ceo and founder of right on fundraising. Won't you tell us what right on fundraising guts. We we do. I'm going to give you like the banner. like it. Right the tagline but that's of course not what we really do. The tagline is that we provide fresh fundraising solutions for high impact nonprofit organizations we do that through grant writing we build annual funds donor communications and we run those big fancy fabulous capital campaigns. That's what we do in a nutshell how we do. It is really different. We're kind of disruptive we break down a lot of norms. That's actually kind of why we exist. Is i spent ten years fundraising and encountered all kinds of things that i thought. Hey i there's going to be another way to do this right here. And basically i found a bunch of people who think the same way and we founded this company took off with it and when we raise a bunch of money and try to shake things up as much as we can and for the most part. Everybody's along for the ride from my time in nonprofits. Usually there was not necessarily money to hire an outside company to help them do fundraising. So how does that work. Who are your customers. And how do you work with them to work within their budget which they're obviously trying to increase which is why they hired you in the first place. So there's this sweet spot we talk about philanthropic equity a lot and for us that means plugging all of the one of the things. That i've always thought was just really surprising. I had the good fortune all through my career. I worked as a nonprofit fundraiser for ten years for a couple different nonprofits and they were really big nonprofits with national affiliations in big brands. And i was always really surprised. At how many nonprofit organizations were in my orbit that were thought it was a lot smaller than we were but accomplished so much without all of the like fancy tools. Because i never wanted for anything. I had all of the things i needed to do. My job but a lot of organizations like most nonprofit organizations don't have those tools and i didn't realize that for most of my career so one of the things i started looking at before i founded. This company was exactly who would need our help. Does anybody actually is. It's just a cookie idea with anybody ever really need this thing. And one of the things that i found was over. Sixty percent of nonprofits operate on budgets of less than a million dollars a year. So that's the large majority of non profit if you're operating on less than a million dollars you probably don't have a director of development you can't make major investments into your fundraising strategy. So basically we are capacity builders we come in and usually organization has a goal. Something that they want to do something big that they wanna accomplish. We build the strategy. We raised that money and then we get out of the way. I have a co worker. Who refers to. Mary poppins fundraising which i like a lot for lots of reasons. Who could who could be upset about. Being compared to julie andrews right. That's that's pretty great. But it's also really true because we really come in and we fundraise and then we leave because our goal is not to replace anybody's development department. It's to help build a development department and helped launch it in and build up so really. What we do is a lot less expensive. It's easier to bring someone in to slowly build capacity than it is to just hire someone and make an investment that you don't actually know if it's gonna pay off or not one of the things that i've heard through. My whole career is that you can never expect a director of development to pay for their salary the first year if they raised that much. Then they're doing really well. That's really low bar. That's like a deer ably low bar so we try and combat some of that narrative around like the industrial complex in this like poverty mentality dot persists with a nonprofit organizations. So you're not you're not nonprofit consultants right. You're not really okay can you. Don't you don't come in. And tell the heads of nonprofits things they would know if they just asked the employees that work under them but get paid a lot more for it. Sounds like something. That's happened to jesse. No it's not like it's happened at every place i've worked anyway. It's really really normal right for consult to come in and we there are definitely so. They're actually been a couple times when someone's wanted to hire us to do a certain thing and we're like hey before you have us do that thing. Have you asked anybody if that's the thing that needs to be done. And so then in that case yeah we we will come in and do analysis and tell them but for the most part we show up to fundraise like. We're actually the ones going on raising the money. So i also saw that. You are one of the most admired ceos in oklahoma. So i think someone lost a bed. So how does it feel. And and i know they. They had to move the ceremony online. What was it like to find out about it. Be a part of that group and celebration and everything was it like to be this awesome girl. It was really really cool. I'm gonna be honest with you. I think a lot of fundraisers will relate to this like. I never set out to be a ceo. I specifically never wanted to become an executive director ceo. Like i've had great mentors and people who do that job. And i know pretty early in my career that like that was not for me. That was for someone else and then we started the company and it took off so quickly that i had to learn how to be a ceo on the fly. And so i started like taking the tidbits of all your favorite leaders all the people who didn't totally screw it up and you start like building. This does portfolio of who you could be and i think i walked around for the entire first year of our business just in such shock that it was working and that anybody wanted to hang out with us and let us help them. Fundraise that when that happened it was just. I don't know it was just like wow. It's time to throw a party so since we could not get together. We actually did throw party. We sent everybody on our team like this package of balloons and confetti in like all the obnoxious oriental trading stuff that you could buy and we sent dinner to lunch to everybody's house so everybody could eat together and then watch the ceremony together. It was fun. It felt like a team win. After like all of the. I think i'm slowly getting over. What is probably my own imposter syndrome. And just constantly being shocked at that this guy that and it does work which is amazing so it was very cool honor. I think it's actually a requirement for any guests on the pod. Have at least some level of imposter syndrome. That's come up at every podcast you've had. I mean chris. And i certainly do not feel that about any of the things. We do very confident. Human beings doubts in your answer to that question. I could already see why you'd be a great boss because you don't you don't assume knowledge you don't have. You are obviously care about the sort of emotional state of your employees. And i like the idea of going from nonprofits and specifically putting yourself as a ceo and non executive director which i feel like has connotations. That are in some ways. It's always good in some ways. Different from sort of nonprofit naming architecture as comes up a lot. Because i like to make fun of be okay. And how they give vice president titles. I invented a title for myself when i started the company. That was neither. Because i felt so weird about it. I just called myself a philanthropic adviser. Until i could figure out what the heck my title actually lies. I've actually curious. Could you tell us a little bit of the story of right on where it came from how you started how you got. To the point of actually having employees in two thousand eighteen. I was coming up on ten years of having been within the sector in fundraising and i felt really fortunate. Because all i've ever done this fundraising and a lot of people who come to fundraising come to it from something else. I was lucky that it was my first job out of college. And i just fell in love with it really really quickly and so it had been all i had ever done and like i mentioned earlier in that ten year time span like i think when you're really devoted to something and it's really central to who you are you see the good the bad and the ugly and i had started seeing a lot of ugly and there were things within the sector that i just. I just didn't understand why they were accepted norms. For example i mentioned the poverty mentality right the scarcity mentality. That is really really persistent within nonprofit organizations. There's also the industrial nonprofit complex which is basically this idea where you have to have fundraising to keep nonprofits going but if you look at where wealth comes from from a lot of really wealthy individuals. Sometimes that wealth is a result of the oppression that causes some nonprofits to exists. Not in every case but in some cases that's very real thing so all this contradictory philosophy all of these different things that were happening and the real life consequences of that that i saw were. I had colleagues that worse spinning out. I mean totally burning out. Really remarkable fundraisers who were leaving after a year and a half two years never to return. Ceo's that were run off by boards. That didn't know what they were doing. There was all hot of collateral damage to poor management of the nonprofit sector. And the last place. I worked i actually experienced i. It was it was crazy. Some what's the best way to say this. Some real institutional racism in a way that i had never experienced before i mean. I'm a very privileged white woman. And i haven't had to deal with a lot of it. I know what it looks like from having worked in some social organizations. But i had never come face to face with it before at at this particular or asian we had a director level person who was systematically excluding black people from the candidate pool. It was bad it was as bad as bad. Could get and it blew up the whole organization and of course when something like that happens all the stones get turned over right so then all the skeletons. Come out of the closet all just wet from there. I walked away from that situation so frustrated that i don't know like i had a greater purpose that i needed to figure out what it was and so i was inspired by a friend of mine. Who took a sabbatical which is not something that i would have ever even considered doing at any point in my life but she did it and i was like. Oh my gosh. That's that's what needs to happen. And so i did. It took a three month sabbatical which was the longest hardest most frustrating months. Ever 'cause i'm really bad at sitting still not trying solve problems and i promised myself that like during this time i was not going to try and solve any of these problems. I was just gonna learn as much as i could. And so i would ask a question. Why do fundraisers only last sixteen months. How much research is there on that. And i would read everything i could read and then that would just leave me to another question and then i would read more so by the end of that three months. I knew exactly what i wanted to accomplish with right on fundraising because i could have. Just what did they say. Hang a shingle. Whatever it is like. I could've just done that right and started fundraising. But i i needed to understand why and i needed to understand what i wanted to accomplish. And i felt like after that. Three month period. That provided the clarity. That i was really looking for like who we were going to be how we were going to go about raising money for people and how we were going to be different than what you would see on the inside of a nonprofit. I think that's why. I'm going to start as myself and i remember making a joke to my husband that we might need to hire someone at your three. Perhaps we have. We're not three years and yet and we're at fifteen a team of fifteen people and we have a whole bunch. More hires coming up next year. So it. I think the reason that it went gangbusters and grew so fast is because we had a lot of clarity around who we were and what we were going to accomplish and it's because of that terrible three three-month stillness highlights. I mean i say that sounds great. And then i'm like now after a week i would. Oh man i try to learn new skill or something. I mean we're i think we're we're like a generation of people who are not good relaxing. I can't. I'm trying to imagine. Jesse like doing nothing for a week. That's the only reason. I let myself go on cruises to one place. I'm forced to relax. There's nothing to do. So i just send a hot tub for a week and and his great old people. Yeah yeah yeah. Yeah i mean i go. I go between three and five when they're eating so but i mean i. I think it's a combination of our our upbringing and the socioeconomic status. We're all stuck in we. Just we just don't take three months off. No europeans. Do for some reason ching. Every week. I was on literally on the phone with my dad every week. Who is a bit of a life coach in his own way. Coaching me how to sit still and not do anything like it was. That was the coaching. I was receiving how to do less. Eddie sitting still hard functionally saying still just like zoning out you can do for a while but like actually trying to be present but still is hard. I mean there's literally meditation classes on how to do that. And i can't get through those without name to go do something else i know is now like you have. I mean offices were all working remotely these days. But you have you have now in oklahoma city and in fayetteville correct. That's right now. We opened in oklahoma city right before covid hit and then we took our time with fayetteville because we were opening an office during a pandemic in that was up at touching. Go but yeah. We're up and running in all three now. So i i remember when the pandemic i darling. The first couple of months from march to june there were love like articles in the nonprofit world about how foundation giving had increased during that time. And i'm wondering did that continue. And how did nonprofits handle the end of summer fiscal year slash and ask actual calendar year slash giving tuesday all the other nonprofit fundraising days during this pandemic and how did that affect the work that right on fundraising does so it's been an interesting year for fundraising right. Everybody made a lot of predictions in the spring about what was going to happen. I honestly thought that the bubble might burst in foundation giving mainly not necessarily because of the pandemic but because it's been ten years of great market conditions and at private foundations. corporate foundations. Have done really really well. So i thought oh maybe this is like we've been waiting for the bubble to burst. This might be the thing and just like in the great recession. We saw foundation step up in a major way. This is actually something that we see a crisis across the board which i think is an incredible testament to what philanthropy is actually about even in the great recession when we saw wealth and income nosedive for a lot of families individual giving climbed getting creased. I think it was like six percent higher giving or something like that. We're gonna end this year with one of the biggest philanthropic booms that we've ever seen an it's because conditions dug deep and they set up new funds and they dipped into their to their balance and their principal to stretch and make things happen now. That doesn't mean that every single nonprofit out there cleaned up shop this year because of that did not happen. I think that giving this year was more selective. Foundations really cared about the work that was happening on the front lines obviously direct services people who were feeding the hungry. Those were things that got a lot of attention and got a lot of money. The arts were really hurt this year. We had a couple of arts clients. Coup made really hard decisions about their fundraising. and i. honestly. I was a big proponent of them keeping going because i felt like foundations and individuals were gonna show up but i think that a lot of people were just really nervous especially folks who rely on performances things like that where you can have actually have people in the seats as just really hard but for twenty twenty twenty one is actually gonna be i think more telling than twenty twenty Because this was the year that everybody came together and stretched and dug deep and took care of all the people we needed to take care of. And i think at the end of the year we will see numbers that put other years to shame and by the way that saying something because two thousand nineteen was also huge year forgiving because so many people were afraid of what changes to the tax code meant. Everybody thought oh god all these changes that trump has made. No one's gonna give will all the donors like overcompensated for that basically and gave more than ever in response to the tax code so saying that we could do more in two thousand twenty than two thousand nineteen is really really significant. Twenty twenty one is going to be the year that tells us what we really need to know because so many foundations did dig into their principal to help this year that it means that they have so if you are earning five percent on say you've got hundred thousand dollars in the bank. Earning five percent on it you dig into your principal. You take down to fifty because you had things you need to take care of so next year. Twenty twenty one. They're still going to get their five percent but it's going to be on fifty grand instead of one hundred thousand so they're going to have less to give away so i think that more than anything else is. What's actually going to impact people who rely on foundation giving. I feel bad for people during this pandemic but like the arts organizations. They have a hard job when things are going well because it's much harder to their things that are easier to raise money on like fundraising for a hospital. Right that was always the dreamgig for me and development like hospital job right taking care of people but challenging someone like create Creatively or getting someone to understand a weird funky ballet raising money for that is hard because people are always like well this other organization. I support gives food to the homeless like. Why are you more important than that. And i know. I know. they've had a rough. I know there was some either like state or federal money here towards art organizations. But i do feel for all the organizations and i hope i hope twenty twenty hope. Twenty one's better for them. At least rayo. I miss shows the good news. Is that a lot of arts organizations. It's good and bad. A lot of organizations rely on individuals right and individuals will show back up for the arts organizations. But they're only going to show up when they can safely sit in theaters and didn't performances and things like that. So yeah. They are in some ways insulated from like these big market crises because they don't rely on foundations but having that reliance on individuals can be tricky when once every millennia you're hit with a pandemic or whatever especially if they have a large building that they still have to pay rent and electricity on so you teased earlier that you have a sister nonprofit organization we do so. Can you tell us a little bit about that. Yeah it is what it does so. Our sister organization is called the land throw k. Try saying it ten times fast bad at naming things but it's called they're expensive and it was not a part of the original plan so one of the things that happened. That was really surprising right out of the gate right when i started right on was we had a lot of folks come to us who were in startup phase. I didn't even know nonprofit startups existed. I did not know that was the thing and we would sit down and we would talk and it would be clear to me pretty quickly that we could not help them. There's certain things that you you need to have in place before fundraising can be really effective like having your five zero one. C three status already taking care of your board of directors built like these things sound really foundational to us. But i start they take time right and resources to get all those things going so we would sit down and talk and i kinda tell them what they need to do next and they would leave and i always felt really frustrated by those conversations and i'm sure they needed to because there was no accountability. There was no place. I could send them where they could get all the answers they were looking for and i was at thirty six degrees north. At the time and my office there was right across from tulsa attack in emmy hamilton. There is a good buddy of mine. And i was just venting to her one day. About like how frustrating. This was to not be able to help this big group of people who had like amazing ideas and some really disruptive cool things that they wanted to accomplish and she said well. Why don't you just do it. And so we sat down and started to think of it and we created without really knowing it or without with language was the only nonprofit accelerator for startups in the state. And the timing. we're calling it an incubator. 