27 Burst results for "Chris Hughes"

"chris hughes" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

"Very hard is aware question. You're in the Pittsburgh area but Chris go anywhere if you want for a thirteen week short assignment in the US. Where would you go? You know. It's a place that that's always been near to my heart when it was there in eighty three and that would be Hawaii that comes up a lot and a lot of people. I've had people on here on this show before who've traveled as physical therapist and they say there are assignments available. There all the time you can go there for three months. I mean it's like a rotation you're a student again set. You're getting paid yeah. It was quite an experience when I was there for a year. Eighty three to eighty four. People were wonderful. It's a it's a cultural melting pot. Everybody's active there's a certain blend of of healthcare that you can't get anywhere else and obviously the scenery and and just a culture shock for a kid from upstate New York. Who's used to hunting Ice Hockey? You know in when you go on those beaches and one of my favorites was sandy beach and You intermixed with that culture. It's it's hard to be. It's there's no place like it. Yeah second question is a what question besides the course listings? We've been talking about today from From Orthopedic P. T. What's something you've watched? Read listen to something that really brings you inspiration that speech at the espy awards by Coach Valvano you know was was was right on with what's important in life and how to stay motivated and how to appreciate the essence of experience. You have love laugh. Learn you know if anybody's ever seen in. Obviously you can access Sadan on YouTube It's it's moving every time you listen to. It just makes you energize. So coach Vo Von. Oh had a great great speech unfortunately was near after he had been diagnosed with cancer but I think he had all the right pieces together how to put that perspective and so that that's a nice one for me. Yeah if you need some inspiration as a clinician or as a student to get through your day he does a really good job of putting that in perspective all in one package. Great great suggestion right there. Last thing we do on three questions is a WHO question who someone the audience should know more about. Maybe someone who's doing some great work that you think deserves spotlight now. I gotta I gotTA hand it over to one of my dearest friends who originally was in Pittsburgh and worked with the Pittsburgh steelers. Who's now director of player development at the Denver Broncos? His name is Coach Ray Jackson Coach Ray. Jackson works with the rookies coming in obviously was a big time right now because they just had you know the NFL draft. And I'll tell you what we had some really nice conversations and still do about learning growing up maturity being mentors for NFL rookies but certainly with my teaching and also being out in the realities of practice in him being in the spotlight job like the NFL super talented guy. And I wish he was still here in Pittsburgh but I was just out there at CSM in Denver and got a great chance to see him and meet with him and his wife and his kids are off to school. Like mine are Inda. He's he's part of our family so I'd like to give a great shout out to Coach Ray Jackson and let them know he does so much and I was able to meet a lot of the Strength and conditioning personnel there when I was out there for CSM SAM and they were very inviting and that was Coach Lauren Landau was air and really fun group so I wish him well. I'm still a steelers fan. Obviously but You know there's nothing better than to be part of those atmospheres that do it right. And the broncos certainly have a first class organization as well so that's my shout. That's good are you off the hot spots three questions August medical staffing if you want to move around the country and do this thing that you love is a physical therapist or physical therapist assistant..

Coach Ray Jackson Pittsburgh Pittsburgh steelers NFL Coach Valvano Coach Ray Coach Lauren Landau broncos US Hawaii Denver Broncos Inda New York Vo Von Chris Denver director
"chris hughes" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

"Orthopedic Physical Therapy we're back. Let's get back to the show stock about the resources you get books. Great articles are fantastic. But you know who's creating this and this is the Dream Team is mentioned before of Orthopedic Physical Therapy. You're getting that interactivity. Some things are difficult to explain without a video. And you're getting some of those videos as well as how do I put this into context right? And that's those case as I can't tell you whenever we do an episode with a case study involves people always say we love that. What can you do another one because it we want to? Now mix this together and figure out. Well how am I going to use this? Or what might I be looking for in in a situation that I can bring these concepts that I just spent time effort money to learn into practice? It's where the rubber meets the road. And that's the applied learning whereafter. We know our members are active in clinic. We know they have expertise themselves that they bring to the learning table in so when you combine it with bringing other people into that authorship process I think it just exponentially allows them to get pretty smart pretty fast and pretty applied and so we've been real happy again. Everything's grassroots you know. These are people who are practicing. Many people take the courses no some of the authors. So that's that's credible and then more importantly there's new opportunities to get involved at any level either as an author. Sme Subject matter expert or even just Get involved in the academy and I think you'll you'll find there's an attraction there that gives you what you're what you're looking for when I first started looking at this and we're talking about current concepts a lot right now because actually at the end of this episode. We'll give you a way to enter to win free access to one of those so stay tuned for that. But I really when I started digging into the other courses besides current concepts I was. I mean shoulder knee. Hip the Academy of Orthopedic Physical Therapy I. I was guessing that what I didn't know is now it's going deeper into these other courses that all tie in together things like. I didn't expect to see Pharmacology. Physical therapy management of concussions. And then once I'm starting I'm I'm digging theorem saying will yeah. Of course all these things tie in so those are great. It's more than just knee hip shoulder. Yeah and we have an advisory panel that meet set combined sections meeting. They offer up some niche areas that we might Wanna fill with a course. We also have our satisfaction surveys where people recommend courses in. Yeah we've run a number of courses that that sort of may not be building in volume of sales but they're needed one might be that regenerative course. We offered a regenerative medicine course which was actually probably ahead of its time. You know because people weren't really understanding the field it's a broad field it's new on the basic science and the applied side in so yeah. I think it's it's been fun to craft the menu every year. We meet at CSM and we roll these courses out and we. We obviously have to make sure they're popular but more importantly are they needed and so we blended with the usual topics body regions. Always sell really well. You know guys. I'm looking for a new course but when you add of course like a concussion which for the longest time was billed as a neuro experience. We've got a great monograph in there on the Ortho side of concussions and I think it was cutting edge. It was done by in Mucus and that group out of Pittsburgh excellent internationally known. And you can't get any better than that Jimmy. Yeah one other. That jumped out of me. You mentioned neuro neurology north edicts blending together two big areas of the human body where Orthopedic Physical Therapist neurophysical therapist. They're not in not in the silos. You're working with the human body. There you guys have that course availables. Well Sh- yeah. Yeah we recognize. You can call yourself in affiliate as an orthopedic therapists but we all know. It's all connected and I think it's coming full circle right now with the movement systems approach in some of these other as you get out in the area of practice you realize. I can call myself what I what I want but you know in the end. That patient has muscles. Nerves VESSELS. Cardiopulmonary risk factors. You know you got to you. Can't ignore it and so I personally spent some time in head injury during my affiliations and I was purely Ortho but the neuro made me a better orthopedic person to treat these individuals so you always have that respect and it's just a dividing line on paper but when you look at what courses we offer..

Orthopedic Physical Therapy Academy of Orthopedic Physical Orthopedic Physical Therapist Jimmy Pittsburgh
"chris hughes" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

"His specialty is bio mechanics and motion analysis. Chris Welcome to the show. Ma'am Oh thank you Jimmy. It's great to be on and share some thoughts with you really appreciate the time. What are we talking about today? Really is kind of emerging or I should say the thing. We should always pay attention to your right. We're always lifelong learners as a physical therapist or just people in general we need to be that learning very personal and once you leave at school and graduate. Sometimes we think. Hey I'm done learning now. It's time to go do but really it's always up to you to find resources to learn and stay current stay competent and progress. What you know so you can help the ultimate end goal which is your patients and we're talking about the Academy of Orthopedic Physical Therapy and that's something near and dear to your heart. Yeah exactly you know. I've been on board at his editor over thirteen years and was given the reins to craft and edit and come to the table with new courses and the academy puts out an array of courses. I think we're averaging about eighteen or so a year and it was. It's been a great ride through those thirteen years because we're filling a niche of continuing education in a professional way so yeah. That was my gist. I was self motivated by making sure. There were quality con ED courses out there. I think you're skipping the major part. We've talked about it before on this show. Is The people that you have creating these courses and delivering these courses. They're the experts in orthopedics physical therapy there. I mean this is like this is like Jordan magic bird the dream Yeah when we solicit authors and you know we have seasoned authors and then we we also welcome aboard new authors who have great insight and so you get those stage names like Todd Ellen Becker and you get and you get Sally Ho you know these guys have been around for a while and they share very well the experiences to those learners who really want to go to the next level peel that onion like you said. Jimmy to the next level after you've graduated you get some patient experience under your belt. Now it's up to you to craft that curriculum of learning and we just trying to put it out there on a plate and and see if it matches your taste and I think we've had a great response. I'll continue the plate and the taste Metaphor here will go. Let's find out what's on the menu right and I think a Lotta Times myself included. We're the Google generation or a generation. Where's the Google time right? So if you're thinking if you're sitting at home you're like yeah you need to you know some continuing education credits are I want to hone my craft? What do I do with Google? It typically the first two three four things pop up. That's the thing to look at. I wanted to get in deep because against a thing that you just throughout was about eighteen courses a year like that's a lot of stuff on the menu it's a Lotta specials continually coming out of the kitchen. Yeah in each of those series of course is could be three or six monographs sets and of course. Our most popular one is at current concepts which we use For a lot of the registrants who use it for the exam. That's a twelve monographs sat. So we're spending these courses all year long and you know we try to with our new platform. Our new tech platform offered in such a way that people get a good glimpse of what they're going to buy and sample it. If you will and dino. The academy's worked really hard at making sure we are seeing if we believe that. If you come you'll like it and we'll stand behind it with service and credibility so yeah it's it's it's been to that level that mission and vision for this action to do that are we gotta make sure people know where the restaurant is located. If they're gonNA you know. Eat off the plate and check out the MENU. Ortho T. DOT ORG as well as at orthopedic on twitter where a lot of people tend to do some interacting in our profession. So let's talk about that current concepts course when when someone is looking to and you you mentioned there people use this as a a prep for the The Orthopedic Clinical specialist examination. Let's talk about it real high level. What ingredients go into it and then what is someone get when they make a meal out of it? Well I I think they the whole the whole dish you know they get the ability to get background information on anatomy physiology. They get the blend of the patient. Care Scenarios Excellent case studies than they get those assessment tools at the end so they it really takes you through the layers of learning and then you can also astute the self assessments and say. Where do I need to go back in? How do I need to fill in the details? Because obviously when you're studying for something like the board exam the OC s you don't want gaps in the twelve monographs. Set goes through every body region. Plus it has a clinical reasoning monograph to it in so we believe we've hit the major topics that allow comprehensive review and self reflection and so I think the way it's crafted as as written work and we've added much more media dimensions to the monographs as well. We think we've got winners. And our audience has said so that a lot of them have said. It's really helped me study for the the boards and and pass those certification exam. So when you hear from people who've gone through current concepts specifically and again you can find out more information there'd Orthopedic Dot. Org You know some of the things that you hear is I felt. That's what people want to know right..

Google Jimmy Academy of Orthopedic Physical Orthopedic Dot Chris Welcome Todd Ellen Becker The Orthopedic Clinical specia editor Sally Ho Ortho T.
"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:28 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

