18 Burst results for "Chris Hadfield"

"chris hadfield" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

05:34 min | 6 months ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"Plus, it's not just you, seasonal allergies really are worse this year. And the climate emergency is to blame. And the northern lights might be visible Wednesday night in parts of the northern U.S. and Canada with bonus rockets being blasted into them by NASA. Here's some cool stuff for your ride home. So last night I was scrolling through Reddit and saw a video of captain Chris Hadfield during his tenure at NASA's Aquarius underwater lab, demonstrating what happens when you try to open a can of soda at the bottom of the ocean. This led to people, of course, sharing hadfields incredible 2013 music video of David Bowie's space oddity that he filmed on board the International Space Station..

Chris Hadfield NASA Reddit Canada U.S. David Bowie International Space Station
"chris hadfield" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Don't have to be particularly qualified at all to be able to have a very minimal but still a spaceflight experience It's still early and it's still imperfect and we've got to figure out the regulations and how to work it into society It's sort of like airplanes a 110 years ago But it's a really interesting trajectory And it's a natural follow on to the type of work that I've been doing my whole life And there's a whole universe out there still that's going to require a professional astronauts I'm not too worried about no people like you But we have that people aren't going to get confused that someone going for a ride is actually someone who's flying the ship At one point before space flight in the book Alan shepherd leads the quote astronauts prayer and we can't say it on the radio but it is something like dear lord please don't let mess up Yeah Is that a real thing Was that your invention I flew on the space shuttle twice as part of the flight crew I flew in Atlantis and then an endeavor And both times on the way out to the launch pad the director of flight operations or the chief astronaut Whoever was in the van with us said that exact prayer So that's the real thing Yeah And it's actually something you say you know when you're out on a spacewalk or whatever you know you're about to do something where you see a reversible and the consequence of doing it wrong is huge you know life and death or billions of dollars worth of equipment So yeah that little prayer is good It kind of gets your mind focused and pay attention to what's happening And yeah it's real That's retired astronaut and ISS commander Chris Hadfield his new book is.

Alan shepherd Chris Hadfield ISS
"chris hadfield" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on 1A

"For this <Speech_Female> nascent <SpeakerChange> space tourism <Speech_Female> industry. <Speech_Female> Not <Speech_Female> how closely <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> are these <Speech_Male> potential environmental consequences <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Being followed <SpeakerChange> and monitored <Silence> right now. <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> don't know how <Speech_Female> much monitoring is <Speech_Female> happening right now. <Speech_Female> Just because the industry <Speech_Female> is so <Speech_Female> young <Speech_Female> but i think it definitely <Speech_Female> makes sense to <Speech_Female> keep track <Speech_Female> of the emissions <Speech_Female> as <Speech_Female> as the industry <Speech_Female> matures a little <Speech_Female> bit and we see how <Speech_Female> many flights <Speech_Female> there actually <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> as <Speech_Female> as she was. Just saying. <Speech_Female> you know <Speech_Female> we need to. We <Speech_Female> need to look at. What's coming <Speech_Female> out of the <Speech_Female> rockets. <Speech_Female> Obviously there's going <Speech_Female> to be a different impact <Speech_Female> environmentally <Speech_Female> if we're looking at something <Speech_Female> that's like two flights per <Speech_Female> year versus <Speech_Female> hundreds <Speech_Female> And so. I <Speech_Female> think that's where <Speech_Female> the questions are going <Speech_Female> to be <SpeakerChange> as <Speech_Female> this moves forward. <Speech_Male> Not <Speech_Male> what will you be looking for <Speech_Male> next as <Speech_Male> we watch. This <Speech_Male> potential industry <Speech_Female> start <SpeakerChange> to expand. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I'm really <Speech_Female> curious once <Speech_Female> again to see <Speech_Female> what the demand <Speech_Female> actually <Speech_Female> looks like. <Speech_Female> And then even <Speech_Female> more than that <Silence> <Speech_Female> I really <Speech_Female> want to know <Speech_Female> what <Speech_Female> the end goals <Speech_Female> are really. <Speech_Female> And so <Speech_Female> all of these. Companies <Speech_Female> <hes> spacex. <Speech_Female> Blue origin <Speech_Female> virgin galactic. <Speech_Female> Even nasa <Speech_Female> have said that. <Speech_Female> These projects <Speech_Female> are aimed at <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> accessibility <Speech_Female> to space at opening. <Speech_Female> It up at making <Speech_Female> it <Speech_Female> more available <Speech_Female> But <Speech_Female> what does that really look <Speech_Female> like in practice. <Speech_Female> Who <Speech_Female> is going to be flying. <Speech_Female> What do the passenger <Speech_Female> manifests <Speech_Female> look like. <Speech_Female> I mean we know <Speech_Female> that based <Speech_Female> on history <Speech_Female> and what we've seen so far <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the first passengers <Speech_Female> that are paying for these flights <Speech_Female> are going to be very <Speech_Female> wealthy individuals <Speech_Female> who are not representative <Speech_Female> of <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> most of humanity <Speech_Female> on earth <Speech_Female> and so as the <Speech_Female> industry matures is <Speech_Female> going to shift. <Speech_Female> Are we going to start. <Speech_Female> Seeing people. Visiting <Speech_Female> space who are <Speech_Female> more representative <Speech_Female> are the company's <Speech_Female> going to start prioritizing <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> because if the goal is <Speech_Female> really to <Speech_Female> have these <Speech_Female> sub orbital flights <Speech_Female> be a stepping <Speech_Female> stone on the <Speech_Female> way to a future <Speech_Female> in space. <Speech_Female> Then i think that's something <Speech_Female> they're going to have to pay attention <Speech_Female> to and even <Speech_Female> then when we're asking <Speech_Female> these questions about <Speech_Female> what does humanity's <Speech_Female> future in space <Speech_Female> look like water we <Speech_Female> envisioning. <Speech_Female> Who is the we <Speech_Female> in that pronoun. <Speech_Female> Who's asking that question. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> And i think that <Speech_Female> matters to. <Speech_Female> That's not <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> yet. Drake science <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> reporter and contributing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> writer for national <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> geographic <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> also with us <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> today. Former astronaut <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> chris hadfield <Speech_Music_Male> and author of the <Speech_Music_Male> forthcoming fiction <Speech_Music_Female> book. The apollo <Speech_Music_Male> murders and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> philip mcallister <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> director of the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> commercial space flight. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement>