'cause i didn't know what an incubator was so it's actually Later and at this point we have four or five cohorts that have gone all the way through. So it's almost like fifty people deep now and they're really really cool organization so as a ten week training program. That's rally point. That's a business accelerator. It's one hundred and fifty dollars so we don't make any money off of it that covers the cost of just the materials and then all of my staff that i mentioned all come from nonprofit background they teach all the classes. So there's basically no expense to us to put the thing on. It's just as doing what we like to do. Which is all for us a lot of fun obviously and the other thing that we do which really came about this year is and this has actually been something. That's been as a fundraiser. A point of frustration for my whole career and that is the lack of diversity in the field of fundraising by are basically white and female. Like seventy percent of fundraisers and so having a diverse pipeline of talent has always been a real challenge. And this year. With the killings of george floyd and brianna taylor like it emphasized for our team. Something that we had already been talking about on rt new. We went through this big hiring phase in the spring and we were all sitting on this call together for the first time. Like the whole team Just like introducing each other and everybody just kind of got really quiet and looked around and someone finally said how this is a really white group and we were all like ooh. Yeah it really is so we were in the middle of this conversation of how to be really about diversifying our team when the killings happened and really started gaining traction in the media and so my eighteen probably half of which at least were participating in marches and who were really involved came to me and said we want to do something we want to do. Something really tangible and release specific. And i pushed back because i felt on facebook for example. I've seen this post and it like struck at my core. Sometimes you see something in it just as so honest that it like hurts. I saw post that someone had made that. Basically said yeah. Thanks for that. Great press release. Now show me what your board of directors looks like. And i was like. Oh that's us and if we come out and say something right now. It's no matter if we mean it still going to feel disingenuous. Because we aren't practicing that and i didn't want us to be disingenuous because this is obviously too big too important so we sat down and we figured out what we can do immediately and they really drove this whole strategy and we did three things. The first one was to make a donation to an organization that focuses specifically on black justice. So we made a five thousand dollar donation to that. We did put out a statement because it was important to the team for the statement and then the third thing that we did is we launched this new program through anther k. called pathways to philanthropy and it is a grant writing apprenticeship paid for black indigenous and people of color who are interested in learning how to become great writers since a national program so we launched that in the fall. And that's so those are really the to corporations if lindsay okay the business accelerator and this this apprenticeship program which as far as i know is the only one of its kind in the country. Because we've been trying to find other people who can collaborate with and there's like i said there's not a lot of entry points for black indigenous and people of color to get into the fundraising rally and i i in building this program. I talked to a couple of my colleagues about why that is and they had some really really fantastic feedback. First of all. I mean there's all the challenges that come with fundraising anyway. Which jesse knows all all about but then on top of that. People of color are sometimes assumed in interviews that they don't have circles of wealth that are similar to white folks. There's also this idea that they just don't have the same skill set which is kinda patently untrue in kind of easily too. Easy to disprove. But the stigma i suppose and then the third piece is that they don't have personal networks of wealth so they just they can't dig deep so all of those things. We thought. Those are our perceptual that we can tackle. the networking component or the mentorship component. Was the third piece so not having a proper mentors so we kinda took aim at all three of those things in this apprenticeship program so it is the hard skills first and foremost of learning how to do the thing right then. Second lane is the whole second year of the apprenticeship because it's two years. The whole second year is devoted to developing end work wealth so meeting donors and developing personal relationships donors and then the third component mentorship were partnering with the idea which is african american development officers which is awesome organization in atlanta. Because we want our our people in this program from all of the united states and we want to have a diverse set of mentors and as a white woman. I know that there are things that i just don't get that. Our apprentices are going to go through and need mentors who get it right so we can't mentor the people who are in this program as well as as as people as bphc can so. That's kind of the program really excited about it. Actually i can't wait to start hiring people out of this program. That's what i'm looking for. Do you mentioned something earlier. That i knew they were two different things but i still don't know what is the difference between them. What's the difference between the accelerator and incubator. Oh my gosh. let me tell ya now. So there's an actual definition for what an incubator is and typically an incubator includes a physical space so it includes a desk or it includes a resource or an office of some kind whereas an accelerator is more like a training program that you're going through for the incubator can have both components so like a thirty six degrees north could be like an incubator. Yes they have slipped during up for which is super exciting so the thirty six degrees as it is right now is a gym basically instead of having a personal trainer where the incubator is the personal trainer vs. Okay okay. so we're talking about nonprofit startups. We're talking about the like the bar. Our good friend. Tommy app and the tulsa voter van. They organizations that are using another nonprofit as they're like financial sponsor. Is that what. We're talking about those type of organizations. That's a great question. So that's called. A cheery agent is the real heir s term for it so those people. Those folks are included in it. Bet no we're not just talking about some start ups so startups is kind of a broad category for nonprofits because yeah people who are truly in. Start up mode like they're piloting their idea. Asian you have early stage people who've been doing it for a minute but are still trying to figure it out. Then you have restarts frequently and nonprofits. Someone will have an incredible idea. They have something that's happened to them in their personal life right and they wanted their inspired or they fill a passionate about a specific thing. They go out and try to do that thing. And if all flat on their face because there was like eight thousand things didn't know so then they have to come back to the starting boredom restart the whole organization and we see a lot of that too Doesn't take like you have to do a series of things before you're able to get your five a one. C three status have to have a board already and all these things or actually no. Tell me what the steps are. Yeah so if the actual process of getting your five. Oh one c. Three status is really simple. It's just paperwork. You actually don't have to have your board. It will me come as a surprise to you that the state of oklahoma has very little regulation around around the board has to be on it and the state law is that you actually have to have one person on your board is sustainable I know i could made my production company a nonprofit that easily. Oh well the federal government requires that when you fill out your paperwork you have what are called incorporators and you only have to have three of them. And they're not aboard. That's not the same thing as aboard. It's just three people who agree to vouch for what you're trying to do right and you are typically one of them and your mom. I'm kidding don't have your mommy at at like real embrace should fear or corporators and then when you get your status your very first board meeting where you pass your bylaws setup. All of the boring really really important things. Then you can vote your incorporators onto the board to be your first board members. But they're not technically. There's no voting. There's no fiduciary responsibility none of that. When you just samir paperwork it takes right now. It's taking about six months. There's two forms so the long form takes about six months to get right now. The short form takes about three weeks so his three pages long but making assumptions about our audience. But i feel like a lot of our audiences. They either heavily support. Nonprofits are worked for nonprofits themselves and so to those frustrated few what what would you tell them about how to make internal changes to how fundraising is done in their organization. Not knowing the specifics of their problems but knowing the sort of general issues that have come up. Oh man that is a really. Can i give you six answers. So one of the things that we really got. After when we started the company is we started tackling. This list of the six reasons. Why nonprofit fundraisers leave and they released specific mike and remember all six of them. Now that on the spot again to definitely forget one but the first one is pay. You hear people complain about pay a lot and sometimes that's merited and sometimes it's not going to be honest. My salary ranged from thirty five thousand dollars to seventy five thousand dollars in the ten years. I worked for nonprofit. And i felt like that was always pretty generous but then again i worked at bigger organizations right but pay is definitely an issue especially if you work at a smaller organization so paying a competitive wage and what that means competitive different things to different organizations but really country About what competitor competitive means so. The pay is a big one. Another really big. One is unrealistic fund raising expectations. And i definitely experienced. I feel like you basically get two different kinds of boards when you're fundraiser. you either get the board. That is way too excited about fundraising and is all up into the details and like way into the weeds or you get aboard that's gay. We hired a fundraiser. Our job is done We don't need to do anything else. And neither of those are particularly helpful right. You really need a board. That comes down the line and works with you to both create realistic goals and to actually fundraise. Another one is having the right resources. This is something that we combat on behalf of our clients. So we subscribe burr example to all of like the grant databases and all this stuff. One of the things i was most shocked at was that foundation directory. Which is now candid houses. Everything you'd ever wanna know about grant who gives the money who's on the board of trustees how much they give what the deadline is literally everything you would need to to win money and it costs two grand a year. Most small nonprofits cannot afford a subscription service. That is to grand a year. They're thrilled they get a grant that is to grand right not having access to the resources of the tools you need to actually get out there and fundraise is another big button for management is one like i mentioned earlier. A lot of people who come to the nonprofit sector. Come from somewhere else. There's no degree that anyone has ever had in undergraduate for how to be a professional fundraiser. You just learn on the fly and actually the whole nonprofit sector is like that. We're lucky in oklahoma that we have the center for nonprofits. They offer a lot of really great management classes so we may be ahead of the game there but having management that doesn't have the same standards across the board of what good nonprofit management looks like is a good way to run off your employees. So unrealistic uil yes. Too many bad managers lack of resources no secession pather career advancement opportunities so when we talk about what we do. We say these are the things that we do. But we're talking about like how we do it. That's how we do it. We are taking aim at those things. We're paying people a really good rate and we are giving them all the resources that they need and we're setting realistic expectations. Many of which have nothing to do with how much money they raise like. All of these things are. They're considered really disruptive inside the nonprofit sector but they're just commonsense right like of course of course you're workforces not going to respond well to bad management. Of course. they're not going to respond well to being poorly compensated so i would. I mean i would love to say. There's like some magic bullet or some magic ingredients that could make nonprofits more sustainable or keep their employees longer but to be totally honest. It's just implementing some things that for profits have been doing for a long time and prioritizing your people. I think that's really really hard. That's the one thing that i saw. Even my best. Ceos sometimes make the mistake of doing was the client was first and while the client is the person you're serving and obviously the reason your organization exists. Your people are who you have to take care of if you are not taking care of your people you are not going to be able to accomplish your mission while along those lines. I know for a long time. There was sort of this harmful. Stigma that a nonprofit had to have a certain percent of their budget to keep their admin costs below a certain amount and it forced them to underpay their employees and effectively resulted in higher turnover and less of ability to raise more money and actually support their people. It feels like that is changing some though that more savvy philanthropic foundations and individuals are kind of picking up on the like business. You gotta spend money to make money and nonprofits. They need the money to pay the employees so they can better serve their people. Yeah also part of what has changed. Is that nonprofits are getting better about the language that they use to describe what they do. We work with our clients on that a lot. They'll say where while we have x. amount of overhead and i'll say well how much of your ceo or your executive director salary in that they spend their time doing program so half their salaries overhearing your programs call them same with even marketing and communications. If half of your marketing is specifically to help get people in the door to get programs. There's a portion of your marketing budget. That's actually programming. So it's a lot of reframing and that's part of that conversation with donors about what do you really mean by overhead. What's true overhead. What's the true cost of doing business. What has happened to development work ethic like zoom meetings similar weird so i actually just was talking to a donor about this last week on a big capital campaign that we're working on and we're getting to the point in this capital campaign where it's time to go start asking for the six and seven figure gifts and i'm i'm sitting here thinking. Oh man i'm going to have to wear like a hazmat suit and carry around gallons of hand sanitizer to go in and have these meetings and i was talking to a donor who is also working on the campaign and she laughed and said nope you go in you make the exact same ask that you would have made person to person and you just do it over. Zoom like the idea that someone would commit to a seven figure gift over. Zoom blows my mind. But that's what's happening. That's how it's changed the the major giving in the major donors have evolved right alongside everything else. And she loves it like. She told me she never wants to talk to the old way. Which is really unfathomable. If you think about all of these troops about fundraising being happening the golf course and all these things that happen in person and all this schmoozing basically right and non of that is happening and they're still giving so. I think it's time for us to enter. And i should get like android for this like our final questions. He's the class s during the covid. Pandemic what have you been doing to like sort of. Keep yourself sane and calm and not depressed. Like chris and i are both pop culture nerd so we usually have some sort of pop culture comfort food that we're watching or reading by our guest. What is it. What are you escape to relax the during this crazy tax at great question this could on terrible so twenty. Twenty is the year. That i discovered that i can actually spend time by myself and my kids won't melt or have nervous breakdowns in my house catch on fire and everything will be fine so i've actually done a really good job this year. At carving out time just for myself for mother's day this year. I by myself. This is huge. I checked into a hotel room by myself. A really nice hotel row. By the way i checked into the tulsa a got a great room. Close the blinds. I binged watched parks and rec. I ordered room service. I walked around the halls. 'cause nobody was there was a pandemic clearly. Nobody was there but me In my robe with a bottle of champagne. And i had the best time never. It was like the best experience. And so carving out really intentional time just for myself like. I didn't have to answer my phone. I didn't have to answer an email. i didn't have to wipe anybody's nose snack. I didn't have to be anything but the chicken that casino walking around with a open champagne bottle. That's all i had to do in the hotel right so that was also watched a lot of the west wing. I re watched a lot of like my favorite shows especially the ones that made me feel really hopeful like leading up to the election. I was clinging to president bartlett with like my whole the There's a very. There's a lily specific four year gap in the last decade. When i did not watch the west wing it just happened to be from november. Two thousand sixteen to november twenty twenty and then a certain event happened. I feel okay watching the west wing again with those parks and rec in between them. Just like that and cheered me up now. We have the answer to one of our other questions. We sometimes ask people involved in political things. What's their politics shows. We know you're parks and rec person. That's good. I guess so the so the last question we always ask is we just want to give you one last chance to plug anything. Do you have anything you want to get out there. Upcoming events online or otherwise or or anything that that our our listeners should know there so we're doing fundraising masterclass in twenty twenty. One one of the things we learned in twenty twenty s people really want us to teach classes. I fought against that for a long time. People really wanted us to do it. So we decided in twenty twenty one to go ahead where like posing it. Speaking of pop culture as like don't don't become a jedi master become a fundraising master. So it's all a bunch of star wars humor which i think my communications manager is about sick of but i'm having a lot of fun with this like star wars themed marketing campaign. But we'll do it every month. And it's for an hour and a half and will do networking when we can be impersonal. Do it in person it'll be live streamed so if you're not in tulsa or oklahoma city where shooting it you can still tune in over lots and lots of different topics. None of them boring. Lots of good needy stuff with the best star. Wars related like ponder. Joke that you tell during this whole man. What i said. Oh man. I had a really good iota. One about give me money you will. I thought it was hilarious. I was thinking like a a do. There is no try when it comes to fundraising pretty good. The meetings are gonna come hot and heavy. I think you're pretty definitely know putting different nonprofit job types into like dark side nightside combinations lenny. Recruit your help for this. Chris and i are great. Add bizarre nerd trivia so. We are happy to help christmas. Very good of puns. We are here to assist you. Thank you for taking the time to talk with us. Thank you all for listening to episode with lindsay jordan from right on fundraising. I hope you enjoyed it as much as chris and i did. Lengthy is a delight. And if you are in an organization that needs help raising money. She is the perfect person to talk to again from pod for good. We hope you all had a happy new year's and you know are surviving the collapse of our democracy and if our democracy democracy survives and you are organization looking to sponsor something wonderful for twenty twenty one pot for good is still looking for sponsors. So with that i will close with get done tulsa and please please broken arrow. I'm looking at you again. Where a mask.