"I'm just GonNa read a little extra marks influences staggering far beyond that of anyone else else in the private sector or in government he controls three core communications platforms facebook instagram. And what's at that. Billions of people use everyday. FACEBOOK's board works more like an advisory committee than overseer because because mark controls around sixty percent of voting shares you along with a couple of professors from NYU and Columbia went down this summer and had conversations with both the FTC the DOJ about facebook. What did you tell them you know? We talked to them about the same things that I wrote about in the article that facebook has specifically pursued a policy of acquiring its Competitors in order to lock down the social networking marketplace. There are some competitors out there like snapchat or or twitter but their size is really a rounding error. I mean facebook's revenue this year there will be fifty billion snaps. Last year was one. I mean these companies they exist but they're they're they're specs compared to facebook size and and so just as I called in the peace breaking I I do think that facebook should be broken up. I think that it should That what's up instagram and facebook. facebook should be separate companies each with their own. CEO each competing against one another. And I think at the same time we also need to think about what a rules for the road for social from networking and other tech companies that can ensure that users are protected even in a more competitive environment so these are things like privacy protections interoperability data portability. Some kind of framework for how we're going to deal with these questions of political speech there were some reports now that the FTC might be considering injunctions against against facebook in the coming year. Kind of explain in Layman's terms. What does that mean and what is it about? They're saying that there are seriously considering telling facebook. Hold up we need to take a closer look. That's the basic idea is that facebook has been working over the past year to effectively. Combine the back in frameworks works that power facebook INSTAGRAM WHATSAPP and make them into one single framework. You have a preliminary injunction would be say pause. Let's talk talk about how these companies work. Let's let's assess whether or not the mergers wore incorrectly approved by the FTC. And by the way it's not just the FTC see every branch of government that could be investigating facebook and some of these other tech companies. Right now now is standing up to do so so it's the FTC it's the Department of Justice it's the house antitrust subcommittee in the House of Representatives. And it's forty seven of the state's attorneys general all across the country. I mean and just by the math right there you see we've got a Republican Administration the FTC J. or are part of the executive branch and about half of those attorneys general also republic. So this is there's a bipartisan consensus. That we need more oversight here and And I think it's overdue. I could see these companies coming back and saying listen we. We have literally billions of happy customers. What's the problem yes? There's political ads and there's a little interference taking a huge amount of mindshare about on a daily basis facebook and say I've got a couple of billion humans that are using our products and services. Relatively happy with an Amazon can say I am half all of ECOMMERCE in America Most people are pretty happy with their boxes showing up in two hours or two days. Yeah I think that well depends on it depends on the public opinion. Researchers plenty of people who aren't very happy with facial or particular. These days you know Amazon is more popular company and we can go from company to company and I think that the point is not to pick on any particular one company just because people don't like it like that's not the problem. The problem is to identify win companies. Where the the challenge is to identify when companies have become problematic when they become too big and have used that power in ways that decrease quality or increase crease prices? Then that's when or decrease wages that's when government should should step in in facebook's case Mark Zuckerberg's response has always always been listened breaking up the company isn't going to solve the problem You know these large companies are the only ones that actually have the ability to tackle tackle the problems at scale facebook's the only one that can hire thousands of content moderators and keep at libraries. And all this other stuff of going so even if you said Okay what happens to separate company and Instagram's a separate company. FACEBOOK MESSENGER is part of a separate company. You're not GONNA fix it. Yeah I mean what we're talking about. Even in a scenario where the what's happened instagram acquisitions or unwound is still three very large companies. Not Not at the size of of today's but with billions of dollars of revenue and significant resources both to police their platforms and to ensure that that their users there's are are protected being in. It's my view in the view of a lot of economists that facebook broken up into three would create more competition and in the long term. Probably really more more prophets were investors and this is what you see in the case of. At and T.. After its structural separation or the case of standard oil is that it turns turns out. Competition Leans towards economic growth. Like what we all feel intuitively or are you concerned heading into the twenty twenty election that it'll we just a repeat of the two thousand sixteen elections in terms of social platforms being manipulated In the in the process I am concerned about what we've done enough to safeguard ourselves. I mean I know you're not at facebook. You left quite some time ago. But I don't think so I think I think there's a lot more that can be done. I think You know one of the most obvious things as I do think that facebook has a responsibility to Not Allow outright all right lies in political advertising. This many other people have said this I think Facebook in particular has a responsibility to be even more aggressive in in deactivating fake accounts because we know that the fake accounts are big way that Trying to to to Manipulate AP late these elections or spurring the the continental along. I think there are other things that they could do that. That would be helpful as well. I think you could charge arch political advertisers the same rates for their ads regardless of whether or not the ads go viral. I mean this seems like a very technical point purchase but just to treat it If you look at the two thousand sixteen election trump was paying one sixteenth of Hillary Clinton's campaign was was was paying for their ads. Because the way that the facebook AD platform is structured is if you pay for an ad that is provocative and people want to share it and it goes it was viral it's cheaper on perm oppression basis then it is otherwise and then finally I also think that they should be thinking thing about how to ensure that putting the the ads aside the political content on the platform that is Reaching big large audiences is is reviewed by some humans to ensure that it's not An outright lie misleading. I mean the a few months ago. Nancy Pelosi that was a that was a fake video where it seemed like she was she drunk even though she doesn't drink. Alcohol is a perfect example and facebook not only allowed that to stay on the platform. But you know because of the way they designed the news feed algorithm it gets distributed very far and wide and that. That's a choice that they're making. You guys roommates. You Co founded this thing your friends. What motivates them? I mean you know these days. It's these days I think he and the facebook leadership I mean. They're I think they're trying to do the right thing. I I I do disagree with a lot of the decisions that that they've made. It's not you know. I think it's important for me to say that because I haven't been friends with mark and other people in the facebook leadership for a long time. This is not personal for me. I don't have a vendetta out for him or for facebook. In in general I think that I do have a responsibility as a CO founder of the company to speak up and specifically when the problems that we're talking about here are so big and are so significant. I mean we are talking about not just political discourse in our country but next year's election seven and the economic power of one of the largest companies in the country and in the world and At a certain point that that responsibility is something that it has caused me to speak out Kris us. Thanks so much for your time. Thanks for having me and finally for this intern..

FACEBOOK FTC Instagram twitter Amazon NYU Columbia You Co Hillary Clinton CEO standard oil Mark Zuckerberg Nancy Pelosi CO founder intern Kris DOJ America House of Representatives
"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

"FACEBOOK's board works more like an advisory committee than overseer because because mark controls around sixty percent of voting shares you along with a couple of professors from NYU and Columbia went down this summer and had conversations with both the FTC the DOJ about facebook. What did you tell them you know? We talked to them about the same things that I wrote about in the article that facebook has specifically pursued a policy of acquiring its Competitors in order to lock down the social networking marketplace. There are some competitors out there like snapchat or or twitter but their size is really a rounding error. I mean facebook's revenue this year there will be fifty billion snaps. Last year was one. I mean these companies they exist but they're they're they're specs compared to facebook size and and so just as I called in the peace breaking I I do think that facebook should be broken up. I think that it should That what's up instagram and facebook. facebook should be separate companies each with their own. CEO each competing against one another. And I think at the same time we also need to think about what a rules for the road for social from networking and other tech companies that can ensure that users are protected even in a more competitive environment so these are things like privacy protections interoperability data portability. Some kind of framework for how we're going to deal with these questions of political speech there were some reports now that the FTC might be considering injunctions against against facebook in the coming year. Kind of explain in Layman's terms. What does that mean and what is it about? They're saying that there are seriously considering telling facebook. Hold up we need to take a closer look. That's the basic idea is that facebook has been working over the past year to effectively. Combine the back in frameworks works that power facebook INSTAGRAM WHATSAPP and make them into one single framework. You have a preliminary injunction would be say pause. Let's talk talk about how these companies work. Let's let's assess whether or not the mergers wore incorrectly approved by the FTC. And by the way it's not just the FTC see every branch of government that could be investigating facebook and some of these other tech companies. Right now now is standing up to do so so it's the FTC it's the Department of Justice it's the house antitrust subcommittee in the House of Representatives. And it's forty seven of the state's attorneys general all across the country. I mean and just by the math right there you see we've got a Republican Administration the FTC J. or are part of the executive branch and about half of those attorneys general also republic. So this is there's a bipartisan consensus. That we need more oversight here and And I think it's overdue. I could see these companies coming back and saying listen we. We have literally billions of happy customers. What's the problem yes? There's political ads and there's a little interference taking a huge amount of mindshare about on a daily basis facebook and say I've got a couple of billion humans that are using our products and services. Relatively happy with an Amazon can say I am half all of ECOMMERCE in America Most people are pretty happy with their boxes showing up in two hours or two days. Yeah I think that well depends on it depends on the public opinion. Researchers plenty of people who aren't very happy with facial or particular. These days you know Amazon is more popular company and we can go from company to company and I think that the point is not to pick on any particular one company just because people don't like it like that's not the problem. The problem is to identify win companies. Where the the challenge is to identify when companies have become problematic when they become too big and have used that power in ways that decrease quality or increase crease prices? Then that's when or decrease wages that's when government should should step in in facebook's case Mark Zuckerberg's response has always always been listened breaking up the company isn't going to solve the problem You know these large companies are the only ones that actually have the ability to tackle tackle the problems at scale facebook's the only one that can hire thousands of content moderators and keep at libraries. And all this other stuff of going so even if you said Okay what happens to separate company and Instagram's a separate company. FACEBOOK MESSENGER is part of a separate company. You're not GONNA fix it. Yeah I mean what we're talking about. Even in a scenario where the what's happened instagram acquisitions or unwound is still three very large companies. Not Not at the size of of today's but with billions of dollars of revenue and significant resources both to police their platforms and to ensure that that their users there's are are protected being in. It's my view in the view of a lot of economists that facebook broken up into three would create more competition and in the long term. Probably really more more prophets were investors and this is what you see in the case of. At and T.. After its structural separation or the case of standard oil is that it turns turns out. Competition Leans towards economic growth. Like what we all feel intuitively or are you concerned heading into the twenty twenty election that it'll we just a repeat of the two thousand sixteen elections in terms of social platforms being manipulated In the in the process I am concerned about what we've done enough to safeguard ourselves. I mean I know you're not at facebook. You left quite some time ago. But I don't think so I think I think there's a lot more that can be done. I think You know one of the most obvious things as I do think that facebook has a responsibility to Not Allow outright all right lies in political advertising. This many other people have said this I think Facebook in particular has a responsibility to be even more aggressive in in deactivating fake accounts because we know that the fake accounts are big way that Trying to to to Manipulate AP late these elections or spurring the the continental along. I think there are other things that they could do that. That would be helpful as well. I think you could charge arch political advertisers the same rates for their ads regardless of whether or not the ads go viral. I mean this seems like a very technical point purchase but just to treat it If you look at the two thousand sixteen election trump was paying one sixteenth of Hillary Clinton's campaign was was was paying for their ads. Because the way that the facebook AD platform is structured is if you pay for an ad that is provocative and people want to share it and it goes it was viral it's cheaper on perm oppression basis then it is otherwise and then finally I also think that they should be thinking thing about how to ensure that putting the the ads aside the political content on the platform that is Reaching big large audiences is is reviewed by some humans to ensure that it's not An outright lie misleading. I mean the a few months ago. Nancy Pelosi that was a that was a fake video where it seemed like she was she drunk even though she doesn't drink. Alcohol is a perfect example and facebook not only allowed that to stay on the platform. But you know because of the way they designed the news feed algorithm it gets distributed very far and wide and that. That's a choice that they're making. You guys roommates. You Co founded this thing your friends. What motivates them? I mean you know these days. It's these days I think he and the facebook leadership I mean. They're I think they're trying to do the right thing. I I I do disagree with a lot of the decisions that that they've made. It's not you know. I think it's important for me to say that because I haven't been friends with mark and other people in the facebook leadership for a long time. This is not personal for me. I don't have a vendetta out for him or for facebook. In in general I think that I do have a responsibility as a CO founder of the company to speak up and specifically when the problems that we're talking about here are so big and are so significant. I mean we are talking about not just political discourse in our country but next year's election seven and the economic power of one of the largest companies in the country and in the world and At a certain point that that responsibility is something that it has caused me to speak out Kris us. Thanks so much for your time. Thanks for having me and finally for this intern..

FACEBOOK FTC Instagram twitter Amazon NYU Columbia You Co Hillary Clinton CEO Mark Zuckerberg standard oil Nancy Pelosi CO founder intern Kris DOJ America House of Representatives
"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

09:00 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

"What did you tell them you know? We talked to them about the same things that I wrote about in the article that facebook has specifically pursued a policy of acquiring its Competitors in order to lock down the social networking marketplace. There are some competitors out there like snapchat or or twitter but their size is really a rounding error. I mean facebook's revenue this year there will be fifty billion snaps. Last year was one. I mean these companies they exist but they're they're they're specs compared to facebook size and and so just as I called in the peace breaking I I do think that facebook should be broken up. I think that it should That what's up instagram and facebook. facebook should be separate companies each with their own. CEO each competing against one another. And I think at the same time we also need to think about what a rules for the road for social from networking and other tech companies that can ensure that users are protected even in a more competitive environment so these are things like privacy protections interoperability data portability. Some kind of framework for how we're going to deal with these questions of political speech there were some reports now that the FTC might be considering injunctions against against facebook in the coming year. Kind of explain in Layman's terms. What does that mean and what is it about? They're saying that there are seriously considering telling facebook. Hold up we need to take a closer look. That's the basic idea is that facebook has been working over the past year to effectively. Combine the back in frameworks works that power facebook INSTAGRAM WHATSAPP and make them into one single framework. You have a preliminary injunction would be say pause. Let's talk talk about how these companies work. Let's let's assess whether or not the mergers wore incorrectly approved by the FTC. And by the way it's not just the FTC see every branch of government that could be investigating facebook and some of these other tech companies. Right now now is standing up to do so so it's the FTC it's the Department of Justice it's the house antitrust subcommittee in the House of Representatives. And it's forty seven of the state's attorneys general all across the country. I mean and just by the math right there you see we've got a Republican Administration the FTC J. or are part of the executive branch and about half of those attorneys general also republic. So this is there's a bipartisan consensus. That we need more oversight here and And I think it's overdue. I could see these companies coming back and saying listen we. We have literally billions of happy customers. What's the problem yes? There's political ads and there's a little interference taking a huge amount of mindshare about on a daily basis facebook and say I've got a couple of billion humans that are using our products and services. Relatively happy with an Amazon can say I am half all of ECOMMERCE in America Most people are pretty happy with their boxes showing up in two hours or two days. Yeah I think that well depends on it depends on the public opinion. Researchers plenty of people who aren't very happy with facial or particular. These days you know Amazon is more popular company and we can go from company to company and I think that the point is not to pick on any particular one company just because people don't like it like that's not the problem. The problem is to identify win companies. Where the the challenge is to identify when companies have become problematic when they become too big and have used that power in ways that decrease quality or increase crease prices? Then that's when or decrease wages that's when government should should step in in facebook's case Mark Zuckerberg's response has always always been listened breaking up the company isn't going to solve the problem You know these large companies are the only ones that actually have the ability to tackle tackle the problems at scale facebook's the only one that can hire thousands of content moderators and keep at libraries. And all this other stuff of going so even if you said Okay what happens to separate company and Instagram's a separate company. FACEBOOK MESSENGER is part of a separate company. You're not GONNA fix it. Yeah I mean what we're talking about. Even in a scenario where the what's happened instagram acquisitions or unwound is still three very large companies. Not Not at the size of of today's but with billions of dollars of revenue and significant resources both to police their platforms and to ensure that that their users there's are are protected being in. It's my view in the view of a lot of economists that facebook broken up into three would create more competition and in the long term. Probably really more more prophets were investors and this is what you see in the case of. At and T.. After its structural separation or the case of standard oil is that it turns turns out. Competition Leans towards economic growth. Like what we all feel intuitively or are you concerned heading into the twenty twenty election that it'll we just a repeat of the two thousand sixteen elections in terms of social platforms being manipulated In the in the process I am concerned about what we've done enough to safeguard ourselves. I mean I know you're not at facebook. You left quite some time ago. But I don't think so I think I think there's a lot more that can be done. I think You know one of the most obvious things as I do think that facebook has a responsibility to Not Allow outright all right lies in political advertising. This many other people have said this I think Facebook in particular has a responsibility to be even more aggressive in in deactivating fake accounts because we know that the fake accounts are big way that Trying to to to Manipulate AP late these elections or spurring the the continental along. I think there are other things that they could do that. That would be helpful as well. I think you could charge arch political advertisers the same rates for their ads regardless of whether or not the ads go viral. I mean this seems like a very technical point purchase but just to treat it If you look at the two thousand sixteen election trump was paying one sixteenth of Hillary Clinton's campaign was was was paying for their ads. Because the way that the facebook AD platform is structured is if you pay for an ad that is provocative and people want to share it and it goes it was viral it's cheaper on perm oppression basis then it is otherwise and then finally I also think that they should be thinking thing about how to ensure that putting the the ads aside the political content on the platform that is Reaching big large audiences is is reviewed by some humans to ensure that it's not An outright lie misleading. I mean the a few months ago. Nancy Pelosi that was a that was a fake video where it seemed like she was she drunk even though she doesn't drink. Alcohol is a perfect example and facebook not only allowed that to stay on the platform. But you know because of the way they designed the news feed algorithm it gets distributed very far and wide and that. That's a choice that they're making. You guys roommates. You Co founded this thing your friends. What motivates them? I mean you know these days. It's these days I think he and the facebook leadership I mean. They're I think they're trying to do the right thing. I I I do disagree with a lot of the decisions that that they've made. It's not you know. I think it's important for me to say that because I haven't been friends with mark and other people in the facebook leadership for a long time. This is not personal for me. I don't have a vendetta out for him or for facebook. In in general I think that I do have a responsibility as a CO founder of the company to speak up and specifically when the problems that we're talking about here are so big and are so significant. I mean we are talking about not just political discourse in our country but next year's election seven and the economic power of one of the largest companies in the country and in the world and At a certain point that that responsibility is something that it has caused me to speak out Kris us. Thanks so much for your time. Thanks for having me and finally for this intern..