nasa chris hadfield Drake philip mcallister
"chris hadfield" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"And if you were unprepared for them the you probably didn't make good choices. But i'd trained for it. Not specifically that but i trained for having a problem while i was outside on a spacewalk who knows what it could have been. Maybe my seat. My suit could have popped the leak or maybe my suit dies. And you know where it's no longer pumping or who knows. All kinds of things could go wrong. And i'd worked out with all the training teams how to react to those things. So when i went blind. A kind of Okay well that's what i've had. I was hoping it before. It's no big deal. What do i do now. Well i've got another i. I could kill houston but they can help me. I just thought well might clear up. It might not. But nobody really helped me and i can still see out my other is. I'm just going to keep on working but the trouble is our bodies are designed for gravity and without gravity tears. Don't fall they. Just stay there on your. I like a big jelly and it got deeper and deeper in my i. Whatever was contaminating hurting my eye and the tears sort of diluted at some but eventually got thick enough that it flowed across my nose into my other eye and then i was sort of struck totally blind. I mean. I could. If i if i forced my eyelids open i could sort of see light and dark but not enough to be able to work so now i i couldn't continue doing. I was doing so. I had to tell houston because also it might have been a an endemic problem with my suit that maybe they were seeing some data on. Or maybe something i didn't know about although i spent years understanding the suits houston. Something's in my suit and it's got in by both my eyes. I'm blind would you like me to do next. And my partner. That i was out spacewalking. West scott said hey. Do you need me to come over to help. And i was like well not really. Because i thought about every time you close your eyes. You're blind and you don't die in the world doesn't end you know just okay. I can't see right now. I have four other senses and so is like get over it. It's just that. If i close my eyes and could i make it back to the airlock and finish the space walk if i needed without vision. Yeah especially with scott helping me so okay. Great i'm not gonna die right now so let's just work on the problem. Houston san well. It might be this special carbon dioxide removal stuff in your suit lithium hydroxide which is really nasty stuff. And you don't want to near is in your lungs because he will do a lot of damage so they wanted event oxygen out of my suit and it seemed logical so i popped a little valve down. Sorta like frankenstein down on the left side of my neck and that allowed my oxygen to his out into space and it allowed emergency oxygen to flow in over my head. That would both make sure that i was getting a fresh off in supply but it also might help clear whatever contaminant was in the suit and at first i thought may wanna here. I am in space squirting. My own oxygen out into the vacuum of the universe will. We'll see how this goes for awhile. But it did start to help. And my eyes teared enough diluted the contaminant and after a while i can see lousy but i could see well enough and my eyes kept tearing ended evaporated and crested around my eyes and it turned out to just be so simple. It was just the anti fog chemicals off of my visor had gotten into my eye a mixture of oils and soaps. But that's how i dealt with it. I practiced in advance. I visualized things going wrong and then when things actually went wrong. I did at real a realistic assessment of the actual danger. Not just my instinctive animal. Fear but okay. So i can't see in why so what you know okay so i came to us so what you know. What does that actually me. Not just me being a little Unprepared to allah shivering in the corner. Hoping somebody was going to rescue me and to me. That's kind of how. I approach everything in life. Get ready for. It anticipate things going wrong. Change my own skillset when it does happen really truly analyze what's happening and don't succumb to fear and then try and learn as much from it and benefit for others afterwards read about people done extraordinary things. They often talk about the scenario that they've somehow imagined friday of different scenarios. They've worked through the problem so when they would something like that happens. It's not so much unexpected. It's a speed bump or it's an obstacle that they're confident. They can overcome that just as certain people atlas guility think that. That's something that all involved. I think it's a mixture of both tony I think you can go your entire life saying oh that's somebody else will make that decision or that's above my pay grade. I'm gonna blame that on somebody else like. I'll blame it on the current politician. Who's in charge of the country. Or i'm gonna blame it on big pharma. I'm gonna blame it on something external so that gives you permission to then have no responsibility for yourself. And it's really easy in tempting to do and i do it myself. You know to some degree but in truth It's your life and you could sit down right now at easily. List the five biggest threats to you right now. You can say financial or existential. You know life death whatever or my kids or whatever if those her are we ready to deal with them or not and if we're not that how can we get a little better ready for them. You're not born with that. That's just a choice right. You could do it today instead of just watching another netflix's or another cat video. Actually do that if a fire alarm goes off in our house right now. What are we all going to do. Or if i blow a tire on my car. Or if i see someone having a seizure or whatever. A lot of people just sort of crossed their fingers and hope and whistle past the graveyard but the trouble with that.