lindsay orch lindsey jordan fayetteville Chris miller chris oklahoma city julie andrews jesse oklahoma Mary poppins emmy hamilton george floyd brianna taylor tulsa
Keep Sounding LIVE Days 2 and 3

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Keep Sounding LIVE Days 2 and 3

"Three. Touchdown. Re-live? So be careful about you talk about we are live, and I'm going Dr St. guys come in. It's the Panthers have traded up with the Seattle Seahawks now, and they are picking number thirty seven in the draft. And we will know who they picked shortly. Join us lie. Adding that to boom, boom, boom. You know? I will I'm going to warn you guys listening in. Now, I'm going to warn you if we trade it up to pick will Greer I'm going to die of laughter. I'm going to cackle and how and die. Oh, no. My brother just text me that there you go. I'm not sure if he's still at the draft or not. I mean. Some of making report what it is Jesus. Yes, soon as you know, let me know. So I can tell Walker because he's writing the the pick article. It's Greg little is it really. Yes. I'm just I'm trying to figure out what the compensation is. Thank you for telling me who it is. So I could let Walker now. I'm somewhat looking. Oh my God. Someone please tell me are you? Sure, it's little I'm hundred percent positive. Steve Regis reported. We're good there. But he, but no one knows what they traded up with. The Panthers traded pick forty seven pick seventy seven. Seriously, field Yates, what are you serious? Yeah. We traded. We traded to our next two picks to move up. Oh my God. I get forty seven because we had to swap second rounders that makes sense. But seventy seven is a steep price on hold on. Are you sure someone's saying it's a hundred? Field Yates say in it. I don't know. Guys like the pick. I love the pick. I don't know if I like the trade. Dude that is awful. Okay. Well, instant analysis of this is I I love the selection of Greg little I think it's a very good pick. He's a true left tackle, we need at least a left or right tackle. So we can keep Cam Newton safe. Depending on what the trade is. I don't know if I like that or not already trade gates is reporting that we gave up the seventy seven th pick as well. My god. Are you fucking kidding me? Do they gave it up? I'm looking at the SPN. The Panthers traded up to grab Greg little offense. Tackle my God. No, not a fancy hawks received pick thirty or traded pick thirty seven forty seven seventy seven. My god. Steve Reid is coming in as well saying they have one more third round pick, which is one hundred overall. So. Yep. I I would say it's pretty much confirmed that they traded away their their second round pick and they're next third round pick. So all they have left is the compensation selection. What's important anyone? Well. I mean, so what what sti- into this obviously were mad about the compensation here. But Greg little seems like he'll be the starting offense attack on the left side day one and they were targeting him in round one Billy you you were big on that yesterday. So I mean, obviously the compensation sucks, but they ended up with Brian burns. And Greg little when they might have only ended up Greg little so I mean, it's not all bad, right? Right. Billions and talking the trade value chart that we all know his gospel. The thirty seven think is five hundred thirty points. The panther is the forty seventh pick in the seventy seven thick are six hundred thirty five so hundred five points larger like twenty percent larger. I really wish they would have traded the one number one hundred pig. Would've probably been a better idea. I'm. Oh, like, how giants fans felt athlete treated Daniel Jones. I'm pretty pissed though. Not not the best play in the board. But it's classic Morty. Herni move. It is. Well, they got an offense tackle the defense of linemen. So. That they did need that. I mean, I'm not I'm not one hundred percent happy with trade either. But I'm trying to be a little optimistic here. I mean, my my opinion summed up in one quick easy sentence Twitter format. I hate the trade. But I love the pick. I hate giving up the seventy seventh overall pick to move up ten spots to get an offense lineman. But I like Greg little and I think he's going to be a good choice. I just wish we could have either trade it number one hundred or even one of our lower like fourth round picks. I mean, you know, you have to pay to play. So I get it. But I also that doesn't mean I have to like it, right? How understand that seven? Like on the trade value chart like Jacksonville gave up a fourth thing on a fourth back with Oakland for moving up a few spots. Oh my God. I thought like it's only ten spots in the second round. So I want to respond to Tony h he said we must have really liked little apparently little wasn't consideration at sixteen yesterday. So the Panthers did value him. I guess they wanted to make sure they got him. So. I mean, they probably would have taken him yesterday. If Brian burns off the board where I'm kind of hung up like I get that. They just gave up more draft capital, which they obviously need for stuff. They for stuff for like other positions, but they did manage to lock in. Like one a and one b I guess is the best way to put it. The worst part about this is we have to wait forever before the Panthers again. Yes, we have to go from thirty seven to one hundred now that's all time that's to entire rounds of the draft. Yes. I may not be here. The whole time. I don't think we're gonna know. We're not going go live the whole time. Now, let's see let's see what time was the hundred thick made lashes gametime. See buffalo just traded up to take Cody Ford. So we might have had to make this move. If we wanted to get a tackle. Yeah. That that is true. Like a sixth round pick. Let's see. I mean, honestly, if you think about it, the bills might have been the ones that were fighting with us that my bills might be why we had to give up seventy seven wanted to move up where we were to get Cody Ford or they might have wanted. Greg little and I settled for Ford. Yeah. Like, I think what happened was the bills offered something where it's like we couldn't get by with the second round pick and the hundred. So we had to move up. We had to give them more because that happens a lot in the middle rounds for like teams, there's multiple trades on the board especially in the second round nowadays. By Billy uses. Jay back now. Okay. We'll see eight cedar J D S asked if we like little better than Ford. I that we quickly. My thing is that Ford is like the guy where he would play multiple positions like he could play center guard. Yeah. Where little seems like he's going to be the guy where he's slated to play left tackle over the Panthers. So I kind of like little a little more. But I don't really hit. I said. I agree with you. I like little more because he's a true left tackle. And I think I know a lot of people disagree with this type. But I don't think Tyler moten is a true life tackle. I think he's a right tackle that's playing left tackle. Played it for one game. And I think Cody Ford's strong point is as versatility. And I think both of those are strong assets. But I think I like Greg little a little bit more. I did it too because he's a true tackle Tony just made up. Good point Evans took over for Ford at left tackle at Oklahoma. So it wasn't even like he was the best left tackle on the team at that point. So. I mean, like if you're looking for your for your left tackle, which I think they were like with Delara if they if they didn't get Brian burns. I think that this is a nice consolation prize. And I think that since they had little as a first round rated prospect. I understand moving up for it, especially if you're fighting with buffalo for two so I'm I'm not happy that they traded away the next pick. But if they I would say I'd rather than have done it than buffalo. Just for perspective. Expectation last year the one hundred was made it right at eleven o'clock two years ago. The eleventh was made it like eleven thirty. Oh god. That's a long as time. We're going to wait three to three and a half to four hours to my next pick. Yes, that's not happening mardi I need to go. Get a bite to eat or something. Speaking of bites, please don't mind me. I'm going to be eating tater tots. I'll be eating my leftover pizza from last night at some point during this. Well, probably Stephen Jones asked what's the best thing going forward for the Panthers. I'm not really sure what he's asking about the draft navy, but I'll answer both ways going forward. I mean, they've addressed too big needs. And obviously, they think right little addresses the left tackle position in obviously Brian burns as big was a big thing for the pass rush. So that's good. I mean, it seems like they're balancing their team out a little bit this far as draft goes. I mean, like I would say the best case scenarios they walk away with a starting safety that or not even a starting safety, but one that can compete with. With Sean gauldin slash Colin. Jones slashed nor a searcy- at free safety. Billy. What what are your thoughts on this pick? I know you're not happy about the trade. But. I I just don't understand like, I don't I'm still I don't know. I'm kind of speechless. Dislike I don't get. What what do you think about like if they were competing with buffalo for this? I mean, that's what it seems like based on the way what happened. They don't have like yours a problem. Like, they're going out in using the media to report all this stuff about how they wanted like a certain player like there was leaks by certain individuals. They want a little that's how I found out obviously that little wasn't consideration. And they're going to business. I guaranteed spin. It stood as they get on the press conference in a minute here. We're going to spin it and be like little rated very highly. Like, we feel like we're gonna I town. That's fine. But that's not how you play the draft board. Like, you just have to be patient and let like player fault. Unite get that were still available. Are you went a later? But just look at what buffalo gave up. I mean. I know they're not going that high up this just just feels like a classic overreaction. He's only bidding against himself. Separating the trade that you seem to be a little you don't know if you like it or not, what do you think? Greg little the player. I mean, he's really good pass blocker. He's a good player. I'll I just I don't think that he's the best. Run-defender right now, he has issues with the strength. And I think that, you know, his technical deficiencies can be sorted out in some ways. I mean, I wouldn't have taken him that high. At sixteen. I would have been a little annoying. I just feel like the upside is will is not that great either. I think that he has the chance to. Be like a Michael Orteig player, which I mean, take forever. It is. But that's kind of like the same type of talent see him. Yeah. I mean, that's that's about it. I mean, he's still just I'm just trying. Michael was was fine. When he was here as are left tackle, if we get a second round pick that could contribute for any substantial length of time. I think that's a a win based on our passes. And really if we're being honest any draft pick that contributes significantly at any level is hit because there's a lot that. Just never even like make make a contribution at all. Yeah. I'm fine with the pick. Like, I never never liked trading up. But whatever it happened. So. Yeah. Like, I said, I'm fine with the pick. I actually loved the pick. I'm glad we we. I'm glad we pick. Greg little. I just wish the trade would have been different and in our slack chat. Eric makes a good point. If Greg little turns out to be our franchise left tackle, this doesn't matter in five years in ten years. We gave up a third round pick to get a franchise cornerstone tackle, then this fine. The only concern is if he turns out to not be very good. And then Martin gets another woman on his second round record. Yeah. And trade up record. And daniel. Our other members of our slack group says, yeah, he would have been he would have been gone by forty seven. And that is absolutely true. There's no way. Greg little would've lasted that long. Who else would we have taken at forty seven seventy seven that would add up to equal value of a true franchise left. Tackle is that possible and not win the trade though. I get your logic. I just I don't see it that way for me. It's not about the opportunity cost of who you select forty seven and seven seven. It's just the assets. It took to get there for one player while you're giving yourself two more bites at the apple essentially, and I get it like if they had a great at higher. It's one thing. I i'm. I don't think Marty Herni is like this oracle on draft prospects, especially at the left tackle position. Like, he should not be given the benefit of the doubt that because he traded up that this player will suddenly turn out to be good player. Like I like him too. But there's obviously like a very good chance turn up the bus makes this trade up even worse. And that's why I'm always against us the assets within the first three rounds of trade up because you just there's too much risk involved. Drink for Franceschi. That's the only situation where it'd be different. But. Everybody. I'm Neil Patel editor and chief the verge and this is the verge cast. I is the flagship podcast verge every week. We cover the latest news and reviews we took a critical look at what is going on now. And next in the world of tech show hosted by me, our executive editor debone, not your friend and Paul Miller. It just feels like there's something wrong with all computers, though. Don't you think that sometimes we do that on Fridays and on Tuesdays interview episode, I've been talking to all kinds of influential people in around the world attack. We talked to Microsoft founder Bill Gates about his film throughout the efforts. You can design systems without having to reveal any individuals particular medical record journalists academics, Lena Khan who thinks that we should be doing way more to break up giant companies like Amazon Facebook, hindsight a lot in casebook to buy up. Both what's up and Instagram proof to been the wrong call and we talked to tech CEO's like videos Bill Baxter explained. Exactly, how smart TV manufacturers make their money. It's about post purchase monetization of the TV its ads. It's ad. Check us out every Friday to your everything intact. From new iphone leaks to breaking down. Facebook's ongoing issues of private. To just me and Paul ranting each other about the role of the government and check us out on Tuesdays. When I have seen every episode. Subscribe diverse chace wherever podcasts served. We'll see. Live. We are live. I can't stop it. Once I hit the button can't stop won't stop. Yeah, we're live for the day. Three of the NFL draft twenty nineteen super excited. Super excited. By the way, John I need you to share the public YouTube. Blink I did already. Did you look at while? There's Don CSR. CSR? Oh, I'm gonna fuck off real quick while I put it on Twitter and Facebook so have had. Yeah. If you're listening, you can go to see I saw, and there's a there's a threat on or you can ask questions or you can ask questions in the live YouTube chat either way. And during the course of the day, we will answer them if they're not too weird. And we have time. That was weird. Sorry went off on my phone. I heard him on my phone and my headset in that all your you over one where you have on. I was slightly overwhelmed. And now there's no enough to make fun of me for being overwhelmed by the to be fair was on my phone and my headset. That's a little bit worse than what you dealt with John. I don't think it's worse than having it both of them playing in your headset. No, it's like it is it's not. So Brian Wilbur takes go hold on. I'm still I'm still doing. My social media's are stuff that you guys talk for a minute. Ivory grit that we didn't get to do this. When we drafted him because we did a show Brian for like two hours after you left. Really had. Yeah, we we didn't stop until what like eleven or felt like eleven it was like idiots pick or something. It was like Panthers. Yeah. It was after the Panthers would have picked if they didn't trade and that was chased vintage, by the way. And. Yeah. But that was my only regret is that. I didn't get to have my will Greer reaction take live because I think that it's hilarious that we picked him. And I also think it's smart. So all right. I'm tweeting. My I'm tweeting the link. Okay. So here's my thing. So I was out. I was out at the bar last night when it happened. And my brother fucking texted me and said that they drafted will Greer. And I honestly thought he was fucking with me because he's been telling me that they're going to draft will Greer for the last two days. So then I go on ESPN and find out they actually did take him. And I just started. I just like kind of broke down laughing at the bar. I think people are thought I was insane. Probably almost got thrown out. But yeah, I think it was. I wish that they had done this without giving up their other third round pick. I guess is the best way to put it and not that I gave it up four will Greer. But they didn't have to do that to get Greg little because I mentioned this back on Twitter a few months ago. But I I think the eagles are really good like case study for what you should do in regards to a backup quarterback because what happens if Carolina makes the playoffs last year with Cam Newton shoulder. You got there to scrub backup quarterbacks. They're not going anywhere for like they've spent some high draft capital on. Will Greer now? Like, maybe they could be competitive. There's a chance that maybe they could win with a guy like him. So I mean, I don't hate the pick. I just hate that. They couldn't address other needs before that. Like safety. Colin Jones starting rip. I'll let John do the safety take. Because I we agree. And he hasn't got the talk yet. So about the part where the the starting safety everybody thinks we should draft. Probably isn't going to be starting or suck. Yeah. Yeah. That's the take. When I wrote my pieces back in like January. I think it was about positions of need and like where they hit and where they bust relative to league average. Last. I'm here. I looked at the last ten drafts. And I this is based on the Panthers having the seventy seven thick. So looked at third round safeties drafted at or after pick seventy seven in the last ten years ever, a fourteen of them. Exactly one has turned into a full time starter. I don't know who it is. Because I didn't have it in front of me anymore. But like. One of them one out of fourteen started at least seventy five percent of the game since he got drafted. And it was like. Four out of fourteen started half of their team's games. So Kevin buyer was that there pick. I mean, we're not getting at one hundred we were not going to get Troy, Paula Malo. I mean, it is just dials not we're not getting I don't think you're gonna triple while. But you'd probably cook got an upgrade on Colin Jones or shut gall. Well, I mean, I think Brian would be an upgrade on Colin Jones. But I don't think that we