facebook FTC Instagram twitter CEO Amazon You Co Hillary Clinton standard oil Nancy Pelosi Mark Zuckerberg CO founder intern Kris America House of Representatives Republican Administration Department of Justice executive
"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

12:03 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

"Any dia. Yeah no you're. This is the crucial point. If the United States as you say continues to withdraw from its presence in the world it's willingness to stand up for human rights its commitments to things like free speech. Democracy that creates a vacuum in international leadership and China is inclined to move in and fill that void. But it's not a fait accompli. It depends heavily. Let's be blunt on the future of American politics. I think a lot of people around in the world of looked at what's happened in American politics over the last four years and have wondered. What is the United States? Still believe in. What are we committed to? And this is an opportunity for the United States to decide whether it's still believes in in defending those values abroad. Well but the Chinese government wants to move in if it can. It's not yet clear if the United States is prepared. That's that's exactly the point. I mean politics six. Yes but you just described how by and large bipartisan. Bipartisan thoughts and beliefs in the United States is as you as you said about China and how a how to do it and it seems like this is just a series of American administrations. Who are not doing the job that you have to be all the way back to George W Bush apparently was told when when he came in office in two thousand this was the biggest strategic threat and you outlined how I was taken totally off the ball after nine eleven and the Iraq aquaphor as as others have written was a total miraculous gift to the Chinese leadership? Yeah I had an interesting conversation. For instance with a European diplomat the Matt who said look we are some of your oldest friends in the world and you are coming to us now and you're asking us to join you in this long long range challenge against China's assertions of greater power it's attempts to bring its values around the world but it's very hard for us to join you on that when you or slapping tariffs on your European allies. So that's an example of the kind of thing if the United States wants to really mount a serious response and a challenge to China's strengthen strengthen the world it needs to be thinking about how it does that with the strength of its of its partners in its allies and it hasn't been building those relationships over the last three years in fact. It's been undermining right right. And that has been a feature of the trump administration. Evan Osnos thank you so much it is fascinating. It's really good to be reminded that there is this huge story out there. Despite what's is going on in other parts of the world thank you so much and now. Despite being blocked in China facebook is still making billions in ad sales in the country. A testimony to the the cloud of the social media giant but is facebook too powerful. It's a question that's often offers. A growing number of critics. Think so including Chris Hughes who was was one of the companies owned co-founders. He left facebook in two thousand seven to join Barack Obama's campaign and he's now leading the fight against corporate monopolies setting him up on a collision course with the company he helped to build new told a hurry SRINIVASA how this fight is ultimately about accountability and saving the very foundations nations of our democracies. So Chris you back several different initiatives one that's going after monopolies one that's doing experiments experiments and learning about models of guaranteed income. You written in support of a wealth tax or all of these different things or they. They tried to tackle larger problem. Yeah we have a belief that the economy has been structured purposefully over the past thirty forty years to create momentus gains for the one percent and and for corporations and make it more difficult for everyday people to make ends meet we see in the data median. Wages are flat. Productivity is stalled all entrepreneurship. Maybe counter intuitively for some as actually at Near an all-time low and so the economy just on the marriage isn't working working. And I think most Americans get that and that's why we're living in a moment where there's a big calls for structural change. You've set up a fun to fight monopolies tell us a little bit about that And what with the intent is so at the economic security project which is the group that I co run. We have a ten million dollar fund to invest in organizations organizations that are taking on concentrated corporate power in whatever form in tech but also in other sectors and it's our observation right right now there are so many individuals. Some of them are organizers and activists. Some are academics and journalists some are artists in storytellers. There's so many people who are saying. Hey wait a second. Our economy is tilted in the wrong direction. Corporations have too much power and this. This isn't just a fluke. This happened because we haven't had active anti monopoly. Policies in a long time and so our fund is there to provide seed seed capital to these individuals to be able to either begin new work or double down on work. That's already been happening to take on that. Concentrated corporate power are so an example is a group like the Institute for Local Self Reliance is helping give voice to a lot of the small business owners across the country who you have a harder time making ends meet and taking on the big corporate titans so a lot of those individuals. Those voices aren't heard a lot in the media or in state capitals are on Capitol Hill. And they're still others like the Athena coalition which is organizing against Amazon. We have a long list. Miller if you're organizing against Amazon even if you put put in this ten million dollar fund and if you're if you're planting these seeds you're taking on corporations that are worth hundreds of billions of dollars so right and that's that seems like it's small small compared to what they're going to spend. It's it's our contention though that that they may have the money but we as a movement have increasing thing power what makes monopoly unhealthy or dangerous monopolies problems for both economic and political reasons. We we can take the economic ones. I look at Amazon. Amazon is right now in a place where it dominates ECOMMERCE and much of commerce in the American economy and it not only sells stuff directly as a company it creates a platform for thousands of other sellers to come on Amazon. And say okay. I'M GONNA a US Amazon's infrastructure to sell my product whether it's a diaper book or something that's handmade as the platform Amazon has all of the data about about what's being sold when how to whom and at what price and it uses that data to then structure its own first is party decisions about about what to produce and what to sell so it just tilts the playing field to favor the incumbent and then there's the political problems albums the fewer companies. You have the more power they have and the more that their their voices heard in the halls of government And they're able to shape policy on their behalf. And so what we've seen even now or particularly now is the growth of this power and Good institutions like the Department of Justice and the FTC have in some cases taking a step back and not taken on their regulatory duties as a result of this of this pronounced power. But what's the difference between Amazon and say a Walmart before Amazon where they had a a tremendous amount of information and they knew my buying habits. Perhaps maybe it wasn't on the online space but they were a giant company and what their promise seems to be to consumers will give you the cheapest product possible or. I should say the best price well to be clear. I don't think there's anything wrong with with prices going down. And in some cases as companies grow larger they the prices can go down temporarily but a recent study that just came out a few weeks weeks ago showed that the collection of big monopolies in the United States economy is costing the average American about five thousand dollars a year. Wouldn't otherwise is have to pay so you can take mobile telephony as an example in the United States We only have a few major carriers in other places in the world they have even more. The competition in the marketplace brings down the prices. So that you can pay less than a month to month. Basis same thing for cable cable service same thing for pharmaceuticals the average household pays over thousand dollars and pharmaceuticals each year and they use it their their monopoly. Power to protect check those prophets so it adds up across these different parts of the economy but again prices are not just the only problem you also see a decrease in quality. FACEBOOK is a good example of this. FACEBOOK is technically a free product for most people to us but because facebook doc has gotten so big all of these privacy scandals that keep happening Seemed to be because there's no other. There's no other real social network to compete so prices go up. Quality goes down in the corporations have an outsized voice in the in the policy making process. Do you think that companies companies have more power than government does now it depends on the sector and it depends on the context in some cases. They In some cases they they do and others not I mean the the power of facebook is a good example over political speech right now mark Zuckerberg and really just mark is making really a formative important decisions about Verification of have ads on facebook whether or not they're going to verify political accolade whether or not the facebook is going to be responsible for verifying political at his position. There's no everybody should be able to say whatever they want and is a informed public bacon make up their own minds we facebook are not gonNA stand in the way and say that this is true and this is not true. His his position is that that we shouldn't hold facebook to the same standards that we hold network television or any of these other companies to and whereas others may have a basic standard of decency to ensure that ADS are not line. Not propagating outright lies. FACEBOOK is going to have none of it and is not going to take on this responsibility. That has a huge impact on the political and civic discourse in are not just in our country but in other countries as well and that kind of power is problematic because it is unaccountable the board of facebook. It's really we just an advisory board because of the way mark has structured the company and until recently we haven't seen a lot of regulatory action from the FTC or DOJ. Oh Jay or or government in so we have one corporate executive in California who's making really important decisions for our international and civil discourse and we can't ensure debate whether that's the right decision or the wrong decision but I think the the point that it teaches us is that that That Mark Zuckerberg and facebook has too much power and the role of government is to identify when that power is being abused. I end to check it just to remind our audience you wrote an op Ed. This past year and ended. I'm just GonNa read a little extra marks influences staggering far beyond that of anyone else else in the private sector or in government he controls three core communications platforms facebook instagram. And what's at that. Billions of people use everyday. FACEBOOK's board works more like an advisory committee than overseer because because mark controls around sixty percent of voting shares you along with a couple of professors from NYU and Columbia went down this summer and had conversations with both the FTC the DOJ about facebook..

facebook United States Amazon China FTC Evan Osnos Chinese government George W Bush Chris Hughes Mark Zuckerberg Iraq Barack Obama Matt Institute for Local Self Relia advisory board Department of Justice Columbia
"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