netflix Houston scott today both five biggest threats frankenstein hydroxide four other senses friday West scott allah houston
"chris hadfield" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"T zero and wham the solids light this great wicked pulse of energy through your vehicle shaking you in your seat. You're lying on your back on some sort of flexible chair in the whole thing shakes you know as if you were in a deckchair earthquake. And then there's this force that begins like some giant foot just positioned itself under the small of your back and began willfully pushing you away from the world. I watched the launch tower. Slide down a disappear out of view as we were climbing away by the time our tail cleared that large shower rarity one hundred miles an hour straight up and think what it's like to get in your car step on the gas and at how long it takes you to get to you. Know hundred miles an hour in forty five seconds. We went through the speed of sound. Gone straight up and the violence of it is kind of like nothing you've ever experienced. The shuttle is generating eighty million horsepower. The relentlessness of it and also the huge danger of the risk. That day was one in thirty eight of dying during launch. those are pretty Daunting odds to defeat but is the only way to get there. It only takes about as long as it took me to describe it here about eight minutes and forty seconds or so. That device has taken you from laying on your back in florida to now being above the atmosphere going twenty five times the speed of sound with perfectly the right parameters going exactly the right direction and the engine shut off and you're weightless tony chap who were chatting with chris hadfield how many extraordinary things he's done in his life. We come back. I'm going to ask chris. What was the difference between somebody. Kids staring at space with a big smile. And you deciding to chase that drink chatter. That matters with tony. Chapman overturn a moment on the iheartradio. Talk network is houston. Are you ready for the event. Houston this is the international space station. We are ready for the event. Thank you for taking the time to be part of this in person today. to the people right across canada. This is a wonderful thing to be part them each week. You can download the latest episode of chatter that matters as a podcast from your iheartradio canada. Now more with tony. Chapman presented by rbc entirely different perspective. You're not looking up at the universe. You and the earth are going through the universe together and you're holding on with one hand looking at the world turn beside you roaring silently with with color and texture a porous by cube containerize away from that and you look under your arm down at the rest of everything unfathomable blackness texture. You feel like you could stick your hand. It looking back chatter matters. Is tony chapman shows presented by be seeing had the great honor to talk to chris hatfill. We've we began by listening to space oddity and realize that chris does not only an engineer and astronaut test pilot but also incredible physician. We're going to get a little bit more into that. The video the music a little bit later but chris. What shouldn't take me back to your early days. When you're a kid as reading about looking up into space watching. Neil armstrong. Your many kids that dreamt about space space movies. You went after. What was the restraint. You and so many others. I think it started with comic books. Tony comic books you know when you're little there is no line between fantasy and reality you haven't seen enough of the world all seems about the same. You know superman. Santa claus and i loved comic books because they were words and images and it helped me imagine what these things might be like and to see those comic books to see people in a leaving earth in in little pointy ships and going to the moon and mars and traveling around the universe that was cool and then my imagination was deep enough and my knowledge is good enough that i could just read science fiction and read arthur. C. clarke ray bradbury in an isaac asimov and arthur conan doyle and all all the interesting writers and then star trek came on tv. When i was. I don't know how it was. I seven i guess so. I was watching. I run of captain. Kirk and spock. And all at every week out on the farm where i was living and i went and saw two thousand one space odyssey in the theaters that had all given me permission to imagine a whole different life. For myself jumbled up in my head of of things that are out there beyond the the flat little horizon beyond the farmhouse or my folks were raising our family. But as you say. I watch neil armstrong and buzz aldrin and mike collins. That apollo eleven. I was nine years old and watched Them descend to the surface. And then you know step out. And he'll put his foot down and then After that what it did to me was it gave me permission to bridge fantasy and reality like this wasn't just a comic book. This is the thing that people were doing. this is now a fantasy. this is a career choice. When you when you go to the guidance counselor and he says what what do you want to do you can say. I would like to walk the moon because neil and buzz did it. Why couldn't i do it. What were the obstacles. Because i already realized i'd started with no skills and i've gained some skills by the time i was ten. You know not a lot. But some so i kind of looked at all right. What else do i need to know in. There wasn't like it was the only thing in my life. I was just a kid like anybody else. you know. Just just goofing around and doing stupid things than learning about myself. You know girls in music and everything trying to be a student at school. But i realized that i wasn't gonna astronaut accidentally. You know the whole don knotts. Reluctant astronaut movie was cute but That's not how it works. If i was actually going to get chosen as an astronaut. I was going to have to change who i was and so i thought okay well cool. I'm going to grow up to be something on. I grew up to be that in. So let's start doing things that may give me the skills so that someday. I might have a chance to do that so it. Just kinda helped shape my choices like. What should i do this weekend. What books should i read. What what courses should i take. Most of your life is not spending school as seems like it. But it's not true and and you have a whole bunch of time even when you're in school to sort of end of independent thought and so i just pursued it and then as i got older i became older. Hey i get my scuba license. Astronauts do spacewalks dive underwater. Learn how to do spacewalks scrape. That's me one step closer to being an astronaut. An astronauts fly in space. I kind of decided he anything. That is a verb. Maybe i could learn to. Do you know Dive fly sang danced. Juggled whatever it is you know. Hey those are verbs. And and i could be a person could do those things so i might i or reply so. I joined the air cadets to To get my pilot's license and so yeah. I learned to fly. Before i learned learned drive a car lot of the people i talk to talk parents sort of allowing people to dream it. Tell me a little about your parents because you're looking at space. They're working a far two very different. Worlds both my folks are grew up on farms and they didn't get beyond high school in any sort of formal education however my father went for a ride in an his brother brought him a ride in an airplane when he was a teenager and he decided that's better than farming and so he went got all his licenses and then became a commercial pilot many worked as a corporate pilot and then he eventually got hired by an airline and he flew as an airline pilot through his whole career while still raising us on a farm and running a five hundred acre corn farm. My parents were an interesting mixture. Very smart quite well read. They really encouraged not just curiosity but curiosity answered. It's easy to be curious just to say why you know that's one of the first words we learn as little kid why.

canada chris forty five seconds tony chapman isaac asimov Santa claus Chapman Kirk florida five hundred acre Neil armstrong twenty five times ten chris hadfield hundred miles an hour tony iheartradio today arthur thirty eight
"chris hadfield" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