will go the rest of all all day today without getting a safety. There are still some decent guys. Still on the board. That's the other thing. I'll be it'll be so funny after all of the uproar about not taking safety at one hundred if one of the safeties that people think we should have taken it one hundred hundred fifteen. Yeah. May maybe Gardner Johnson. Amani hooker. Deonte Thompson, jakulan Johnson marvel. Tell and Sheldrick red wine are all available right now. That's. I mean, that's six safeties that are still there. And I don't think we're going to see a run on safeties from pick one. Oh, three to one fifteen. I just I don't think that's going to happen. It could don't get me wrong. But I don't think it will. I think we can get either Gardner Johnson or Hooker at one fifteen now that doesn't mean that mardi her and he's not gonna pick a linebacker. That's exactly what I fear because that's what mardi Honey does. But at that point, you can just blame mardi Herni for just not drafting a safety rather than there wasn't a safety there to draft. The other thing is that we're past the point of drafting players with the hope that their immediate contributors or at least being good immediate contributors. The other thing I've said like if we have to say pick one hundred which is like essentially a fourth round pick. It's between third and fourth round you just as easily call it an early fourth round pick. Odds are forced to start there. More than likely going to be that guy that everybody hates after week six. Oh, yeah. Guy, the liability and coverage like the new belts rookie nakimora. Exactly. Yeah. He'll make one mistake can be damned to turn ity. The ship has sailed on drafting immediate key contributors, unless we get extremely lucky, and you were we're looking. Yeah. We're looking at depth special teams and backups. We're looking at now. No, I totally agree. I think that's why I'm more open to the idea of trading down and pick you up or picks. Yeah. Just. Annual says in the thread hernia made a comment last night that suggested Greer wasn't necessarily BPA. And that they would now go BPA for the rest of the draft yet. He said that last night that they're looking at by the three guys they wanted. Now, they're going be PA. And that means that we're going to see a run on linebackers. Here's me. The Panthers are going to take a running back. So let's just calm down with those takes. Yeah. We're taking a linebacker running back and probably a kicker cut the kicker to keep Graham to honestly running back this late like isn't the worst? It's not we need we need to find a way to not put Christian McCaffrey on the field for ninety nine percent of the snaps. We can put him on for ninety eight percent of the exactly we need. We ninety eight is acceptable. But ninety nine is just too much. Unacceptable watching everyone flip out about will Greer yesterday was absolutely delicious. Scott, I loved watching it the cream of the crop for ignorant here. So tasty. Yeah. That was fun. Where's the YouTube link? You too dot com. No you fuck. I mean, like two dot com. Slash watch question. Mark v equals D F capital. You five L G U Capital One capital K capital. I'm not typing that in well, that's the YouTube link. Don't say we didn't get it to you. And actually took the time to read that out to me actually makes me more mad. I sit. Brad. He did send it to me. Because I'm the only one who needed it. I it was that was where I used it Brad ceiling. What needs it? So so me looking at what people are I asked for it. And it's same. No. I get it. I get John my opinion doesn't matter when it comes to the opinions of our fans, it's fine. I get whatever. Whatever. There. Now, I can see what they're saying. I have too many tabs voiceless is here. Hi, Sean Elliott about the the watching everybody flip out things. I need I need to revisit the thread 'cause got late, and but some of the stuff like arguments as to why we didn't eat Greer aren't great. I don't know why people are so high on Kyle Alan, I don't either I really don't. The NFL is a starter. That's why didn't start though he didn't start. Did. He did start. F Italy started that he started. But he didn't finish it hurt in the second half and Gary Gilbert came in that's still cats start. Yeah. I mean, but the thing is is New Orleans. New Orleans were playing the guys that that weren't even barely on the roster. It's not essentially won the the fourth preseason game. Basically. I I want you guys to know like, obviously, Brad, and John and Billy know that I'm like a master troll. And I couldn't even finish that sentence without laughing. Just say, you know, he's he's like I get that. He has tools and he's got talent. But. White. But at some point there's like an obviously, this is a bit of a argument from thirty type thing. But at some point like he lost his job at Texas am so he transferred to Houston. You also job Houston and we brought him into training camp. And when I was a training camp Kyle Alan went with the receivers and threw passes for receiver drills while Taylor heineke Garrett Gilbert and Cam Newton did quarterback drills. Like that shows you what? Like what kind of prospect for dealing with and credited him for sticking around and looking good with his opportunities. But I don't I think it'd be irresponsible to assume based on what we've seen that. He's good enough to be like the answer as long-term backup court. I agree. That's why felt like they should have if they wanted a back of heavy they should've addressed that that cetera free market like guy like Robert Griffin third or tyrod Taylor or terrorist semi it. I mean, I think those were viable options our not going to cost you a lot of money either. And you give yourself a lot more protection. Because right now, let's say camp does get hurt. Like you. Do we really trust? Go rookie to come in there and just up this. I don't I trust will Greer more than I trust. Kyle Alan Taylor heineke. Okay. But you trust more than you would trust like tyrod semi or so I want I try Greer at I trust will Greer at one hundred dollars more than I trust. Tyrod Taylor at a thousand. Dollars so to speak. I think you're I think you're underplaying how much NFL contract costs. Brad. No. I'm not grew salary dollars will Greer we'll make one hundred dollars. Our bill. Welcome to the NFL won't even get a crisp hundred dollar Bill who hit two fifties. So I want to touch on something. Billion? I have argued about backup quarterback position in the past. Like, I don't know like three months ago, maybe back in January. So I made the point before that the eagles are a good example of what happens when you've invest in your backup quarterback position. And there's more to it. Billy before you interject I'm up. Yeah. So, but I do believe that there is value in having a solid quality backup quarterback in the Panthers. Just locked potentially locked one in for the next four years. Who could end up being a starting NFL quarterback somewhere not likely, but it could be a solid backup. But I was talking to Ashley today because like obviously I was out at the bar last night. Didn't really get the process. Good it Brian. We get it. You have a life. You're not trapped at home. Grinder old on. I'm not done. So I was prosecuted today at Ashley text me about it. And I was like I was fucking furious about will Greer because I think that the backup quarterback position should have been addressed. But I think they waited too fucking long to do it. Like, they gave up too much valuable draft capital to get Greg little, and then they were basically trapped into getting will Greer with the with their last third round pick. Where like I feel like as Billy said you could get a viable back of quarterback in free agency. Here's. To come here costs money. We already talked about how little caps as we have and stuff like that. Would you? Solid backup. Let's not. Let's not listening. Well, we're not putting Torrey Smith. That's the thing and Ori Smith jersey, Brian. I know I'm going to well, Billy, Brian. I never disagreed with you value of backup, especially as relates to how the other teams that eagles. When our never said you did by the way. No. But here's the thing. Philly like, they got Nick foles and free agency for like, really cheap. And then they traded like cheaper than one hundred dollars. No, they picked up Sud south on waivers. So it's not like they're actually investing a lot of money into it. They just happened to get lucky with foale's in Sud cell and that out because they did invest a lot of money in foles after that season. But and I don't remember what they gave him a two year contract to two thousand seventeen. It was like a two year eight million dollar contract. That's a lot for a backup quarterback Liamine. How like Ryan Fitzpatrick like ten million dollars this year? The Ryan Fitzpatrick was potentially gonna start for the a team you have to that that replace years later. I don't agree with that. At all. Actually, I mean, I'm looking at some of the back of quarterback when it like chide handy got ten million dollars to two years ago tobacco Mahomes. Like, I don't agree that you have to spend like this absorb out of money on it amount of money like for Derek we paid Derek Anderson. What two three million over two years and backup? Yeah. He was. He was and they should have continued to keep him as they were so interested in all this crazy stuff about about like three now. But yeah. I'm just looking like what's his name the guy chase Daniel? They like seven million dollars a year. Okay. Can't afford. Yeah. Who? That's what I'm saying. Like, I think that. Like, Brian is the point that full overpaid when he was with eagles. And I'm saying it was never said he was overpaid. I just said they paid good money for him. I don't think four million dollars is good money. I'm just looking at some of the back of money. And I think that's on the low end of what backups get pay ventured backups. Get paid too much though. Okay. Well, if we could get we have that discussion. But I think that I don't think it's too much. Well, Chelsea Gardner Johnson's off the board. Went to the saints. By the way. Here's my thing. Bryant or whoever thinks the free agent route we have very little money to spend clearly clearly, obviously, the choice Smith, but that's not an option that wasn't the point. I was making. But we don't have a lot of money to spend so signing like going for the free agent back of quarterback costs us something like Haya love our costs, Bruce Arvin signing or something like that will Greer's is gonna cost like eight hundred thousand dollars this year or one hundred hundred dollars. So, but it's a much better allocation of Capri sources, we're not we're not going to. Replace Collin Jones with safety here. This is my thing to counter to go with John's point good teams. Do what we did. Do they? Yes. The patriots drafted Ryan Mallett Jacoby percent. But like the PM Garoppolo and they have Tom freaking Brady is their quarterback. Then they know that they're never going to start because they have Tom Brady. It's it's a smart thing to have a decent backup quarterback. And there's two things that can happen here. Number one. Cam gets hurt are three things Cam gets hurt Greer comes in. And and they win four games. Okay. The other thing that can happen. Cam gets hurt Greer comes in. And they go twelve in four, you know, he could be good. The other thing is is that he never sees the field. Like, we KM could return to two thousand fifteen Cam. There's there are more than. It's more than Grier is gonna suck. I mean, we don't know. And they could they could he could light it up and four games, and then somebody else's quarterback gets hurt and they get desperate. And they offer us a second round pick for him like Jimmy G. I mean, we could have that situation play out. You know, you just don't know he could never play. He could be ten year. Derek Anderson backup who never plays. He it's just we just we don't know. I don't disagree with what you're saying. But for you in for dope person Bill vote on all these people who are make giving this comparison. The Panthers are not the patriots. We would have built Bella check. We have like this absorbed amount of talent are dross. We just don't we have like legitimate holes. And I don't think that we are in the business of just, you know, taking these artery tickets and using them on on backup quarterbacks hoping that they can potentially the line replaced Kammer replace them if he's entered. I just I don't think that's a very allocating would be okay with it. If they didn't treat us at seventy seven pick the trade up, and they had like they address a safety. I think that's fair. I we talked about this yesterday. I don't like that they gave up the seventy seventh pick to trade up. But I mean, apparently at I don't. I know why. But apparently, Ron Rivera doesn't think that we need a safety for whatever reason? All right. Well, he's gonna find out the hard way when he's gonna find out the hard way that that we we do need one. I agree with you. And I've been on the we need to draft a safety train the whole time. And I I honestly think we're going to take one in. Let's see nine picks. I mean, I think that's what we're going to do. I think we're going to take the best one left, and it could be a modern Hooker. We could always try Boston for ten dollars. So I just and if Grier doesn't work out like if he ends up being terrible. It's the number one hundred pick in the draft. It's a comp pick. It's not it's not like we took him at seventy seven or in the second round. Or we traded up to get him or anything like that. It just it doesn't work. And I mean, I don't I don't hate it. I guess I'm not saying that it again. I don't hate the where they took the player. I just hate that they took him before they've they're taking other areas other Ross because like you said like earlier today date three the draft is not where you go out. And find starters, you just don't find starts here. Yeah. You're hearing fortunate. If you do like there are exceptions. And that's my point like your top one hundred is where you find the players who can come in and contribute. And. Yeah. Like, I get that. They have this. You know, high opinion on Kyle or excuse me for Sean all that. But I don't know it just to me it doesn't feel very comfortable in. You say you're very adamant like the top one hundred instinct contributors, we're at a hundred like it's a fine line. At one fifteen is next like the difference between those two picks is negligible. I would get your I would I would agree with you one hundred percent, Billy. If we didn't have the pick pick one fifteen like if we had to go from one hundred to what is our next one one thirty seven or something like that one fifty four whatever it is. I I would I would be fully one hundred percent on board with you that it was a mistake to take a backup quarterback at one hundred because we would have to go that deep without adding somebody else but fifteen fix later. We're going to be able to add probably a quality player. There are still potential starter quality guys that haven't been drafted yet. Like Amani Hooker is still on the board. He might not be in the next eight picks, but he's still there. And if her doesn't. Draft him. That's a completely different conversation. And I will be right next to you demanding he'd be fired. The thing is I don't want him to get fired over not drafting there in the fourth round. This is why I want. Well, it's not necessarily not drafting a player in the fourth round. It's not addressing a position that literally every other person who has ever watched the Panthers play football in the last two years knows that they need to draft. I snapped for the person making the decision. I just want to interrupt real quick. And let you guys know. I just ordered my Torrey Smith jersey, by the way, that's good. So the other thing is we had one quarterback that we wanted. And we'll based on how much time we devoted to getting to know him in scouting him and stuff. There are several different safeties that I'm sure that. We're all we're okay with any one of them happens to fall. And there's plenty of them there. So I think that's part of the goes into the decision where it's like there's ten to choose from. And they're playing the odds that one of them will still be there in fifteen picks because I think it was more likely that one of Amani Hooker Chaussee Gardner Johnson. And any of the other ones would be there over will Greer? So they went ahead into will Greer all this is going to be for not when we draft. It's all gonna be way draft a linebacker are linebacker. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, like, I get a logic. You guys are using here. But. It's. For them to like actually Bank on having a safety. They can that can that can. To compete with like, Colin Jones or shown golden Nora Searcy in the fourth round is just very responsible. Yeah. I mean, we do Searcy coming back. But he he's if you breathe on him too hard he'll get a concussion. So that's another thing too. Because like now people are saying that Ross cockerel is all of a sudden entrenched as a starter at quarterback in that also just makes me a little squeezy because he's coming off pretty serious injury. I don't know he well, we have Sean galled and he can play safety. So Ross cockerels gonna play corner quarterback. Brad. We have a nickel quarter. I think that Dante Jackson played nickel corner. If Cockrill is is healthy. We have bradberry. Cockrel jackson? That's a pretty good trio. Yeah. I would think that at worse. They would just play Dante Jackson's the starter on the outside in to quarterback sets and use them as a nickel when they have nickel sets, and we could use golden as a big nickel. We have good options. Chains. I know Bill you're not happy with that. But that's a lot better that a lot of that that's better than it could be with other positions. Like Ross Cockrell is your prototypical outside zone corner. Get hold on. I never have an issue with them. I'm just saying like it's a little squeezy for me as a fan to spec that injured to be entrenched as a starter. A fan of this team. Fortunately to all. That's what we do like. Well, I mean, I'm trying to mitigate those risks by you know, looking at other areas where they could address again like just using third graphic on quarterbacks. Not what I would Ross Cockrel break his leg. He broke his leg. That's not really like an injury that people don't come back from exam like he hasn't. He hasn't been a good player one year with the giants. Which is why we signed him. He was pretty good the Steelers. If I recall was not that's got caught after like a year if they drafted him. I thought they traded in because they were going to a man of more man heavy scheme that was off. I saw that the reason that he we draft we signed him as well was that he would fit better and our zone. I agree with that. What I saw was that the Steelers were going to a more man heavy scheme. So they traded into the giants. He went to the giants the giants, then let them go. That was what I saw. Because maim, I guess they were all going to a more man heavy scheme since he was actually good with the giants. I just remember it wasn't really like hippy bad as much as just like the fit. I like how they showed the notable fourth round picks on ESPN right now. And there's six of them like ever. Obviously there's more than that. But it was like it's also a really funny list because they went with big names for a long time ago. And then they really regretted for straws recently like John stallworth Steve largest Andre I had to go that far back. Yeah. Charles thank out that Prescott to rate Cohen. Boy, Dak Prescott into re Cohen juices flowing. They took Christian Miller address Scher. Of you know, that for fact, yes, I need to see that. Because I'm okay with that. Where's that? Murod Regis confirmed. It so I will put that imbed in your post, John. Okay. So go in there and do it. I feel like Chris Miller was mocked in. Like, I feel like I saw him in like anywhere from like the first third rounds in some mocks. I don't know why. He's not bad especially in the at at hundred fifteen overall. I mean, I'm okay with it. Like, I I'm okay with it too. I don't hate it. They need they need as much, you know. We need we need defensive line depth. Well, is that a defensive line reluctant Clair's in like a linebacker grocer? Yeah. But I mean, we we need that too. But we need I think we need more defensive lineman right now. Because right now, they have like I think they have enough that drug shirts like they don't need to be like why you have a problem with Vernon Butler. I don't have a problem with him. Ron. You have Eliot. Ron Rivera has a problem with him. Got Kyle love though. It's fun. That is true. We brought Kyle love back, and what is Alan Bailey. They could be signing him. That's all you need is the first sentence right now. Right bread. Yeah. Go ahead, and publish it. Well, let me finish the headlines, and I'll publish it. And you can go back in and write the actual article. I played for Alabama. He's gonna be great tell me when to tell me when to go people people get a little peek behind the curtain. Yes, what we do here. It's really scary back behind the curtain. Don't go back there ever. That's why. That's why you tune into the live show. I'm telling you. It's traumatizing don't do it. Wealth quarterback hurricane. That's a lot of hurries. That's a lot of hurries. Okay. John. I published the story now you can go back in edit and do your right up and republish it make sure you update the time stamp time to plagiarize the shit outta somebody. 