"Any dia. Yeah no you're. This is the crucial point. If the United States as you say continues to withdraw from its presence in the world it's willingness to stand up for human rights its commitments to things like free speech. Democracy that creates a vacuum in international leadership and China is inclined to move in and fill that void. But it's not a fait accompli. It depends heavily. Let's be blunt on the future of American politics. I think a lot of people around in the world of looked at what's happened in American politics over the last four years and have wondered. What is the United States? Still believe in. What are we committed to? And this is an opportunity for the United States to decide whether it's still believes in in defending those values abroad. Well but the Chinese government wants to move in if it can. It's not yet clear if the United States is prepared. That's that's exactly the point. I mean politics six. Yes but you just described how by and large bipartisan. Bipartisan thoughts and beliefs in the United States is as you as you said about China and how a how to do it and it seems like this is just a series of American administrations. Who are not doing the job that you have to be all the way back to George W Bush apparently was told when when he came in office in two thousand this was the biggest strategic threat and you outlined how I was taken totally off the ball after nine eleven and the Iraq aquaphor as as others have written was a total miraculous gift to the Chinese leadership? Yeah I had an interesting conversation. For instance with a European diplomat the Matt who said look we are some of your oldest friends in the world and you are coming to us now and you're asking us to join you in this long long range challenge against China's assertions of greater power it's attempts to bring its values around the world but it's very hard for us to join you on that when you or slapping tariffs on your European allies. So that's an example of the kind of thing if the United States wants to really mount a serious response and a challenge to China's strengthen strengthen the world it needs to be thinking about how it does that with the strength of its of its partners in its allies and it hasn't been building those relationships over the last three years in fact. It's been undermining right right. And that has been a feature of the trump administration. Evan Osnos thank you so much it is fascinating. It's really good to be reminded that there is this huge story out there. Despite what's is going on in other parts of the world thank you so much and now. Despite being blocked in China facebook is still making billions in ad sales in the country. A testimony to the the cloud of the social media giant but is facebook too powerful. It's a question that's often offers. A growing number of critics. Think so including Chris Hughes who was was one of the companies owned co-founders. He left facebook in two thousand seven to join Barack Obama's campaign and he's now leading the fight against corporate monopolies setting him up on a collision course with the company he helped to build new told a hurry SRINIVASA how this fight is ultimately about accountability and saving the very foundations nations of our democracies. So Chris you back several different initiatives one that's going after monopolies one that's doing experiments experiments and learning about models of guaranteed income. You written in support of a wealth tax or all of these different things or they. They tried to tackle larger problem. Yeah we have a belief that the economy has been structured purposefully over the past thirty forty years to create momentus gains for the one percent and and for corporations and make it more difficult for everyday people to make ends meet we see in the data median. Wages are flat. Productivity is stalled all entrepreneurship. Maybe counter intuitively for some as actually at Near an all-time low and so the economy just on the marriage isn't working working. And I think most Americans get that and that's why we're living in a moment where there's a big calls for structural change. You've set up a fun to fight monopolies tell us a little bit about that And what with the intent is so at the economic security project which is the group that I co run. We have a ten million dollar fund to invest in organizations organizations that are taking on concentrated corporate power in whatever form in tech but also in other sectors and it's our observation right right now there are so many individuals. Some of them are organizers and activists. Some are academics and journalists some are artists in storytellers. There's so many people who are saying. Hey wait a second. Our economy is tilted in the wrong direction. Corporations have too much power and this. This isn't just a fluke. This happened because we haven't had active anti monopoly. Policies in a long time and so our fund is there to provide seed seed capital to these individuals to be able to either begin new work or double down on work. That's already been happening to take on that. Concentrated corporate power are so an example is a group like the Institute for Local Self Reliance is helping give voice to a lot of the small business owners across the country who you have a harder time making ends meet and taking on the big corporate titans so a lot of those individuals. Those voices aren't heard a lot in the media or in state capitals are on Capitol Hill. And they're still others like the Athena coalition which is organizing against Amazon. We have a long list. Miller if you're organizing against Amazon even if you put put in this ten million dollar fund and if you're if you're planting these seeds you're taking on corporations that are worth hundreds of billions of dollars so right and that's that seems like it's small small compared to what they're going to spend. It's it's our contention though that that they may have the money but we as a movement have increasing thing power what makes monopoly unhealthy or dangerous monopolies problems for both economic and political reasons. We we can take the economic ones. I look at Amazon. Amazon is right now in a place where it dominates ECOMMERCE and much of commerce in the American economy and it not only sells stuff directly as a company it creates a platform for thousands of other sellers to come on Amazon. And say okay. I'M GONNA a US Amazon's infrastructure to sell my product whether it's a diaper book or something that's handmade as the platform Amazon has all of the data about about what's being sold when how to whom and at what price and it uses that data to then structure its own first is party decisions about about what to produce and what to sell so it just tilts the playing field to favor the incumbent and then there's the political problems albums the fewer companies. You have the more power they have and the more that their their voices heard in the halls of government And they're able to shape policy on their behalf. And so what we've seen even now or particularly now is the growth of this power and Good institutions like the Department of Justice and the FTC have in some cases taking a step back and not taken on their regulatory duties as a result of this of this pronounced power. But what's the difference between Amazon and say a Walmart before Amazon where they had a a tremendous amount of information and they knew my buying habits. Perhaps maybe it wasn't on the online space but they were a giant company and what their promise seems to be to consumers will give you the cheapest product possible or. I should say the best price well to be clear. I don't think there's anything wrong with with prices going down. And in some cases as companies grow larger they the prices can go down temporarily but a recent study that just came out a few weeks weeks ago showed that the collection of big monopolies in the United States economy is costing the average American about five thousand dollars a year. Wouldn't otherwise is have to pay so you can take mobile telephony as an example in the United States We only have a few major carriers in other places in the world they have even more. The competition in the marketplace brings down the prices. So that you can pay less than a month to month. Basis same thing for cable cable service same thing for pharmaceuticals the average household pays over thousand dollars and pharmaceuticals each year and they use it their their monopoly. Power to protect check those prophets so it adds up across these different parts of the economy but again prices are not just the only problem you also see a decrease in quality. FACEBOOK is a good example of this. FACEBOOK is technically a free product for most people to us but because facebook doc has gotten so big all of these privacy scandals that keep happening Seemed to be because there's no other. There's no other real social network to compete so prices go up. Quality goes down in the corporations have an outsized voice in the in the policy making process. Do you think that companies companies have more power than government does now it depends on the sector and it depends on the context in some cases. They In some cases they they do and others not I mean the the power of facebook is a good example over political speech right now mark Zuckerberg and really just mark is making really a formative important decisions about Verification of have ads on facebook whether or not they're going to verify political accolade whether or not the facebook is going to be responsible for verifying political at his position. There's no everybody should be able to say whatever they want and is a informed public bacon make up their own minds we facebook are not gonNA stand in the way and say that this is true and this is not true. His his position is that that we shouldn't hold facebook to the same standards that we hold network television or any of these other companies to and whereas others may have a basic standard of decency to ensure that ADS are not line. Not propagating outright lies. FACEBOOK is going to have none of it and is not going to take on this responsibility. That has a huge impact on the political and civic discourse in are not just in our country but in other countries as well and that kind of power is problematic because it is unaccountable the board of facebook. It's really we just an advisory board because of the way mark has structured the company and until recently we haven't seen a lot of regulatory action from the FTC or DOJ. Oh Jay or or government in so we have one corporate executive in California who's making really important decisions for our international and civil discourse and we can't ensure debate whether that's the right decision or the wrong decision but I think the the point that it teaches us is that that That Mark Zuckerberg and facebook has too much power and the role of government is to identify when that power is being abused. I end to check it just to remind our audience you wrote an op Ed. This past year and ended. I'm just GonNa read a little extra marks influences staggering far beyond that of anyone else else in the private sector or in government he controls three core communications platforms facebook instagram. And what's at that. Billions of people use everyday..

facebook United States Amazon China Evan Osnos Chinese government George W Bush FTC Chris Hughes Iraq Barack Obama Mark Zuckerberg Matt Institute for Local Self Relia Department of Justice advisory board Miller
"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:34 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

"Any dia. Yeah no you're. This is the crucial point. If the United States as you say continues to withdraw from its presence in the world it's willingness to stand up for human rights its commitments to things like free speech. Democracy that creates a vacuum in international leadership and China is inclined to move in and fill that void. But it's not a fait accompli. It depends heavily. Let's be blunt on the future of American politics. I think a lot of people around in the world of looked at what's happened in American politics over the last four years and have wondered. What is the United States? Still believe in. What are we committed to? And this is an opportunity for the United States to decide whether it's still believes in in defending those values abroad. Well but the Chinese government wants to move in if it can. It's not yet clear if the United States is prepared. That's that's exactly the point. I mean politics six. Yes but you just described how by and large bipartisan. Bipartisan thoughts and beliefs in the United States is as you as you said about China and how a how to do it and it seems like this is just a series of American administrations. Who are not doing the job that you have to be all the way back to George W Bush apparently was told when when he came in office in two thousand this was the biggest strategic threat and you outlined how I was taken totally off the ball after nine eleven and the Iraq aquaphor as as others have written was a total miraculous gift to the Chinese leadership? Yeah I had an interesting conversation. For instance with a European diplomat the Matt who said look we are some of your oldest friends in the world and you are coming to us now and you're asking us to join you in this long long range challenge against China's assertions of greater power it's attempts to bring its values around the world but it's very hard for us to join you on that when you or slapping tariffs on your European allies. So that's an example of the kind of thing if the United States wants to really mount a serious response and a challenge to China's strengthen strengthen the world it needs to be thinking about how it does that with the strength of its of its partners in its allies and it hasn't been building those relationships over the last three years in fact. It's been undermining right right. And that has been a feature of the trump administration. Evan Osnos thank you so much it is fascinating. It's really good to be reminded that there is this huge story out there. Despite what's is going on in other parts of the world thank you so much and now. Despite being blocked in China facebook is still making billions in ad sales in the country. A testimony to the the cloud of the social media giant but is facebook too powerful. It's a question that's often offers. A growing number of critics. Think so including Chris Hughes who was was one of the companies owned co-founders. He left facebook in two thousand seven to join Barack Obama's campaign and he's now leading the fight against corporate monopolies setting him up on a collision course with the company he helped to build new told a hurry SRINIVASA how this fight is ultimately about accountability and saving the very foundations nations of our democracies. So Chris you back several different initiatives one that's going after monopolies one that's doing experiments experiments and learning about models of guaranteed income. You written in support of a wealth tax or all of these different things or they. They tried to tackle larger problem. Yeah we have a belief that the economy has been structured purposefully over the past thirty forty years to create momentus gains for the one percent and and for corporations and make it more difficult for everyday people to make ends meet we see in the data median. Wages are flat. Productivity is stalled all entrepreneurship. Maybe counter intuitively for some as actually at Near an all-time low and so the economy just on the marriage isn't working working. And I think most Americans get that and that's why we're living in a moment where there's a big calls for structural change. You've set up a fun to fight monopolies tell us a little bit about that And what with the intent is so at the economic security project which is the group that I co run. We have a ten million dollar fund to invest in organizations organizations that are taking on concentrated corporate power in whatever form in tech but also in other sectors and it's our observation right right now there are so many individuals. Some of them are organizers and activists. Some are academics and journalists some are artists in storytellers. There's so many people who are saying. Hey wait a second. Our economy is tilted in the wrong direction. Corporations have too much power and this. This isn't just a fluke. This happened because we haven't had active anti monopoly. Policies in a long time and so our fund is there to provide seed seed capital to these individuals to be able to either begin new work or double down on work. That's already been happening to take on that. Concentrated corporate power are so an example is a group like the Institute for Local Self Reliance is helping give voice to a lot of the small business owners across the country who you have a harder time making ends meet and taking on the big corporate titans so a lot of those individuals. Those voices aren't heard a lot in the media or in state capitals are on Capitol Hill. And they're still others like the Athena coalition which is organizing against Amazon. We have a long list. Miller if you're organizing against Amazon even if you put put in this ten million dollar fund and if you're if you're planting these seeds you're taking on corporations that are worth hundreds of billions of dollars so right and that's that seems like it's small small compared to what they're going to spend. It's it's our contention though that that they may have the money but we as a movement have increasing thing power what makes monopoly unhealthy or dangerous monopolies problems for both economic and political reasons. We we can take the economic ones. I look at Amazon. Amazon is right now in a place where it dominates ECOMMERCE and much of commerce in the American economy and it not only sells stuff directly as a company it creates a platform for thousands of other sellers to come on Amazon. And say okay. I'M GONNA a US Amazon's infrastructure to sell my product whether it's a diaper book or something that's handmade as the platform Amazon has all of the data about about what's being sold when how to whom and at what price and it uses that data to then structure its own first is party decisions about about what to produce and what to sell so it just tilts the playing field to favor the incumbent and then there's the political problems albums the fewer companies. You have the more power they have and the more that their their voices heard in the halls of government And they're able to shape policy on their behalf. And so what we've seen even now or particularly now is the growth of this power and Good institutions like the Department of Justice and the FTC have in some cases taking a step back and not taken on their regulatory duties as a result of this of this pronounced power. But what's the difference between Amazon and say a Walmart before Amazon where they had a a tremendous amount of information and they knew my buying habits. Perhaps maybe it wasn't on the online space but they were a giant company and what their promise seems to be to consumers will give you the cheapest product possible or. I should say the best price well to be clear. I don't think there's anything wrong with with prices going down. And in some cases as companies grow larger they the prices can go down temporarily but a recent study that just came out a few weeks weeks ago showed that the collection of big monopolies in the United States economy is costing the average American about five thousand dollars a year. Wouldn't otherwise is have to pay so you can take mobile telephony as an example in the United States We only have a few major carriers in other places in the world they have even more. The competition in the marketplace brings down the prices. So that you can pay less than a month to month. Basis same thing for cable cable service same thing for pharmaceuticals the average household pays over thousand dollars and pharmaceuticals each year and they use it their their monopoly. Power to protect check those prophets so it adds up across these different parts of the economy but again prices are not just the only problem you also see a decrease in quality. FACEBOOK is a good example of this. FACEBOOK is technically a free product for most people to us but because facebook doc has gotten so big all of these privacy scandals that keep happening Seemed to be because there's no other. There's no other real social network to compete so prices go up. Quality goes down in the corporations have an outsized voice in the in the policy making process. Do you think that companies companies have more power than government does now it depends on the sector and it depends on the context in some cases. They In some cases they they do and others not I mean the the power of facebook is a good example over political speech right now mark Zuckerberg and really just mark is making really a formative important decisions about Verification of have ads on facebook whether or not they're going to verify political accolade whether or not the facebook is going to be responsible for verifying political at his position. There's no everybody should be able to say whatever they want and is a informed public bacon make up their own minds we facebook are not gonNA stand in the way and say that this is true and this is not true. His his position is that that we shouldn't hold facebook to the same standards that we hold network television or any of these other companies to and whereas others may have a basic standard of decency to ensure that ADS are not line. Not propagating outright lies. FACEBOOK is going to have none of it and is not going to take on this responsibility. That has a huge impact on the political and civic discourse in are not just in our country but in other countries as well and that kind of power is problematic because it is unaccountable the board of facebook. It's really we just an advisory board because of the way mark has structured the company and until recently we haven't seen a lot of regulatory action from the FTC or DOJ. Oh Jay or or government in so we have one corporate executive in California who's making really important decisions for our international and civil discourse and we can't ensure debate whether that's the right decision or the wrong decision but I think the the point that it teaches us is that that That Mark Zuckerberg and facebook has too much power and the role of government is to identify when that power is being abused. I end to check it just to remind our audience you wrote an op Ed. This past year and ended..

facebook United States Amazon China Evan Osnos George W Bush Chinese government Mark Zuckerberg FTC Chris Hughes Iraq Barack Obama Matt Institute for Local Self Relia Department of Justice advisory board Miller
"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