Chatter that Matters

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on Chatter that Matters

"And now i was completely blind outside spaceship. So what's the scariest thing you've ever done may twenty thirteen astronaut. Chris hadfield performs a cover to david bowie. Space odyssey ground control to may jetta records. What he's the commander at the international space station ground control to may your tom david bowie. When he hears the rendition tweets out. Hello space boy. Lock yo so use hatch and put your helmet on is twenty abbott hosted the platform chatted it matters dot ca presented by our. See whether we're doing a radio. Show podcast poster. Video aren't tant is to help you get where you need want and deserve to go on this show. I talked with ordinary people who are doing extraordinary things and in doing so. We uncover life lessons that we can all apply to be more and do commencing. John ground controlled. Egypt really made the. You're listening to the iheartradio candidate talk network and this is chatter. That matters with tony chapman presented by rb. See the capsule few so chris. Welcome to china that matters attacks. my pleasure. Nice to be speaking with you. Tony what's the best way to describe it. Downhill ski racer. Test pilot musicians spacewalker commander. The space station or author of a new book called the apollo orders crash from health. Those things taty kinda depends went in my life. You're asking or or what topic you're asking about but yeah you know i think it was one of the great science fiction authors said. Hey we're people specialization is for insects. Which a lot of different things. So so yeah. I i'm passionately involved in all those things and i consider myself very lucky to be most recently and author but i work with space companies and and Working very closely with moon settlement policy right now of of how that's going to happen in human history developing other companies in teaching university and playing a lot of music. I was supposed to be touring with bowie's band this last year but but because of cova debts in curtailed. So yeah i i enjoy all different facets of life but please just call chris so we have so much to cover but i watched one of your ted talks when you described the first time you went into space. Can you just take our listeners. Back to the first time you realize at that kid used to dream about going into space was actually heading sure. I've been lucky enough to fly in space. Three times twice on the space shuttle in once as the pilot of a russian soyuz. The first time in life the first time you do something is often the most special the most revolutionary and it's the combination of everything to that point in your life. Because you're are about to do something. You've been dreaming of since you're a little kid you doing something that you have been working towards for decades to gain the skills to be trusted to go do it. It's been a huge definer of your life. The choices you had to make the places you've lived what is done with your yourself and your family and it's extremely dangerous and it's something you passionately believe in and want to do so. All of those things are about to happen so you come out that morning exquisitely prepared but very very excited but also with with an ability to calm yourself because of all of the things that you know and the understanding and the practice you've gone through and you wake up and you don't eat much because you know when you hit the weightlessness you're probably going to be motioned sex. You don't wanna you don't wanna see your reckless against the most people don't actually eat anything and then getting dressed is hard because you have to wear pressure suits in case. There's a leak in the spatial. That takes a long time. But you do get into this vehicle. Call it an astro fan. Which is sort of comical. We ride in the astro van. The several kilometers past vehicle assembly building knowledge spectators out to where your rocket ship is sitting on the pad iconic there on the horizon and lit up by gigantic zenana lights in the darkness. Step out of the van at the base. Get into this elevator and eventually takes up to the one hundred ninety five foot level hundred ninety five feet above the launch pad. And you're there you're right next to your spaceship on one side. You can see the atlantic ocean now because that's where you're gonna go over the atlantic so there's the beautiful tranquility of that. The other side is all of the kennedy space center. Tens of thousands of people who have come to see launch today including about one thousand of my closest friends who were there and one by one you crawl into the ship. I felt at the time very calm. Because i'd practiced it and i knew what was happening. And and i knew the odds. And i knew my role. So there's a great comfort in that being completely prepared for something tends to decrease the nervousness and the worry the stress of it. But i was also as excited as have been in my life because i was about to embark on this grand adventure. I was about to take a huge risk to go do something that was going to open a door to basically everything i'd been dreaming about and the rest of my life. That's that's a pretty interesting threshold to be standing on crawl into the ship. Your warm your way up into your seat and it's not really a seat. It's a couch. you're lying on your back. Because he launched with your belly button pointed at the sky. And there's someone there strapping un as tight as can be Because it's violent they give you a little note from your spouse and kiss on the forehead. And and then they closed the hatch. Now you and your crew are alone inside the spaceship and there's still a fair but it's time to launch but it's a time for reflection you're listening to the chatter of launch control and all of the technicians the thousands of people that are needed to launch a shuttle check in with houston. When they come up on the radio. Talk to our flight surgeon. Who's just telling us jokes in the background to keep everybody calm. And i was seated next to one of the most experienced astronauts in history. A guy named jerry ross. I think that was his fifth spaceflight. And i noticed about ten minutes before launch that jerry's knee started bouncing up and down. And i thought if jerry's excited and it's okay that i'm excited and i don't even know jerry knew that. His knee was bouncing just in in an expression of his own emotion. But more than excited. I and the other people in the crew. I was intensely focused. And i sort of built my whole life to be able to ignore everything else at that point except how to make this machine work. Nothing else really mattered. Because my job was to work with the other astronauts inside. Atlantis and overcome the terrible odds Through our own force of will and and tenacity and comprehension and make this machine do what we wanted to do and deliver a safely to space. Pretty amazing to be in there watching the clock.

Chris hadfield david bowie tony chapman atlantic ocean jerry ross Tony one hundred ninety five foot today tom david bowie first china last year Three times first time iheartradio atlantic fifth spaceflight thousands of people hundred Egypt
"chris hadfield" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on 600 WREC

"We have everything from conventional loans FHA VA just about anything that you could think of and we do a tremendous job at doing everything that we can support our loan officers giving them coaching marketing anything that they need to ensure that ship that they're successful you really do you really are telling the truth and you know I love working with Sierra we are lenders were not brokers we we we are lenders and we do service a lot of our own lunch not all but a lot of our online so that's this nice because you get to keep you get to keep that customer relationship and it is a people business thank you call Porter in we're gonna be hearing more from Kyle but you know we're living through extraordinary times of change during this corona virus pandemic financial markets don't like uncertainty and you know other to most people but we each have an opportunity to grow to learn a new skill into place ourselves in the best position possible one of the tell story about NASA commander and astronaut Chris Hadfield eat this is what he teaches his students over there the more you know the less you fear Chris Hadfield he has floated out into the blackness of space and he describes how he could feel heat on one side of the space suit on the side on the side where that was facing the sun and at the very same time he could sense that chill of space on the other side of his space suit he talks about every astronaut's life phone on the mission and depends on the it it it really depends on the ability to solve problems quickly he studies every system on the ship then he boils it down to one page he brings home his point to students by saying you have to be able to solve any problem in one breath we'll let you know even though you may not be preparing to fly a spaceship but.