'cause yeah. Pull a d if you will. Live mike's. Yep. So I I really like them going after more edge rushers because like I understand Billy's point that they need more defensive lineman. But the pass rush sucks last year. Let's let's be real here. So like taking these picks and just thrown dartboard for pass rushers. I'm all right with it. I think that the question. Sure, are you saying the edge or the interior because I think the interior was just all did the entire pass rush as I. So right now, we have thirty one tackle is probably going to be the last year third year old defensive tackle who clearly aging, and they just re-signed at thirty five year old nose tackle for one year launch fine last year. Do no hold on me once and eight. By all indications of first round bust. Yeah. I mean, am I wrong in that? I think was fine. I also think that he's thirty years old. These clearly on the car. I know I don't I agree with you. I think you're right. I just also I believe that you we should build it from the outside in like, I think we're okay on interior line in two thousand nineteen. We are not okay at edge in two thousand nineteen. And I think that what we'll see is that next year. Kyle love will be rotated out completely will draft a defensive tackle. And then, you know, a couple years down the road wan short will end up. Being what Kyle love is now. And we'll just you know, we'll do that. But we had to replace Julius peppers. Like, we absolutely had to know. I don't I don't I don't suggest that they I don't mind the only defensive tackle. I think we should have drafted before. Now was at all. Her and Quinton Williams. Like if we would have our Christian Wilkins are Dexter Lawrence in the the first three rounds. Like if we would have gotten one of those guys it would be different. I agree. I just think it'll take it a little bit of pressure off the interior when you have so many when you have solid rushers and I'm not saying Carolina did that I'm not saying Carolina added like high end outside rushers multiple times. I'm just saying Hooker. That was that ship sailed. I thought we didn't pick him right now. Okay. I don't really understand this like hold on. Like, yeah. Your logic makes sense Brian. But the point here is that the interior defensive line. They claps pocket locked quicker than an edge rusher would from yet. I think that they'll be better when Ron Rivera is coaching them or the place, I should say. And I know that sounds like, you know, blasphemy, but they did look better the defense all around play better. What Ron Rivera was calling the plays? Obviously, Don, Terry PO was disappointing K want short still played up to what I would call it the standard for him Vernon Butler is still unknown. But. This is considering that the titans picked Amani Hooker right after we put we pick. Chris miller. So fans are going to melt meltdown. I just think the issue will be I feel like it'll be easier to deal with on the interior when you have more threats on the outside that might require double teams, chip blocks or running backs to go block them. So. I might be wrong. I'm gonna I'm gonna try to make Panthers fans. Happy. Because I'm to negative. So I'm gonna try to be positive right now, pro football, focus and disclaimer at shared. You're about to read. Okay. They're not perfect. I'm not just using them because it fits my opinion. But new Panthers edge Christian Miller. Let all SEC edge defenders in the class by averaging a pressure on thirty seven percent of his pass rushes in the games waning moments last season. He can get after the quarterback. That's a different one than I should overall grade was eighty point three ranked thirtieth thirty nine total pressures twenty-five total stops twenty two point seven pass rush win percentage. So he's not terrible and getting him at one hundred fifteenth overall is a pretty decent value. And let's just be real. Here are pass rush sucked last season. It's something that we've been saying for months now, we've got to get a pass rush. We've got to get a pass rush. We've got to get a pass rush. And by God, they actually went out and did it. So we can't really complain because we didn't draft to safety in the fourth round. When we've been bitching in wining for months that we are pass rush. Will they did that? So. Be happy. I don't think anyone is upset the draft the player. I think the the. I just think the confusion lies with how they manage their Auster in where the resources have gone like let's say they instead of giving Bruce Irvin that deal they gave it to like an interior defensive alignment. I would feel a lot more comfortable with it at this stage. Like, they still have Mario Addison. They still have marquees Hanes like is. He like now off the roster because they took this guy. Like, everyone was hiding him up to be like the next Addison. I mean FAO bottle like are they like cut him? Now. Like, I think they're gonna cut EFI. Oh Bata on the by week after we get back from London. Well, I mean, that's my conspiracy theory this season that we're only keeping him because we're going to London. All right. Well, I still think key showed like some flash. I agree. One hundred percent that he showed some flashes. I think he has potential you want out of your third or fourth edge rusher. Now, it's a little. I'm not saying you're wrong. I'm not trying to be like Debbie Downer. I'm just trying to think logically how they've managed roster. Like, I think we're finally building a team that Ron Rivera truly wants like we're getting what he had in San Diego. But instead he go he had like Eric Weddell like Antoine case. In a lot of really good secondary players. Will we have that too? We have Colin Jones and respond gauldin and dinar Searcy and Ross Cockrel. I mean, those are one for one comparisons, right? You're not gonna take the bait. Christian villas, very. Like a this goes back to original. I keep harping on keeping this like this is why they need more picks. Because like like, let's say they have like our fourth rounder in took like anything L care, if it's Hooker Thompson or whatever. Like are. You just interior defense alignment like I'd feel a lot better about you know, there. I'm not saying either like Chris Miller any they select here is gonna come into contribute. But I think that depth. More flexibility. Now, you're kind of kitchen whole yourself like these guys were like the af hot last year. On it to me. It seems like they could they could manage their entire team building a little better. That's value. Picks to me, especially in the first four rounds. Shared. By other people would disagree. So. For players in his class. Christian. Miller was second in the SEC in a few snaps per pressure behind Josh Allen. Who what seventh overalls overall? Yeah. In the next Christian Miller, and then Montas sweat, Gitai polite and Ganda Walker from Georgia. That's that's good. He's very similar profiles. Very similarly to burns is in terms of his stature is. Yeah. I mean, I just I think Ron wants guys who can just get after the quarterback. And I'm okay with that. I wished if I were her I would have drafted Amani Hooker. Now, I'm not saying we shouldn't drive to safety. I'm not saying it's not a need. I'm not saying that I'm I would have drafted Amani Hooker instead of Christian Miller, but I get why they drafted Christian Miller instead of a Mani Hooker. Like, I understand their thought process. That's the way I am too. I would've picked safety there for sure. But I'm I'm cool with a pick. I see the merits and going with another taking another swing on a pass rusher. 'cause we we fighting. My animals are fighting earlier now, they're both the sound asleep. So which is great right now. I understand the the merits of the like the making process like on what we're doing. And it another little signal to show that we're going to try to be. We have plans for being creative with the. The way we go after the quarterback next year. Like, I don't think the Bryans burns pick alone would say like 'cause we could very easily be classic around trying to pigeonhole into traditional defensive end. But the fact that we signed Bruce Irvin drafted Brian Barnes. And now draft a Christian Miller like all three of them are not what you'd call. Prototype. Four three defensive ends. Yeah. Armar is announce in the pick. Why really? On with this with a guy in a wheelchair and syrup her. It's Jordan scarlet. Runningback? Car running back from Florida. That's actually not terrible terrible. But it's so Mimi for for her new Panthers campers eighteen for our he's actually pretty decent. He's like the third running back taken vice taken any. John. I'm getting a tweet imbedded for you. I'm putting pictures. Behind the curtains again. Can't get this anywhere else. This is all our articles work Brad, hold our hands while we just type in names. Pretty much. It's like it should probably. Think the Panthers have type he's basically exact same size Christian McCaffrey perfect. Yeah. He's basically just somebody to. Mccaffrey. I'm getting your headlines done. I have the publish you can now I'll wait just to publish it. When you're done in L. Yeah. I'll start I hadn't published Glenn publish, okay? And I'll start and then go back in and right. Who is Jordan scarlet? Go on. The Panthers waste roster spot on. Camera artisan deaf. So here's a siege. Change for you. At an interesting facts about Jordan scarlet suspended for the entire twenty seventeen season. Juicy. Yeah. Not not a boy scout. Yeah. A little. A bad. Boy man, this kid there on ESPN is terrible kicker. God, no lecture. He's like three years old to kick the football. And it just kind of fell off the teeth. Piece. No, not that Jordan Skala, Burnley, Jordan, garlic soccer player. I think you think I miss spelt his name. Think it's with one T at the end. Think no. No, it's okay. Okay. Jordan scarlet among four suspended Gators reinstated after credit card fraud charges. Oh, wow. It's the first time we go jets get. All right. So. That apparently nine players on the team were a. That big scheme. Okay. Yeah. He was he was involved in that. He got spent season though, he must have been pretty much. Each of the nine suspended Gators charged with using stolen credit card numbers last summer to pay for items, including laptops, ipads, beats headphones and take out orders. Why would you do that? Oh my God. That is so stupid. Yeah. That's not. That's not very smart. Racist, not you know violence. He's also older than Christian McCaffrey f y what? I mean. Yeah. Somebody just said in the. Thread will credit card fraud is a felony. Yes. It is. It is. But it's not like a bad person crime. It's it's not it's not like domestic violence rape murder. You know, things like that. He it's an into me. It's a little different. I think those kind of mistakes don't really. He doesn't have a history of being violent towards people. And I mean, I'm not I'm not downplaying the fact that it's a crime. We're going gonna trap somebody who has a criminal instance in their past. That's the kind of crime I want it to be. It's a it's a victimless crime. The person whoever's whoever is credit card numbers guy used them. They got their money back. So yeah, the only are the the the sellers of the products that were bought. Yep. Yep. Which does suck. I mean, it's been nobody feels bad for best buyer or beats talk yet or. Yeah. Exactly. Doubt. They bought most of the stuff from a mom and pop shop. And don't get an I think in most cases insurance companies cover that. Yeah. Yeah. The insurance companies are the real victims here and who feel. And the honest fucking them. Okay. So we're most likely not making a trade today because we only have one pick left. And we can't trade unless he wants to trae like next year's fifth to jump up in the six round to get somebody. He wants I pretty confident we're not gonna trade today, which means we will. Now, we're certainly not gonna trade up at this point made it clear that they feel like they've addressed their needs. So now, it's just gravy. Yeah. I mean, and again doesn't really matter trait back, whatever the hell who cares if this point it doesn't matter. This is a great one to comment. In the open thread are Scott ninety four set Florida guys sell this to Florida guy sell this guy to me robot. Zoysia says I'm not believing anything coming from Florida, man. Yeah. To me. He seems way too redundant with Cameron Artis paint. Doesn't seem like that's what I don't understand. Like, why did we draft a running back when we sign Cameron Artis Payne to a one year deal? Like, I get that they wanna bring somebody and dispel McCaffrey. But I thought we'd already done that with Cameron Artis paying because by drafting a guy the fifth round you effectively just gave somebody cheap four year deal. Well, that is true. That is true. I mean, I I find it impossible to legitimately be mad about a fifth round pick. So, you know, maybe he can be a kick returner. You know, I'm not I'm not mad about it. I mean, he seems like it's running back. So we'll see. Oldie is in peer Miami form, probably won't even make the fifty three man roster. It wouldn't surprise me. If you ask only how Brad is doing. Scarlett has got some big arms. Fairly bench press four sixty five pounds. If you look at the guy, he he basically like as far as physique is a carbon copy of Christian, McCaffrey. Yeah. Build on offense at least scarlet will fit in for hashtag flex via. He absolutely good. Lord. Interestingly enough, Jordan, scarlet re tweeted real will Greer last night? When will Greer tweeted keep pounding? Conspirists the whole draft bring fear. It's all rig-. We already know who we have. So, you know, what's interesting here is that I think Greer scarlet where at Florida at the same time. Yeah. Them were suspended from the university during their time at Florida for one reason are another yet Greer got caught with PD's. I mean, yeah, I'm not trying to like downplay or act like it doesn't matter. Because it probably doesn't. But I found that notable because I mean element was pretty rigid with his character guys. Yeah. I mean, we've always been like that with Harney to. Well, I think it's always like that always like that with Jerry Richardson like it was always JR, not hurting. So it seems like a scarlet specialty is yards after contact about anything else. So can I share something with priced? Nope. You can't Philly gear. Shut down. Josh nor says, right. No Norse getting got. He follows a draft. I mean, really closely. He said scarlet sucks me. Okay. I mean, like, I I really have no opinion on the guy some people like him some people. I I don't really know. It's to me. It's just like other Cameron Artis gain. Like, I don't get it up for a fifth rounder. I mean, there's only so much you can expect I don't even know who is available. And who is not. Depths as far as the draft goes, I consider yards after contact to be a pretty important Staten. He seems to be good at that. I mean, I I don't know. He's clearly not even though he looks like Christian McCaffrey looking at his stats. He's not a Christian McCaffrey type back. He's he's not a ball catching back. Yeah. He's only going to be in there for like four plays. That McCaffrey isn't on the field for says that we're going to end it. Thanks for listen. Thanks for listening to the show guys. We really appreciate you hanging out with us. And letting us entertain you by talking about football, you can find us on I tunes Spotify. Spreaker? Google podcast wherever you podcast look for keep sounding and we'll probably do a draft wrap up show next week. So be on the lookout for that. Guys later football. For the touchdown. Took it in time. For the. Second. Jon Stewart that he's in for a touchdown. That's interesting. I gets role win in New England. My name is Spencer home by name is Jason Kirk. My name is Ryan nanny. But we combine we've form the shutdown Castrejon keep telling you this forecast is technically college football podcast. But it's also a show about care disaster regional grocery stores. We live Tennessee Batman homeowners associations bears in video games. Pittsburgh Batman, the hell of being trapped at a group, text unreliable legal advice. I mean, there's also some actual football discussion about coaches, having huge contracts or coaches making terrible decisions or coaches, saying really stupid things or the NC double A's saying released. Yeah, there's lots of stupid things in this big dumb, beautiful sport like time Arkansas decided to use a captured feral hog as a mascot, and it escaped and it wound up killing seven rattlesnakes a pig and a Coyote, sometimes we talk about okay Bill. If you wanna take college football exactly as seriously as it deserves to be taken come find us on apple podcasts Spotify or wherever else you listen to podcasts like this one focused. It's not voltron unless it is.