10:38 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

"That's the danger so they may get regime trash it just not the kind of trump wants I think trump is nine months ten months away away from elections. Can he just stick it out and step back and see what happens. It'll be a big risk. I think for him. The major thing is out to get a deal. I think the building building blocks or they're now the major issue in that respect is can you get the full raw having killed so the money will be much more difficult than you want your president to sit down. Shake his hand and smiled before a camera. Now it was two weeks ago and perhaps that was one of the reasons why some is more hawkish advisers. told him to go ahead with this assignation. This is the problem so if we can work that out and find a way to get these two sides at negotiating table and we have the formula ready which I just described getting the US out of the region. Get this ball rolling on a French proposal. which is one of the some? He claims that Obama gave Iran right. We have the building that we just have to work out the photo of thing. It does seem such a long way in the future that given what's happening on the ground and these sort of competing trees but we'll wait to see Mohammad Ali Shabani. Thank you very much us. So now. To Ukraine's place in this crisis the down flight seven five two was bound for Kiev and Eleven Ukrainians were on board for the country. There is also a sense of trauma former all over again given the inevitable comparisons with flight. Seventeen five years ago. That plane was brought down in eastern Ukraine by Russian missile and two hundred ninety eight people were killed as Ukraine deals with this tragedy. It is also embroiled in the trump impeachment drama. Danilo look gifts keep Cranes former deputy foreign minister. And he's joining me from Kiev. Welcome back to the program and it seems every time I come to you in a terrible Abel situation for your country so clearly. The world offers many many condolences to all those families who lost their dear ones. and I wonder what what you can say you think will be the result of the conversations between your president the Iranian President whether this can be resolved within away or whether it's yet another really tough obstacle to get over I do appreciate your kind of ours versus support addressed to the Ukrainian nation of Certainly at this warmly. Welcome and do feel this. Great Grief and pain for those innocent lives killed in that in that attack before answering your question and let me also say that we share the same pain as many any other nations who sit and severity killed in this dramatic assault so this is a global tragedy and we sat only feel that no one remains indifferent what happened in Iran including Iran society We believe that the tragedy happened. They're also shocked that that society what is important right now is to ensure that there is a proper transparent servants investigation that is done in full accordance to the international standards to the international law. So so those who committed that horrific crime would be brought to us this. This is important for Ukraine. And this sense of truth is extremely important for Ukraine citizens. It doesn't I hope that The Ukrainian authorities They say that they closely cooperate with Irani authorities right now We'll do their best to ensure that the allegation will bring about with necessarily results. However I think that strong international corporations operations should be maintained so we all know the truth and the truth is established missile ski you? You know the as I mentioned the both presidents from Ukraine and Iran didn't have a phone conversation Hassan Rohani from Rahm has said Iran fully acknowledges that the tragedy tragedy was due to the actions of the military of this state. So I WANNA ask you about that because you just said this assault and I want to know whether you believe on whether the Ukrainian leadership believes that it was a tragic error on art or do you think there's another issue that you want to call for this transparent investigation obviously sleep and do you believe that President Zilenski is is is doing the right thing in charge of trying to get all the answers and the compensation as he said he said Ukraine is interested in the truth we ask all our international partners to assist the investigation and provide any relevant evidence that they might might have. There are a number of questions in what you say and let me briefly respond to all these elements the first of all. This is true that there is a satin debate. Within Ukraine. A proper was the initial reaction. Presence Lansky His initial statements. His initial response is widely considered to be careful cautious hesitant and sat. Only this position received a lot of internal domestic criticism. Nevertheless Ward is important to to be mentioned that unambiguity of the position of our best partners strongly contributed to the truth. I also want to mention that a a flu within twenty four hours after the plane was was shut down the cranium experts Where already on the ground on the site Providing the cranium authorities with Nasseri assessment and conclusions all these elements helped receive necessary acknowledgement on behalf of Iran authorities to To acknowledge that the the very fact and the responsibility award or what happened often. This is important right now. If it's even more important to ensure it together in our joint efforts that they investigation would be done fully in accordance to the to the international norms of why. I'm saying this. This is the matter of and the water. Ukrainian experts mentioned here in cave since the tragedy happened in Iran Recalls the painful experience of image seventeen In July of two thousand fourteen the reaction of Ukrainian Goldman. We'll need it quicker and clear. It was clear that Russia stood behind that that shameful a unspeakable crime contrary to Iran Russia continues devious to deny the responsibility. And I hope and believe I trust that nevertheless sooner or later sir. The responsibility for the crime happened to the victims of seventeen would be brought to justice and we're also responsibility would come to those Russian. The perpetrators of crime happened in two thousand fourteen. I I need to ask you to react. Also to the fact that your former Foreign Minister Pavlo Kloempken has said Ukraine now has the reputation of a place his that can cause all kinds of trouble. It is the opposite of everything we were working for. So He's obviously referring to this tragedy to the one you mentioned tension with seventeen but also of course about your country being dragged in to a political crisis and impeachment crisis in the United States and there are new reports poured of emails that that show particularly that in fact the White House the White House in fact did order the stopping stopping of aid to you shortly after that phone. Call between President Trump and presidents alinsky. I mean where do you think that is going. And to enter Kloempken case. Ace is Ukraine mortally wounded if I can put it that way by this dramatic series of major crises season issues in which is involved. That's.

Ukraine Iran president Kiev United States assault President Trump Mohammad Ali Shabani Obama Pavlo Kloempken Danilo deputy foreign minister President Zilenski Irani White House Lansky President
"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

10:38 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on Amanpour

"That's the danger so they may get regime trash it just not the kind of trump wants I think trump is nine months ten months away away from elections. Can he just stick it out and step back and see what happens. It'll be a big risk. I think for him. The major thing is out to get a deal. I think the building building blocks or they're now the major issue in that respect is can you get the full raw having killed so the money will be much more difficult than you want your president to sit down. Shake his hand and smiled before a camera. Now it was two weeks ago and perhaps that was one of the reasons why some is more hawkish advisers. told him to go ahead with this assignation. This is the problem so if we can work that out and find a way to get these two sides at negotiating table and we have the formula ready which I just described getting the US out of the region. Get this ball rolling on a French proposal. which is one of the some? He claims that Obama gave Iran right. We have the building that we just have to work out the photo of thing. It does seem such a long way in the future that given what's happening on the ground and these sort of competing trees but we'll wait to see Mohammad Ali Shabani. Thank you very much us. So now. To Ukraine's place in this crisis the down flight seven five two was bound for Kiev and Eleven Ukrainians were on board for the country. There is also a sense of trauma former all over again given the inevitable comparisons with flight. Seventeen five years ago. That plane was brought down in eastern Ukraine by Russian missile and two hundred ninety eight people were killed as Ukraine deals with this tragedy. It is also embroiled in the trump impeachment drama. Danilo look gifts keep Cranes former deputy foreign minister. And he's joining me from Kiev. Welcome back to the program and it seems every time I come to you in a terrible Abel situation for your country so clearly. The world offers many many condolences to all those families who lost their dear ones. and I wonder what what you can say you think will be the result of the conversations between your president the Iranian President whether this can be resolved within away or whether it's yet another really tough obstacle to get over I do appreciate your kind of ours versus support addressed to the Ukrainian nation of Certainly at this warmly. Welcome and do feel this. Great Grief and pain for those innocent lives killed in that in that attack before answering your question and let me also say that we share the same pain as many any other nations who sit and severity killed in this dramatic assault so this is a global tragedy and we sat only feel that no one remains indifferent what happened in Iran including Iran society We believe that the tragedy happened. They're also shocked that that society what is important right now is to ensure that there is a proper transparent servants investigation that is done in full accordance to the international standards to the international law. So so those who committed that horrific crime would be brought to us this. This is important for Ukraine. And this sense of truth is extremely important for Ukraine citizens. It doesn't I hope that The Ukrainian authorities They say that they closely cooperate with Irani authorities right now We'll do their best to ensure that the allegation will bring about with necessarily results. However I think that strong international corporations operations should be maintained so we all know the truth and the truth is established missile ski you? You know the as I mentioned the both presidents from Ukraine and Iran didn't have a phone conversation Hassan Rohani from Rahm has said Iran fully acknowledges that the tragedy tragedy was due to the actions of the military of this state. So I WANNA ask you about that because you just said this assault and I want to know whether you believe on whether the Ukrainian leadership believes that it was a tragic error on art or do you think there's another issue that you want to call for this transparent investigation obviously sleep and do you believe that President Zilenski is is is doing the right thing in charge of trying to get all the answers and the compensation as he said he said Ukraine is interested in the truth we ask all our international partners to assist the investigation and provide any relevant evidence that they might might have. There are a number of questions in what you say and let me briefly respond to all these elements the first of all. This is true that there is a satin debate. Within Ukraine. A proper was the initial reaction. Presence Lansky His initial statements. His initial response is widely considered to be careful cautious hesitant and sat. Only this position received a lot of internal domestic criticism. Nevertheless Ward is important to to be mentioned that unambiguity of the position of our best partners strongly contributed to the truth. I also want to mention that a a flu within twenty four hours after the plane was was shut down the cranium experts Where already on the ground on the site Providing the cranium authorities with Nasseri assessment and conclusions all these elements helped receive necessary acknowledgement on behalf of Iran authorities to To acknowledge that the the very fact and the responsibility award or what happened often. This is important right now. If it's even more important to ensure it together in our joint efforts that they investigation would be done fully in accordance to the to the international norms of why. I'm saying this. This is the matter of and the water. Ukrainian experts mentioned here in cave since the tragedy happened in Iran Recalls the painful experience of image seventeen In July of two thousand fourteen the reaction of Ukrainian Goldman. We'll need it quicker and clear. It was clear that Russia stood behind that that shameful a unspeakable crime contrary to Iran Russia continues devious to deny the responsibility. And I hope and believe I trust that nevertheless sooner or later sir. The responsibility for the crime happened to the victims of seventeen would be brought to justice and we're also responsibility would come to those Russian. The perpetrators of crime happened in two thousand fourteen. I I need to ask you to react. Also to the fact that your former Foreign Minister Pavlo Kloempken has said Ukraine now has the reputation of a place his that can cause all kinds of trouble. It is the opposite of everything we were working for. So He's obviously referring to this tragedy to the one you mentioned tension with seventeen but also of course about your country being dragged in to a political crisis and impeachment crisis in the United States and there are new reports poured of emails that that show particularly that in fact the White House the White House in fact did order the stopping stopping of aid to you shortly after that phone. Call between President Trump and presidents alinsky. I mean where do you think that is going. And to enter Kloempken case. Ace is Ukraine mortally wounded if I can put it that way by this dramatic series of major crises season issues in which is involved. That's.

Ukraine Iran president Kiev United States assault President Trump Mohammad Ali Shabani Obama Pavlo Kloempken Danilo deputy foreign minister President Zilenski Irani White House Lansky President
"chris hughes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:16 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Chris Hughes and Courtney Martin nine and he Hey we're going to get into a bunch of the needy interesting kind of intellectual political issues that you work on but I want to start right from the beginning because you do actually in this book as well certain beginning which is your childhood you grew up in North Carolina son of a public school teacher and a paper salesman I think you really formative experiences that shaped how you thought about economics back then you probably don't have that language for it but about race and class and one of the things you talk about the book was the two contrasting churches he went to growing up at which I thought was such an interesting window into some of what form your early way of thinking about this stuff would you mind talking a little bit about that yeah the first church so we did go to two different churches growing up the first was called new Jerusalem Lutheran that was in the middle the country and we went there popping until I was about seven or eight and I remember it being very familial very relaxed I think I I think it's the book has been out for over a year but I talk in the book about how I remember running between the skirts of women in their Sunday dresses and suits as a as a little kid and it was it was a community where it felt like everyone took care of one another and then the second church we went to my parents moved and we moved downtown in hickory North Carolina and we lived two blocks from what is still a very beautiful small town southern street the mansions go up and down the main Avenue there are beautiful big trees and there's a church that sits on the corner of eighth street Dr northwest in six Avenue called holy Trinity and that church was really different there are we were at the lowest end of the totem pole we still had all kinds of privilege and and our lives but we're at the lowest on the totem pole and I became very aware of class in specifically the the tools that a lot of the people who went to that church used to ensure that my family knew that we were at the lowest end of the totem pole so I I feel very sensitized to that at that time and then that grew as my own life continued and I went to a fancy boarding school and then went to Harvard on financial aid and that awareness I think of those class divisions is still what drives me today even the whole life is changed dramatically since then yeah and another one of the things you write about that really put you in proximity to difference was the after school program you went to when you talked about being like one of the only way kids and and we were talking backstage about that I'm thinking about that a lot these days myself can you talk a little bit about how those early friendships like who are those friendships with and how did they form you do you still remember the the guys and girls used to hang out with back then yeah I remember the faces and remember all the names my closest friend was named Richard and he he was black he was I was a small kids he was a bigger kids and we became really close in some ways I felt like he was my playmate and protector and it was a it was a close relationship at the same time it was also clear that there were some kids that it was okay to spend you know to go over and spend Friday night Wes and then other places where it wasn't okay and there was some it was unclear is fat my parents is that society is that school what is it but those divisions were really clear to me even then and so you know I talk about in the book that as much as we were you know middle class and that did very much color my own upbringing at the same time I had all kinds of privilege as a white kid in that after school program I still was treated differently than the other kids who were there and had all kinds of opportunities that that they didn't so it was a different experience there because most of the day I was tracked with academically gifted kids being taught all kinds of things and then all of those kids got picked up right when the bell rang my parents were working and then I moved into a very different sphere and then on the weekends so another so I'd like to think that that's part of you know small town life in a lot of places but I think it's increasingly segregated unfortunately yeah well and also an interesting early opportunity for you to shape shift and experience all these different places there are life is now let you don't realize you're going after school care but but absolutely yeah and so then I love the fact that you basically research on the very early internet so the internet has like been a part of your getting about private schools like private boarding schools yeah and you applied to a bunch of them it sounds like really much from your own volition this is not I was telling you about no no the opposite yeah and and then when Andover offered your financial aid package that was enough you call the admissions officer and explain the situation prompting them to give you nearly a full ride which I don't think they like that I disclose that now that you can negotiate yeah exactly like all right I'm like tell me about that fourteen year olds Chris I'm assuming you're about fourteen like yeah when you look back on him are you just like wow I mean where did you get the hot spot to do that I wasn't aware was loneliness I was really you know I did well in school I was a little but I was a nerdy I like classical music I was gay and was not out at the time and I think it was also just scared of putting myself out there particularly with other boys but to make a lot of the friendships that you need I I we can talk all day about what I was was scared of I'm not sure I I no everything was even in retrospect but that means that loneliness made me dream of a place where things would be better the grass is always greener on the other side or one dreams and so that restlessness got combined with parents or like you can always you could do everyone go out there and be ambitious and so I did there was no Google so I Yahoo search best high schools in America I've got some catalogs applied to them and without having ever seen them ended up getting our financial aid and and heading off and it was in many ways the most transformative experience of my my life and not not particularly easy one the first year isn't boarding school was if I thought it was only before I went it was even worse I arrived with a stick southern accent I was still very much closeted high didn't know who I was or who I wanted to be and really didn't make friends at all but was determined not to go back and didn't know how to go forward and like a lot of teenagers was depressed suffered from depression and I channeled all of that energy into books books became then a refuge for me and they still are books ideas and I'm also a drive to be clear to to you know be if not one of the if if if not the best one of the best in classes and so I did get good grades I did do well and that serve me well in that period of of my life but it was a was a rockier time her time yeah and that refuge in books do you remember as a teenager one of the books that meant the most to you like just gosh Giovanni's room I read sometime in that period the bald one bug tenders the night was a book that really struck me and I had you know I I I wear those four classes or that you're reading outside of for classes yeah as much as I you know I I I think there is the the private school in boarding school world in United States is very problematic it was also a place where I did have really high quality instruction a dozen people in the class really curious other students for the most part and teachers who really wanted to to invest and so that was a a kind of environment in which I I first said then he went to this place called her word and ended up with a roommate but people here have heard of mark Zuckerberg but before we go down that path which obviously is it well known line I was wondering what before you ever got that roommate assignment before sort of your life took that direction what did you think you were going to Harvard to become like did you have an idea in your mind as you want to be a professor or no I have no idea I probably would have dreamed of being a novelist and settled for a lawyer or something like that I don't know that would have been that would have been the orientation I mean I knew that I needed to and wanted to to to do too well I mean I was the first I was an only child but I was the first in my family ever get a chance to go to a place like Harvard I was on financial aid this was not an opportunity to talk to and I'd worked hard to to get there and so you know when we switched on Facebook in February two thousand four and marking doesn't didn't come back to school right after that fall semester and it occurred to me not to come back to school but I also thought that was a little crazy the idea of dropping out to work on the start up no matter how promising it may seem wasn't knowing wasn't wise but it wasn't what I wanted to do I wanted I wanted to be at school I want at the time I also wanted to work on Facebook and I believed in its and its potential but but I didn't have the same I had a I had a rare opportunity I needed to use it yeah I ask a question in part because I was thinking about that you've had such an extraordinary life and like so many extra nap attendees but they've come with a tremendous amount of like scrutiny and pressure and I wondered do you ever wish you were like a lawyer novelists write a novel I think sometime my late twenties I got like ten pages and and yeah call today but you never know no I don't I don't I'm I'm as much as my life has had a lot of weird twists and turns I don't I really love what I'm doing now I love being an activist I love I love the work although it did take me some time to find that home in professional endeavors now that I have it it's really for phone and so you were kind of unusual in the founding crew because you're the communications and marketing guy not the tech guy and there's been a lot written and I think even your reference that there were moments where marks you know he was convinced that this could be this massive thing and at times it was like can this really be this massive thing it was like it bordered on delusional in some people's minds because it wasn't what it was now and do you remember a moment when you were like well I actually do think this is going to be a massive thing was it a slow unfolding or was there like a key moment when at the field goals always kept moving in the sense that you know we started Facebook pepper two thousand forces for college students most of you know the the the story and it exploded at Harvard within a few weeks and it was initially just an experiment to see you know how people would would connect with one another and then a few other schools come on a few others college the college market was saturated then it became bigger it became open to other Americans and became global in the field the feel goes just kept moving I do there was one moment maybe I don't know two years and something like that where mark and I were having kids in downtown Palo alto it beats my heart and he began comparing Facebook to to Google and the next kind of big platform on the internet and I remember thing myself great and how much with possible and but at the same time feeling like because those field goals because the goal is it had been shifting so.