Porter Kyle commander Chris Hadfield FHA NASA
"chris hadfield" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"And welcome back to coast to coast George nor with you along with colonel Chris Hadfield served as commander on the international space station Chris I get duh edgy in a plane after two hours how could you folks spend so much time up there in the international space station don't you get claustrophobic all right well it's a busy place George word we're not passengers on board so yeah we're right on about two hundred experiments constantly and it's a big complicated ship it all it's like a like a huge destroyer or cruise liner or something that can never come into port for for thirty years naturally have to do all the maintenance and fixing all over there and so they actually have a electronic schedule for is that tells us what we're doing every five minutes for the whole six months that you're up there don't know why and it split so it's it's a hugely demanding and busy life and what you're really looking for is is a little bit of time off to take pictures of the window or or or write music or or or think about where you are and speaking of music I understand you're quite an accomplished musician yourself I do the guitar up on the space station that that was put there by the action of the NASA psychiatrist because music and an arts are are are so important just for mental health people need music and and so I yeah I played I played in bands my whole life and and and fronted bands and I wrote a whole album of music on the space station on well did a cover of a Bowie tune that that lots a lots of people are saying that the targets gets played quite a bit up there and and it's a really nice way to kind of explain explain things to yourself you know to to float weightless window playing guitar and and watching the world role by silently it's an amazing personal experience as amazing as a matter of fact I've got a little clip of you singing space oddity up there on the international space station ground control to major Tom control to major Tom which and it's on ground control to major Tom Mensing one engine stations and it's you if you a great job with that super and that of course and.

George Chris Hadfield commander Tom Mensing NASA Bowie five minutes thirty years six months two hours
"chris hadfield" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"And welcome back to coast to coast George nor with you along with colonel Chris Hadfield served as commander on the international space station Chris I get duh edgy in a plane after two hours how could you folks spend so much time up there in the international space station don't you get claustrophobic all right well it's a busy place George word we're not passengers on board so yeah we're running about two hundred experiments constantly and it's a big complicated ship it all it's like a a huge destroyer or cruise liner or something that can never come into port for for thirty years I have to do all the maintenance and fixing all over there and so they actually have a electronic schedule for is that tells us what we're doing every five minutes for the whole six months that you're up there don't know why and it split so it's it's a hugely demanding and busy life and what you're really looking for is is a little bit of time off to take pictures of the window or or or write music or or or think about where you are and speaking of music I understand you're quite an accomplished musician yourself hi this guitar up on the space station that that was put there by the action of the NASA psychiatrist because music and an arts are are are so important just for mental health people need music and and so I yeah I played I've played in bands my whole life and and and fronted bands and I wrote a whole album of music on the space stations on well did a cover of a Bowie tune that that lots and lots of people are saying that good targets gets played quite a bit up there and and it's a really nice way to kind of explain explain things to yourself you know to to float weightless window playing guitar and and watch the world role by silently it's an amazing personal experience as amazing as a matter of fact I've got a little clip of you singing space oddity up there on the international space station ground control to major Tom control to major Tom news hatch and no limits on ground control to major Tom Mensing one engine station and with you it is a great job with that super not of course win but we did that.

George Chris Hadfield commander NASA Bowie Tom Tom news Tom Mensing five minutes thirty years six months two hours
"chris hadfield" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Supply and welcome back to coast to coast George in order with you along with colonel Chris Hadfield served as commander on the international space station Chris I get duh edgy in a plane after two hours how could you folks spend so much time up there in the international space station don't you get claustrophobic all right well it's a busy place George word we're not passengers on board so yeah we're running about two hundred experiments constantly and it's a big complicated ship it all it's like a like a huge destroyer or cruise liner or something that can never come into port for for thirty years I have to do all the maintenance and fixing all over there and so they actually have a electronic schedule for is that tells us what we're doing every five minutes for the whole six months that you're up there don't know why and it splits so it's it's a hugely demanding and busy life and what you're really looking for is is a little bit of time off to take pictures of the window or or or write music or or or think about where you are begin a music understand you're quite an accomplished musician yourself I do the guitar up on the space station that that was put there by the action of the NASA psychiatrist because music and an arts are are are so important just for mental health people need music and and so I yeah I played I played in bands my whole life and and and fronted bands and I wrote a whole album of music on the space station and while it did a cover of a Bowie tune that that lots and lots of people are saying that guitar gets gets played quite a bit up there and and it's a really nice way to kind of explain explain things to yourself you know to to flow weightless window playing guitar and and watch the world role by silently it's an amazing personal experience as amazing as a matter of fact I've got a little clip of you singing space oddity up there on the international space station control to main jets control to major Tom each and hello limits on ground control to major Tom saying engine station you it is a great job with that super and that of course and.

George Chris Hadfield commander Tom NASA Bowie five minutes thirty years six months two hours
"chris hadfield" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on KTOK

"With Chris Hadfield as we talk about his work in national it's a guide to life on earth our final segment just ahead on coast to coast AM well are you a coast insider yet if you are then you know all about the great benefits you get from it but these folks who have joined our very happy hello this is Gino in Chesterfield Missouri and I am a coast to coast insider because I loved good radio I'm a member of George's Norreys army of coast to coast insiders and I love to listen to the shows that are really great over and over again and go back into the archives and look up similar shows by the same artist that he has on its only fifteen cents a day and you can sign up by going to our website coast to coast AM dot com stem cell technology one of the wonders of the planet from Beverly hills California Dr Nathan Newman has been a leader in the use of stem cell technology for repairs to the body he's taken that same technology to skin care with luminous in a P. T. two hundred advanced polypeptide technology it's a revolutionary idea when it comes to cosmetic treatment of the skin we've taken these polypeptide looked at the fact made this combination of peptides that are normal and very hard actually to make and their unique so that's why it works so well and it works so fast so what makes it so unique why is this so different than any other product out there first of all there are no cells in it there no animal products there no strong acids there's no error tunes they are made for all types of skin there's no product that can do all that for every person for all types of skin so this is a really unique model and again we are targeting those problems that causes us to age the best skin of your life starts here Dr Newman's luminous with eight P. T. two hundred reduces the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles and restores youthful vitality and radiance try luminous today at healthy looking dot com shop is full product line or try the luminous serum with the highest concentration of eighty P. T. two hundred in our starter kit for only nineteen ninety nine with free shipping order now at healthy looking dot com this exclusive formula is not available in stores start your path to a younger smoother softer.