Panthers Greer Greg little Billy John stallworth Ron Rivera Amani hooker Colin Jones Brad NFL Brian Chris Miller Daniel Jones Brian burns Christian Miller giants Bill YouTube
RHLSTP 263 - Tim Minchin

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

1:12:57 hr | 11 months ago

RHLSTP 263 - Tim Minchin

"Hello Richard Herring here. I'd like the Casual Hasa Games. Devil trump is in the background of the video. Guys Pretty Cool right welcome to another sta. I'm we've got an amazing guest for you. It's the brilliant J. B. S. Tim Minchin Checkout is TV show upright which we barely talked about. It's really good luck with your loads of live. Shows that coming up really soon in fact the starting in London tonight with Michael Palin and Ashland Day so you can't come to that one must sixteens. We got niche. Kumar and in Barrington the power pop. Newbie there were very few tickets. Left full about one master twenty thirds we have izzy city. She's brilliant and as yet to be announced in my brain. It might be out by the time you get to this check restoring dot com slash gigs role in felonies. Moffat youth not yet confirmed the guests that some very exciting news a quiz show host. Do I hope we go for that one. And we're going for some crazy big names. You never know who we're going to end up with and also able to sakes. We have got lolly. Be at Adam and Joe. Anim- Buxton Joe Cornish together at last by net. They said they'd never worked together again but they come back for me. These shows will go up online that when the soda as well. Of course I must twenty eight. I mean Birmingham guest yet to be announced also sold out huge there to thank you so much Birmingham Forcible Norwich April twenty fifth also sold out. Thanks for your support knowledge. You guys great no guests. Yeah dance for those. That's how we like it London Tickets head bad. Just get the news on the guests. I if you're not just books and tickets for those remaining gigs. In London we are planning on doing more late. June the just keep on checking restarting dot com slash gigs as Tober and November. Think those are the dates. Yes they are every Monday October. Novem- because the pencilling in and we will do a few more on the countries while I believe so do keep supporting if you can either come to see the shows Dot Com by Jason Becoming a badger. Or go to guy. I started coming by the question. Books that will help us. Fumble part cost the trump card game berry enjoyable. That will help us do multiple calls to we have big plans this year. So if you can afford three pounds a month to give us Badge and in return for eight podcastone months seem pretty good value to me. The net will help was Mike Mole. Rats spend these. Sitcom we're GONNA do a later in the year or early twenty twenty one It's all looking good. There's also a Gig of the March twenty fourth at the two. It's not even needed Guy Ramos in the Blue Room. If that's usually just where people hang out and have a drink is not a lot of tickets is only to customers. Got Your priority half and register your interest in new hopefully might wins tickets to CMO Mutoko. James Acosta Come. Those are some pretty good Coming over that will end up on the regular fade for people who want to customers and Yeah it's looking pretty good so thank you for your support vote This is my yeah. That's what I'm going for twenty twenty and I hope something really terrible happens to me in about a week's time just admiral dramatic irony to my hubristic excitement that anyway. I've got two house. The Games trophies are there's not many people who got two of them and I'm one of the only ones match Britain's anyway and yeah his trophy that anyway that's crack home. Relax is full. That's crazy people are going to be young theory us in the comments and then I will delete them if they say what time they have to start listening and watching. You've been great. Thank you very much enjoying these fantastic. Poke costs I come recycling ago. Why my token even longer Israel Justa with Timothy Christopher mention that it's going to bother me the middle nine enjoy John. Welcome to the let the square. Please welcome a man. Who's been lauded in the spectator magazine? This week is rigid. Thank you why. You're two inch airings. Xxx Texas Paul Cost. I you got to come up with a new thing cost so many cost. I've decided to exit from all words beginning with L. S. and T. like lexicon I'm GONNA leave lexicon sex in Texas than aspects. Nobody's better if they do. I'M GONNA leave them by the way I twenty nine take and if I'd rather be dead than that happening on how you listening thinking that's a long time ago. It was three days. It was in three days time when I was talking to a bunch of chunky. Pandey men who work in it and stay away from social situations the other day they call it. Just GonNa ask The Spectator magazine. Right which is I. I was a bit nervous about doing slightly Fascist magazine fashion and they were quite nice about me. They said they said I was the king. The usual stuff they say about me. They'd say offstage he seems like a man replay. Replaying an argument with himself. I mean that doesn't sound like he doesn't doesn't they've got there but they weren't as nice about you as they were about me and I just WanNa just though that that thing I said was that they said build a fan base of Chunky bid at men who stay away from social situations who work in. It if you didn't have many friends you'd probably like Richard Herring is what about you. WanNa proven wrong. But I'm looking at the front on a Chunky Pandey manual works and I tell you what would you do for a living? A massive students with I approve hawks task. So then you gotta the Specht. How many people would classify themselves jet flight cheering as a chunky baby man who stay away from social situations? Yeah afraid of social situations. You wouldn't have joined in with that hearing. This isn't a social very social situation. We all hang around after Madame Caroline. Love it to me. We all go for drink afterwards if you fancy some. Something's GonNa have to do it but I've got to a level maths you can bring the shooter. Yeah I I. It's quite dot so I can't see if he's not who you your mess. You ask the way. Well if she's not gonNA teach in Maths. Everyone thanks your name. Indigo just told me intimidate you were just talking about backstage about the color indigo. We're talking about. I asked him the question. What's your favorite color? The backstage interview. He said Magenta. I said how indigo gets a bad rap because it's in the rainbow but nothing's colored indigo. Is it in the world? It's always one of those main seven but never go. There's something indigo my door knows the word indigo fucking. Use that from someone to name a child that we made the point. You were born violent so it must have been worse. I don't need to write each team. Told you just they would come up. Just which has come on. Good luck with the with the Carolina. Mrs Harrison cracks straight on. Thank you I wanted to prove that guy wrong. You fuckers fuckers. I've gotta but people who is a very mixed audience and there are some women here. There's at least three women here because mentions today's very excited. We loved my guest this week. He's puppy snow for telling students how best to live. Their lives was wearing funny hats. I'm a funding. Mike telling me I was a funny hander. Johnny how are you good? Look how young you were? I was forty forty. Two in the good that was that was a good start on stage. You worked out well. Sometimes you get that donkey one. Having sex with their family didn't see that coming parents and merely discussing number one number one hundred and fourteen and number two hundred fifty something not quite but nearly nearly the tent Poles. Hold this fucking thing. I am on the sly skew in the center. Yeah so we can keep going but you have to come back in about another one hundred. You should stop not just so I- appear to be a book in everyone's should do when you get into block back for the third time you're gonNA come on. Let these men go somewhere to socialize. Asking successful Tim. After eight is just people in cracked the thirty quite a long way apart. Do we need companies? Probably somebody feels to tell me if you're a chemist and this is becoming the cameras. Do we have these? Chaz lost here these. These are relatives of you. Spend your budget this good get so what. What brings you to United Kingdom. Tim Turing Again House against Tom in a long time. I'm really enjoying it. It's good a lot playing music on stage and swearing and people come into come. Yes they will come Can you make a living from dunes and you have to do another job in the day? I just don't I wrote Mathilde none of it. I didn't write Matilda and all of my committee the opposite of the Truth. But yeah yeah it's really really good fun and I do actually have this quite often onstage. I have this moment in the UK. Where I feel quite genuinely like people just I went away for eight years and then I haven't heard really in the UK for since the orchestra show and they came back. It's lovely good. Yeah Youtube for keeping me alive Spurs. Yeah so you since we last time we had a difficult professionally window. We talked in twenty twenty seven. I was just brexit because I think you predicted that. Oh Yeah Right. Yeah something else fought them so I think it was just before the two thousand sixteen so it's been a little boot under the two thousand sixteen because it's before that was twenty three years. We must've already talked about my film closing down. Maybe not that we did. I think I think it was still ongoing. So you written Dreamworks Doing Robin Hood. Yes but last. Yeah Yeah that will. Interestingly Robin Hood was let the most successful of the things I was doing was the most famous flop of the last anyway. Yeah so animated film and that got shut down and then ground Ho Broadway and that got shut down and then I moved to Sydney in felt depressed for a while and numb donate stuff. It's put a lot of time into Larkin's I three quarters. Yeah Yeah Yeah and then. They just decided they've been new people to go from the the question is that. I guess I'll never know the answer to because Americans don't tell the truth but the trait in that world and the Hollywood world the executives trait artists is sort of thing to manipulate rather than them peers. They're like like what monkeys do we hire to do this thing and then how do we make the Monkey Not Cross? It's more so it's very hard to get straight answers and I'm actually very interested in giving them as well and yes so. I spent four years on the film and I ended up directing it and it was Yes huge beauty. Listen ninety million dollars dreamworks musical with Singing Animals Strategy and Hugh Jackman and all that Jack even Mugabe and name once and Ben Medicine every all the all the doing voices and hounds. Zemo is during the school with me and it was pretty cool and really hard work and It's hard to talk about losing it. Like obviously make an animated film such as sort of obtuse privilege thing to be allowed to do and the loss of it is not something anyone can go. That must feel like this. It's it's very but it really is like is like spending four years building a full sized house out of matchsticks but you had to hugh the matchsticks yourself invent would I like. You're you're literally just going. Harry wrote this my friend Harry crips write the script and then we developed it and then then as people drawing sketches of characters and then you take videos of movement and you just build it bit by bit until you having four meetings about the surface of feather all the way eucalyptus leaves hang and the way light hits Eucalyptus. There is the level of Sort of fidelity is infinite. It's actually really exciting and very very tedious and everything but we are at the stage where you could watch a three fully surfaced fully digitally lit song with huge. Ackman's voice in whole bits of these beautifully developed characters by French animators and yeah and then when universal pictures dreamworks the question. I'll never the answer to is. Did they go? Do they get a a team of experts in animation animated musicals and go? This one's not going to work. In fact I do know the answer. They didn't genuinely didn't day. They bought the studio and Universal also in another animation studio which is run by GEICO. Chris Miller who's one of the great geniuses of the form who made the Little yellow guys and all that one of those focus called millions and millions. And he's a genius. I am and I said to Chris. Miller don't drink. What do you think this film and Chris and I just went well. We'll shot it down and it was. It was like forty five million bucks in one hundred and ten people working on them and fully record crazy inside the the thing that made me depressed ground. Who does probably actually more brutal brutal under way but I just that loss of time at the things that could have been doing time. Just couldn't get over that that was the pervasive thought. I could've been could've been doing this or that because I'm quite sort of an agitated person who likes making things to have four years of making things put in the trash samed vandal. There's just no way they someone might come in and say. Hey we've finished. Yeah well for another twenty five. Quit at least some really good. Exactly what happened? Yeah Lebron wanting more. It's just they netflix. Wanted to buy animal. Logic wanted to buy and universal the short stories universal made it completely unviable non-vaible to buy and when I asked one of the executives of why you would take something that you've already used as a write off against the expense of the studio which basically what they did. They took something that was a risk and went. If we just take that forty five million bucks already spent and that still suspend and all those people and we take it from the risk because we don't overdose assay because we've never made a musical and we don't know what that is if we put it in the column of light stuff we get to ride off legally against the purchase of the three point. Seven billion dollar purchases the studio. Then it's a plus one phone call is pretty gross but you know people have west problems as I say on stage when I talk about this in my tour the very definition of privilege is having big sad because someone shut down one hundred million dollars one hundred million dollars cotton relative right my but yeah so jimmy the exact city schmuck insurance. I said how can you say I said sell it to Netflix? Something he went. Yeah we'll sell it to them for the full cost of what we spend on it. Plus the cost of the software which they'd have to lace office because it's unique during the software. Plus the cost of re-training animates use that software. Plus we would take. We would demand that we take fifty forty whatever percent of any profit and might well. No one's going to do that. Bro. It's hard enough to make. Any profit often often animated film anyway and he went. Yeah and what do you mean wash schmuck insurance and I went right. What him what he meant was like Schmuck. If you make money off of we're going to kill it dead. Yeah that's what the subject is very tough business and you've had a lot of success. I mean well I totally think of it like that. The amount of lock I have had. I still do a lot of unlocked. Yeah you know. It's it's hard to see that when you're in it because you think I worked but it's bullshit it's Bullshit I. It is pure luck that I've had Matilda and my as I say in my shirt that I was misdiagnosed as a comedian. All those you isn't that same to work and then had some unlock. The trouble is when the mechanism of unlock is psychopathic humans. It's you have to say them just as cells of unlock. You know. Say all the things that are terrible in the world as if you take a macro view the only way I can get my head around evil of Yucky stuff in the world is to think of. The world is an organism of which some cells cancerous. And if you think about that and then come into light just psychopathic exacts. Its all this. Of course there's some shitty cells. I didn't seem like it was good for you and guide you going back to Sydney. We'll always going to do. I didn't I didn't have the film shut down. And then what time the Sydney twenty was. I'm four years since before we left England so we're going to get the film done in fact. The film was going slowly so I was going to be facing commuting from Sydney to La for the year. We still have to go on it. But it didn't have to do that in there a moment when they shot it down where the relentless yeah. I wish someone would shut down my radio force. It comes up enough to write it but sort of feel. It's the same site set. The my problem is I haven't really done any of the work to do it. Very urine animated character could have been drawn by an eccentric Frenchman. I think it's realistic view. You've done some other things. You been squinched. His name is about it's going to work masturbating in the way to work. Couldn't Commu tosses yes quintas a little thing written by friends of mine that I was very glad to be asked to do it and it was a filmed in one day. So he did six episodes in one like the whole thing was filmed. In one day did a couple of hustles a few days before in this film and filmed and filmed as the whole show was just all these divergent stories and our story was one story filmed for four hours and I was getting sicker and sicker and sicker. So if you watch that show. I can't talk but luckily we filmed it chronologically and at the end he has a break up and gets very upset. So I'm so sort of worked but yeah it's a good day I got to kiss Andrea. Dimitriadis is incredibly beautiful. Was it for the show were just? She just passed out. You also played the blue willow in orange is the new with the wiggles and you played the blue wiggle in. I'm guessing in a sketch. Show is it is. Yeah Yeah. Nazim Hussain is a starting committed so so squint as I don't believe Australia exists. No no no. This is a conspiracy that Walker that kangaroo conspiracy now is a great