Chris Hughes Courtney Martin
Man Behind the Camera

Bon Appetit Foodcast

11:40 min | 1 year ago

Man Behind the Camera

"All right so this is your second time with the pot getting our concern Osama veteran okay known at the table. No crunchy snacks crunchy snacks. No no shaking of the coffee ice loud. There are months where like weeks will go by. We're I'm like how am I literally. Don't know where your I will not have seen you for two weeks. Yeah that is basically the story of my life. Sometimes I don't even know where I am. I'll wake up hotel. Mike Oh yeah no. I'm in Appleton Wisconsin. Oh No oh now I'm in San Antonio Texas. Yeah I mean we talk about a few issues in your job in general but in our travel issue that came on May so you you shot almost the entire feature will yeah does may two thousand nineteen you were in Beirut with Andy Burgundy tracked and then you I'm just flip through the pages then you were in Taipei with Suli and also burgundy and Andy any wanted to tag on everything so that was a big photo portfolio of yours your shot in Allison Rome in spring break menu story that was just in New York yeah that was here in the building the buildings that was as basic recipe story and then you shot photos for our red sauce America package which brought you. Where did you go for this one? Oh man that was a lot. I think that was six cities L. A. L. A. Philly New Orleans. Oh my God. Where did I go? I mean you literally can't remember yeah I it was like four to five cities. I guess my first question is I think a lot of fans of yours. WanNa know like how do you end up as a staff dog for at a food magazine like whenever someone asked me about this is I'm the worst possible personnel asked because it's purely luck and circumstance stance and my only goal and still the only like hey just don't get fired and spend closing up on your six and I still get asked to come back every day and there were definitely moments early on we're Alex pollick grocer artificial photo department critic Blake. I'M GONNA kill Lau a huge mistake so you start off as an intern turn years ago yeah. That's my freshman year of college. I just wanted to do something with my life and not just go home for the summer to California and you know Oh bummer and my parents house so I wanted to find an internship and I've always had a fascination with the magazine world apply too much internships. Nobody got got back to me in like a week. Before summer started. I saw a posting for esquire magazine to be a fashion closet intern. Oh and I was like that sounds cool. That sounds way out of my reach. I am hugely under qualified for that but I'M GONNA shoot my shot and Michael Steph. who was the fashion assistant at the time got back to me? He's like when can you come in based on what oh it. Did you have background. It was the most underqualified letter ever. It was basically hey. Here's my resume. I was a lifeguard in high school. I was a high school tutor and I intern at the State House in Massachusetts in politics nothing related to magazines but I really love menswear and here's like my favorite menswear blogs and here's my favorite brands brand's. I like fashion. I can work hard and he got back to me. Can I just say that. I am a lot of times when I talked to young people who are just out of college in their writing you you know letters to inquire about a job and they read like they're written by a law firm. I'm always like learning be yourself. Be passionate sort of expose yourself so to speak but that's what's GonNa grab some somebody's attention one hundred. I think the way I showed her. The letter wasn't like the formerly hi my name's dogs home. Hey My name's Alex. I'm really excited about this. I know him not meant for this Gig but I will do whatever it takes gap and so forth and they took a chance on me and that kind of was my segue into the New York City magazine publishing world and it turns out having square on your resume. Just opens opens up a lot of doors but it was great. It was just my eighteen years old. I didn't get paid but I got to see how magazines work I've got to be on fashion shoots Justin Timberlake Lake and Ryan Gosling and wow poll like hold fourteen thousand dollar jackets and look it Nick Sullivan whose whose the editor in chief at the time Grainger David David David grange just like talk shop and like this is amazing. This is legendary and that made me really WANNA stick with it yeah very recall okay so internship at esquire. How then does that lead you to be a so after that? I was convinced that I wanted to stay in publishing. Look fashion. menswear ended up at Nylon guys Juku for a little bit complex four pins so I was very very much in that circuit as an intern just doing minimal intern work but after a couple of years I was just like this is not really what's my angle here. I don't WANNA be stylus. I don't WanNa be a fashion writer. The idea of being a photographer and fashion was just you know. I didn't even sit down. That's not going to happen so after this is my third yes approaching my third year of college. I A Internet a bunch of or apply uh-huh bunch of other internships again. Nobody got back to me. Despite actually this I'm being off and having a lot of magazines in Monroe oster I applied to like yeah a a couple of mags won't be noted but they're they're. They're okay. They just get back. I mean I saw a posting for bone apetite photo internship and I was like I know nothing nothing about food. I like pictures. I took photo classes in high school and college. So how active a photographer were you at this point. It's like I'm not active. I don't know I took a lot of fissures in high school. I had my own flicker account. I you were you were you were definitely interested. We're sitting at least and I took pictures of the school paper and stuff like that. I I was a you know an avid hobbyist as major so do you did you come in an interview like what God you the job ultimately so I went in again. It's always like a last minute. Call in showed up from Boston and I met with Jake. Ramoser are former photo assistant and he he gave me a talk. Hey so turn yeah. It looks like you've worked a lot of magazines. you have zero photo experience and you have zero food experience so you're pretty underqualified but honestly the only person here that's interviewed. That's worked at large publications so we're GonNa go with you. So that was basically it was it was Bazeley. Hey you're you've worked at reputable places so we'll hire yeah. I do think that's interesting interesting career wise like over the years. I've worked at James Beard Foundation in Time Out New York and the food's severe than G. Q. Got more fashion thing that came back to food. I was a sports writer in college like it is you can move around and I think one thing that editors employers look for is that you do have experience in in a particular field and that you know how to get stuff done that you know under you understand what the industry requires but within that sort of industry you can shoot food. You can shoot you know people. You can do all these things. You don't have to be in one lane. One hundred percent I think at the time I was taking some classes and I was also I was studying NPR print journalism at the time and I remember talking about that with Jake and he was like Oh. This is a plus because you kind of understand writing thing and photography on some level so we'll run with this so he didn't internship summer internship a year or so later. We ended up hiring you as a foot assistant no so I did this summer internship and I was like this is way better than working fashion. Everyone's so much nicer yeah yeah. It was a great time and I was like in order for me to WANNA stay in this world I can see I need to shift from fashion to food media so then I went back to Boston awesome for my senior year and as as I left Alex pollock the photodetectors times like hey we love your great. Just reach out when you're when you're graduating we can like. Maybe you keep you keep you happy. Come back so I would always send emails and I say hey just graduated like three months three or four months. I would love to come talk about a photo editor assistant role. Did you in the interim year. Were you working on shooting things. Decrease your portfolio to share with Alex to say hey I just want. I've been shooting a lot. Take a look at my stuff. Yes so thankfully because of my time I she went over to Boston magazine for my senior of college and I ended up being digital intern which basically means I was just doing every anything and everything for the website correct the king yeah yeah I remember being so proud and like twenty years old on my I've got years of intern experience. I haven't been paid for any of them but you we know I've seen some stuff like that really was my my pride enjoy worked a lot of places and they harden managed digital intern and they also gave me bill do photo take pictures and do have my own bylines socially once a lot of times when you get your foot in the door somewhere are the the brand or the magazine wherever they need people to do stuff go. You can go okay but we'll trust you. There's something trustworthy about you. Then people are all right. Go give this a shot. You'd have a DVD will keep doing it. I must really thankful that it was a web internship versus print because obviously no one's GonNa give any Interna print byline whereas it's much lower risk to teachers hey make something for lab and if it's really good we'll Polish and if not we won't publish in no one will ever or care about low budget so it was just gave me a lot more freedom and they knew that I worked at the food magazine before okay so you know how to take pictures of food. You were photo intern turn. I'm like yeah I guess I mean I. I saw Marcus Nelson. Do you like an overhead shot of something by a window so I can do that. How hard can it be yeah so I mean I I? I did it and they would. It was really cool. I mean they sent me there. Okay so we'll just have you do restaurants so they would send me like once a week in shoot for four restaurants a week and just shoot it for their website so who was giving you guidance about photos style at that point what kind of shots they wanted from the restaurants. It's nobody else really. They just assumed you knew what you were doing. The funny thing is I applied to Boston magazine to be a photo inter. I WANNA continue that path that track of being working for requirements it's but they they didn't want but then the digital department got back to me. I didn't really have communication with the magazine so it was just kind of me and our digital editor who just send me. I was like Oh this. Let's get this close enough to bone advocate and some overhead shots off light and like keep doing this and I would just bike around Boston Jason and go to a bunch of restaurants that are digital restaurant editor Chris Hughes covered and yeah it was it was really good training. It's really good training. I looking back it was really great just being able to go in and practice and shoot restaurants for relatively low risk and have that be an internship set eh great base so then I shot all these restaurants and as shooting what's in all this stuff to Alex pollick. I'm like hey portfolio.

Intern Boston Boston Magazine Food Magazine Mike Oh Alex Editor Esquire Magazine San Antonio Texas Writer Andy Burgundy Jake Osama Appleton Wisconsin New York California New York City Magazine Alex Pollick Beirut James Beard Foundation
"chris hughes" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on KGO 810

"Clowns they being laughed at all over the world and I watch this morning I watch dance you follows you trying to get through that with the performance of Robert Muller put on where I don't think he ever read the agreement or the document the president suggests the house look at president Barack Obama's book deal and the Clinton foundation Bob Constantini Washington as and as a police officer faces drugs and weapons charges the investigation in the forty eight year old John Tompkins began with another man was pulled over during Sunnyvale traffic stop that led them to search Tompkins Sunnyvale home where officers found illegal narcotics and weapons one of the last remaining sticker factories in the country is shutting down its tours and retail store in Petaluma Mrs Grossman's sticker factory has been open for forty years printing stickers that have been shipped around the world the company will still sell stickers on line in there might be pop up sale events every now and then yes and the up twenty two nasdaq plus ninety two those are record highs for those indexes this market report sponsored by all worth financial wealth managers of Facebook co founder has been making the rounds with government agencies calling for the break up of the social media giant Facebook co founder Chris use has been calling for the break up of the social media giant and now work comes in he's been talking US government officials and regulators that are looking into the company's market power Hughes's argued that Facebook CEO mark Zuckerberg has too much power and that regulators should break up the company from Instagram and whatsapp which the social network acquired in meetings with government agencies Hughes presenter thirty nine page slide deck outlining why Facebook should be broken up I'm color creed.