"chris hadfield" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

11:36 min | 3 years ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Coast George in order with you Chris Hadfield with us Chris so we first went to the moon with the men fifty years ago we had Apollo eleven twelve fourteen fifteen sixteen and seventeen why did we stop do you folks the district within the astronaut community wonder that too what we stop because it was a race and we won the race it if you if you stage I mean people stop running in the Olympics when they cross the finish line at four point and and the way that the whole Apollo program was built was to win the space race to beat the Soviets to the moaning and a great geopolitical battle that was going on and and so once the race was won the the program was over there are other competing programs for for taxpayers dollars the president Nixon at the time had to make the decision and decided to edit and packed canceled it with two rockets that it never flew the rockets were already built for Apollo eighteen Apollo nineteen of those one of those you can see now at the Johnson Space Center in the Arabic at the Kennedy Space Center so it was it was just the way it was built that it was all put together as as a race and the race was finished and so it's kind of a lesson learned as well you you if you want something to be a long lasting program then you need to build it that way and have the sustainability planned as part of how you're going to do it not just make it a a one time are done to kind of rate rate race based deal you cheer the Alton lunar foundation tell me about that organization yeah the technology has gotten good enough now that it becomes way way cheaper to to get to orbit and and therefore to accelerate forty one percent faster get to the moon and so the group that I'm working with is looking at how cheap can you get it how if you use the least expensive launchers we have whether it's SpaceX like they have a lunch tomorrow going up to the space station or whether it's in a rocket lab down in New Zealand or some of the other competitors how much money does it take the land something on the surface of the moon now and if you can get it cheap enough then what sort of opportunities does that open up how can we we understand the moon better explore it look at the water that's there start to move towards not not just the the visiting that we did during Apollo but actual settlement of the mount and what sort of policy should be have this we settled about whose laws are going to apply you know how how are we going to do this collective how is it that that we are going to settle other planets because however we settle the moon that's probably going to establish the precedent for how we settle any other planet Mars next after that so it's it's a really interesting group to be part of and if you can get the cost down say two eight million dollars or ten million dollars to land something small and then that's that's an awful lot of money for an individual but it's not a lock for for a company or no not an organization and and for a lot of people that's not even a very much money at a personal level so it it opens up some new business opportunities as well as a lot of scientific and and precedent setting opportunities and then that's the that's the group that I'm working with the open letter foundation if we go back with men and women to the moon when do you think that could happen what's your gas out well could versus will we could go to the known relatively quickly if we had the the budget at a burning reason you know we know how to build the space ships we did it as you say fifty years yeah your role technology but but you have to always fight the annual budget cycle center has to has to fight its way into the all the other needs of the nation and the international community and then there was a really tough battle to build the international space station it took a long time and it was started with freedom under under Reagan which you know came from earlier ideas that final became the I SS and we will work on the eighties and nineties and but people have been living now in space permanently on the station for nineteen years as of last month and and so it happened that more up there and were were looking at the universe of like at the world and running all the experiments on board it's it's our great first permanent international stepped away from the area so it takes time but it happens and I think the moon is going to follow that pattern as well we've proven we can go there but to settle it takes time that's right just like settling the Europeans that came to North America you know five hundred years ago we we sort of forget our own history but but England first came over in fourteen ninety seven they didn't send even one more pro one more follow up for like seventy five years and they didn't start settling for over a hundred years even though they knew there was a whole continent they're just waiting for you know for opportunity yeah they had the older competing politics and things had to deal with at home just like we do now so I think you know within the next fifteen twenty years well of people living permanently on the moon could be sooner if we choose to do that could be later if we choose not to we have to decide what's important to us would you go to the moon here fast all I'd love to are you asking I would love to go on mass it right yeah yeah yeah yeah are you going to do is call in a to our show the you got to promise me that that that we have from the moon I'd be happy to get out to take the time lag but no that's what I set out to do what I was a nine year old kid that's what really inspired me and and we're going to have people living on the mound and I think we're reasonably some of the people that are in the astronaut corps right now the younger ones are going to be the ones that are living on the mound so yeah I I I think it all year all got to do various things within your own lives and and eventually you're all going to end up somewhere why not try and set a nearly impossible goal instead of destinations within your own life I would love to go and and help explore the moan and and settle there I think I'd be a grand life adventure buzz Aldrin who was with Neil Armstrong on Apollo eleven had to use a bic pen to launch the lunar lander off the surface of the moon to get back to the command module did you ever have any chance of moments that all on space all all all the time really it's a it's a big complicated chip the international space station and and things fail all the time I mean four days before we came home the space station started spewing its main colon out are out of a really seriously we were losing turn out the space on one day's notice we had to do an emergency space walk to go out and fix this big ammonia leak and and but because of everybody's training and the serious way that we approach it all of the preparation we go through we were able to deal with it and get it sealed and stopped and and still come home three days later so so yeah we we have there are more what I what I did our our space shuttle endeavor docked with the space station back in two thousand one a station had a serious software problem the the main computers were over writing their own hard drives and they went out of control and and and we had to take control added to control the space station with the space shuttle we had to go in and started do lobotomies on the computer and and rebuild them on board to bring them back to life and and allow the space station to get control of itself again working with all the mission controls around the world that type of stuff happens all the time and and and relies on the skill in the preparation of the work of of everybody on earth but also the astronauts on board Chris when you got in the Russian Soyuz capsule to come back home where do you end up landing is that public knowledge yeah yeah we land there's lots of places we can land of several places in the United States that are designated you know could you you can control it within about a fifteen or twenty mile circle you don't wanna land like Dorothy on somebody's house you know choose areas that are that are somewhat low low population density but don't you landed rider we know what the Saudis can land and water but but it's harder to rescue out in the middle of an ocean it's better if you could have a nice controlled landing on land it's like we did with the space shuttle it's simpler sure and so we normally we land back it near to the launch site we launched from Baikonur Kazakhstan same place if you're a good parent watch I would try and land near there on the end the big prairies of Kazakhstan and that's where where I land it is for virtually every so use has landed there but a couple were slightly shorter slightly long but but we land on the prairies of Kazakhstan but if we had an emergency onboard George at any moment we could jump into the so use and so you could end up land anywhere on earth you could land in Kansas you know it it's just a matter of problem occurred and and whether you had to hustle your way back down to the earth and if we landed in the ocean and the vehicles good for that and your were trained for ocean survival and desert survival an arctic survival just in case that's three ended up is it a bump when you land all it's a car crash when you land it is at that George you we come slamming down to the earth and watch the video for work from the inside that was there but a few films made inside and just before we hit the ground we fire a little retro rockets the jet like when where three four feet up just to slow us down a tiny bit so that's the big chill and then you'd be a bang into the earth itself so it's sort of like left fist right fist crashed back to the earth again but world we're in crash seats that are that are specific like like any vehicle that are designed to soak up the impact well maybe one of the best ways to relate the Russians train you remember not to be talking during landing so that you don't bite your tongue off it would level that's a good point and what's it like when you first get a lot of the capsule you've been in space for five or six months or your legs wobbly yeah we we exercise two hours a day up on just the space station so we keep our muscle strength good but your wobbly as you say it's your balance system that let you down because you haven't had to fight gravity for half a year your body has sort of forgotten how to hold your head up and how to how to how to your your heart has forgotten that your blood can have a weight you know if you think about it all the way the blood in your body my god at like if your body at your heart actually asked to lift the weight of that blood all the way up to the top of your head a faint and so when you get back we're actually wearing like like Spanx or something the IG suit that squeezes our calves in our thighs and just to help squeeze the blood up to your head so that you don't play when you went to see her yeah you're you're pretty disoriented but but if it passes fairly quickly it and your your functional salon to keep your eyes open pretty quickly let's take some calls for you this hour let's go to Joe in the Bronx in New York to get us started Joseph go ahead wonderful restaurants storage thank.