Australian. Stand up. Sri Lankan Ozzie. And Somehow one of the network somehow convince channel nine which is like a terrestrial network. They usually does that. This Lincoln Ozzy do a Sitcom about racism basically and we play the wiggles and he was the long lost Brown legal. But that's that's been a great thing about moving back to Australia that I squint and oranges. Brown both things that usually I'm fully in control of everything I do like. I'm and now people just come into this and I go. Yeah that'd be great as sort of like trying to be part of the VIBE. What was the brought? What what what went wrong with Robin Hood? Robinhood sir. I I mean yeah I haven't seen it. Oughta notes that come out young kids in with Kim's fry you always fans I was good. Tame was a Miami spotting a little bit of bias. Jamie Foxx Shit Tim. It's a very interesting thing and I don't know how much I should say about it because I don't want to be disloyal to 'cause there's my by good people and produce away friend of mine. The reason I got in the movie is because the produce agenda Evanston well. I got in the movie because I was right for the past but I wouldn't have been noticed except that the producer was among my kids school. It's a Hollywood story and we're going trick or treating very relevant few years ago. Jen's that's violence dad. He's kind of quirky looking like and so she rang auto bathurst to originate director on. Pt Blinders and Black Mirror. So hot and who was the director of this Robin Hood? And what have you heard tim mention and he's English. Oh yeah and that's the that's Freitag sure and it seemed obvious actually. The script was written by another friend of mine but then he got moved on. In the way that does get moved on their own projects in Hollywood and another rider and in the end I think can say without upsetting anyone any of people who made the film massive of your average get riots. This is off right. I can shave my head. Yeah you look you look spiritual but just what amazes me is is that you can go into production on a hundred million dollar film that robinhood without a script that everyone's happy with but it's the way it goes because all these things script scripts in L. Ed is one element of this. Massive thing really. It's like do we have the stars how they available. Do we have the studio? Have we built the set? Because on a film a reboot of Robinhood King Arthur or one of those other China might more money out of properties. The thing is how do we make look so good? That competes with vengeance. Their heads are in all that. How do we compete with marvel? At how do we compete with Star Wars? It's amazing and meanwhile the scripts that yeah I think what's their draft and it's just not I don't give a fuck. How big your movies? I think the script is the only thing that fucking matters until it's right and that's why I'll never work in Hollywood because I just can't you know Ma am. I just get on board as a producer and I'm no. I'm not GonNa do anything that I can't that and that's why I've gone home and wind back to turn is because I just don't want to do anything that I can't go. I think that should get made now. Yeah I think that does seem to be doing films. There's a lot of people. Holy Grail and Kalat. The most Hollywood films are not as good as any of the things that the people end up being in the already. What is it's just that. At a certain price point there are a whole lot of executives. Who have never made anything who are scared the APP when I never made anything. I mean they're good producers and good executives but I've never fucking made anything so I don't know whether it's going to be a good seeing animal or whether it's going to be a good robinhood they might be really good people but mostly they're scared because someone's giving the bucks fuck maybe that's good. Phi Phi that guy that guy and it's just a Shishir. Yeah and how for you coming your rise to fame was pretty rapid and then you went even more famous than even more famous going to Hollywood. How was it for you as little? Timmy minchin incite inside their work. Work working alongside Hollywood Hollywood stars and being part of that. Did you feel like you say this is what I born to do or experience of that? Well I mean I've never met. People May Have Mitt and are very still very excited. I've met you and I'm excited. I explained you weren't in Robin Hood but I'm very excited to me You've met people that you went committing that purse. And what's the experience? I'm still I'm still thinking this. Is I think if you put me in the middle of a Hollywood blockbuster and I was acting I'd be I'd be all the way throughout beginning. Fucking Jamie Foxx. What's going on and then again? Just say the lines that in the script but let me ask you. Did you know I? I mean I've been acting. I was an actor comedian. I was just bad I mean I was a failed one and and I I have to. I think I want to say without sounding like a tool. It's probably that post bolted. Just not every now and then I'll meet someone ago but it lasts about two seconds because it's a totally done to say but they're obviously oldest knittle. Tommy Cruz Little Sandy bulletin that their oldest humans and I just weirdly. Don't feel I think that's a great privilege of being brought up in the most isolated capital city in the world going to a sort of Nice gourmet brought up by strict but kind parents and just I sort of on one hand never believed I mean I literally left Perth at the age of twenty seven already married thinking maybe one day. I'll be out of school for a play at the Malthouse theatre in Melbourne. Might and I meant that like maybe but maybe Zona payment to play piano. Piano at twenty eight so does allow one day. I'm going to be on Broadway so I've got absolutely rooted in that and I still feel very strongly that I that that my career is a fluke now taking my opportunities and worked hard at them but on the other hand I just don't give a shit I don't. I don't know why maybe that's an entitled Perth Middle Class upbringing thing where there just wasn't anyone to be scared. But I I mostly feel cowed by paypal. I think that's I think like some people go to Hollywood and get so into it and so change and become those people and I love meeting famous. Some people love y'All namedrop fuck and I love the people. I've got to me yet but I I don't know in the end I'll tend not to pursue it. I don't know why I I think mostly I went to Was the big ball in New York. Where the main lady who likes costumes runs one hundred and one Dalmatian? Yeah she's like that narrow straight plays film and Winter Netball Netball. I went to the met ball ones. When Matilda's in New York and I just Downton Abbey girls were there they were fucking gripe but I got sat next to tiny Christina Ricci and she was actually ended up in great and then there was a model and a basketball player and a model a model in basketball or something Christina Ricci and me and I just fell and this is where the like. Maybe I'll be out of playing a piano. Bach guy comes up sitting there going. I have two concurrent thoughts one is. I am an ugly gross man. I'm surrounded by beautiful. Wealthy People. Christina fucking reaches Gorgeous and done the Chin up. Kinda MAKING SURE. She's in case. Someone takes a fighter and I'm like these people don't WanNa fucking nothing to say I'm utterly unfunny. I just feel disgusting and at the same time. I'm thinking my God. These people have nothing to say. Do not deserve to be not not that not that but like like feel feeling of hundreds inferiority and significant superior and I went through the night and eventually got drunk enough and found the Downton Abbey and that was quite fun. I wanted to move beyond says. I got to be honest but I went home when I'm never doing that again. That made me feel like the worst version of myself. I feel like needy gross and I can see where that fuck him. Yeah but it is interesting because I think for some. They go that way and then they leave mine. I'm GonNa win that. I'm friends these people and that's all that matters and then there are and the work they've put in falls away. That's not this is what happens to this whole thing in the cloud model right I want to. I think you should write music together. I've got an idea for you. You're GONNA work because I'm a bit lazy update based on the film. I've had an idea. I'm so excited. We haven't seen the film Shank. Why don't we do like the plot of the movie Shrek Two surveys one? It's dreamworks movie on all the guys they made it A. It's too much pain for me to. It's already a music. Yeah no but we do. We doing good friend. Different one being up star Trek I take from the fifty fifty fifty split. I think we if that's quality going. We could have written by the end of the night. If you're happy with that opening line do you think Granddaughter Day would have worked better? If you'd had a shrek sort of the same character isn't that the honors Shrek margin who can't say the beauty in the world needs to learn how to say it. It's fucking three stories in the world are all. Have you in the center good? I saw good. Yeah probably like Matilda saw goods better. Grandma does better for adults is more complicated people that we made a terrible miscalculation with musicals costs like eighty CEOS sixty. Quit or whatever and groundhog does better. If you're saying it. Four Times. A groundhog day was very successful in London. Awards and stuff and then when there's lots of reasons why groundhog day didn't work in New York and almost none of them are anything to do with the show but I like Groundhog Day. Unlock and the weird thing is. I'm just adding working on another musical and it's definitely so this. If you get thing so rowdy musical I should say Dennis Kelly Matthew watchers mode Mathilde. But you get a struggle. It's fucking bottle and the people who were just all top of the game and it worked out well and it happens once in a generation billy where family musical can run and run and run and once you've been involved in something like that you've got a couple of choices one is try for the rest of your life to have another one and the other is go for that anymore and it does it does. It is writing a musical. Does give you financial security to not be so much under pressure. And I have decided very consciously. I'm completely disinterested aiming for another ten year running musical. It's an absurd thing to aim for. Anyway I mean that's when you start going wrong that's when you become those fearful exects going. How do we make Robinhood as Popular Star Wars? You just you just not going to the chances of you making a Robin Hood of success. I wanted one hundred. And you're going for that your bullshit so ground. Her does deliberately more complex and interesting and the next one's going to be almost inaccessible. I'm interested in the form. Yeah I'm not interested in a lot of musicals and I'm not GonNa read music. I ain't trying to be son dime but I'm only interested in musicals to the extent that they are an interesting form to try and do cool stuff with and if I'm not going do that then other thing I can do gone. Tura getting a TV show and he's also been I find that fascinating as writing stuff as well. The people get to that stage when they've got that complete financial security and yet they still chaired out stuff that is increasingly popular populace to make money. And you kind of think. Why wouldn't you just at least do every other one? Just do something really weird. You know you can do. You've got to the point where you want to so I want to talk about. Richard Curtis without at all. Because I love him. I think he's not only an incredible ride. About one of the most amazing people he literally spends fifty percent of every year just working on charity and comic relief. Like he's an amazing ethical beautiful funny but he's not trying to write another. He's not trying to write for weddings and Notting Hill because they were commercially. Successful Guy is what he writes. Flat that he writes. He doesn't want to be fucking Beckett. He wants to write beautifully constructed so so he's written yesterday and it's not because he's trying it's how he writes right whereas Mathilde for both dentists in Iowa's probably like oh one okay. Let's do a real doll story. But it's not our thing now and I've been asked in many children's musical since and I said no because I don't self identify as a primarily children's artist. Where are you excited when Alan Sugar Open? The groping episode of the apprentice on the Mathilde set. Did that. Make you excited when you saw that these that happened. Nope don't really know who Alan Sugar is. And I don't really know what the apprentice like I think Donald Trump was the donald trump. Donald Trump was the American apprentice and the him presumably. Alan sugar is the actually. I've I've tweeted on sugar a lot over the time you have replied beings when trump said do you think you're gonNA be the next prime minister and he's had no he was Jack Replacement but they can be signing on the set of Matilda and then all the bookcases come in and the candidates swept children's toys good set for? He probably got some money off of that. I doubt it. I got some insight. We got a new emergency questions that we haven't asked you before. Okay How's this going? I'm loving it. I don't know about the rest of them. Yeah I don't know it's quite it's meant to be funny as can be done spotlight. Once you're done a couple of funny ones we can take. We can do serious one. Yeah two newspapers of called me the best interviewer in the country and wing something. That's mainly because I hate people. I just put I G GREE. That poor people are horrible. I don't I just think there. What part is my his new image. The question we haven't asked you if you owe the art museums in the world. Decide that you are allowed to take one item from one of them museums and keep it for yourself. What one painting or piece of exhibition from a museum? Anything piece of history. Would you take home with you if you could ask him any museum in the in Hobart in the Museum of all new art which is one of the best modern art museums in the world? There's a sort of robotic working class. That Shit's every couple of done. One that can I have a sculpture? That's been bought by the Singaporean government. There's there's a Salvador Dali sculpture in Singapore Foyer of Commercial Building Code Newton or something. Does anyone know it? It's got a hole in his chest and the round sphere hanging sculptures in the world. Yeah that's right. Yeah Yeah. It's beautifully proportioned but that that shows that. I don't know shit about because I suppose I should take something classical. I liked LAPUTA. That's my favorite sculpture of Jesus being cradled by Mary. It's in the back pulls weapons when he's just across so when he's across approportion he's don't know it's beautifully since. The light was good slightly winkle because he knows he's coming back and is it the prostitute or his mom his mom. But you know that's confusing him. It was his mom there on the prostitute. I think it's his mom in the in the in the Mary. Magdalene wasn't a prostitute. Just know she was just a woman without a husband. She says like wash in people's feet with the head. That's in that book. It's indistinct just virgin. Minute maid until Sultanas mistranslations all over the shop. I like Dali. I know it's very sort of unique student of me but I also like Jesus is three day cross. Jesus Dali's Jesus crucifixion waited. A few of them actually can have those that few very. It's been granted me. I'm allowed to give what's amazing. I'll be waiting when you get a lot of people choose. Things aren't worth much money really kicking themselves to people who got the Mona Lisa. So fast it's going to be some. There are a couple of Have you been refused entry to a country do that? Let's have you spill wine on my my lovely. Fuck your couch. Look at my pens. We it as the whole asked me the question you ever been refused entry to a country. Never asked anyone that question. I don't remember writing. I've never been refused entry to a country girl on holiday once I was in and she was an also yeah thing because she refused entry. Swear this it's a cheap confused that she'd Gotten America and they found that drug convictions. You've had a big holiday America planned. And then she wasn't allowed into America. Says you came to Thailand? Is that where I met her and walked up? The beach walked back down to the Beach. And then we both benign nine questions. Yeah no I mean getting into America's bit of a punish. You have to stand for three hours and then have a grumpy person questions. But I've never turned me away. I don't have any interesting things about me so I've been convicted of anything note. Have you know still still pick a mix of America hears about that? They won't let me edit that out. I don't want to go have been to America by since trump's go don't wanna go there till he's not there anymore. That was another big thing about leaving. Is Palpable sense of. Get me the fuck Outta here. This is crazy and he's Australia a safe place to go in those the. Uk's not safe place to go have a fundamentalist Christian prime minister. But I don't know we just dig primary resources out of Aboriginal Land and sell it to China with fine I. It's a funny thing. Australians that there's a lot about Australia that's very I hyper aware. The fat and I'm like God places should just be a bit more like Australia. Health system has a balanced between private and public and everyone gets health but people can pay for insurance and that education systems really good and then I go yet. That's because we control immigration despotically and we had a primary result unsustainable primaries those is out of Aboriginal Land. And we like. We can do all that. Because we're rich and heartless but it's lovely. It's short term Rehab. George Mambo on quite reach La would love to yesterday was yesterday. It was really good but it's depressing. How because pretty depressing. I mean he was breaker interviewee view. The message is not very