US CEO Hughes Petaluma Tompkins Sunnyvale Sunnyvale Clinton mark Zuckerberg Robert Muller Chris use co founder Facebook Mrs Grossman John Tompkins
Have Tech Companies Become Too Powerful? Congress Will Investigate

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:22 min | 2 years ago

Have Tech Companies Become Too Powerful? Congress Will Investigate

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google from Connecticut to California from Mississippi to Minnesota millions of businesses are using Google tools to grow online. Learn how Google is supporting businesses in your state at Google dot com slash economic impact. How important have Facebook, Google apple and Amazon become to your daily life. Some in congress think that these companies have gotten way too big and have way too much power to the point that they are snuffing out competition and actually harming consumers. This comes as the Trump administration has also suggested ramping up its antitrust oversight, Tony Romm with the Washington Post has done extensive reporting on this end is here with us in the studio. Thanks for coming in. Hey, thanks for having me, so congress is holding hearings this week on this very topic. What realistically is gonna come from them? Yeah, this is about the walls really closing in on big tech companies here in Washington. We've heard lots of theoretical concerns for a long time that companies like Facebook and Google and Amazon. Are too big. And as a result of that bigness are misusing your data or stifling competition. But we're now beginning to see lawmakers of both political parties putting that into action. And we had this week was an announcement from Davidson cellini, the top congressmen who leads the House Judiciary committee's competition, focus panel saying that they're going to embark on this very lengthy, top to bottom review of big tech companies to see exactly if they're stifling competition, and then to figure out at the end of the line here, whether something has to be done to fix the country's antitrust laws. And so we could see a lot here because see public hearings, we could see the grilling of major tech executives once again, we could even see subpoenas that force these companies to turn over documents. So it could be pretty uncomfortable for tech. I mean, we did see the Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifying in front of congress last year of wanna play a little clip of that. Let's listen overlaps with Porsche, don't think you have a monopoly. Certainly doesn't feel like that to me. Okay. So a Facebook as you point out has long been accused of privacy breaches of spreading disinformation and Washington, kind of just turned a blind eye. Now, there is this change is this all because of the Russian visitation, if feels like they're playing a bit of catch-up here in Washington. It's not all because of the Russia investigation, but I feel. And if you talk to experts, they say, the same thing, there's this overwhelming feeling that perhaps Washington just wasn't paying enough attention to the ills of the tech industry that companies like Facebook had gotten a pretty decent political ride here in Washington. But whether it's what happened with Russia and the spread of disinformation or the privacy violations. We've seen it Facebook. There's down this recognition that perhaps regulation hasn't caught up with these companies. And so this sort of translates, the antitrust conversation with a company like Facebook because lawmakers say, well, if you're concerned with the things that company like Facebook is doing. Where do you turn? What's the other social network that you use? If you find that Facebook is acting in some objectionable way, they think the choices are too few right? Because. Unlike you know. Apple. Which produces the iphone there are other alternatives. Something like Facebook. There really isn't something distinct that, that could provide an alternative for consumers. Yeah. And Facebook bought up some of its competitors. Right. So Facebook, also, owns WhatsApp messaging service, it owns Instagram, which is a photo sharing site that many folks use. And so the concern is that Washington allowed this sort of consolidation to happen. And that perhaps there needs to be a second look at a company like Facebook so separately. The Trump administration is taking these steps at least talking about them to increase antitrust oversight. How is that gonna play up? Yeah. We're sort of seeing the reckoning translate to the Trump administration as well as the Federal Trade Commission and the department of Justice, the two major anti-trust agencies here in Washington are beginning to divvy up their territory, deciding which agency is going to look at Facebook, or Google, or apple or Amazon, and so it's still early days. This is not to say that there's some immediate any trust. Invasive investigation hanging over these companies or that they're going to be broken up or something. But this starts the process, the could lead to the store. Of things that change the way, these companies behave. I mean Donald Trump and democratic contender for the White House, Elizabeth Warren don't agree on much. But at least they're both talking about the fact that these companies have gotten too large. I mean, she's just calling out for the all out dissembling of, of these companies Facebook's co founder Chris, Hughes published an op-ed in the New York Times and talk to us on our show last month, calling for Facebook to be broken up. Let's by that. To be little startup story of American entrepreneurship has become a leviathan and most importantly, Mark, Zuckerberg is unaccountable. And I think government should step up break up the company and regulate it, can you foresee that happening the world long way from that there is a rare political alignment, right now between folks, like Warren and President Trump who feel for slightly different reasons that we need to take a much tougher look at these beat tech companies. But a break-up of Facebook ready of its peers. For that matter is something that wouldn't just happen overnight. I mean remember when the US government looked at Microsoft and embarked on any trust investigation, then it took over a decade for that to even be resolved. So we're talking about a long process and the conversation started really this week, Tony Romm covers technology policy for the Washington Post and he was in our studios. We should add Facebook Amazon, and Google are all NPR sponsors. Tony. Thank you. Thanks, Rava

Facebook Google Washington Amazon Congress Washington Post Tony Romm Apple Donald Trump Russia Mark Zuckerberg Elizabeth Warren Connecticut Davidson Cellini United States House Judiciary Committee Porsche Rava Microsoft
"chris hughes" Discussed on Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on Pivot with Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway

"Come on. Yeah. Yeah. Exciting topic. But let's move on. I didn't offer me morphine. We know the immediately give you the opiates, and I said, no. And I right now feel like I should have said. Yes. Anyway, Chris uses off. Ed fallout continues. I obviously to podcast with them on Friday to, and he wrote the up in the air times. And he's talked to a bunch of people fall out from Chris us, what do you think, so I want to be? Upfront here I'm a bit jealous or resentful that Chris Hughes, who seems to me to be more lucky than talented my sense, is that he, he shared a dorm room with this genius named Mark Zuckerberg? And I think the fact that continues to do tremendous damage to the world is a genius and he made a ton of money. I you know, my sense, is Chris wasn't even that long. But he wrote this op at any basically summarized. Everything we've all been saying, for a while about Facebook, and it's gotten a ton of traction, which is, which is great, but it's really created a lot. It got a lot more attention than I would have guessed it did, because it summarized everything, and he's had founder next to it. Yeah. It's a it's a correct question. I have no idea. I've listened to him. I listened to on the daily, I think is a thoughtful guy, I wonder if we're just at that point where the American public, or people are just ready to, to kind of say okay enough already. We need to do something about it. And they article his is opinion. Piece was very well, written. It was a little bit long. View. I don't think most people attention span along. But he kind of summarized everything that people have been saying, but I don't know why all of a sudden this this, because a lot of people from Tim Wu. I mean, there's been Roger MAC amusement sent a lot of people have been piling on. And yet he this seem to be for some reason Christmas as everyone. Yeah. Everyone is is gonna go there. Rumors that the FTC was going to impose a twenty year monitoring process on Facebook. Do you match titan jumped in and said these big tech companies suddenly he? What's interesting is. I don't know if you saw this week, but also the big news was that, basically, the court set of the supreme court said. Forward against apple in terms of their apps store, and which I found interesting that that's happening before Facebook good, bottomless Facebook should absolutely FTC, or DOJ action going after them to break them up. And if even if it doesn't happen here it's going to happen in another country..

Chris Facebook Tim Wu Chris Hughes FTC Chris us morphine supreme court Mark Zuckerberg Roger MAC founder apple DOJ twenty year
The drumbeat to break up Facebook gets louder (The 3:59, Ep. 559)

The 3:59

05:01 min | 2 years ago

The drumbeat to break up Facebook gets louder (The 3:59, Ep. 559)

"The. The three fifty nine. I'm Ben FOX Rueben. I'm living seems that the new cause of the day is calling to break up. Facebook two of the latest prominent figures to jump on this bandwagon. Our Facebook, cofounder Chris Hughes and president candidate Kamala. Harris, let's setback for a second here and ask Alfred what are some of the reasons offered to break up this company? I mean, the biggest reason a lot of people have been arguments. Facebook is way too big for its own good. There's issues with them owning Instagram and what's app a lot of people. I've always seen these Facebook satisfied. I'm leaving Facebook. But you can still find me on Instagram, and it's kind of like they're owned by the same company and it's frustrating like you might be going from drinking soda to diet soda. But at the end of the day, it's like all your money still going to them. Right. So there's this huge concern that they are like a monopoly in social network gang would like what what exactly like what are their competitors? You got. You got Snapchat. But yeah, you're right. Like, the other ones it's interesting so Facebook, and their defense has said that they are non monopoly, but not because they don't say, Twitter, Snapchat, or Snapchat, competitor. So they say they're competing with Google and Amazon, which are not social networks. So it's interesting that that's what Facebook views as it's competitors. Anytime. They mentioned, you know, there are the the average person has about ten different apps on their phones and Facebook is only one of them or something like that. The problem is that they always ignore the fact that you know, there's Facebook then there's scrimped and there's the what's app apple and there is Facebook messenger. Then if you really want again to Facebook light, if you don't wanna use the Facebook app, so they might not be monopoly in the sense of, you know, Facebook itself, but I think that's why there's a call to break. There's so many things Facebook owns that. Even though the average person has ten apps on their devices like half of those are from Facebook. All right. But let's think about this is really. The likelihood that anything even close to that would actually happen. I mean, it's possible. I mean GE broke up, and I think t- broker. Yeah. I think they're trying to make that argument for Facebook. Now, I don't know why they point to Google Amazon us or competitors probably from digital advertising. So we'll see if that happens next. And this is this could be really significant the US pre court this morning said an antitrust case can move forward against apple the suit claims that Apple's total control of the app store is forcing prices higher since the company takes thirty percent. Cut on apps sales costing customers more money a win for the plaintiff could potentially opened up to allow more apps stores or direct abseil or direct app. Sales to phone users. Yeah, that sounds pretty big. Yeah. A part of this for Apple's also security concern too. I mean, there's a reason why they keep it limited to the app store. They like guard that a lot they make sure that there's no militias apps getting on. There. And they've done a pretty good job at that. I mean, that's why they have that reputation versus Google play where it's much easier to get on that being said though, you know, the Google play also takes a cut of anything that goes onto its apps store. That's why you know, you can't download fortnight from the Google play store. But yeah, it's interesting that to see this case moving on. And. Yeah, like you said if it gets decided that apple can't be doing what it's doing. Currently. I mean one there's gonna be an issue of security, but you know, your apps could also be cheaper. Yeah. And we'll see if that has any direct impact on what we were just talking about with Facebook where consumers would be able to sue for regulatory changes. Last rule is another company that's weathering calls to break up amid this blowback our own Richard Nieva sat down with Google's ad chief to discuss user privacy. Alfred what was quick takeaway from this big thing that stuck out to me was he the Google head of advertising arguing about why all these privacy settings are not on by default. Yeah. And saying. That was a good thing. Yeah. Which is research showing that is not true. Like most people when they get a browser or anything like that. They usually use the default settings unless you know about privacy settings. Good chance, you're not even going to change it. They mentioned that you know, there had been about two two billion visits this year to it's a privacy settings. But only about twenty million people actually changed it. So, yeah, he he's making this argument Google doing all these things to add privacy settings. But the problem is like there is you to find there's somewhat easy to find. But they're not on by default. So it's kind of like unless you go and do that on your own which most people don't do these privacy settings are really only their name only either way we're at a time. If you want to read more about these stories check them out on CNN by the way game of thrones season. Eight is very good and your all bunch of complainers. I'm Ben FOX Ruben. I can't believe you said that I'm out for thanks for listening.

Facebook Google Apple Ben Fox Rueben Alfred Instagram Chris Hughes Amazon Harris Ben Fox Ruben Kamala CNN United States President Trump Snapchat GE Twitter
Kamala Harris: 'We Have to Seriously Take a Look At' Facebook

America Trends

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Kamala Harris: 'We Have to Seriously Take a Look At' Facebook

"A democratic presidential hopeful is among those calling for more regulation on Facebook. Here's USA radio's Rick Vincent with more after Facebook cofounder. Chris Hughes called for the social media company to be broken up. California Democratic Senator Kamala Harris told C N N's state of the union that breaking Facebook needs to be seriously looked at they're very few people that can actually get buy and being involved in their communities or society, or whatever their profession. Without somehow somewhere using Facebook there. It's very difficult for people to be engaged in any level of commerce without we have to recognize it for what it is. It is essentially that has gone unregulated in a New York Times piece. Thursday Hughes said co founder, Mark Zuckerberg as turned Facebook into an innovation suffocating monopoly and lamented the company's slow response to Russian agents, violent rhetoric and fake news.

Facebook Chris Hughes Kamala Harris Rick Vincent New York Times Mark Zuckerberg Senator USA California Co Founder
Weekend wrap--Facebook breakup and Google I/O

Talking Tech

03:34 min | 2 years ago

Weekend wrap--Facebook breakup and Google I/O

"Hiring is challenging, but there's one place you can go. We're hiring is simple. And smart that place is ZipRecruiter. Where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates. Try it for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash tech talk. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to hire. Hey, it's Jefferson Graham with USA. I am that for my Spain and Portugal holiday. And here we go again with another weekend wrap up on talking tech two-goal held its big I o conference for app developers. This week announcing new low cost phones in a rebranding of Google home products. But the search giant didn't dominate the week's headlines ride hailing company. Uber went public on Friday and got its share of chatter while Amazon founder Jeff Bezos made a detailed pitch for flying astronauts to the moon by twenty twenty four. Now, those stories were big, but the internet blew up this week talking about Facebook at a co-founders thoughtful heartfelt plead a US regulators to break up the company that Chris Hughes and Mark Zuckerberg to- founded in a Harvard dorm room Hughes pen the piece for the New York Times. And then did the talk show circuit saying that zuckerberg's a good kind person? But the focus on growth led. Him to quote, sacrifice security and civility for clicks, unquote. Meanwhile, Google looked to address consumer burn out over super expensive smartphones with a new pixel phone for three hundred ninety nine dollars. It's not waterproof and doesn't offer wireless charging. But then it doesn't cost a grand either. Google also lent some confusion to its Alexa, rival the Google home line. Remember that Google home hub that I love when it was released last year. It's now called the nest home hub because well Google owns nest which makes several home automation products and wanted to beef up the nest name a larger addition selling for two hundred thirty dollars that nest home hub max will be released in the summer. It will also feature a video camera. That follows users around the home similar to Facebook's portal device that is your weekend. Talking tech news wrap up I'm Jefferson Graham with USA today. Thanks for indulging with me while I was on. Holiday in Spain and Portugal. Thanks to all my guest host. If you have any feedback on today's show, you can find me on Twitter where I'm at Jefferson Graham, please subscribe to talking tech where every listen to online audio and I'll be back at you tomorrow with another quick hit from the world attack. Hiring used to be hard. It was and still is one of the biggest challenges businesses face before it meant dealing with endless stacks of resumes flipping through them. And hoping the perfect candidate would jump out at you and the manual review process wasn't any easier. But in today's high tech world hiring can be easy. And you only have to go to one place to get it done. Ziprecruiter dot com slash tech, talk with their powerful matching technology. Ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find the most qualified contenders for your job. And actively invites them to apply. Ziprecruiter is so effective that four out of five and players who post on the site. Get a qualified candidate within the first day and right now talking tech listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at this exclusive web address, ZipRecruiter dot com slash talk. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash T. E C H T A L K, ZipRecruiter dot com slash tech talk. Ziprecruiter, the smartest way to. Higher.