George Chris Hadfield fifty years two eight million dollars fifteen twenty years ten million dollars five hundred years seventy five years forty one percent three four feet nineteen years hundred years six months three days four days nine year two hours one day
"chris hadfield" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"George nor with you along with colonel Chris Hadfield served as commander on the international space station Chris I get duh edgy in a plane after two hours how could you folks spend so much time up there in the international space station don't you get claustrophobic all right well it's a busy place George word we're not passengers on board so yeah we're right on about two hundred experiments constantly and it's a big complicated ship it all it's like a it's like a huge destroyer or cruise liner or something that can never come into port for for thirty years naturally have to do all the maintenance and fixing all over there and so they actually have a electronic schedule for is that tells us what we're doing every five minutes for the whole six months that you're up there don't know why and it split so it's it's a hugely demanding and busy life and what you're really looking for is is a little bit of time off to take pictures of the window or or or write music or or or think about where you are and speaking of music I understand you're quite an accomplished musician yourself hide this guitar up on the space station that that was put there by the action of the NASA psychiatrist because music and an arts are are are so important just for mental health people need music and and so I a I played I played in bands my whole life and and and fronted bands and I wrote a whole album of music on the space station on well and did a cover of a Bowie tune that that lots a lots of people are saying that could target gets played quite a bit up there and and it's a really nice way to kind of explain explain things to yourself in order to float weightless window playing guitar and and watch the world role by silently it's an amazing personal experience as amazing as a matter of fact I've got a little clip of you singing space oddity up there on the international space station ground control to major Tom ground control to major Tom US news hatch and no limits on ground control to major Tom Mensing station with you you this sure if you you did a great job with that super and that of course when but.

George Chris Hadfield commander Tom NASA Bowie Tom US Tom Mensing five minutes thirty years six months two hours
"chris hadfield" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Hi and welcome back to coach to coach George nor with you along with colonel Chris Hadfield served as commander on the international space station Chris I get duh edgy in a plane after two hours how could you folks spend so much time up there in the international space station don't you get claustrophobic all right well it's a busy place George word we're not passengers on board so yeah we're running about two hundred experiments constantly and it's a big complicated ship it all it's like a it's like a huge destroyer or cruise liner or something that can never come into port for for thirty years I have to do all the maintenance and fixing while we're there and so they actually have a electronic schedule for is that tells us what we're doing every five minutes for the whole six months that you're up there don't know why split so it's it's a hugely demanding and busy life and what you're really looking for is is a little bit of time off to take pictures of the window or or or write music or or or think about where you are and speaking of music I understand you're quite an accomplished musician yourself I do the guitar up on the space station that that was put there by the action of the NASA psychiatrist because music and an arts are are are so important just for mental health people need music and and so I a I played I played in bands my whole life and and and fronted bands and I wrote the whole album the music on the space station on well and did a cover of a Bowie tune that that lots and lots of people have seen that guitar gets gets played quite a bit up there and and it's a really nice way to kind of explain explain things to yourself you know to to float weightless in the window playing guitar and and watch the world role by silently it's an amazing personal experience as amazing as a matter of fact I've got a little clip of you singing space oddity up there on the international space station ground control to major Tom control to major Tom news hatch and hello it's on ground control to major Tom Mensing engines station if you it is a great job with that super and that of course one but we did.