depressing. What's so depressing is when smart people feeling really pessimistic. You got any optimism. I have must because I'm too dumb to see your fucking much so either. I'm quite smart. I just don't think we can save the world by getting rid of capitalism and all banding together. Don't really see that. I'm not either if that's right but I'd love to have the argument from massive ignorance. I'm just not every now and then I read something of by someone that I think is very very bright and I think Oh shit. You're you're really you think you're quite pollyannaish. You think humans a lovely so so your house on the hill you know. Golden light on the hill involves humans not being primates not being fundamentally competitive sexually competitive competitive races driven by every I mean maybe at my friend Adam rather argue with me and say I'm doing evolutionary psychology and it's bullshit but I I feel like any system. That doesn't acknowledge our competitiveness do it? I'm just massively icon. I think eventually commonsense. Okay we'll take things going so wrong that we didn't commonsense okay. Kim has common sense advocate. Do I mean when things are fighting? The NAZIS WASN'T COMMONSENSE. Nationalism pressed into service of something. I'm not sure it's common sense. It's what we do. We know he's I. I was thinking cap at the people who are capitalist. If the world's destroyed good you have us having lots of money. There's GonNa come a point where the money's self point go fuck. My money's GonNa be with us if we don't do something about this. It might be worth. Yeah talks it off a couple of million of these fifty five billion. I think in terms sustainable energy and stuff the already tipped. We're on our way it's just that it's and there's too many people trying to hold it back. I think we we're going in the right direction. It's just really really too. Yeah so market. Forces aren't making a move fast enough and I'm not sure all are screaming and Greta GonNa make it move much faster but it's better this year. It is acknowledgment of climate. Science doctor is surely a lot better this year than it was five years ago. Uh Yeah that's his augmenting extinction valiant quite law a very short time in terms of raising awareness. That's depressing enough yesterday. Your your more depressed and depressing but without any knowledge. Ignorance depressing watching parliament. You are very very inspirational in your. So what is a while ago the one I watched? I don't know what it's called valedictory speech. Whatever the students funny hat funny hat red coat gown you get to do that sort of stuff is. That was done a few of them. Yeah three three of us do the same speech of yet out on the set of of Mathilde like Alan should just just took Alan sugar quits on. No I did a speech for Mount View Grad about being an actor and it was quite like being an active shit. You should be something quite contentious and I just WanNa my old union earth my other. Old Union Perth. Yeah it's I mean. There's a big honor to be asked to do that sort of thing. Yeah it's an exchange. I understand the nature of the exchange. Which is we'll give you a fight degree you give a good speech hits on the Internet. Maybe a few students in I mean I. I think that's right. I think the fight degrees. I don't think they're meaningless. That they give people fake degrees if they've done stuff that hung fake degree in Of caught all four on doctorates one. I refused eventually because I'm I don't know where they are. Actually there's somewhere though I think there may I. I mean I when I first got offered. One won't accept this mom win. Don't be a prick someone's just there's being sort of acknowledging the reality of it and then there's just being a smug dig like no one's getting hurt by someone saying you went to our union. We think you did good at your staff but I also like the opportunity to try and do a nice speech. It's a good challenge. Just scribble things and but I think there's a point at which I mean. I feel that about this podcast to tell because I talk so much but I really hit a point round might. I'm not that interesting. I need to shut the car and stop life. Act is an talking about my skill. Is I'm able to structure sentences with endings. But that sort of like an Avatar for wisdom is not. There's nothing but there's a log with these beautiful and always contain like a lyrics which is what fascinates me because I love words even more than music the lyrics fantastic but the idea is in a dead so especially for people well densely. Don't get that in many songs. You can listen to ten times in a row and get something out. Oh good thanks assign good. That's what I want. I want to do that with and I go now. But yeah you get used to ask to talk enough and you start thinking you've got to say it's not necessarily not necessarily true but we have to pretend on this. We have otherwise the whole thing was world in my sort of what I was saying earlier about feeling both tiny status high status at the same time and I talk in my show about the balance between self loathing and pride in that balances that I think I've got nothing to say. And most of the people saying she'd had dumbest Shit. So if we don't say something to fill the Falcons I'd rather than we talked about this if I was as a very big pleasure to do this. Podcast is difficult is doing six five days but God. I love that movie. It's channel four and then they didn't make it right. Doug -IETY I should be the one about psalms mums. Thank you go. Oh Yeah Yeah. That's in the two zero also. It's like it's so mean as well. Yeah it's a really great way is a rare. We'll soundings O'Brien we'll we'll recognize himself. Them looks at that stuff now. It's a problem without prime minister. I think about Scott Morrison. Think all wake in camera just talking to pay want something from him and then the weekend when you think. Maybe the prime minister reading an interesting book. He's literally the Proper Hill Song. Church pray for rain proper literal. Jesus stuff and you think. When are you going to have any thoughts were what? Where's the data that's going in? That's helping expand your. Why did I talk about primary? I just totally say it is. That was that faith failure. 'em Yeah I think I think religions got the human race to where we are. We wouldn't have got here. It's been very functional but we won't get to the next bit because I think that's the problem people believe that someone's going to come and rescue us even if it's it might be God but they think science will come to the rescue or or just some coming. Donald Trump. Go No not stuff true so that worry about what is true. I guess is that story's all we have like and I've actually come to the point having been quite pragmatic and cynical about art. I've always been like people like you really important on my job you can. It's as important as anything but I actually. It's not so much the stories stories of everything so if we don't have the story of religion what's the story we're telling ourselves you know we no longer. So Britain and America are trying to reassert the story of nationalism which is an arbitrary boundary based on space but but based on arbitrarily fought for borders. But we're trying to reassert the idea of nationalism because we think that's the story that helped us through the last challenge. What did you say you will come to our senses? What we did is we. We gathered together under a flag. An arbitrary story bunch of lines that someone drew in there fucking study one day so nationalism is a story has been useful religion as a story has been useful. What need to get to quick? Smart is the story that the human race requires each other to face the big challenges. Which at the moment is apart from the ones that are getting old but it's still a problem. Nuclear proliferation is climate. And it's we're so unfortunately the old good stories. The old useful stories are barrier to the news full story because nationalism required us to be parochial and rightist. And you know some of these old boys still the way they talk about. You know the why the fuck anos Sunday Mail or whatever the hell talks about Germany as if we're still in the Second World War it's insane. There's still talking about the crowds and pitches of Anglo America with the spike on a helmet. It's like their children. Still trying to assert a story. That's no longer useful. But that is the thing in between us and the news story. Which is the human race is the new tribe and without each other. We will die out. You laugh at me. I didn't I wake up from the also. We have a little bit more but we do have the we have the Internet in place. We wanted the world you would think we. We thought that was going to break down the barriers. The Internet as podcasts is going to do it. This is just the episode. Scott is going to go all around the world translate into every language so I talk a Bit. My show empathy about public shaming. And I you know I do understand that prove the guys going on about how public shaming the problem get slammed because it's like public shaming is not the problem the fuck where shaming of the problem. You know you easy for you to look in but I do. I am trying to find a way to talk about how Anga competent mechanism for change in our progressive. It seems to be quite cool to explicitly say. I don't care how that person feels. I'm going to fucking destroy them. Because they are fascists or whatever. The narrative isn't man. Wow so that the thesis is the hypothesis is oppressing my empathy for people. Who Don't know what I know. Don't feel what I feel. Haven't read what I've read is the mechanism by which we're going to move forward. It feels intuitively problematic. Doesn't let us. Yeah let's make sure we don't feel anything for that. White Middle American guy who has never met a gay person or whatever the fuck their ignorance is the challenge for progressives is not just to be empathic for death row inmates and the things that are al things. We're really good at being but to be empathic for racist let's job yeah. 'cause we got education take a little bit and enrich somebody fallen out my head's as a result being streep for pretending pretending to be stupid becomes terrible terrible thing. Well where are we? Oh my goodness we. It's it's floating around this down and I always good I do so I I can. I can dig. I'll find a way past rep as I was going to be another serious. I feel sorry for the people. Listen to four fucking serious flipping nonsense time. Let's see if they test them boss to that question before asti many Haza question. He's a question. Have you ever been in a motorboat? There you go. That's going to say that's going to save. What what what what about is. I've never been anyone. I've been waiting and even on any sort of bumping probe rowboat canoe a canoe opinion. I've wrote a fake Oxford Cambridge boat race with toby. Young and only huck. Oh Yeah from. Boats Toby's insistence. Cox Jonathan Aitken. Was there as well. It was it was a merry mix. Yeah despicable with the motor with a Morandi with the motor the motor. That's fucking weird. How do you get across water fly? Ferrets ferry count as a motorboat copying up in an ISO- motor big opinion. Ferry I think varies a motive. But you may not. I mean little we ever. Water skied not successfully tried runs. Very young okay and like Skirt stood up on a board behind the boat. Does that count skate? Yeah really bad because if you go online and permit sharing skiing into youtube you'll find. My most successful attempt is gay. I seem not to be moving very slowly moving and then somehow still managed to trip over my case. I think you're going to become a good skier of really not. I've been twice my wife who I know you love if I die. I hope you look after him after fun. She chewed like skiing. Wants to go skiing. And I gain with your game with you on the craft. My wife and I will go skiing with my skiing snowboarding. I don't I didn't like I don't like skiing. I don't think I'd like snowboarding. You don't mind about I live. No one's offered to take me on one home. Visit me in Sydney on Automotive Killen K. Goods SEDATES STEPH. GonNa Ham all right. This is the question going to rescue this podcast. And that's going to talk about pod. Desert needs rescuing. It's been you know you're on with Mathilde. This is like groundhog. You know what you're GonNa get when you invite me on your handsome. Almost leave of the book you so handsome. You're still beautiful old. You'RE STILL. You're still looking young pink. It's enjoy the I wherever you are now. Tim I know you have to then gets much much worse. Forty four forty fourth grade four four. It was just the end of great. That's how I've been one more good year and then I'm Gonna I'm GonNa. I'm not I was probably about forty four in that. Yeah you look much look different. I bet grayness is tough isn't it is is what about gang up because you SORTA still feel like though. Just go all right. You're allowed to be young again. They get you back to thirty. You still feel that it's going to happen and then you go. No that isn't. I'm not ever going to be young again. They're not going to let me go back. Women talk a lot about how my wife is built and definitely that the feeling of not being noticed is she's beautiful and lovely looking which is not your wife but try to count the levels on which that wrong. She's beautiful and she's never beauty hasn't been her main thing but definitely she went off feel. It had a big effect on. Do you think of this. Do you think that's big of women? I suppose it is not talk about Amsterdam you I I do feel so it's a stupid thing is absolutely. Go thing where you go. I just want to be like fence. I just want something fancy and then it's you know it's slightly annoying that they don't notice you're sitting in a cafe and there's a couple of You know I'm like I'm going to try to be friendly to pick you up but you know gated like either. Yeah Oh yeah nothing. I would just like the opportunity to prove to my wife how much I love her. You know your friends who are in like normal jobs. I think there's an obviously an egotism Minnesota in our industry where it whatever but I have friends that turned about thirty five and just went fucking half out and they just they just really happy really happy with their wives and their big bellies and maybe every now and then the gone a motorboat and this and they're just they're really doesn't bother me them in the slides it Solipsism I've been vote over a Had Oh this has been a motorboat with midtown and there's no way paid by the man in Finland who was the finish me when they did talking cock in Finland. Oh it was. That was a great weekend in Finland. I've got I went to Finland. They put my show in an incomprehensible language. It went really well. Really beautiful woman had sex with me after the show finished. Beautiful Finish woman. I'm I went on a on a beach. I love that you had forgotten i. That is a much better mode about experience when I went on a motorbike. I've not been by. I remember mine jerked off by a best if you listen to Paul how. I was annoyed because I tried to was there for two nights and I tried to hook up with again the second night all. She didn't WanNa see Megan the second night. But then we got we correspondent I probably might spice it was a while ago it was. I was pre my wife I should mention. It was some time ago. I was a good man. I was young and since you got married you have been on a motorboat compeletely forgotten about well. We say sometimes the emergency questions. You think that's not going anywhere. They're the ones hoping cheating yourself too thin hungover over with some fat finish men. What bye bye with the guy in the show in a couple of his mates. When I was on the island. Oh I don't really know who these people people invented. They're taking remote Isla de Sausages after I've just had one of their women and they know and they know what I've done one of their women. The Scandinavian still own very viking. Anyway Happy Yeah. I feel sad this morning. Thank you coming to do this. It's a pleasure really nice. It was seventy percent a pleasure. It's been lovely. You're always awesome. What's coming up that you can tell us about anything. Just more of the toy touring Australia. This is going out and about six or seven months time. Well it's not much use them but I've got I've made a TV show that I'm it's my favorite thing I've ever been involved in court upright. It's on on the twenty eighth and November on Sky Atlantic. Okay or now TV which you can try it for free and watch my show and then let it go. Don't do a free advert for them. They sometimes pay us to say that is. It's a it's it's a hell ride. It was in it and stuff. It's like it's the opposite script is the script was everything and then we filmed it and then at the end. It looked like the script on telly taking piano across Australia taking Piano Chris. It's not really about that though. Is it now metaphor? Isn't it interesting that he's actually about it? It's pretty good though. I mean unless you hide it which goes. I've got to watch it and I'll let you know the next time you come on. Yeah I'll send it to you ahead of time so you can tell your friends laser jet. You've been listening to justify would be recurring in my tim. Minchin thank you very much to pass music with every week. It's record get in the shops. Thank you very much less square in Vegas back after all time. Thank you very much. Chris is not gonNA go faster stripe home to everyone at CASS. I've moved to produce more the executive producer this week. What fellow he lost quite bit of Daddy. Cool down. Dick Wilson Eichel Daniels from behind his back but his attitude to his basement. Thanks that exact producing this week's episode. This is a sniper take dove FUZZ DOT COM production. Why not just become a blubbing monthly by go bus? Astrid DOT com slash by three pounds a month getting eight week among the my with. That's crazy plus smoke. And you get loads of extras becomes one about a badges. Why didn't you do you want to do?

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