Ziprecruiter Google Jefferson Graham Facebook Mark Zuckerberg Portugal USA Spain Chris Hughes Jeff Bezos Amazon New York Times Harvard T. E C H T Alexa Twitter Founder Usa.
Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes: It's time to break up Facebook

Joe Walsh

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes: It's time to break up Facebook

"What are the co founders of Facebook is calling for the social media giant to be broken up? Facebook cofounder Chris Hughes CEO, Mark Zuckerberg has turned Facebook into an innovation. Suffocating monopoly in New York Times opinion piece Hugh said Facebook should be forced to spin off. What's happened Instagram and he called for a new federal agency to regulate tech companies Hughes who left Facebook in two thousand seven to campaign for Barack Obama says he no longer has any ownership in Facebook or any other social media company? He was publisher of the new Republic from twenty twelve to twenty sixteen and is now co chair of the economic security

Facebook Barack Obama Chris Hughes New York Times Mark Zuckerberg CEO Hugh
"chris hughes" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Just one more thing every back to the phones. And that is I don't know if you're familiar with this you heard I probably have one of the founders of Facebook, Chris Hughes, no longer with Facebook head this gigantic piece in the New York Times yesterday, dead, just savage, Mark, Zuckerberg and Facebook. Now, he says sucker bergh's a fine guys. Nice guy. Very kind person used to be a good for heaven's seen sucker Berg since two thousand seventeen but this is way out of control. Facebook is too big Facebook needs to be broken up just like AT and T and standard oil what Facebook needs to be broken up. Facebook one division. Whatsapp another division Instagram, another division, break them up there monopoly. Nobody can compete with them a need to be regulated. We got to break them up. Otherwise, Mark's got too much power. Mark has more power. Our and more influence over politics than anybody ever had it's unfair. It's got to happen. Do it now. And what really got this guy off was this Cambridge at Olympic thing. I have to tell you. Cambridge Analytica that was the Mercer's found a way to mine the Facebook membership in a way that benefited Donald Trump the left is out using Facebook this same way, Cambridge analytic, Dan. They just haven't been as big and successful. But because burn didn't stop Cambridge Analytica end. Because Berg didn't stop the Russians from running their anti Hillary ads or what they actually were running anti-trump as the truth and the Russians didn't start buying ads on Facebook until after the election. But that's neither here nor there. Let me tell you some Facebook. Have you seen response? She's Burs response. He wants to be regulated. He wants to be right. He's one thing. Chris us may have a point. We do need to be read come on in and regulators. Now, why do you think Zuckerberg wants the government to set up some oversight bunch? That's gonna regulate social media. Because he will never have any competition. He would have any competition now. But if it's no different remember how we pointed out crony capitalism works. Let's say you're WalMart, and you've got a gazillion thousand million dollars, and your nearest competitor is Costco. And they've only got a gazillion dollars. What do you do is WalMart, you'll come out in favor of the minimum wage going up to a hundred bucks an hour. Whatever it is you're in favor of it. Why because you know, Costco, can't afford it. You can. So you can put your competitor out of business by getting incoherence with the government to raise the minimum wage when everybody thinks wait a minute, WalMart, private sector. They ought to be opposed to minimum not if it'll run their competitors out of business. It's no different Zuckerberg and Facebook, please regulators, please because it'll make it impossible for startups to get started. If the regulation starts from the moment, you know, Facebook's already established regulate the hell out the mall you want. You can't change anything. Regulation would end the opportunity for any competition. Regulation would guarantee. Facebook's perpetual monopoly status. That's why Ford and don't think anything other than that. No, I'm not saying Chris Hughes is running a scam. And once you know is is actually hoping in doing face. Facebook's dirty where I'm not saying that I'm not saying he said, I'm just saying that Facebook welcoming regulation. Is no different than in, my hypothetical example. Walmart eagerly supporting a minimum wage increase if your competitors can't do business under the new rules. If your if your competitors can't do business while being by regulation. We're talking about speech, hate speech. Government gets to define it hate, speech, funds speech, political speech, offensive speech, dull speech, dry speech, whatever it is. Facebook Saudi established nothing's going to possibly be done to them. They own it. And by regulating, the business what competitors going to want to join that market when you face regulation to get go folks mother's day is two days from now. This is Friday mother's day is Sunday. You might be thinking you've waited too long. There are floral arrangements that are being delivered all across the fruited plane today for mother's day deliveries today and tomorrow from our friends at one eight hundred flowers. Now, the ninety nine percent of you that have taken care of this long ago when I suggest you take care of it. Good for you. I trust that the moms and your life. We're going to be very pleased..

Facebook WalMart Berg Zuckerberg Costco Chris Hughes Mark New York Times Cambridge sucker bergh Cambridge Analytica Instagram AT Chris us Donald Trump Olympic standard oil Hillary Ford
Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes says it's time to break up the social media giant

CNBC's Fast Money

03:51 min | 2 years ago

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes says it's time to break up the social media giant

"Facebook cofounder. Chris Hughes making a big call on the government to break up the social media giant's monopoly in the New York Times op at he says it needs to happen before Facebook combines its Instagram and what's at platforms Hughes will appear on NBC's nightly news this evening. Do you think Facebook is dangerous? I do the reason that I'm speaking out is because I think Facebook has become too big too powerful. He is extremely powerful because he has no boss because there's been there's no regulatory agency. Facebook responding today saying accountability for tech companies comes through new rules for the internet. Not breaking up a successful American company. So is it actually time to break up Facebook, Tim, well, you know, the irony here is I actually think this adds value. I I think there's multiple properties here, which are normally valuing are undervalued right now. And in fact, the the core business is the one that's getting most of the valuation. We're starting to see levers pulled an Instagram. So to me, this is a case where I think you have four businesses under this umbrella. Would this help the regulatory damage? Let's put it this way. As you've heard me say, I think Facebook trades at a discount to its intrinsic value because of regulatory risks. And because of just I think a perception problem. Yeah. Impact in that article. He said we've seen other anti-trust cases at standard oil, Microsoft, IBM, and AT and T and all of them actually traded higher. Ultimately, I just I don't know that this is if it's a legislative issue. I just don't know that they can get it done of. I'm skeptical. I maybe there's something like GDP are. I don't know. But ultimately, I don't think that was that detrimental. Where do you stop though? I mean, it seems to me like legislation. Yes. I mean, I think this is a very slippery slope and the reach that Facebook has into the internet is the same one that four or five companies, which we all know well have and it's a dominant position and its rules of the internet. The problem. I think is I would imagine that most people don't want congress all due respect to congress to be the ones make up legislation about things that are very complicated to understand and things that are constantly changing. So then then do you get to a point where you say there needs to be the equivalent of an FDA for data privacy or tech regulation? No, no. I don't think. So at all, I mean, we've gone through multiple different times with multiple different industries. This is no different. If they're breaking the law if we're upset about that. Then don't use the product if you can do that. And there's other conscious competition out there. You look at something. Like a we chat the super app. That's what Facebook is trying to go after there are competitors to the so I don't think. Then bundling a browser and a search engine. I mean like that this is one person who has a controlling shares of Facebook in all of these platforms who ultimately has control over an algorithm, which populates a news feed for which millions of Americans get their primary news. I mean isn't a slightly different. Listen, I don't understand going to fifty different this each state have their own Facebook. Does this each demographic? What? Receive strip out with what's happened. It's still have core Facebook. I mean, again, I don't know how you break. I understand what he's getting it. I just don't understand how you break it up one of the things that was interesting. He was getting at is Facebook's ability to crush copy, or by anybody that is a potential threat to their business. And so we're there to be legislation that would prevent them from doing acquisitions or copying. Okay. Then maybe that would affect Facebook's growth. Also, that's very hard to legislative sounds like Amazon to me to I believe Amazon has been in a position to crush or copy or put somebody out of business. And and it's it's worked for the consumer. But it hasn't worked for those

Facebook Instagram Chris Hughes New York Times NBC Congress Amazon Standard Oil FDA TIM AT IBM Microsoft
Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes says the 1 percent should give cash to working people - Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

Red Eye Radio

00:20 sec | 3 years ago

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes says the 1 percent should give cash to working people - Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

Cosby
Kim Kardashian, Kevin Cooper and Douglas discussed on The Drive Home with Jillian Barberie and John Phillips

The Drive Home with Jillian Barberie and John Phillips

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Kim Kardashian, Kevin Cooper and Douglas discussed on The Drive Home with Jillian Barberie and John Phillips

"Yeah i get it kim kardashian is working on another case came tweeted about the plight of san quentin prison death row inmate heaven cooper a spokesperson for everyone that's in prison is she going to one by one let everybody i guess okay this time she's playing the california governor jerry brown to retest dna evidence in his case governor brown can you please test the dna of kevin cooper she said she tweeted it over the weekend cooper a fifty nine year old was convicted of the murders of douglas in penny ryan their ten year old daughter jessica and her friend ten year old chris hughes and chino hills and eighty five okay so she thinks that he didn't do it.

Kim Kardashian Kevin Cooper Douglas Jessica Chris Hughes California Jerry Brown Ten Year Fifty Nine Year
Unilever picks Rotterdam HQ over London in blow to UK before Brexit​

02:08 min | 3 years ago

Unilever picks Rotterdam HQ over London in blow to UK before Brexit​

"Sure i'm more so they've got all those pressures coming together got those levers that may come poll andrea just wanted to get your reaction on another consumption story this morning this is unilever has announced essentially that it will be scrapping its headquarters here in the uk in london and focused solely on the rotterdam headquarters we're hearing this morning that less than one hundred headquarters employees will be affected this this by this move this unilever headline just breaking now on the bloomberg unilever saying that this decision has absolutely nothing to do with brexit i'm guessing though that we are going to see a lot of brexit related headlines in connection with it but i think there's another underlying story hey unilever had this approach last year from crofton heinz we've debated chris hughes is debated at gadfly whether the british and the doctor james really all that different bart's it will definitely be perceived as the this move trying to defend another approach and and making it more resistant to another hostile approach because they consumer companies on out of the woods.

Andrea UK London Crofton Heinz Chris Hughes Bart Unilever Rotterdam Bloomberg James
"chris hughes" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on Recode Decode

"I'd also like to tell you about one of our other podcasts recode media with peter kafka peter who'd you talk to this week it cara by talk to jason bloom last week south by south west you should have been there i know you're a south by south west yourself very busy so you missed out so you can listen to this episodes an awesome conversation he's one of the most interesting people i've ever really talked to he's a really interesting hollywood producer who made get out all the purge movies a million horror movies he makes them cheap he makes them profitable and it's interesting to no one else has done that which is something we talked about length and we also talked about what it's like to be up for an oscar and to not win an oscar you will enjoy listening to this for free sounds great peter you can find recode media on apple podcasts spotify google play music wherever you listen to your podcasts or here in the red chair with chris hughes one of the co founders of facebook but he's talking about income inequality because of his new book fair shot rethinking inequality and how we earn it we just talked about his background and how we got to this topic let's talk some more about that because there's so many things hanging off of income inequality there's all kinds of efforts talk about first about your efforts that you are doing in stockton what's how how do you approach it because again there's lots of different thoughts about this and some people think it's you know i had someone the other day call it communism like okay yeah kind of i think capitalism with much better guardrail so so the group that i corun is called the economic security project and what we're trying to do is convene a bigger broader conversation about how guaranteed income can work in america.

jason bloom producer oscar facebook stockton america south west hollywood apple chris hughes
"chris hughes" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"chris hughes" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Fundable thing is is through cash and their ability to chase their own dreams or figure out there on youtube so you got interested in it through that just by giving just by giving initially what had tried to do that concept because again there's lots of pull i'm assuming you get like pecked to death all day what you should give to and how you can help people yeah and i mean my husband and i give to array of causes it's not just cash international try t rights is in another thing that's important is we were active in the fight for for marriage equality but particularly when it comes to income inequality and poverty when you're on the hunt for what's the most effective thing to do to do one of the things that i've learned is that sometimes the best solution is the simplest right of course we need more and better education right of course we need more small businesses to create good jobs we've spent decades thinking about those things investing in those things and and we should think more however sometimes we we overlook the most powerful tool the most powerful weapon in the arsenal and in in many ways the simplest and i think cash cash can be that so my hope though is to take the conversation a little bit out of speculating about whether robots are going to take all the jobs in twenty forty and and and situated in the here now because income inequality has not been as bad as it is today since one thousand nine hundred thousand nine hundred zero that's an agency year the great depression began the top point one percent not one percent of the top point one percent owns as much wealth as the bottom ninety percent right combined right and so anybody who says well that's just the way the economy works i that is no we have chosen the rules that structure this economy and we had the power to choose different ones and i think a guaranteed income should be at the center right we're gonna talk about that more because it's it's it's loaded with so many different things politics with everything else when we get back we're here with chris hughes he is one of the co founders of facebook but his new book is called fair shot rethinking inequality and how we earn it.

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