George Chris Hadfield commander NASA Bowie Tom Tom news Tom Mensing five minutes thirty years six months two hours
"chris hadfield" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And welcome back to coast to coast George nor with you along with colonel Chris Hadfield served as commander on the international space station Chris I get duh edgy in a plane after two hours how could you folks spend so much time up there in the international space station don't you get claustrophobic all right well it's a busy place George word we're not passengers on board so yeah we're running about two hundred experiments constantly and it's a big complicated ship it all it's like a like a huge destroyer or cruise liner or something that can never come into port for for thirty years I have to do all the maintenance and fixing all over there and so they actually have a electronic schedule for is that tells us what we're doing every five minutes for the whole six months that you're up there don't know why and it splits so it it's a hugely demanding and busy life what you're really looking for is is a little bit of time off to take pictures of the window or or or write music or or or think about where you are and speaking of music I understand you're quite an accomplished musician yourself I do guitar up on the space station that that was put there by the action of the NASA psychiatrist because music and an arts are are are so important just for mental health people need music and and so I I played I played in bands my whole life and and and fronted bands and I wrote the whole album the music on the space station on well did a cover of a Bowie tune that that lots and lots of people are saying that the targets gets played quite a bit up there and and it's a really nice way to kind of explain explain things to yourself you know to to float weightless window playing guitar and and watch the world role by silently it's an amazing personal experience as amazing as a matter of fact I've got a little clip of you singing space oddity up there on the international space station ground control to major Tom control to major Tom use hatch and hello it's on ground control to major Tom Mensing engines station it's you a great job with that super not of course win.

George Chris Hadfield commander Tom Mensing NASA Bowie five minutes thirty years six months two hours
"chris hadfield" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"And welcome back to coast to coast George in order with you along with colonel Chris Hadfield served as commander on the international space station Chris I get duh edgy in a plane after two hours how could you folks spend so much time up there in the international space station don't you get claustrophobic all right well it's a busy place George word we're not passengers on board so yeah we're running about two hundred experiments constantly and it's a big complicated ship it all it's like a a huge destroyer or cruise liner or something that can never come into port for for thirty years I have to do all the maintenance and fixing all over there and so they actually have a electronic schedule for is that tells us what we're doing every five minutes for the whole six months that you're up there don't know why and it splits so it's it's a hugely demanding and busy life and what you're really looking for is is a little bit of time off to take pictures of the window or or or write music or or or think about where you are and speaking of music I understand you're quite an accomplished musician yourself hide this guitar up on the space station that that was put there by the action of the NASA psychiatrist because music and an arts are are are so important just for mental health people need music and and so I a I played I played in bands my whole life and and and fronted bands and I wrote a whole album of music on the space station and while it did a cover of a Bowie tune that that lots and lots of people are saying that guitar gets gets played quite a bit up there and and it's a really nice way to kind of explain explain things to yourself you know to to flow weightless window playing guitar and and watch the world role by silently it's an amazing personal experience as amazing as a matter of fact I've got a little clip of you singing space oddity up there on the international space station control to manger control to major Tom and ground control to major Tom Mensing station with you it is a great job with that super and that of course one but we did that.

George Chris Hadfield commander NASA Bowie Tom Mensing five minutes thirty years six months two hours
"chris hadfield" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"chris hadfield" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Coast to coast George nori with you along with colonel Chris Hadfield served as commander on the international space station Chris I get duh edgy in a plane after two hours how could you folks spend so much time up there in the international space station don't you get claustrophobic all right well it's a busy place George word we're not passengers on board so yeah we're running about two hundred experiments constantly and it's a big complicated ship it all it's like a okay huge destroyer or cruise liner or something that can never come into port for for thirty years you have to do all the maintenance and fixing all over there and so they actually have a electronic schedule for is that tells us what we're doing every five minutes for the whole six months that you're up there don't know why list so it's it's a hugely demanding and busy life and what you're really looking for is is a little bit of time off to take pictures of the window or or or write music or or or think about where you are and speaking of music I understand you're quite an accomplished musician yourself hi this guitar up on the space station that that was put there by the action of the NASA psychiatrist because music and an arts are are are so important just for mental health people need music and and so I yeah I played I played in bands my whole life and and and fronted bands and I wrote a whole album of music on the space station on well and did a cover of a Bowie tune that that lots and lots of people are saying that guitar gets gets played quite a bit up there and and it's a really nice way to kind of explain explain things to yourself in order to float weightless window playing guitar and and watch the world role by silently it's an amazing personal experience as amazing as a matter of fact I've got a little clip of you singing space oddity up there on the international space station ground control to major Tom control to major Tom use hatch and hello it's on ground control to major Tom Mensing stations and with you a great job with that super not of course win.

Chris Hadfield commander George nori NASA Bowie Tom Mensing five minutes thirty years six months two hours
The Apollo 11 Moon Landing, 50 Years Later

KQED Radio Show

01:26 min | 3 years ago

The Apollo 11 Moon Landing, 50 Years Later

"Tomorrow is the fiftieth anniversary of man's first steps on the moon courtesy of the NASA Apollo eleven mission which remains the most astounding and most viewed moment in the history of television today fresh air is noting that anniversary by listening to interviews with astronauts and test pilots during this hour we'll speak with pioneering test pilot Chuck Yeager one of this century's astronauts Chris Hadfield and the first American in space Alan Shephard and we'll start with one of the astronauts from that Apollo eleven moon mission fifty years ago Michael comes well Neil Armstrong and buzz Aldrin walked on the moon on July twentieth nineteen sixty nine Michael Collins was orbiting in the Apollo eleven command capsule waiting to take Armstrong and Aldrin back to earth three years before that Collins pie with a German I ten and walked in space attached to a spacecraft only by a high tech umbilical cord Michael Collins wrote an autobiography then wrote a book called lift off about the US space program lance when Terry gross spoke with Michael Collins in nineteen eighty eight she asked him about the very start of the Apollo eleven moon mission back in July nineteen sixty nine when you were strapped down in July of nineteen sixty nine waiting to head for the moon and you heard the countdown what were you thinking about when you heard the countdown I

Chuck Yeager Alan Shephard Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin Michael Collins Nasa Apollo Chris Hadfield United States Lance Terry Gross Fifty Years Three Years